Editorial Board
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 14, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

Discover EASL ’s webcast library
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 14, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

Apply for the Short-term training fellowship Andrew K. Burroughs
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 14, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

EASL NAFLD Summit 2019, Seville, Spain
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 14, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

Discover EASL ’s upcoming meetings
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 14, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

Contents
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 14, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

JHEP at a glance (July 2019)
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 14, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

From the Editor ’s desk…
Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ECC) have rarely been studied separately. Mortality trends from these 2 neoplasms have been inconsistent over the last decades. Bertuccio et al. aimed to analyse trends in mortality from ICC and ECC in selected countries worldwide. For this, they extracted death certification data for ICC and ECC and population estimates from the World Health Organization and Pan American Health Organization databases for 32 selected countries from Europe, the Americas, and Australasia over the 1995-2016 period. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 14, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Richard Moreau, Ramon Bataller, Thomas Berg, Sophie Lotersztajn, Jessica Zucman-Rossi, Rajiv Jalan Tags: Editorial Desk Source Type: research

Residual risk of HCC during long-term oral nucleos(t)ide analogues (NUCs) in patients with CHB – Is one NUC better than the other?
Antiviral therapy with oral nucleos(t)ide analogues (NUCs) is recommended by international guidelines for patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) who have treatment indications,1 –3 as NUCs are effective in suppressing HBV DNA and reducing the risk of hepatic events and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).4,5 Entecavir (ETV), tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) are the 3 recommended NUCs, with high genetic barriers to resistance as well as favora ble safety profiles.1,3,6 (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 14, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Grace Lai-Hung Wong, Pietro Lampertico Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Tumour-associated macrophages in hepatocellular carcinoma: Pressing the metabolic switch to prevent T cell responses
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of global cancer-related deaths. The majority of patients present with advanced disease and current medical therapy only prolongs survival by a few months.1 HCC occurs on the background of chronic liver disease in more than 90% of cases and is a paradigm for inflammation-induced cancer where the tumour microenvironment (TME) is characterised by ongoing metabolic stress and an immunosuppressive environment.2 This has led to significant interest in assessing whether immunotherapy could be an effective approach to combat this cancer. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 14, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Joanne M. O'Rourke, Daniel A. Patten, Shishir Shetty Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Liver infiltrating T cells regulate bile acid metabolism in experimental cholangitis
In primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), T cells are likely involved in targeting biliary epithelial cells [1]. Chronic bile duct inflammation leads to cholestasis, biliary fibrosis and potential malignant transformation in the case of PSC [2]. Adaptive immune responses are considered to contribute to early as well as late stages of disease [3]. Numerous genetic risk loci for PBC and PSC were identified that encode for genes involved in adaptive immune responses [4 –6] and portal infiltrates that were predominantly composed of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have been described in the live...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 14, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Fabian Glaser, Clara John, Bastian Engel, Benedikt H öh, Sören Weidemann, Jan Dieckhoff, Stephanie Stein, Nathalie Becker, Christian Casar, Fenja Amrei Schuran, Björn Wieschendorf, Max Preti, Friederike Jessen, Andre Franke, Antonella Carambia, Ansgar Source Type: research

Effectiveness and Safety of Sofosbuvir/Velpatasvir/ Voxilaprevir in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Previously Treated with DAAs
Current treatments with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection lead to elimination of the virus in more than 95% of patients, regardless of the HCV genotype or presence of advanced liver fibrosis [1]. The AASLD and EASL guidelines both recommend combinations including an NS5A inhibitor with either a NS3/4 protease inhibitor such as grazoprevir/elbasvir or glecaprevir/pibrentasvir, or a nucleotide analogue plus an NS5A inhibitor such as sofosbuvir/velpatasvir for durations ranging from 8 to 12 weeks [2 –4]. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 13, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Jordi Llaneras, Mar Riveiro-Barciela, Sabela Lens, Mois és Diago, Alba Cachero, Javier García-Samaniego, Isabel Conde, Ana Arencibia, Juan Arenas, Francisco Gea, Xavier Torras, José Luis Calleja, José Antonio Carrión, Inmaculada Fernández, Rosa Mar Source Type: research

