Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy
An association between liver function and heart function has been known for many years.1 Patients with alcoholic cirrhosis may develop alcoholic cardiomyopathy, and patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular complications.2 In patients with cirrhosis a specific type of cardiac dysfunction named cirrhotic cardiomyopathy has been coined, and this is independent of the etiology of the liver disease.1,3 (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 28, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: S øren Møller, Samuel S. Lee Tags: Hepatology Snapshot Source Type: research

Liver – master and servant of serum proteome
Hepatocytes synthesise the majority of serum proteins. This production occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and is adjusted by complex local and systemic regulatory mechanisms. Accordingly, serum levels of hepatocyte-made proteins constitute important biomarkers that reflect both systemic processes and the status of the liver. For example, C-reactive protein is an established marker of inflammatory reaction, whereas transferrin emerges as a liver stress marker and an attractive mortality predictor. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 27, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Deniz Kuscuoglu, Sabina Janciauskiene, Karim Hamesch, Johannes Haybaeck, Christian Trautwein, Pavel Strnad Tags: Review Source Type: research

Class III obesity is a risk factor for the development of acute-on-chronic liver failure in patients with decompensated cirrhosis
Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a syndrome that occurs in patients with cirrhosis, characterized by acute hepatic decompensation, organ system failure, and 28-day mortality of greater than 15%.1 The pathophysiology of ACLF has not been fully elucidated, but appears to be a consequence of a dysregulated inflammatory response, resulting in rapidly evolving organ failure and mortality.2 –6 The reported prevalence of ACLF among those hospitalized with decompensated cirrhosis approaches 30%1 and associated healthcare costs of ACLF are as high as $1.7 billion in the US. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 27, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Vinay Sundaram, Rajiv Jalan, Joseph C. Ahn, Michael R. Charlton, David S. Goldberg, Constantine J. Karvellas, Mazen Noureddin, Robert J. Wong Tags: Research Article Source Type: research

Lysyl oxidase-like protein 2 (LOXL2) modulates barrier function in cholangiocytes in cholestasis
Bile ducts play a pivotal and active role in bile formation and excretion.1 –4 Bile duct integrity is therefore a prerequisite for normal liver function.5 Normal bile duct secretory function critically depends on regular epithelial barrier function including selective permeability for specific molecules.5 This requires numerous specific proteins forming a tightly regulate d tight junction protein complex between bile duct epithelial cells (BECs).6 Cholangiopathies are frequently associated with alterations of BECs’ tight junctions. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 27, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Marion J. Pollheimer, Silvia Racedo, Amanda Mikels-Vigdal, Derek Marshall, Christopher Bowlus, Carolin Lackner, Tobias Madl, Tom H. Karlsen, Johannes R. Hov, Susan K. Lyman, Joanne Adamkewicz, Victoria Smith, Emmanuel Moreau, Gernot Zollner, Tor Jacob Eid Tags: Research Article Source Type: research

Lysyl oxidase-like protein 2 (LOXL2) Modules Barrier Function in Cholangiocytes In Cholestasis
Bile ducts play a pivotal and active role in bile formation and excretion [1 –4]. Bile duct integrity is therefore a prerequisite for normal liver function [5]. Normal bile duct secretory function critically depends on regular epithelial barrier function including selective permeability for specific molecules [5]. This requires numerous specific proteins forming a tightly regulated tight junction protein complex between bile duct epithelial cells (BECs) [6]. Cholangiopathies are frequently associated with alterations of BECs’ tight junctions [5,7,8]. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 27, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Marion J. Pollheimer, Silvia Racedo, Amanda Mikels-Vigdal, Derek Marshall, Christopher Bowlus, Carolin Lackner, Tobias Madl, Tom H. Karlsen, Johannes R. Hov, Susan K. Lyman, Joanne Adamkewicz, Victoria Smith, Emmanuel Moreau, Gernot Zollner, Tor Jacob Eid Source Type: research

Molecular profiling of subclinical inflammatory lesions in long-term surviving adult liver transplant recipients
Routine serum markers of liver injury such as aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST, ALT), gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT) or alkaline phosphatase (AP) are known to be insensitive and nonspecific indicators of allograft rejection in liver transplantation (LT) [1,2]. Despite this, the long-term management of LT recipients continues to rely on a combination of serum liver biochemistry tests and calcineurin inhibitor pharmacokinetic markers. The performance of protocol, or surveillance, liver biopsies has been proposed as a more accurate strategy to assess graft function and potentially to personalize the use of im...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 27, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Mar ía-Carlota Londoño, Lara Neves Souza, Juan-José Lozano, Rosa Miquel, Juan G. Abraldes, Laura-Patricia LLovet, Alberto Quaglia, Antoni Rimola, Miquel Navasa, Alberto Sánchez-Fueyo Source Type: research

