Lichen planus and other lichenoid dermatoses: Kids are not just little people
Lichenoid dermatoses, a group of inflammatory skin conditions with characteristic clinical and histopathologic findings, range from common to rare. Classic lichen planus typically presents as pruritic, polygonal, violaceous flat-topped papules and plaques; many variants in morphology and location also exist. Other lichenoid dermatoses share similar clinical presentations and histopathologic findings. These include lichenoid drug eruption, lichen planus-like keratosis, lichen striatus, lichen nitidus, and keratosis lichenoides chronica. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - November 1, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Michael J. Payette, Gillian Weston, Stephen Humphrey, JiaDe Yu, Kristen E. Holland Source Type: research

Bullous diseases: Kids are not just little people
Bullous diseases may be rare; however, this does not preclude the clinician from being familiar with their manifestations and treatment. After ruling out infection, genetically inherited blistering diseases are more likely to be the cause of blistering or erosions in the neonatal period, whereas immunobullous diseases are more common in adults. Published literature on immunobullous disorders reflects information gleaned from case reports and open-label case series; prospective studies and evidence-based treatments are limited. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - November 1, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Kalyani Marathe, Jun Lu, Kimberly D. Morel Source Type: research

Cutaneous infectious diseases: Kids are not just little people
The changes in immune response that occur with age play a significant role in disease presentation and patient management. Evolution of the innate and adaptive immune systems throughout life, influenced partly by hormonal changes associated with puberty, plays a role in the differences between pediatric and adult response to disease. We review a series of manifestations of dermatologic infectious diseases spanning bacterial, viral, and fungal origins that can be seen in both pediatric and adult age groups and highlight similarities and differences in presentation and disease course. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - November 1, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Shehla Admani, Sphoorthi Jinna, Sheila Fallon Friedlander, Brett Sloan Source Type: research

Phototherapy: Kids are not just little people
Phototherapy is the delivery of treatments in the form of visible or ultraviolet light for the therapeutic care of a patient. Usage of phototherapy in children is affected by limited data in the medical literature, the inability of some children to stand still during the delivery of therapy, parental concerns regarding risks of therapy, and scheduling difficulties. Despite the limitation of data, there are publications in support of usage of phototherapy, especially for psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and vitiligo in both children and adults. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - November 1, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Eunice Song, Debashis Reja, Nanette Silverberg, Marti Jill Rothe Source Type: research

Laser therapy in dermatology: Kids are not just little people
Advances in laser research and technology have led to expanded laser applications for the treatment of dermatologic disease. Lasers are viable treatment modalities for patients of any age group and offer unique treatment options for both adult and pediatric patients. While many skin diseases can be treated similarly in children and adults, differences in treatment approaches can result from varying anxiety levels, pain tolerance, psychosocial considerations of untreated disease, determination of suitable anesthesia, the use of size-appropriate safety equipment, and differences in the evolution of skin disease over time. (S...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - November 1, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Mona Shahriari, Hanspaul Makkar, Justin Finch Source Type: research

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This is a lavishly illustrated, beautifully executed compilation of some of the best medical photographs of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons can be appreciated as a visual record of medical history. It also documents changes in medicine within a larger social context. Technologic innovations allowed increasing informality, spontaneity, and opportunity for the amateur physician-photographer, taking medical photography out of the portrait studio and into the medical classroom. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - November 1, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Mark Bernhardt Tags: Book Review Source Type: research

Beyond diagnosis and treatment: How simple reassurance makes all the difference
In life there are some people who are confident enought that they do not require reassurance and then there are others that need it constantly just to be able to function in their daily living. I am fortunate enough to experience the gift of reassurance and being able to give it back. As a first time mother, many of the experiences were unnerving and it was reassuring to hear someone say that I was doing a good job. We were also lucky to have a pediatrician who put our parenteral paranoia at ease by keeping communication open. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - November 1, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Anya Stassiy Tags: Dermatology Disquisitions and Other Essays Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - November 1, 2015 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - November 1, 2015 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Lichen planus and lichenoid reactions as a systemic disease
Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic disease that involves the skin, scalp, mucous membranes, and nails. The etiology of LP is still unknown; however, some external and internal factors (eg. drugs, stress, hepatitis C virus) have been suggested to trigger the disease. Many studies have investigated an immunologic pathogenesis that is probably related to T-cell autoimmunity with the keratinocyte as the target cell. Altered self-antigens on the surface of basal keratinocytes modified by viruses or by drugs are believed to be the targets of the T-cell response. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - August 29, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Judit Lukács, Sibylle Schliemann, Peter Elsner Source Type: research

