Table of Contents
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - November 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Fellowship candidate selection at the BEST Medical Center: A novel process
Dr. Ida Lystic completed her MD degree at the prestigious Harvey Medical School (which has since been renamed the Harvey Provider School) and her residency in internal medicine and gastroenterology fellowship at the OTHER (Owen T. Henry and Eugene Rutherford) Medical Center. She was subsequently hired as an assistant professor at the BEST (Byron Edwards and Samuel Thompson) Medical Center in 2015. After eventually completing an extensive list of employment requirements, she was able to begin seeing patients. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - September 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Philip R. Cohen Tags: Dermatologic Disquisitions and other Essays Source Type: research

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The history of arthritis seems not to have achieved the attention given to the history of dermatology or even allergy. A number of scholarly papers have delineated the development of rheumatology, and at least one book has been directed toward gout.1 (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - September 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Lawrence Charles Parish Tags: Book Review Source Type: research

Dermatosis papulosa nigra: a clinically and histopathologically distinct entity
Dermatosis papulosa nigra was first described by Aldo Castellani (1874-1971) more than 90 years ago, and it has since been presumed to be a variant of seborrheic keratosis. Despite their morphologic similarities both macroscopically and microscopically, key differences have yet to be explained. These lesions also exhibit different demographics, with dermatosis papulosa nigra having a predilection for dark-skinned individuals and a female predominance. No studies to date have investigated this, but studies assessing the mechanisms of similar dermatologic conditions may yield significant clues. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - September 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Simon Arda Metin, Brian W. Lee, William Clark Lambert, Lawrence Charles Parish Tags: Comment and Controversy Source Type: research

Oral dermatology: Part II
The diagnosis and treatment of oral mucosal diseases can be challenging for the clinician. Interest in oral dermatology, oral medicine, and oral pathology by physicians, dentists, and other health care professionals is high. The purpose of this edition of Clinics in Dermatology, titled Oral Dermatology Part II, and the first volume, Oral Dermatology Part I,1 is to provide the learner with a current review of topics pertinent to oral dermatology. The contributors include dermatologists, dentists, oral medicine specialists, and otolaryngologists who possess specialized experience and expertise in oral diseases. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - September 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Roy S. Rogers, Nasim Fazel Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Beh çet disease: New aspects
Beh çet disease is currently considered an “autoinflammatory disease” triggered by infection and environmental factors in genetically predisposed individuals. Although the disease is characterized by recurrent oral and genital aphthous ulcers and ocular involvement, it can affect multiple organ sys tems. Complex aphthosis is characterized by recurrent oral and/or genital aphthous ulcers. It is important to evaluate the patient with complex aphthosis for Behçet disease and related systemic disorders. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - September 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Isil Bulur, Meltem Onder Source Type: research

Oral mucosa biology and salivary biomarkers
We describe the distinct features of the tongue, mucosa, and salivary glands. In particular, we examine the composition and function of the saliva, with special focus on salivary biomarkers. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - September 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Rosie Qin, Andrea Steel, Nasim Fazel Source Type: research

A diagnostic and therapeutic approach to primary burning mouth syndrome
Primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is an oral mucosal disorder that is characterized by a chronic and often debilitating intraoral burning sensation for which no localized or systemic cause can be found. BMS most commonly affects postmenopausal women. The pathophysiology of primary BMS is not well understood. Diagnosing BMS can prove to be challenging. BMS patients can also pose a therapeutic challenge to clinicians who are consulted to evaluate these patients. Most commonly used therapies include tricyclic antidepressants, α-lipoic acid, clonazepam, and cognitive-behavioral therapy. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - September 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Siamak Moghadam-Kia, Nasim Fazel Source Type: research

Contact stomatitis
occurs in up to 10% of the population. Mechanical or chemical irritation, ill-fitting dentures, and dental fillings can induce irritant contact stomatitis. Type I hypersensitivity and type IV hypersensitivity to dental products and foods are frequently responsible for the allergic types of contact stomatitis. We review the causal agents of contact stomatitis, the differential diagnoses, diagnostic testing, and potential treatment. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - September 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Mirtha Cifuentes, Parastoo Davari, Roy S. Rogers Source Type: research