An Ordinal Model to Predict the Risk of Symptomatic Liver Failure in Patients with Cirrhosis undergoing Hepatectomy
Safety of elective hepatectomies in cirrhotic patients has increased significantly during the last decades but mortality of such procedures is still estimated between 3 and 14%[1]. Post-hepatectomy liver failure (PHLF) is the more worrisome complication, with a reported mortality as high as 50%[2,3]. Moreover, it is the leading cause of prolonged hospitalization, increased costs, and poor long-term outcomes in patients undergoing surgical procedure. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 13, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Mathieu Prodeau, Elodie Drumez, Alain Duhamel, Eric Vibert, Olivier Farges, Guillaume Lassailly, Jean-Yves Mabrut, Jean Hardwigsen, Jean-Marc R égimbeau, Olivier Soubrane, René Adam, François-René Pruvot, Emmanuel Boleslawski Source Type: research

Defining Virus-specific CD8+ TCR Repertoires for Therapeutic Regeneration of T Cells against Chronic Hepatitis E
Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis in the global population. HEV is an emerging public health risk found in both the developed and developing countries [1,2]. There are several genotypes of HEV but only one serotype. Genotypes 1 and 2 infect humans only, and distributed mainly in the endemic regions where poor hygiene is the main cause of transmission via fecal-oral route. Genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic; their hosts include both human and animals, and are found predominantly in the urbanized countries. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 13, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Chai Fen Soon, Patrick Behrendt, Daniel Todt, Michael Peter Manns, Heiner Wedemeyer, Margaret S ällberg Chen, Markus Cornberg Source Type: research

Activation of YAP Attenuates Hepatic Damage and Fibrosis in Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury
Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is considered as the standard treatment for end-stage liver disease. Resulting from organ retrieval, cold preservation and warm ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) can lead to impaired graft function up to and including primary graft non-function, which may predispose to acute and chronic rejection. Indeed, by contributing to a shortage of available donor organs, IRI represents one of the most challenging problems in transplantation[1 –4]. Thus, novel therapeutic concepts to combat IRI are needed to improve OLT outcomes and expand donor organ pool. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 12, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Yuan Liu, Tianfei Lu, Cheng Zhang, Jin Xu, Zhengze Xue, Ronald W. Busuttil, Ning Xu, Qiang Xia, Jerzy W. Kupiec-Weglinski, Haofeng Ji Source Type: research

Allocation of Liver Grafts Worldwide Is there a best System?
Liver transplantation (LT) has been undoubtedly one of the most successful procedures developed in the late 20th century, and as a consequence allocation of scarce liver grafts has caused many controversies (Fig. 1-2) [1]. In the early stages of the procedure, from 1980s until mid-1990s, liver grafts were prioritized in the USA based on the degree of sickness and localization of the patients in the hospital [2]. For example, candidates admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) received the highest priority taking over on patients hospitalized in a non-ICU setting as well as outpatients, somewhat independently of their accum...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 11, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Christoph Tschuor, Alberto Ferrarese, Christoph K ümmerli, Philipp Dutkowski, Patrizia Burra, Pierre-Alain Clavien, Liver Allocation Study Group Source Type: research

Reduction of immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment in cholangiocarcinoma by ex-vivo targeting immune checkpoint molecules
Liver cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide.[1] Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) accounts for 10% of primary liver cancers and the incidence is significantly increasing. CCA is an aggressive hepatobiliary malignancy originating from the biliary tract epithelium with features of cholangiocyte differentiation.[2] It is classified into the following types according to its anatomic location along the biliary tree: intrahepatic (iCCA), perihilar (pCCA) and distal (dCCA). (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 10, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Guoying Zhou, Dave Sprengers, Shanta Mancham, Remco Erkens, Patrick P.C. Boor, Adriaan A. van Beek, Michail Doukas, Lisanne Noordam, Lucia Campos Carrascosa, Valeska de Ruiter, Roelof W.F. van Leeuwen, Wojciech G. Polak, Jeroen de Jonge, Bas Groot Koerkam Source Type: research

