Aesthetic aspects of skin aging, prevention, and local treatment
Skin aging is a complex biologic process influenced by a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Aging skin shows wrinkles, uneven tone, loss of elasticity, and thinning. Skin health is considered one of the principal factors representing overall well-being and the perception of health in humans; therefore, anti-aging strategies to combat aging signs and dysfunction have been developed over the last decades. Understanding the mechanism behind skin aging is required for elucidation of the mechanism of action and, hence, the potential benefits of the claimed anti-aging products. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Christos C. Zouboulis, Ruta Ganceviciene, Aikaterini I. Liakou, Athanasios Theodoridis, Rana Elewa, Eugenia Makrantonaki Source Type: research

Can aging be slowed down?
Aging is a complex process, with genetic and environmental influences, that unfolds over time. The rate at which skin aging proceeds is predictable, although many persons appear older or younger than their chronologic age. This is especially evident in rare genetic disorders such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome in which persons suffer from a premature aged appearance and in neotenic complex syndrome in which children appear to be “frozen in time,” remaining physically and cognitively similar to an infant or toddler despite increasing age. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Aila Malik, Leonard J. Hoenig Tags: Understanding of Mechanisms of Skin Aging Source Type: research

When the skin is in the center of interest: An aging issue
The skin represents the first bearer of marks of time as well as an easily accessible model for the assessment and determination of the involved molecular mechanisms. The deterioration of important skin functions due to intrinsic and extrinsic aging leads to clinical manifestations, which mirror several internal age-associated diseases, such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, skeletal, and endocrine/metabolic skin diseases. Current molecular data indicate that skin aging, especially intrinsic aging, mirrors age-related deficiencies in the entire human body. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Christos C. Zouboulis, Eugenia Makrantonaki, Georgios Nikolakis Tags: Understanding of Mechanisms of Skin Aging Source Type: research

Skin aging: the dermal perspective
The world population of adults aged 60 years or more is increasing globally, and this development can impact skin disease morbidity and mortality, as well as being reflected in the health care system organization. There is substantial evidence that the burden from a remarkable number of skin nonmalignant and malignant conditions is greater in the elderly. Dermatologic research and clinical education in dermatology should focus on both challenges and opportunities created by aging. Skin aging due to intrinsic and extrinsic factors can alter significantly epidermal and dermal structure and functions. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Karolina Strnadova, Vojtech Sandera, Barbora Dvorankova, Ondrej Kodet, Marketa Duskova, Karel Smetana, Lukas Lacina Tags: Understanding of Mechanisms of Skin Aging Source Type: research

Dermatoporosis, a prevalent skin condition affecting the elderly: current situation and potential treatments
The term “dermatoporosis” was introduced a decade ago to highlight the need to pay attention to the problems posed by premature skin aging beyond esthetic considerations. People with this condition have a thinner skin that becomes fragile, tends to tear, and may lead to deep dissecting hematomas—as a f inal stage—corresponding to a medical emergency. Various studies have demonstrated a high prevalence of dermatoporosis in the elderly, with women being more exposed than men. We have developed a scoring system for dermatoporosis, providing different strategies to treat and prevent this skin condit ion...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: G ürkan Kaya, Aysin Kaya, Olivier Sorg, Jean-Hilaire Saurat Tags: Understanding of Mechanisms of Skin Aging Source Type: research

Genetic basis for skin youthfulness
Aging skin is a consequence of both intrinsic factors, including genetics, and extrinsic factors, including environmental exposures such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation and smoking. This contribution focuses on intrinsic factors that promote aging skin. Specifically, in this contribution we review the literature describing how single nucleotide polymorphisms, epigenetic changes, variable gene expression, microRNA, and mitochondrial depletion relate to skin aging. Investigations studying intrinsic factors associated with skin aging are important as they promote a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of aging...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Kelsey S. Flood, Neil A. Houston, Kevin T. Savage, Alexa B. Kimball Tags: Understanding of Mechanisms of Skin Aging Source Type: research