Liver Stiffness measurement in the primary care setting detects high rates of advanced fibrosis and predicts liver related events in hepatitis C
Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a major public health issue with an estimated global prevalence greater than 71 million cases and over 1.75 million individuals infected annually.[1] Together with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), CHC is accountable for over 1.34 million deaths worldwide annually, being the second highest cause of death from communicable diseases and ranked seventh for all-cause mortality.[2] The rapidly increasing rates of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the developed world has largely been attributed to increased rates of CHC infection since 1975. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 27, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Stephen Bloom, William Kemp, Amanda Nicoll, Stuart K. Roberts, Paul Gow, Anouk Dev, Sally Bell, Siddharth Sood, Ian Kronborg, Virginia Knight, Diana Lewis, John Lubel Source Type: research

Low Subcutaneous Adiposity Associates with Higher Mortality in Female Patients with Cirrhosis
Differences in body composition between the sexes exist in healthy subjects, [1,2] and populations with cancer [3] and cirrhosis, [4 –6] with females having higher adipose tissue mass (adiposity) and males having greater muscularity. Body composition of people with cirrhosis has been assessed using approaches such as air displacement plethysmography, bioelectrical impedance analysis, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. [4,7] However, the ability of these techniques to differentiate between two major body compartments, muscle and adipose tissue as well as capability to provide a specific measure of adipose tissue de...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 27, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Maryam Ebadi, Puneeta Tandon, Carlos Moctezuma-Velazquez, Sunita Ghosh, Vickie E. Baracos, Vera C. Mazurak, Aldo J. Montano-Loza Source Type: research

Class III obesity is a risk factor for the development of acute on chronic liver failure in patients with decompensated cirrhosis
Acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a syndrome that occurs in patients with cirrhosis, characterized by acute hepatic decompensation, organ system failure, and 28-day mortality of greater than 15%.[1] The pathophysiology of ACLF has not been fully elucidated, but appears to be a consequence of a dysregulated inflammatory response, resulting in rapidly evolving organ failure and mortality.[2 –6] The reported prevalence of ACLF among those hospitalized with decompensated cirrhosis approaches 30%[1] and associated healthcare costs of ACLF are as high as $1.7 billion in the United States (US). (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 27, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Vinay Sundaram, Rajiv Jalan, Joseph C. Ahn, Michael R. Charlton, David S. Goldberg, Constantine J. Karvellas, Mazen Noureddin, Robert Wong Source Type: research

JNK1 induces hedgehog signaling from stellate cells to accelerate liver regeneration in mice
The unique ability of mammalian liver to regain mass after tissue loss has revolutionized the treatment and cure of many patients with liver tumors. However, there are limitations to effective regeneration, as hepatic failure may develop after extensive liver resection. This entity, known as the small-for-size syndrome (SFSS), results from an insufficient functional volume of the liver remnant and remains the most frequent cause of death due to liver surgery.[1,2] Two-staged hepatectomies were introduced to reduce the SFSS risk. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 27, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Magda Langiewicz, Rolf Graf, Bostjan Humar, Pierre A. Clavien Source Type: research

Liver- master and servant of serum proteome
In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), hepatocytes synthesize the majority of serum proteins and this production is adjusted by complex local and systemic regulatory mechanisms. Accordingly, serum levels of hepatocyte-made proteins constitute important biomarkers that reflect both systemic processes and the status of the liver. For example, C-reactive protein is an established marker of inflammatory reaction, whereas transferrin emerges as a liver stress marker and an attractive mortality predictor. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 27, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Deniz Kuscuoglu, Sabina Janciauskiene, Karim Hamesch, Johannes Haybaeck, Christian Trautwein, Pavel Strnad Tags: Review Source Type: research

EASL International Recognition Award Recipient 2018: Prof. Anna Lok
It is a great honor and pleasure to introduce Dr. Anna Suk-Fong Lok for the EASL International Recognition Award. This award is conferred to an individual with a history of distinguished academic achievements and substantial contributions to the field of hepatology. Like the declaration of fine wine vintages, this honor is only conferred when there is a truly exceptional recipient. As a former mentee and someone who has known Anna for the past 25  years I can attest that she is truly deserving of this award. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Marc G. Ghany Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