Molecular and histological correlations in liver cancer
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly heterogeneous cancer, both at the molecular and histological level. High-throughput sequencing and gene expression profiling have identified distinct transcriptomic subclasses and numerous recurrent genetic alterations, and several HCC subtypes characterized by histological features have also been identified. HCC phenotype appears to be closely related to particular gene mutations, tumor subgroups and/or oncogenic pathways. Non-proliferative tumors display a well-differentiated phenotype, and among this molecular subgroup, CTNNB1 mutated HCC constitute a homogeneous subtype with c...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 10, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Julien Calderaro, Marianne Ziol, Val érie Paradis, Jessica Zucman-Rossi Tags: Review Source Type: research

Loss of Fbxw7 synergizes with activated AKT signaling to promote c-Myc dependent cholangiocarcinogenesis
Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is the second most common primary liver cancer [1,2]. Depending on the anatomical site, CCA is classified into intrahepatic (iCCA) and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (eCCA) [3]. iCCA incidence has been rising over the last decade, while that of eCCA slightly decreased [4]. For iCCA detected at early stage, curative surgical resection is the optimal treatment strategy [5,6]. However, less than one third of patients achieves negative tumor margins, and recurrence rate is high [5,7]. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 10, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Jingxiao Wang, Haichuan Wang, Michele Peters, Ning Ding, Silvia Ribback, Kirsten Utpatel, Antonio Cigliano, Frank Dombrowski, Meng Xu, Xinyan Chen, Xinhua Song, Li Che, Matthias Evert, Antonio Cossu, John Gordan, Yong Zeng, Xin Chen, Diego F. Calvisi Source Type: research

Sofosbuvir/Velpatasvir for 12 Weeks in Hepatitis C Virus-Infected Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease Undergoing Dialysis
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a global health challenge with an estimated 71 million individuals infected worldwide.[1] The disease burden of HCV infection is due to progression of chronic liver disease, which can lead to cirrhosis, liver failure, hepatocellular carcinoma, and death. Chronic HCV infection is also independently associated with the development of renal impairment referred to as chronic kidney disease (CKD) and has been shown to be more prevalent in patients with renal disease. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 10, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Sergio M. Borgia, Janet Dearden, Eric M. Yoshida, Stephen D. Shafran, Ashley Brown, Ziv Ben –Ari, Matthew E. Cramp, Curtis Cooper, Matthew Foxton, Conrado Fernandez Rodriguez, Rafael Esteban, Robert Hyland, Sophia Lu, Brian Kirby, Amy Meng, Svetlana Mar Source Type: research

In Memoriam: Valerio Nobili (1966 –2019)
The Hepatology community recently lost one of its foremost clinician investigators, Valerio Nobili. Valerio was internationally renowned for his outstanding contribution to research in the clinical aspects of pediatric fatty liver disease and his early passing, at the age of 52, is a tremendous loss for science and for his patients. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 8, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Elisabetta Bugianesi, Massimo Pinzani Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Reply to: “Time association between hepatitis C therapy and hepatocellular carcinoma emergence in cirrhosis: Relevance of non-characterized nodules – A response”
We appreciate the interest generated by our manuscript,1 and thank Dr. Pol et al. for their letter,2 and the Editor for giving us the opportunity to respond. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 7, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Victor Sapena, Jose Rios, Ferran Torres, Zoe Mari ño, Xavier Forns, Jordi Bruix, Maria Reig Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Nivolumab in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Sorafenib-Experienced Asian Cohort Analysis
Worldwide, liver cancer is predicted to be the fourth most common cause of cancer-related mortality, accounting for an estimated 782,000 deaths in 2018, with most liver cancers being hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).[1] There are, however, global differences in HCC incidence and trends, with Eastern and Southeast Asia having among the highest incidence of liver cancer.[1] This difference in HCC incidence between Asian and non-Asian regions is related to the high incidence of chronic viral hepatitis in Asia. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 6, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Thomas Yau, Chiun Hsu, Tae-You Kim, Su-Pin Choo, Yoon-Koo Kang, Ming-Mo Hou, Kazushi Numata, Winnie Yeo, Akhil Chopra, Masafumi Ikeda, Ryoko Kuromatsu, Michihisa Moriguchi, Yee Chao, Huanyu Zhao, Jeffrey Anderson, Christine Dela Cruz, Masatoshi Kudo Source Type: research