Cutaneous manifestations of systemic autoinflammatory disorders
Rare systemic autoinflammatory diseases (sAIDs) are driven by cytokine-mediated uncontrolled inflammation that results from activation of innate immune pathways. sAIDs present with recurrent fever episodes, fatigue, musculoskeletal symptoms, gastrointestinal, neurologic, and skin manifestations. They include hereditary monogenic and acquired multifactorial disorders, show a significant morbidity and usually persist for life. Due to the limited awareness of sAIDs, they are often associated with a considerable delay in diagnosis. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - August 29, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Bediha Bölükbasi, Karoline Krause Source Type: research

Pyoderma gangrenosum—a systemic disease?
Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an orphan disease. It belongs to the group of neutrophilic dermatoses. Four major subtypes and several rare manifestations illustrate the great variety of clinical presentations and clinical course. PG is potentially life threatening and associated with a number of internal diseases including chronic inflammatory bowel disease, hematologic disorders, and malignancies. PG itself shows extracutaneous manifestations. These findings are in favor of PG as a systemic disease. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - August 29, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Uwe Wollina Source Type: research

Seronegative reactive spondyloarthritis and the skin
Spondyloarthritidies represent a group of conditions affecting the axial and peripheral muscoloskeletal apparatus and are often associated with psoriasis, infections, and inflammatory bowel diseases. Other diseases included in this category are psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and enteropathic arthritis. Reactive arthritis is an elusive spondyloarthritis, commonly occurring 1 to 3 weeks after a digestive or a genitourinary tract infection, in which microorganisms do not infect the joint directly. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - August 29, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Elena Generali, Angela Ceribelli, Marco Massarotti, Luca Cantarini, Carlo Selmi Source Type: research

Systemic drug reactions with skin involvement: Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and DRESS
Skin is often affected in adverse drug reactions. Although the majority of cutaneous adverse drug reactions are benign and self-limiting, Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), affecting multiple organs and systems, are potentially fatal. Many organs can be affected, including the mucosal membranes, gastrointestinal tract, liver, lungs, kidneys, and eyes. We discuss the causes, pathophysiologic aspects, and main clinical features of SJS, TEN, and DRESS as systemic diseases with skin involvement. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - August 29, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Razvigor Darlenski, Jana Kazandjieva, Nikolai Tsankov Source Type: research

Lyme disease/borreliosis as a systemic disease
Lyme disease/borreliosis (LD) is a well-known arthropod-transmitted entity in the northern hemisphere. The incidence of LD is reportedly rising throughout the world, although better diagnostic facilities may be contributory. The disease distribution is expanding in Europe, with its presence being now documented at higher altitudes and latitudes. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato is the most important genospecies leading to LD, although newer ones continue to be discovered. The variations in clinical spectrum with genospecies involved are an interesting feature. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - August 29, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Virendra N. Sehgal, Ananta Khurana Source Type: research

Is herpes simplex a systemic disease?
Orofacial herpes simplex virus infections are usually caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), and HSV-2 infections have been accepted as a sexually transmitted disease. HSV establishes a latent infection in the dorsal root ganglia of the host and remains there for the rest of life. HSV affects mainly skin and genitalia, although in immunocompromised patients it may cause local infection with vast skin involvement, chronic herpetic ulcers, or widespread mucous membrane damage, as well as systemic infections localized in the central and peripheral nervous systems, gastrointestinal tract, and ocular system. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - August 29, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Ivan N. Staikov, Neyko V. Neykov, Jana S. Kazandjieva, Nikolai K. Tsankov Source Type: research

Systemic involvement in mycosis fungoides
Mycosis fungoides (MF) represents almost 50% of all primary cutaneous lymphomas and more than 70% of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL). Arising from preferentially skin-homing lymphocytes with genetic instability, MF evolves through stages (IA-IVB), producing inconspicuous inflammatory features in the beginning and finally resulting in a proliferation of cytomorphologic, phenotypic, and genotypic abnormal tumor cells. Over the past 200 years, there has been much confusion in the classification of lymphomas due to semantic disagreements (MF, CTCL, parapsoriasis, lymphosarcoma, reticulum cell sarcoma, and many other terms), ...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - August 29, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Günter Burg Source Type: research