EASL Recognition Award Recipient 2018: Prof. Didier Samuel
On behalf of the European Association for the Study of the Liver, it is a great honor and privilege to present Prof. Didier Samuel as a recipient of EASL ’s 2018 Recognition Award. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Daniel Shouval Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

EASL Recognition Award Recipient 2018: Prof. Mario Mondelli
It is a great honor and pleasure for me to highlight the life and career of Mario Mondelli, who is receiving the European Association for the Study of the Liver Recognition Award for 2018. I have known Mario since 1980 when he was a research fellow with Professor Roger Williams at the Liver Unit, King ’s College School of Medicine& Dentistry, London, UK. Over the decades Mario has become a close colleague and a personal friend. We both share our passion and enthusiasm for liver diseases, in particular immunology in liver disease and clinical hepatology with an emphasis on viral hepatitis and immune mediated liver...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Michael P. Manns Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

EASL monothematic conference: Gut –liver axis, Leuven, Belgium, 2018
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

EASL NAFLD Summit 2018, Geneva, Switzerland
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

EASL clinical school: Abdominal sonography, Rotterdam, Netherlands, 2018
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

The International Liver CongressTM, Vienna, Austria, 2019
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

Contents
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

JHEP at a glance (May 2018)
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

Discover the Hepahealth Project Report
(Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

From the Editor ’s desk....
An important study in the field of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) highlights the association with systemic cardiovascular problems. More specifically, a large study by Lee et al. investigated the association between NAFLD and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. A total of 5,121 consecutive asymptomatic individuals with no prior history of coronary artery disease underwent abdominal ultrasonography and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Thirty-eight percent of the participants had ultrasonography-diagnosed NAFLD. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Richard Moreau, Ramon Bataller, Thomas Berg, Jessica Zucman-Rossi, Rajiv Jalan Tags: Editorial Desk Source Type: research

β-Hydroxybutyrate protects from alcohol-induced liver injury via a Hcar2-cAMP dependent pathway
Excess alcohol intake has many effects on the liver and can present with several clinical syndromes.1 One of the most serious is acute alcoholic hepatitis (AH), which occurs unexpectedly after decades of high levels of alcohol consumption, and is characterized by sterile liver inflammation, jaundice and can progress to a systemic inflammatory response.2 There is a mixed inflammatory infiltrate characterized by neutrophils, and upregulation of a variety of inflammatory cytokines including IL-1 β, TNF-α and IL-6. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Yonglin Chen, Xinshou Ouyang, Rafaz Hoque, Irma Garcia-Martinez, Muhammad Nadeem Yousaf, Sarah Tonack, Stefan Offermanns, Laurent Dubuquoy, Alexandre Louvet, Philippe Mathurin, Veronica Massey, Bernd Schnabl, Ramon Alberola Bataller, Wajahat Zafar Mehal Tags: Research Article Source Type: research

Reply to: “Validation of response to yttrium-90 radioembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein invasion”
We thank Dr Cucchetti and colleagues for their letter on our recently published proposal of prognostic stratification for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and tumoral portal vein thrombosis (PVTT) undergoing Yttrium-90 trans-arterial radioembolization (TARE).1 By combining three easily available baseline parameters (bilirubin levels, PVTT extension and tumor burden) we found that it is possible to markedly stratify prognosis of patients undergoing TARE, and thus to refine treatment allocation, avoiding futile treatments. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Carlo Sposito, Carlo Spreafico, Vincenzo Mazzaferro Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

B-hydroxybutyrate protects from alcohol-induced liver injury via a Hcar2-cAMP dependent pathway
Excess alcohol intake has many effects on the liver and can present with several clinical syndromes[1]. One of the most serious is acute alcoholic hepatitis, which occurs unexpectedly after decades of high levels of alcohol consumption, and is characterized by sterile liver inflammation, jaundice and can progress to a systemic inflammatory response[2]. There is a mixed inflammatory infiltrate characterized by neutrophils, and up-regulation of a variety of inflammatory cytokines including IL-1 β, TNF-α and IL-6. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Yonglin Chen, Xinshou Ouyang, Rafaz Hoque, Irma Garcia-Martinez, Muhammad Nadeem Yousaf, Sarah Tonack, Stefan Offermanns, Laurent Dubuquoy, Alexandre Louvet, Philippe Mathurin, Veronica Massey, Bernd Schnabl, Ramon A. Bataller, Wajahat Zafar Mehal Source Type: research