TEMPORARY REMOVAL: Hepatitis A and E – differences and commonalities
The publisher regrets that this article has been temporarily removed. A replacement will appear as soon as possible in which the reason for the removal of the article will be specified, or the article will be reinstated. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 4, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Neta Gotlieb, Darius Moradpour, Daniel Shouval Source Type: research

Hepatitis A and E – differences and commonalities
Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) are the most common causes of acute hepatitis in humans worldwide (1-7). The genomic structure of these viruses is shown in figure  1a and 1b. Both enterically transmitted hepatotropic viruses show a similar but not identical epidemiologic pattern, mode of transmission and clinical course (table 1). However, there are also some distinct genetic differences within the genome of the individual viruses with an impact on epidemio logy and transmission (Figure 1a and 1b) . (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 4, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Neta Gotlieb, Darius Moradpour, Daniel Shouval Tags: Hepatology Snapshot Source Type: research

MMP2/MMP9-mediated CD100 shedding is crucial for inducing intrahepatic anti-HBV CD8 T cell responses and HBV clearance
Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection continues to be a major public health burden worldwide. The persistence of HBV infection increases the risk of end-stage liver diseases, such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma[1]. Exposure to HBV in neonates usually leads to viral persistence, whereas most infected adults spontaneously clear the virus[2]. The clearance of HBV relies largely on a potent and diverse T cell immune response, which usually becomes dysregulated in chronic HBV infection[3 –5]. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 4, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Shangqing Yang, Lu Wang, Wen Pan, Wibke Bayer, Christine Thoens, Kathrin Heim, Ulf Dittmer, Joerg Timm, Qin Wang, Qing Yu, Jinzhuo Luo, Yanan Liu, Maike Hofmann, Robert Thimme, Xiaoyong Zhang, Hongtao Chen, Hua Wang, Xuemei Feng, Xuecheng Yang, Yinping Lu Source Type: research

TOX promotes the exhaustion of antitumor CD8+ T cells by preventing PD1 degradation in hepatocellular carcinoma
Compromised antitumor immunity characterized by presence of dysfunctional CD8+ T cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME) is a hallmark of cancer [1,2]. Long-term persistence of tumor antigens and/or the suppressive TME drive the progression of antitumor effector CD8+ T cells into a functionally impaired state called ‘T cell exhaustion’ [3]. Exhausted CD8+ T cells possess diminished effector functions and a distinct transcriptional profile relative to those of effector cells, and they express high amounts of inhibitory receptors, such as programmed cell death-1 (PD1), T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain c o...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 4, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Xiaochen Wang, Qifeng He, Haiyuan Shen, Anliang Xia, Wenfang Tian, Weiwei Yu, Beicheng Sun Source Type: research

Natural History of Histologically-proven Alcohol Related Liver Disease: A systematic review
In this study we systematically gathered all the published data regarding the natural history of alcohol related liver disease in people who had a liver biopsy to define the prevalence of the disease, the annual risk of progression to cirrhosis and the annual risks of death at each stage of the disease. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 4, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Richard Parker, Guruprasad P. Aithal, Ulrik Becker, Dermot Gleeson, Steven Masson, Judith I. Wyatt, Ian A. Rowe Source Type: research