Systemic involvement in localized scleroderma/morphea
Localized scleroderma (LoSc), also known as morphea, is a rare fibrosing disorder of the skin and underlying tissues. Sclerosis is mainly limited to the skin, but subcutaneous tissue, fascia, and underlying muscles and bone may also be involved. In some cases, systemic manifestation with visceral abnormalities may occur. Several publications have focused on significant aspects of LoSc: genetics, immunity, epidemiology, scoring systems, and unification of classifications. Clinical studies featuring large cohorts with the disease published by various international study groups have been of great value in furthering the diagn...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - August 29, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Anna Gorkiewicz-Petkow, Agnieszka Kalinska-Bienias Source Type: research

Acne - a potential skin marker of internal disease
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most prevalent endocrine disorder in adult women. Hyperandrogenism is the crux of the pathogenesis of both acne and hirsutism, the most frequent clinical presentations of the syndrome. The chronic anovulation that may occur, often but not always associated with enlarged cystic ovaries, has long been recognized as an important feature of PCOS.In recent years major changes have occurred with regard to PCOS:Although management of the common cutaneous manifestations, mainly acne, hirsutism, alopecia, and acanthosis nigricans, remains strictly within the realm of daily dermatologic practi...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - August 29, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Joseph L. Pace Source Type: research

The skin as a target organ in multisystemic diseases II
Progress in medical science has given a new reading to the claim that the skin could be a mirror of the pathological changes found in the internal organs. The concept that we previously promoted is furthered in this issue; namely that the greatest part of skin diseases are systemic ones.In this issue we focus on another group of diseases with systemic involvement and skin manifestations. We review such inflammatory conditions as lichen planus, autoinflammatory syndromes, and pyoderma gangrenosum focusing on their systemic involvement. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - August 29, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Nikolai Tsankov, Jana Kazandjieva, Razvigor Darlenski Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

(History of Mexican Dermatology)
This book is handsome—a foot high with a sober navy blue hard cover featuring a 1905 photograph of Mexico’s General Hospital. The one-volume work is printed on high-quality thick, low-reflectance glossy paper. The print is extremely neat and easy to read. The many pictures (not consecutively numbered) are all in black and white, which to me seems somehow appropriate to a historical treatise. Unfortunately, the thick, heavy pages are not well bound, so they tend to come loose. The 43 co-authors are all leaders in contemporary Mexican dermatology. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - August 29, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Maria M. Tsoukas, Mauricio Goihman-Yahr Tags: Book ReviewEdited by Maria M Tsoukas, MD, PhD Source Type: research

“Work itself is a pleasure.” 200th anniversary of the birth of James Paget (1814-1899)
The year 2014 marked the two hundredth anniversary of the birth of James Paget (1814-1899), one of the most famous of English surgeons. Paget was considered an excellent clinician in his own lifetime and was careful in his scientific observations. Rarely did he ever work fewer than 16 hours a day. Not only did he contribute to the development of surgery, but he also made important dermatologic observations. In addition to describing cases of bone deformations, now called Paget’s disease of the bone, he also described chronic ulceration of the nipple associated with breast cancer, additionally known as Paget’s d...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - August 29, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Andrzej Grzybowski, Jarosław Sak Tags: CARETAKER OF THE SKIN Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - August 29, 2015 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - August 29, 2015 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

or : Pioneering statistical survey on prostitution at the beginning of the 20th century
The earliest serious investigation into prostitution in Croatia was a survey conducted in 1907 by the physician Fran Gundrum. His study was an attempt at a comprehensive exploration of prostitution, which tried to reconstruct demographic, anthropologic, and sociologic features of prostitutes. I present an analysis of his study and argue that Gundrum consistently found himself vacillating between blaming society and charging the nature of women to explain the existence of prostitution. This ambivalence was a result of embracing both the power of Enlightenment, which believed that human morality could be improved by the proc...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Martin Kuhar Tags: CLIO DERMATOLOGICA Source Type: research

Commentary: Fold (intertriginous) dermatoses: When skin touches skin
In this second of a three-part series on regional dermatoses,1,2 we address disorders associated with fold dermatoses. Such intertriginous dermatoses can be particularly difficult to treat due to the long list of differential diagnoses. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Yalçın Tüzün, Ronni Wolf Source Type: research

Acrodermatitis enteropathica and other nutritional diseases of the folds (intertriginous areas)
The appropriate intake and metabolism of vitamins and minerals are critical to maintaining homeostasis. Imbalance in essential nutrients, either through dietary excess or deficiency or disorders in metabolism, can result in a spectrum of dermatologic and systemic manifestations. Certain nutrient deficiencies produce a characteristic pattern of cutaneous eruption. Recognition of these patterns is important, as they can alert the physician to an underlying nutritional disease. We review nutritional diseases involving zinc, biotin, essential fatty acids, vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), and riboflavin that present specifically with i...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Nikita Lakdawala, Jane M. Grant-Kels Source Type: research