HCV modifies EGF signalling and upregulates production of CXCR2 ligands: role in inflammation and antiviral immune response
As a leading cause of chronic liver disease worldwide, HCV establishes in more than 70% of infected individuals a persistent infection characterised by continuous replication and high serum titres. The high propensity for persistence and the creeping course of disease is suggestive for powerful mechanisms allowing HCV to subvert host antiviral immunity, to modify the inflammatory response, and to utilise host cell infrastructure without affecting cell viability. This enables the virus to avert development of overt disease over decades, despite ongoing viral replication. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Christina Groepper, Kerstin Rufinatscha, Nadja Schr öder, Sabine Stindt, Christian Ehlting, Ute Albrecht, Hans H. Bock, Ralf Bartenschlager, Dieter Häussinger, Johannes G. Bode Source Type: research

CD36 palmitoylation disrupts free fatty acid metabolism and promotes tissue inflammation in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) describes a range of conditions caused by the accumulation of fat in hepatocytes. Fifteen percent to 30% of the general population in both the Western world and Asia suffer from NAFLD [1,2]. The prevalence is increased in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (70%) and morbid obesity (90%) [3]. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a subset of NAFLD characterized by excessive fat accumulation in hepatocytes (steatosis) associated with liver tissue inflammation. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Lei Zhao, Chang Zhang, Xiaoxiao Luo, Pei Wang, Wei Zhou, Shan Zhong, Yunxia Xie, Yibo Jiang, Ping Yang, Renkuang Tang, Qin Pan, Andrew R. Hall, Tu Vinh Luong, Jiangao Fan, Zac Varghese, John F. Moorhead, Massimo Pinzani, Yaxi Chen, Xiong Z. Ruan Source Type: research

Hepatitis E blood donor screening – More than a mere drop in the ocean?
Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is probably the most frequent cause of acute viral hepatitis worldwide [1]. In the past HEV was considered to be an infection of the developing world, where large outbreaks have been reported. These cases are caused by ingestion of fecally contaminated water and are related to HEV genotype 1 and 2. Increasing numbers of autochthonous cases in the developing world, caused mostly by HEV genotype 3 and 4, have been described over the last decade. Although the transmission routes are not completely understood, domesticated swine, wild boar and deer have been described as reservoirs for the zoo...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Beat Mullhaupt, Christoph Niederhauser Source Type: research

Re: validation of response to yttrium-90 radioembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein invasion
We thank Dr Cucchetti and Colleagues for their letter on our recently published proposal of prognostic stratification for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and tumoral portal vein thrombosis (PVTT) undergoing Yttrium-90 trans-arterial radioembolization (TARE)[1]. By combining three easily available baseline parameters (bilirubin levels, PVTT extension and tumor burden) we found that it is possible to markedly stratify prognosis of patients undergoing TARE, and thus to refine treatment allocation avoiding futile treatments. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 26, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Carlo Sposito, Carlo Spreafico, Vincenzo Mazzaferro Source Type: research

Outcomes of sequential treatment with sorafenib followed by regorafenib for HCC: additional analyses from the phase 3 RESORCE trial
For patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who cannot benefit from resection, transplantation, or ablation, the oral multikinase inhibitor sorafenib at the approved dose of 800 mg/day is the standard first-line systemictreatment.[1 –3] Recently, lenvatinib was shown to be non-inferior to sorafenib for overall survival (OS) for first-line systemic treatment of HCC.[4] Since the approval of sorafenib in 2008, one of the most important unmet needs in the treatment of HCC has been the development of agents that improve outcomes after disease progression during sorafenib treatment. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 25, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Richard S. Finn, Philippe Merle, Alessandro Granito, Yi-Hsiang Huang, Gy örgy Bodoky, Marc Pracht, Osamu Yokosuka, Olivier Rosmorduc, René Gerolami, Chiara Caparello, Roniel Cabrera, Charissa Chang, Weijing Sun, Marie-Aude LeBerre, Annette Baumhauer, Ge Source Type: research

Association of hepatitis E virus infection and myasthenia gravis: A pilot study
Recently, a very important prospective multicentre study reported that 2.4% patients with non-traumatic neurological injury had evidence of current/recent hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, highlighting the role of HEV in inducing neurological diseases.1 To date, the full spectrum of HEV-associated neurological injury is still unknown. Myasthenia gravis (MG) has been associated with a number of viral infections, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV),2 poliovirus,3 and Zika virus.4 One study described a woman suffering with MG as a complication of acute HEV infection. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 19, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Lin Wang, Feng Gao, Gang Lin, Yun Yuan, Yining Huang, Hongjun Hao, Hui Zhuang, Ling Wang Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Hip fracture risk in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis: a population-based study using English and Danish data
5-year cumulative incidence for hip fractures by age group at inclusion. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 16, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: H. Otete, T. Deleuran, K.M. Fleming, T.R. Card, G.P. Aithal, P. Jepsen, J. West Source Type: research