A Pilot Study of Safety and Efficacy of HCV Retreatment with sofosbuvir/velpatasvir/voxilaprevir in Patients With or Without HIV (RESOLVE STUDY)
Retreatment with twelve weeks of SOF/VEL/VOX was safe and effective in patients with relapsed HCV following initial combination DAA-based treatment. Treatment response was not diminished with HIV-infection or previous noncompletion of or poor adherence to DAA-based therapy. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 4, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Eleanor Wilson, Emily Covert, Jennifer Hoffmann, Emily Comstock, Benjamin Emmanuel, Lydia Tang, Jennifer Husson, Joel Chua, Angie Price, Poonam Mathur, Elana Rosenthal, Sarah Kattakuzhy, Henry Masur, Shyam Kottilil Source Type: research

Longitudinal neurometabolic changes in the hippocampus of a rat model of chronic hepatic encephalopathy
Chronic hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complication of chronic liver disease (CLD) and is characterized by cognitive and motor deficits [1-3]. While minimal and overt HE may affect 20-70% of patients with CLD, the diagnosis is difficult in its early stages [4,5]. Tools allowing the detection of early neurometabolic changes in patients may allow for timely intervention thereby minimizing the number of overt HE episodes and ensuing complications and costs. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 4, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Olivier Braissant, Veronika Rackayov á, Katarzyna Pierzchala, Jocelyn Grosse, Valérie McLin, Cristina Cudalbu Source Type: research

Interferon- γ-dependent immune responses contribute to the pathogenesis of sclerosing cholangitis in mice
Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a poorly understood chronic progressive biliary disease of unknown aetiology, characterised by biliary inflammation and fibrosis, development of cholestasis, end stage liver disease and a high risk of malignancy. Approximately 60% of PSC patients are male and 70 to 80% have inflammatory bowel disease. Both, incidence and prevalence of PSC are increasing, indicating that current medical treatment is poorly effective [1]. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 4, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Gevitha Ravichandran, Katrin Neumann, Laura K. Berkhout, S ören Weidemann, Annika E. Langeneckert, Dorothee Schwinge, Tobias Poch, Samuel Huber, Birgit Schiller, Leonard U. Hess, Annerose E. Ziegler, Karl J. Oldhafer, Roja Barikbin, Christoph Schramm, Ma Source Type: research

Incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma in HIV/HBV-coinfected patients on tenofovir therapy: Relevance for screening strategies
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the most important cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide.1 In high-income settings, between 5 and 10% of HIV-infected individuals are coinfected with HBV, which is a major cause of severe morbidity and mortality in this population.2 HIV infection accelerates the progression of HBV-related liver disease and mortality is higher among HIV/HBV-coinfected individuals compared to HBV-monoinfected ones.3 While the incidence of HBV-related HCC is estimated to range between 0.1 and 0.4% per year among non-cirrhotics and to be above 3% per year among cirrhotics, it...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - June 3, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Gilles Wandeler, Etienne Mauron, Andrew Atkinson, Jean-Fran çois Dufour, David Kraus, Peter Reiss, Lars Peters, François Dabis, Jan Fehr, Enos Bernasconi, Marc van der Valk, Colette Smit, Lars K. Gjærde, Jürgen Rockstroh, Didier Neau, Fabrice Bonnet, Source Type: research

Contributing factors and outcomes of burn-associated cholestasis
Although the outcomes of severe burn injuries have improved over recent decades, morbidity and mortality remain high: almost 40% of patients develop acute respiratory distress syndrome[1,2], up to 50% of patients develop acute kidney injury[3,4] and the mortality ranges from 15%[1,3,5] to 25-30%.[2,4] Liver necrosis and hepatic dysfunction after burn injuries have been reported since the late 1930s.[6] An autopsy series from the 1980s described increased liver size and lipid infiltrations after burn injuries. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 29, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Christian de Tymowski, Fran çois Dépret, Sabri Soussi, Moreno Nabila, Thomas Vauchel, Maité Chaussard, Mourad Benyamina, Axelle Ferry, Alexandru Cupaciu, Marion Jully, Haikel Oueslati, Alexandre Fratani, Maxime Coutrot, Philippe Sogni, Maurice Mimoun, Source Type: research