Bacterial infections of the folds (intertriginous areas)
The axillary, inguinal, post-auricular, and inframammary areas are considered skin folds, where one skin layer touches another. Skin fold areas have a high moisture level and elevated temperature, both of which increase the possibility of microorganism overgrowth. A massive amount of bacteria live on the surface of the skin. Some are purely commensal; thus, only their overgrowth can cause infections, most of which are minor. In some cases, colonization of pathogenic bacteria causes more serious infections. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Yalçın Tüzün, Ronni Wolf, Burhan Engin, Ayşegül Sevim Keçici, Zekayi Kutlubay Source Type: research

Viral infections of the folds (intertriginous areas)
Viruses are considered intracellular obligates with a nucleic acid, either RNA or DNA. They have the ability to encode proteins involved in viral replication and production of the protective coat within the host cells but require host cell ribosomes and mitochondria for translation. The members of the families Herpesviridae, Poxviridae, Papovaviridae, and Picornaviridae are the most commonly known agents for the cutaneous viral diseases, but other virus families, such as Adenoviridae, Togaviridae, Parvoviridae, Paramyxoviridae, Flaviviridae, and Hepadnaviridae, can also infect the skin. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Esra Adışen, Meltem Önder Source Type: research

Fungal infections of the folds (intertriginous areas)
Superficial fungal infections are widespread, regardless of age and gender, in populations all around the world and may affect the skin and skin appendages. Although there are thousands of fungal infections from various genera and families in nature, those that are pathogenic for humans and nesting in skin folds are limited in number. The prevalence and distribution of these fungi vary according to the patients and certain environmental factors.Because the areas including the lids, external auditory canal, behind the ears, navel, inguinal region, and axillae, also called flexures, are underventilated and moist areas expose...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Ahmet Metin, Nursel Dilek, Duriye Deniz Demirseven Source Type: research

Hailey-Hailey disease: A fold (intertriginous) dermatosis
Hailey-Hailey disease, also called benign familial pemphigus, is a late-onset blistering disorder that affects the flexures. There are typically painful erosions and cracks in affected areas. Lesions generally begin between 20 and 40 years of age. In two third of all cases, positive family history is detected. In pathogenesis, there is a defect in keratinocyte adhesion due to ATP2 C1 gene mutation. The result of the desmosomal decomposition is acantholysis. Menstruation, pregnancy, skin infections, physical trauma, excessive sweating and exposure to ultraviolet radiation are important triggering factors. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Burhan Engin, Zekayi Kutlubay, Uğur Çelik, Server Serdaroğlu, Yalçın Tüzün Source Type: research

Psoriasis inversa: A separate identity or a variant of psoriasis vulgaris?
Psoriasis is a chronic skin disorder affecting approximately 2% of the European and American population. The most common form of psoriasis is the chronic plaque type. Inverse psoriasis, also named flexural or intertriginous psoriasis, is not considered a separate disease entity but rather a special site of involvement of plaque psoriasis, characterized by its localization to inverse/intertriginous/flexural body sites. We review current evidence and establish whether inverse psoriasis is a separate disease entity based on characteristics in terms of epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical and histologic presentation, microbiol...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Silje Haukali Omland, Robert Gniadecki Source Type: research

Baboon syndrome and toxic erythema of chemotherapy: Fold (intertriginous) dermatoses
Three decades ago, researchers described an eruption with a very characteristic distribution pattern that was confined to the buttocks and the intertriginous and flexor areas. They gave this reaction pattern one of the most unforgettable names in dermatology, baboon syndrome (BS), due to the characteristic, bright-red, well-demarcated eruption predominantly on the buttocks and genital area, reminiscent of the red bottom of a baboon. The authors described three cases provoked by ampicillin, nickel, and mercury. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Ronni Wolf, Yalçın Tüzün Source Type: research

Darier disease: A fold (intertriginous) dermatosis
Darier disease, also known as Darier-White disease, is characterized by yellow to brown, oily keratotic papules and plaques in the seborrheic areas of the face and chest. This disorder may show different clinical manifestations, such as palmoplantar pits and nail abnormalities. The trigger factors are mechanical trauma, heat, humidity, ultraviolet B, and pyogenic infections. The disease usually becomes apparent in the second decade of life. The ATP2 A2 (SERCA2) gene mutation was detected in all patients. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Burhan Engin, Zekayi Kutlubay, Emine Erkan, Yalçın Tüzün Source Type: research