Reply to: “DCD consensus and futility in liver transplantation”
We read with great interest the letter by Giorgakis et al.1 where the authors discuss the allocation of livers obtained from donations after cardiac death (DCD) and comment on variations and terminology of risk factors in context with the recently presented UK-DCD-Risk-Score.2 This novel prediction model, developed from the DCD cohort in the UK, classifies DCD liver transplantations (LT) according to the overall donor and recipient risk. For example, livers from younger donors with a short functional donor warm ischemia (fDWIT) engrafted into low risk recipients with a few points in the model for end-stage liver disease (M...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 13, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: A. Schlegel, M. Kalisvaart, J. Isaac, P. Muiesan Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Reply to: DCD consensus and futility in Liver Transplantation
We read with great interest the letter by Giorgakis et al[1], where authors discuss the allocation of livers obtained from donors after circulatory death (DCD) and comment on variations and terminology of risk factors in context with the recently presented UK-DCD-Risk-Score[2]. This novel prediction model, developed from the DCD cohort in the United Kingdom (UK), classifies DCD liver transplantations (LT) according to the overall donor and recipient risk. For example, livers from younger donors with a short functional donor warm ischemia (fDWIT) engrafted into low risk recipients with a few points in the Model-of-end-stage...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 13, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: A. Schlegel, M. Kalisvaart, J. Isaac, P. Muiesan Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

DCD consensus and futility in liver transplantation
Schlegel A et al. describe a newly formulated donation after cardiac death (DCD) liver transplantation predictive index, which may redefine futility in DCD liver transplantation.1 Death on the waiting list and organ scarcity have encouraged the use of “marginal” grafts, a term that encompasses the DCD liver.1 Contrary to the initial reports, mounting experience from centers with high volume DCD programs demonstrate that DCD vs. donation after brain death (DBD) graft survival equivalence can be attained. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 12, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Emmanouil Giorgakis, Shirin E. Khorsandi, Wayel Jassem, Nigel Heaton Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

“DCD consensus and futility in Liver Transplantation”
Schlegel A et al. describe a newly formulated donation after cardiac death (DCD) liver transplantation predictive index, which may redefine futility in DCD liver transplantation[1]. Death on the waiting list and organ scarcity have encouraged the use of “marginal” grafts, a term that encompasses the DCD liver[1]. Contrary to the initial reports, mounting experience from centers with high volume DCD programs demonstrate that DCD vs. donation after brain death (DBD) graft survival equivalence can be attained[2–4]. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 12, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Emmanouil Giorgakis, Shirin E Khorsandi, Wayel Jassem, Nigel Heaton Source Type: research

New insights into HDV-induced innate immunity: MDA5 senses HDV replication
Coinfection with hepatitis D virus (HDV) is observed in about 5 –10% of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected individuals. It is known to be associated with more severe and faster progressing liver disease, as well as poor prognosis.1 Under certain conditions a strong innate immune response to a viral infection can lead to severe immunopathogenesis.2 For HDV, neith er the factors that drive the pathogenesis in HDV/HBV coinfection, nor the details of the interaction between HDV and the host innate immune system have been well characterized. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 11, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Aleksei Suslov, Markus H. Heim, Stefan Wieland Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “Targeting the gut-liver axis in liver disease” [J Hepatol 67 (2017) 1084–1103]
It has come to our attention that in the Clinical Trial Watch ‘Targeting the gut-liver axis in liver disease’ the affiliation for Agustín Albillos was incorrectly stated as ‘Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Madrid, Spain.’ (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 11, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Reiner Wiest, Agustin Albillos, Michael Trauner, Jasmohan S. Bajaj, Rajiv Jalan Tags: Corrigendum Source Type: research

New insights into hepatitis D virus (HDV) induced innate immunity: MDA5 senses HDV replication
Co-infection with Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is observed in about 5-10% of Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected individuals and known to be associated with more severe and faster progressing liver disease and poor prognosis [1]. Under certain conditions, a strong innate immune response to a viral infection can lead to severe immunopathogenesis [2]. For HDV, neither the factors that drive the pathogenesis in HDV/HBV coinfection, nor the details of the interaction between HDV and the host innate immune system have been well characterized. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 11, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Aleksei Suslov, Markus H. Heim, Stefan Wieland Source Type: research