Models estimating risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with alcohol or NAFLD-related cirrhosis for risk stratification
Annual HCC risk varies greatly in patients with cirrhosis ranging from as little as5%. Although this variability is well recognized, few models exist to estimate HCC risk in patients with cirrhosis and none are commonly used. Liver societies recommend the same screening strategy (abdominal ultrasonography every 6 months with or without concomitant serum AFP) irrespective of HCC risk[1-3]. Studies show poor compliance with these screening recommendations[4,5]. Stratification of HCC risk in patients with cirrhosis into low (e.g. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 27, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: George N. Ioannou, Pamela Green, Kathleen F. Kerr, Kristin Berry Source Type: research

Pluripotent stem cell-derived bile canaliculi-forming hepatocytes to study genetic liver diseases involving hepatocyte polarity
Hepatocytes are polarized cells, exemplified by the segregation of their plasma membranes into basolateral/sinusoidal and apical/canalicular domains.1,2 Hepatocyte polarity is essential for many hepatocyte-specific functions.1 Not surprisingly therefore, loss of hepatocyte polarity is correlated with liver diseases.2 In inherited liver diseases, mutations in specific genes can cause a defect in the targeting, expression and/or function of proteins that display a steady-state residence at either sinusoidal or canalicular surface domains. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 24, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Arend W. Overeem, Karin Klappe, Silvia Parisi, Petra Kl öters-Planchy, Lavinija Mataković, Marines du Teil Espina, Christian A. Drouin, Karl Heinz Weiss, Sven C.D. van IJzendoorn Tags: Research Article Source Type: research

Discover EASL ’s webcast library
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 23, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

Discover EASL ’s upcoming meetings
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 23, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

Time association between hepatitis C therapy and hepatocellular carcinoma emergence in cirrhosis: Relevance of non-characterized nodules – A response
We read with interest the paper by Mari ño et al. which suggests an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic patients treated with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), (3.7%/100 person-years [PY]) especially in those with undetermined nodules before treatment (9.6%/100 PY).1 (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 23, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Stanislas Pol, H élène Fontaine, Fabrice Carrat, on the behalf of the ANRS/AFEF Hepather Study group Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Normothermic regional perfusion – What is the benefit?
We read with great interest the recent article by Hessheimer et al. on normothermic regional perfusion (NRP) in controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors in Spain.1 In this innovative national analysis, the authors compare NRP against super rapid retrieval in terms of relevant outcome parameters after liver transplantation. The results appear impressive, as they show a significant reduction of biliary complications by NRP (overall: 8 vs. 31%, ischemic cholangiopathy: 2 vs. 13%). This is also important from an economic perspective, as NRP is currently one of the cheapest machine perfusion techniques available...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 23, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Andrea Schlegel, Paolo Muiesan, Philipp Dutkowski Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Reply to: “Normothermic regional perfusion – What is the benefit?”
We thank Drs. Schlegel, Muiesan, and Dutkowski for their interest in our manuscript1 and are delighted to provide clearer and updated information regarding the use of normothermic regional perfusion (NRP) in controlled donation after circulatory death (cDCD) liver transplantation. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 23, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Amelia J. Hessheimer, Elisabeth Coll, Patricia Ru íz, Mikel Gastaca, José Ignacio Rivas, Manuel Gómez, Belinda Sánchez, Julio Santoyo, Pablo Ramírez, Pascual Parrilla, Luis Miguel Marín, Miguel Ángel Gómez-Bravo, Juan Carlos García-Valdecasas, Ja Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Wilson's disease: Fatal when overlooked, curable when diagnosed
Wilson ’s disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ATP7B gene. Copper is an essential micronutrient which is incorporated into a variety of proteins and metalloenzymes (cytochrome C oxydase, superoxide dismutase, dopamine-ß hydroxylase, lysil-oxydase, tyrosinase), as we ll as being necessary for the proper growth, development, and function of many organs, including the liver, bone, connective tissue, brain, and heart.1,2 (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 21, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Peter Ferenci, Peter Ott Tags: Hepatology Snapshot Source Type: research