Oral leukoplakia and oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma
Oral leukoplakia is defined as a white oral lesion not related to another disease process. These lesions are largely asymptomatic, and the clinical relevance of oral leukoplakia is primarily tied to its association with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Timely workup and effective management of these lesions can reduce the risk of malignant transformation and promote early diagnosis of invasive tumors. A biopsy should be performed promptly of any persistent or suspicious leukoplakia with subsequent management dictated by histologic findings. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - September 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Arnaud F. Bewley, D. Gregory Farwell Source Type: research

Oral manifestations of nutritional disorders
Nutritional deficiencies occur when body metabolic requirements are not matched by intake and absorption. Reasons for this discrepancy are numerous, but often social, economic, medical, and even psychiatric factors may play a role. Vitamins and minerals are required for appropriate rapid cell turnover of the oral mucosa. The oral cavity is a unique anatomic environment that may manifest early signs of nutritional disorders as well as other indicators of systemic disease. Knowledge of these oral manifestations and associated findings will allow a practitioner to consider a nutritional disorder when evaluating oral changes a...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - September 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Stanislav N. Tolkachjov, Alison J. Bruce Source Type: research

Etiology, evaluation, and management of xerostomia
Xerostomia is defined as the complaint of oral dryness. It is a condition that primarily affects older adults and can have a significant negative effect on one ’s quality of life. Patients with xerostomia often do not have objective signs of hyposalivation. The underlying etiology of xerostomia includes a variety of systemic diseases and local factors. Our aim is to provide a comprehensive review of the differential diagnosis, evaluation, and management of xerostomia. Prompt diagnosis and management can alleviate the clinical manifestations of this debilitating condition. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - September 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Jillian W. Millsop, Elizabeth A. Wang, Nasim Fazel Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - September 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - September 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

The balancing act of societies and of clinical histories
Individuals and societies are, respectively, confederations of cells and individuals. They function well only if their constituents work in a complementary and harmonious way. This is regulated by control mechanisms. Failure or malfunction of these leads to disease or social upheaval, respectively. Medicine, including dermatology, and government act by restoring homeostasis when self-regulation is unable to do so. Long-term or even permanent survival of individuals and societies can be achieved when profound understanding of control mechanisms becomes a reality. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Mauricio Goihman-Yahr Tags: Clio Dermatologica Source Type: research

“Wolf’s isotopic response”: the originators speak their mind and set the record straight
Having been the first to have introduced the concept of “isotopic response” three decades ago, we wanted to express some of our thoughts on its current application, now that more than 100 such cases have been reported in the literature. It is, of course, gratifying to read about its appropriate application, and it is our hope that others will refrain from distorting its original meaning. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Ronni Wolf, Danny Wolf Tags: Dermatologic Disquisitions and Other Essays Source Type: research

Mikhail Bulgakov: The man torn between medicine and literature
The year 2016 marked the 125th anniversary of the birth of physician-venereologist and passionate writer Mikhail Afanasievich Bulgakov (1891-1940). From his essays emerges a figure of a man torn between medicine and literature. His works contain fragments pertaining to his personal ailments and health problems, which are described with medical precision, for example, morphine addiction. Bulgakov ’s essays are full of metaphors and references to the political situation of Soviet Russia. He compared this situation to syphilis as in treacherous infections, a slow destroying and enslaving of a social organism. (Source: C...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Andrzej Grzybowski, Beata Dobrowolska, Joanna Kwiatkowska, Jaros ław Sak Tags: CARETAKER OF THE SKIN Source Type: research

Atopic dermatitis: Part I
Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder. The first recorded cases date back to the Roman era and have been a source of controversy and discomfort ever since.1 The Global Burden of Disease study has ranked this disease, sometimes referred to as eczema, as the most burdensome skin disorder, as a result of its extremely high prevalence in both developed and developing nations and substantial impact on patients ’ quality of life.2 Atopic dermatitis is also associated with a large public health burden, secondary to the costs of increased health care utilization, in addition to lost productivity and wages...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Nanette B. Silverberg, Jonathan I. Silverberg Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