Acanthosis nigricans: A fold (intertriginous) dermatosis
Acanthosis nigricans (AN) is a mucocutaneous disorder that is characterized by focal or diffuse hyperkeratotic, surfaces, which are symmetrically distributed hyperpigmented lesions of the skin. It rarely affects mucosal surfaces like oral cavities. Although it is commonly seen in adolescents, AN is also increasingly seen in children who are obese. Recent studies have found that AN can be a cutaneous indicator of insulin resistance and malignancy. Acanthosis nigricans has been associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, endocrinopathies, drugs, and malignancies. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Zekayi Kutlubay, Burhan Engin, Orkhan Bairamov, Yalçın Tüzün Source Type: research

Pemphigus vegetans of the folds (intertriginous areas)
Pemphigus vegetans (P Veg), the rarest form of pemphigus, is thought to be a variant of pemphigus vulgaris (PV). Classically, two subtypes of P Veg are recognized: (1) Neumann P Veg, which usually begins as PV with vesicles and bullae that rupture to form hypertrophic granulating erosions, then evolving into vegetating exuding masses; (2) Hallopeau P Veg, initially characterized by pustular lesions that, after rupturing, merge and gradually evolve into vegetating erosions with a centrifugal expansion. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Vincenzo Ruocco, Eleonora Ruocco, Stefano Caccavale, Alessio Gambardella, Ada Lo Schiavo Source Type: research

Diaper (napkin) dermatitis: A fold (intertriginous) dermatosis
Diaper (napkin) dermatitis is an acutely presenting inflammatory irritant contact dermatitis of the diaper region. It is one of the most common dermatologic diseases in infants and children. In the past, the disease was thought to be caused by ammonia; however, a number of factors, such as friction, wetness, inappropriate skin care, microorganisms, antibiotics, and nutritional defects, are important. Diaper dermatitis commonly affects the lower parts of the abdomen, thighs, and diaper area. Involvement of skin fold regions is typical with diaper dermatitis. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Yalçın Tüzün, Ronni Wolf, Süleyman Bağlam, Burhan Engin Source Type: research

Hyperhidrosis, bromhidrosis, and chromhidrosis: Fold (intertriginous) dermatoses
Human sweat glands disorders are common and can have a significant impact on the quality of life and on professional, social, and emotional burdens. It is of paramount importance to diagnose and treat them properly to ensure optimal patient care. Hyperhidrosis is characterized by increased sweat secretion, which can be idiopathic or secondary to other systemic conditions. Numerous therapeutic options have been introduced with variable success. Novel methods with microwave-based and ultrasound devices have been developed and are currently tested in comparison to the conventional approaches. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Kristina Semkova, Malena Gergovska, Jana Kazandjieva, Nikolai Tsankov Source Type: research

The checklist: BEST medical center employment requirements 2015
Dr. Ida Lystic, a newly minted gastroenterologist, has accepted a job at the Byron Edwards & Samuel Thompson (BEST) Medical Center. On her first day, after six months of preliminary paper work, she completes multiple checklists mandated by the center: dress code, employee health, and class checklists. Her open-toe pumps have been replaced by disposable paper booties and her polished fingernails have been covered with blue latex-free gloves. Nicotine screening (the use of which is prohibited not only while at work at the BEST Medical Center, but also while at home) was performed, and she had a mask fitting for tuberculo...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Philip R. Cohen, Razelle Kurzrock Tags: DERMATOLOGIC DISQUISITIONS AND OTHER ESSAYS Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - June 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Daisy Maude Orleman Robinson: The first American woman dermatologist
Born in 1868 and the first American woman to become a dermatologist, Daisy Maude Orleman (later Robinson) graduated from the National Medical College of Columbian University, now George Washington University, in 1890. After training in dermatology in Paris and Zurich and after marriage to Andrew Rose Robinson in 1904, she joined the faculty of the New York Polyclinic Medical School and the Northwestern Dispensary in New York, where she was an attending dermatologist starting in 1905. Her achievements included being the first woman dermatologist to present a case at a dermatologic meeting, to publish a scholarly paper in de...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - April 17, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: David M. Pariser Tags: CLIO DERMATOLOGICA Source Type: research