Pravastatin combination with Sorafenib does not improve survival in advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma
HCC incidence is still growing in Western countries.[1,2] Tumor development is frequently related to liver damage, typically caused by cirrhosis. While curative treatments (transplantation, resection, percutaneous destruction) can be proposed for small tumors, about two thirds of patients cannot receive such treatments.[3] (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 21, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Jean-Louis Jouve, Thierry Lecomte, Olivier Bouch é, Emilie Barbier, Faiza Khemissa Akouz, Ghassan Riachi, Eric Nguyen Khac, Isabelle Ollivier-Hourmand, Maryline Debette-Gratien, Roger Faroux, Anne-Laure Villing, Julien Vergniol, Jean-François Ramee, Jea Source Type: research

Arterial Subtraction Images of Gadoxetate-Enhanced MRI Improve Diagnosis of Early-Stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary hepatic malignancy and the third most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths.[1,2] Although the prognosis of patients with advanced HCC remains poor, patients with early-stage HCC are eligible for curative treatments such as surgical resection, local ablation, and liver transplantation.[3,4] Therefore, accurate imaging diagnosis of early-stage HCC is important. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 17, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Dong Hwan Kim, Sang Hyun Choi, Jae Ho Byun, Ji Hun Kang, Young-Suk Lim, So Jung Lee, So Yeon Kim, Hyung Jin Won, Yong Moon Shin, Pyo-Nyun Kim Source Type: research

Return to sender: Lymphocyte trafficking mechanisms as contributors to primary sclerosing cholangitis
Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is an inflammatory disease of the biliary tree, characterized by stricturing bile duct disease and progression to liver fibrosis. The pathophysiology of PSC is still unknown. The concurrence with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in about 70% of the cases has led to the hypothesis that gut homing lymphocytes aberrantly traffic to the liver, contributing to the disease pathogenesis in patient with both PSC and IBD (PSC-IBD). The discovery of mutual trafficking pathways of lymphocytes to target tissues, and expression of gut-specific adhesion molecules and chemokines in the liver has point...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 17, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Manon de Krijger, Manon E. Wildenberg, Wouter J. de Jonge, Cyriel Y. Ponsioen Tags: Review Source Type: research

The Burden of Hepatitis E among Patients with Hematological Malignancies: a Retrospective European Cohort Study
The hepatitis E virus (HEV), the causative agent of hepatitis E, is a member of the Hepeviridae family that includes enterically-transmitted, small, non-enveloped positive-sense RNA viruses that can infect mammals (Orthohepevirus A, C and D), birds (Orthohepevirus B) and trout (Piscihepevirus). There are four major HEV genotypes (HEV-1 to HEV-4) that can infect humans.[1] HEV is predominately transmitted with contaminated water in low-income countries (mostly HEV-1 and HEV-2) and with contaminated meat and offal that originate from HEV-infected animals (HEV-3 and HEV-4) in high-income countries. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 17, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Johann von Felden, Laurent Alric, Sven Pischke, Celia Aitken, Stefan Schlabe, Ulrich Spengler, Maria Teresa Giordani, Paul Schnitzler, Dominik Bettinger, Robert Thimme, Alienor Xhaard, Mascha Binder, Francis Ayuk, Ansgar W. Lohse, Jan J Cornelissen, Rober Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 15, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

Discover EASL?s webcast library
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 15, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

EASL NAFLD Summit 2019, Sevilla, Spain
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 15, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

EASL: Join the community or renew your membership
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 15, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

Discover EASL?s upcoming meetings
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - May 15, 2019 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research