The history of atopic dermatitis
Fred Wise (1881-1950) and Marion Sulzberger (1895-1983) are often credited with introducing the term atopic dermatitis to dermatology in 1933. This definition was based on atopy, a term first created by Arthur Coca (1875-1959) and Robert Cooke (1880-1960) in 1923, when they recognized an association between allergic rhinitis and asthma. Despite its recent introduction into our medical lexicon, historical precursors of atopic dermatitis date back to at least as early as 69-140 ce. In this contribution, we highlight both the prominent individuals credited with shaping the disorder into our current interpretation and the susp...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Owen N. Kramer, Mark A. Strom, Barry Ladizinski, Peter A. Lio Source Type: research

Current and emerging concepts in atopic dermatitis pathogenesis
Atopic dermatitis is a common skin disorder with a complex, evolving pathogenesis. Research on the pathogenesis has shifted from focusing primarily on generalized immune system abnormalities in T helper 1/T helper 2 (Th1/Th2) activity to more targeted immune and skin barrier abnormalities contributing to the overall phenotype. Specific signaling pathways recently implicated in atopic dermatitis include production of interleukin (IL) 4 and IL-13, which promote immunoglobulin E production, Th17 and Th22 cells, and production of cytokines. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Marguerite Sullivan, Nanette B. Silverberg Source Type: research

Typical and atypical clinical appearance of atopic dermatitis
Atopic dermatitis is a complex, systemic inflammatory disorder associated with a variety of clinical features. The original criteria of Hanifin and Rajka include major criteria and a list of about two dozen minor criteria however, even the minor criteria do not include some features of atopic dermatitis noted less commonly but still seen with some frequency. This contribution first reviews the common clinical appearance of atopic dermatitis in infancy, childhood, and adulthood, as well as the less typical appearances, including lichenoid atopic dermatitis; juvenile plantar dermatosis; nummular-type atopic dermatitis; folli...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Nanette B. Silverberg Source Type: research

Selected comorbidities of atopic dermatitis: Atopy, neuropsychiatric, and musculoskeletal disorders
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic pruritic inflammatory skin disease with substantial morbidity and quality of life impairment. There are a number of comorbid health problems that occur in patients with AD, aside from the cutaneous signs and symptoms. Chronic pruritus and inflammation can lead to sleep disturbances and mental health symptoms, which are not mutually exclusive. AD is associated with and may predispose to higher risk of other atopic disorders, including asthma and hay fever. Persons with AD appear to be at higher risk for multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression, attention-deficit/hyperacti...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Jonathan I. Silverberg Source Type: research

Contact dermatitis considerations in atopic dermatitis
Complex immunologic pathways, influenced by both genetic and environment triggers, contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Suppressing mechanisms between the Th1-driven allergic contact dermatitis and the Th2-driven atopic dermatitis conditions were thought to reduce the simultaneous expression of both; however, recent evidence indicates that pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis are likely to develop clinically relevant positive patch tests and more likely to react to specific allergens, such as lanolin. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Chandler W. Rundle, Daniel Bergman, Alina Goldenberg, Sharon E. Jacob Source Type: research

Current and emerging topical therapies for atopic dermatitis
The pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) involves epidermal barrier dysfunction and T helper cell type 2 (Th2) lymphocyte-driven inflammation. Cytokines, such as interleukin 4 (IL-4) and IL-13, are important in this reaction. They stimulate B cells to produce immunoglobulin E, causing atopic disease. This process has been well characterized, and new therapies for AD, such as phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE-4) inhibitors, Th2-expressed chemoattractant receptor –homologous molecule antagonists, and Janus kinase inhibitors, work by antagonizing this cellular pathway. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Jeremy Udkoff, Andrea Waldman, Jusleen Ahluwalia, Jenna Borok, Lawrence F. Eichenfield Source Type: research

Selected active naturals for atopic dermatitis: Atopic Dermatitis Part 1
The desire for naturally derived agents is a growing trend for patients, physicians, and pharmaceutical companies. Studies indicate that complementary and alternative medicine is often used by patients and parents of children with atopic dermatitis, not necessarily with beneficial results. A half-dozen natural agents (ie, topical agents: coconut oil, colloidal oatmeal, sunflower oil, mustard oil, glycerin, and oral Chinese herbal therapy) are discussed because they have become popular for their expected activity in the therapy of atopic dermatitis. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Nanette B. Silverberg Source Type: research