Dysregulation of serum bile acids and FGF19 in alcoholic hepatitis
Alcohol abuse is the most important cause for liver disease worldwide [1]. The most severe form of alcoholic liver disease is alcoholic hepatitis with mortality rates of 20-40% at 1-6 months, and a 90-day mortality rate of up to 75% in severe alcoholic hepatitis [2 –4]. Corticosteroids are the only effective medical therapy but failure in many patients has been reported [2]. There is no cure for patients not responding to medical therapy, except for early liver transplantation that is offered in some centers to a highly selected group of patients [5]. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 11, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Katharina Brandl, Phillipp Hartmann, Lily J. Jih, Donald P. Pizzo, Josepmaria Argemi, Meritxell Ventura-Cots, Sally Coulter, Christopher Liddle, Lei Ling, Stephen J. Rossi, Alex M. DePaoli, Rohit Loomba, Wajahat Z. Mehal, Derrick E. Fouts, Michael R. Luce Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “Targeting the gut-liver axis in liver disease” [J Hepatol 67 (2017) 1084–1103]
It has come to our attention that in the Clinical Trial Watch ‘Targeting the gut-liver axis in liver disease’ the affiliation for Agustín Albillos was incorrectly stated as ‘Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Madrid, Spain.’ (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 11, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Reiner Wiest, Agustin Albillos, Michael Trauner, Jasmohan S. Bajaj, Rajiv Jalan Tags: Corrigendum Source Type: research

New insights into hepatitis D virus (HDV) induced innate immunity: MDA5 senses HDV replication
Co-infection with Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is observed in about 5-10% of Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected individuals and known to be associated with more severe and faster progressing liver disease and poor prognosis [1]. Under certain conditions, a strong innate immune response to a viral infection can lead to severe immunopathogenesis [2]. For HDV, neither the factors that drive the pathogenesis in HDV/HBV coinfection, nor the details of the interaction between HDV and the host innate immune system have been well characterized. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 11, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Aleksei Suslov, Markus H. Heim, Stefan Wieland Source Type: research

Dysregulation of serum bile acids and FGF19 in alcoholic hepatitis
Alcohol abuse is the most important cause for liver disease worldwide [1]. The most severe form of alcoholic liver disease is alcoholic hepatitis with mortality rates of 20-40% at 1-6 months, and a 90-day mortality rate of up to 75% in severe alcoholic hepatitis [2 –4]. Corticosteroids are the only effective medical therapy but failure in many patients has been reported [2]. There is no cure for patients not responding to medical therapy, except for early liver transplantation that is offered in some centers to a highly selected group of patients [5]. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 11, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Katharina Brandl, Phillipp Hartmann, Lily J. Jih, Donald P. Pizzo, Josepmaria Argemi, Meritxell Ventura-Cots, Sally Coulter, Christopher Liddle, Lei Ling, Stephen J. Rossi, Alex M. DePaoli, Rohit Loomba, Wajahat Z. Mehal, Derrick E. Fouts, Michael R. Luce Source Type: research

New trials and results in systemic treatment of HCC
The design of prospective trials in hepatocellular carcinoma is a true challenge because the underlying condition of the liver, upon drug exposure, could interact with the specific course of carcinoma and influence overall outcome. The information generated by basic and clinical researchers provides the rationale for improving the prognosis of this complex disease. However, an additional challenge is interpreting emerging data in real time in order to integrate them into the design of further trials. (Source: Journal of Hepatology)
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 10, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Mar ía Reig, Leonardo Gomes da Fonseca, Sandrine Faivre Tags: Clinical Trial Watch Source Type: research

EASL Clinical Practice Guidelines for the management of patients with decompensated cirrhosis
The natural history of cirrhosis is characterised by an asymptomatic compensated phase followed by a decompensated phase, marked by the development of overt clinical signs, the most frequent of which are ascites, bleeding, encephalopathy, and jaundice. The following Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) represent the first CPGs on the management of decompensated cirrhosis. In this context, the panel of experts, having emphasised the importance of initiating aetiologic treatment for any degree of hepatic disease at the earliest possible stage, extended its work to all the complications of cirrhosis, which had not been covered...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - April 10, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Authors: European Association for the Study of the Liver Tags: Clinical Practice Guidelines Source Type: research