Blood Money: The Cyril Karabus Story
It would be a fantastic fiction novel, if indeed it were not all true. The story begins a decade ago, in October 2002. The plot includes false accusations and missing documents, an intricate web of international politics, and extraordinary actions by ordinary individuals. The story is set in a nation—the United Arab Emirates—that does not conform to the principles of jurisprudence of most modern countries. A trial against a physician after the unfortunate death of a child from leukemia has concluded, and a guilty verdict has been declared that resulted in an order to pay “blood money” to the child&r...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - April 17, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Philip R. Cohen, Razelle Kurzrock Tags: Book Review Source Type: research

Treatment of alopecia areata with squaric acid dibutylester
Squaric acid dibutylester is a topical sensitizing agent utilized for the treatment of alopecia areata. The mechanism of action is not fully understood, but is believed to redirect the inflammatory response by invoking allergic contact dermatitis. Several studies have compared the efficacy of squaric acid dibutylester to other treatments vs placebo with favorable results. This contribution reviews the history of the topical sensitizing agent squaric acid dibutylester and discusses the mechanism of action, the use in alopecia areata, and the efficacy and safety of this therapeutic agent. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - April 17, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Nikki D. Hill, Kristin Bunata, Adelaide A. Hebert Source Type: research

Pediatric dermatology, part II: More hot topics in pediatric dermatology
The development of the field of pediatric dermatology has created an expansion in publications and understanding of dermatologic diseases in childhood. Pediatric dermatology is a small but vibrant subspecialty in the United States, with the first pediatric dermatology board having been offered to eligible dermatologists with pediatrics/pediatric dermatology training since 2004, with 232 individuals nationwide (as of September 8, 2014) having become board certified by the American Board of Dermatology since that time With the 10-year span since the first board examination, initially board certified pediatric dermatologists ...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - April 17, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Nanette Silverberg Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Newborn infant skin: Physiology, development, and care
Infant skin is critical to the newborn child’s transition from the womb environment to the journey to self-sufficiency. This review provides an integrative perspective on the skin development in full term and premature infants. There is a particular focus on the role of vernix caseosa and on the implications of skin development for epidermal penetration of exogenous compounds. Healthy full-term newborn skin is well-developed and functional at birth, with a thick epidermis and well-formed stratum corneum (SC) layers. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - April 17, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Marty O. Visscher, Ralf Adam, Susanna Brink, Mauricio Odio Source Type: research

Epidemiology of childhood atopic dermatitis
Atopic dermatitis (AD) or eczema is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder with significant morbidity and quality of life impairment. Elucidating the epidemiology of AD is important for understanding disease risk factors and facilitates development of interventions for disease prevention. This contribution aims to summarize recent developments in the epidemiology of AD, including the US prevalence, regional differences, and secular trends of disease prevalence, genetic and environmental determinants, distribution, and determinants of disease severity and health care use for AD. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - April 17, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Nitin Garg, Jonathan I. Silverberg Source Type: research

Systemic therapy of childhood atopic dermatitis
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common childhood inflammatory disease that, in a small percentage of cases, can become severe enough to require potent systemic treatment. Many trials have been conducted with systemic agents for the treatment of severe pediatric AD; we review the evidence here. Although corticosteroids are widely used in practice, they are not generally recommended as a systemic treatment option for AD in children. Most patients experience a relatively rapid and robust response to cyclosporine. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - April 17, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Nathaniel A. Slater, Dean S. Morrell Source Type: research

Obesity and the metabolic syndrome in pediatric psoriasis
Psoriasis is a common, chronic inflammatory dermatosis that often has its onset during childhood. There is increasing evidence that psoriasis in adults is associated with obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and associated comorbidities, including insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. This association is postulated to arise, at least in part, as a result of a systemic proinflammatory state that is mediated by adipose tissue. Several recent observational studies suggest that children and adolescents with psoriasis may be at increased risk of being overweight and obese as wel...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - April 17, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Iris Gutmark-Little, Kara N. Shah Source Type: research

Hidradenitis suppurativa in prepubescent and pubescent children
Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS) is an uncommon disease, which is particularly rare in young and prepubescent children. HS pathology centers on the follicular unit and involves aberrant cutaneous cellular immunity. HS tends to first manifest in puberty, but a handful of prepubescent cases of HS have been reported and are linked to hormonal disorders, in particular elevated testosterone. The most common manifestations of HS are abscesses, scarring, acne inversa, and keloids, especially in the intertriginous areas of the groin and the axilla. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - April 17, 2015 Category: Dermatology Authors: Noah Scheinfeld Source Type: research