Systemic therapies in atopic dermatitis: The pipeline
Atopic dermatitis (AD), the most prevalent inflammatory skin disease, is characterized by robust T-cell activation. The disease has several subtypes, all having a common T helper type 2 (Th2)/Th22 polarization, but it also displays differential immune skewing, such as increased Th17/interleukin 23 skewing in the skin of intrinsic, Asian, and early pediatric AD patients. Current systemic treatments for moderate to severe AD are largely unsatisfactory, associated with significant adverse effects and low compliance. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Yael Renert-Yuval, Emma Guttman-Yassky Source Type: research

Timing of food introduction and atopy prevention
The apparent increase in atopic disease, particularly food allergy, over the past 2 decades has resulted in reconsideration of prevention strategies aimed at the infant ’s diet. Early advice to have atopy-prone infants delay ingestion of potential food allergens, such as egg, cow’s milk, and peanut, was rescinded, as new evidence emerged that did not support these approaches. More recently, randomized controlled trials have provided data to support an opposite strategy, promoting early ingestion of allergens as a means of food allergy prevention. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Malika Gupta, Scott H. Sicherer Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

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As the editors of Cosmeceuticals and Active Cosmetics (Figure 1) allude to in their preface to this third edition textbook, the production and use of cosmeceuticals have exploded since Albert Kligman first coined the term in 1984. The industry is now worth more than $6 billion and continues to grow, with constant additions to the innumerable available products. This textbook provides a comprehensive, scientific look at the cosmeceutical industry, exploring the ingredients used and the medical conditions they aim to treat. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Benjamin C. Garden Tags: Book Review Source Type: research

Impact factor: Universalism and reliability of assessment
In 1955, Eugene Garfield (1925-1917) published a paper in Science where for the first time he advocated the necessity of introducing parameters to assess the quality of scientific journals. Underlying this necessity was an observation of a trend where the whole area of influence in academic publishing was dominated by a narrow group of large interdisciplinary research journals. For this reason, along with Irving H. Sher, they created the impact factor (IF), also called the Garfield impact factor, journal citation rate, journal influence, and journal impact factor. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Andrzej Grzybowski, Rafa ł Patryn Tags: Clio DermatologiciaMauricio Goihman-Yahr MD, PhD, Section Editor Source Type: research

Isotretinoin in retrospect
When isotretinoin was introduced about 30 years ago, this oral retinoid was applauded as the answer for the treatment of acne. The side effects, for the most part, were recognized; however, indiscriminate use subsequently led to both government intervention and disappointment. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Ayse Serap Karadag, Lawrence Charles Parish, Wm Clark Lambert Tags: Comment and Controversy Source Type: research

Psychosomatic aspects of vitiligo
Vitiligo is a chronic common skin disease. The asymptomatic hypopigmented cutaneous lesions are considered by many health care professionals as a cosmetic problem only; however, vitiligo can have a major psychosocial impact on patients ’ lives. We review some of the factors responsible for this impact, such as the general public’s wrong perception of the disease, feelings and emotional responses from patients, how stressful events can act as triggers of the disease, stigmatization experiences suffered by the patients, the prev alence of psychiatric morbidity, the effects on relationships and sex life, how quali...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Felipe Cupertino, Jo ão Paulo Niemeyer-Corbellini, Marcia Ramos-e-Silva Source Type: research

Body dysmorphic disorder in the dermatology patient
Body dysmorphic disorder is primarily a psychiatric disorder, in which the patient believes that some normal or very near normal aspect of his or her physical appearance is distorted or ugly. Should there be a minor abnormality, it is grossly exaggerated in the mind of the patient, causing feelings of shame and embarrassment and leading daily to spending hours at the mirror, or any reflecting surface, as the patient tries to conceal or remove the perceived abnormality through the development of ritualistic behavior. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Caroline S. Koblenzer Source Type: research

Dissociation and conversion symptoms in dermatology
Dissociation and conversion (defined as the somatic component of dissociation) can play an important mediating role in the exacerbation of the stress-reactive dermatoses (eg, psoriasis, idiopathic urticaria, atopic dermatitis), dermatoses that are exacerbated by excessive scratching (eg, lichen simplex chronicus, prurigo nodularis) and koebnerization, and the self-induced dermatoses (dermatitis artefacta, acne excori ée, skin picking disorder, trichotillomania, onychotillomania/onychophagia). Dissociative symptoms often coexist with obsessive-compulsive symptoms in the more severe cases of the self-induced dermatose...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Madhulika A. Gupta, Branka Vujcic, Aditya K. Gupta Source Type: research

Obstructive sleep apnea and dermatologic disorders
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is present in at least 2% of women and 4% of men, and its prevalence is increasing, because a major predisposing factor for OSA is a high body mass index. Psoriasis has the most strongly substantiated link with OSA, where the relationship may be bidirectional. Dermatologic disorders may be comorbid with OSA due to several factors: (i) the heightened proinflammatory state in OSA, which can occur independent of body mass index, and may exacerbate inflammatory dermatoses; (ii) intermittent hypoxemia may promote neovascularization and tumor growth in certain cancers, such as melanoma; (iii) obesit...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Madhulika A. Gupta, Fiona C. Simpson, Branka Vujcic, Aditya K. Gupta Source Type: research

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the dermatology patient
Dermatologic symptoms can be associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in several situations: (1) as features of some core PTSD symptoms, such as intrusion symptoms manifesting as cutaneous sensory flashbacks, as autonomic arousal manifesting as night sweats and idiopathic urticaria, and as dissociation manifesting as numbness and dermatitis artefacta; (2) the cutaneous psychosomatic effects of emotional and physical neglect and sexual abuse (eg, infantile eczema, cutaneous self-injury, and body-focused repetitive behaviors such as trichotillomania and skin picking disorder) and eating disorders, which can have ...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Madhulika A. Gupta, Patricia Jarosz, Aditya K. Gupta Source Type: research

Suicidal behaviors in the dermatology patient
An assessment of suicidal behaviors in the dermatology patient may be necessary in several situations: (1) in the presence of psychiatric comorbidity (major depressive disorder, body dysmorphic disorder, substance use disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder), encountered in up to 30% of dermatology patients; (2) when dermatologic symptoms ( “dysmorphophobia,” dermatitis artefacta) represent psychiatric pathologic conditions; (3) when psychosocial stressors (bereavement, interpersonal violence) increase the risk of suicidal behavior and exacerbate stress-reactive dermatoses (psoriasis, acne); (4) in the presence...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Madhulika A. Gupta, Daiana R. Pur, Branka Vujcic, Aditya K. Gupta Source Type: research

Use of hypnosis, meditation, and biofeedback in dermatology
Hypnosis utilizes trance to access otherwise inaccessible repressed or unconscious memories and features of the psyche and control of physiology not attainable in the ordinary conscious waking state. Medical uses of hypnosis in dermatology include reducing discomfort from itching or skin pain, altering ingrained dysfunctional habits such as scratching, promoting healing of skin disorders, searching for psychosomatic aspects of skin disorders and alleviating them, and reframing cognitive and emotional dysfunctional patterns related to skin disorders. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Philip D. Shenefelt Source Type: research

Psychiatric disorders and pruritus
The skin and psyche are intimately related with various skin diseases caused by or resulting in psychiatric disturbances. Pruritus is a commonly reported symptom in psychiatric patients, and likewise psychiatric co-morbidities, including anxiety and depression, are frequently seen in chronic pruritus patients. Primary psychodermatologic conditions, such as somatic symptom disorder, dermatitis artefacta, obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (excoriation disorder and prurigo nodularis), delusional infestation, and substance use disorder, can all induce significant pruritus in patients, severely affecting their quality ...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Helen Gin Lee, Carolyn Stull, Gil Yosipovitch Source Type: research

Personality disorders and the “difficult” dermatology patient: Maximizing patient satisfaction
Personality disorders (PDs) are stable and enduring patterns of thought, feeling, and behavior that deviate from one ’s cultural norms and cause impairment in functionality. Patients with PDs are commonly encountered in the dermatologic setting and can be perceived by providers as “difficult.” Given that PDs are chronic, rigid, and frustrating to deal with, it is important to be skillful in the approach to s uch patients, especially in the era of the value-based reimbursement system, in which patient satisfaction is crucial for reimbursement. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Mio Nakamura, John Koo Source Type: research

Somatic symptom disorder in dermatology
Somatic symptom disorder (SSD) is defined by the prominence of somatic symptoms associated with abnormal thoughts, feelings, and behaviors related to the symptoms, resulting in significant distress and impairment. Individuals with these disorders are more commonly encountered in primary care and other medical settings, including dermatology practice, than in psychiatric and other mental health settings. What defines the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors as abnormal is that they are excessive, that is, out of proportion to other patients with similar somatic symptoms, and that they result in significant distress and impairm...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: James L. Levenson, Aditi A. Sharma, Alex G. Ortega-Loayza Source Type: research

Neuropsychiatric factors in sensitive skin
Sensitive skin is a syndrome defined by the occurrence of unpleasant sensations (stinging, burning, pain, pruritus, and tingling sensations) in response to stimuli that normally should not provoke such sensations. The worldwide prevalence of sensitive skin is approximately 40%. Clinical, histologic, biochemical, and therapeutic data show that this condition is related to changes in epidermal nerve endings with subsequent hyperreactivity and neurogenic inflammation; hence, sensitive skin is not a psychosomatic disorder, although psychologic consequences are possible. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Laurent Misery Source Type: research

Psychiatric dermatology revisited
For some time, there has been an increased recognition of the role of psychologic and social factors, along with multiple physiologic systems (neurologic, endocrinologic, immunologic), in dermatologic disease.1 –4 Psychiatric dermatology represents components of the interfaces between these factors that most directly relate to psychiatry. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Madhulika A. Gupta Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Somatization in the dermatology patient: Some sociocultural perspectives
Somatization in dermatology patients is a challenge to diagnose and manage. Somatization presents as medically unexplained dermatologic symptoms, which are commonly encountered in dermatology and psychiatry practices. These cutaneous symptoms are often intriguing and do not fit into any particular known dermatologic condition. Sometimes, they may evoke negative feelings in the practicing dermatologist. The dermatologic somatic symptoms might be one way of communicating psychologic distress in a culturally acceptable method. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Krishna M. Prasad, Geetha Desai, Santosh K. Chaturvedi Source Type: research

An assault to the National Academies of Venezuela
In the late hours of January 13 and the early hours of January 14, the National Academies of Venezuela (Medicine, History, Law, Language, and Physical and Natural Sciences) suffered an assault. People entered the building in which these highly respected institutions are located. Computers, printers, and electronic devices were stolen. Files and furniture were thrown around. Fortunately, there was no major damage to the building itself, nor were there human victims. (See Fig. 1.) (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Mauricio Goihman-Yahr Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

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I read this book, a few chapters at a time, on my commute to clinic each morning. By the time I stepped into the office, I was already trying to think of how I would put my newfound knowledge to use. Although modest in appearance, this book is full of useful and practical information. If you take the time to read this book, I think you will find you look at pink lesions with a new found sense of respect and familiarity. They will no longer be amorphous blobs of unknown malignant potential, but a puzzle, which may be carefully put together to deliver a clinical decision with confidence. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - March 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Iona Chapman Tags: Book Review Source Type: research

Pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus determined by CD86 and CTLA4 polymorphisms
Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and pemphigus foliaceus (PF) are rare autoimmune blistering diseases with presumed T-cell –dependent pathology. Activation of naïve T cells is dependent on antigen recognition, subsequent signaling through the T-cell receptor complex (signal 1), and various other interactions of T cells with antigen presenting cells that may be collectively designated as signal 2, which is uncondition ally required for T-cell activation both in response to infection and to autoantigens. Among the best described interactions contributing to signal 2 are those mediated by B7 family molecules, such as CD80 a...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - March 1, 2017 Category: Dermatology Authors: Srdjan Tanasilovic, Svetlana Popadic, Ljiljana Medenica, Dusan Popadic Tags: INVESTIGATIONAL ROUNDSEdited by Vesna Petronic-Rosic, MD, MSc and Sarah Stein, MD Source Type: research