The use of lasers and light sources in skin rejuvenation
Smooth, wrinkle-free skin is associated with supposed attractiveness, youthfulness, and health, while rhytids have a negative impact on one ’s perceived appearance, image, and self-esteem. Noninvasive esthetic procedures such as laser or light therapy have been used to achieve and attain a more youthful appearance. Currently, there is a wide range of lasers and devices available for the regeneration and healing of skin. Lasers and lig ht sources for skin rejuvenation involve the removal of aged skin tissue via thermal heat from high-powered lasers, stimulating the surrounding tissues to recover through natural wound-...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Nicolette Nadene Houreld Source Type: research

Aging of the skin barrier
The skin barrier is mainly present in the stratum corneum (SC), composed of corneocytes surrounded by intercellular lipid lamellae, and attached by corneodesmosome. The tight junction attached to the lateral walls of keratinocytes in the upper part of the stratum granulosum is also included in the skin barrier. During aging, the following structures and functions of the skin barrier are changed or disturbed: (1) skin barrier structure, (2) permeability barrier function, (3) epidermal calcium gradient, (4) epidermal lipid synthesis and SC lipid processing, (5) cytokine production and response after insults, (6) SC acidity, ...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Eung Ho Choi Source Type: research

Aging in skin of color
Ethnic skin is quickly emerging as the norm in the United States, and as the population becomes more diverse, there is also a projected rise in the number of aging adults. Given the paucity of data regarding aging in ethnic skin, the authors have consolidated available information for this population. Literature examining structural and functional variation of aging in ethnic skin types was primarily found through PubMed and supplemental textbook chapters. Aging is comprised of two synergistic processes, intrinsic or chronologic aging, and extrinsic aging. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Samantha Venkatesh, Mayra B.C. Maymone, Neelam A. Vashi Source Type: research

The role of stem cells in anti-aging medicine
Aging is the result of two overlapping processes, “intrinsic” and “extrinsic.” Intrinsic structural changes occur as a consequence of physiologic aging and are genetically determined; extrinsic relates to exposure to harmful events and habits, like smoking, bad diet, alcohol consumption, lack of sleep, stress, sun exposure, environmental po llution, etc. Aging may be decelerated by improving bad habits or treating signs of aging with various esthetic methods, food supplements, and antioxidants. It is believed that we cannot stop aging entirely due to the intrinsic part, which leads to irreversible c...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Aleksandar Godic Tags: Understanding of Mechanisms of Skin Aging Source Type: research

Skin aging revisited
Skin aging is both preventable and treatable, which is the major theme for this issue of Clinics in Dermatology. Skin aging is a topic worth revisiting, because it concerns our patients who wish to stay and feel younger-looking as time marches on. Clinics in Dermatology has presented variations on the subject on various occasions.1 –3 Since the publication of these issues, there has been recently an explosion of new knowledge on the understanding of the mechanisms of skin aging and its management, emerging to be translated in clinical practice. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Christos C. Zouboulis, Leonard J. Hoenig Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Comment to the contribution, “Leprosy: A great imitator”
We have read with great interest “Leprosy: A great imitator,”1 which has detailed various aspects of leprosy. We wish to provide additional information and to emphasize several important points. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Pugazhenthan Thangaraju Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Aging and the treatment of basal cell carcinoma
We describe how a patient ’s life expectancy can be estimated and combined with tumor characteristics to determine lag time to benefit, a concept to better understand whether patients will experience the efficacy of a treatment within their life span. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Shreya Sreekantaswamy, Justin Endo, Amy Chen, Daniel Butler, Lily Morrison, Eleni Linos Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Feedback practices in dermatology residency programs: building a culture for millennials
Corporate studies have consistently shown that millennials prefer more frequent and detailed feedback in the workplace. With most dermatology residents fitting the description of a millennial, we sought to study their preferences in feedback and then compare this to current feedback practices and cultures. Our study supports that residents prefer more frequent informal feedback, especially compared with residency program directors. We also showed a desire for formal feedback training programs, which can help to overcome some of the noted barriers to providing feedback. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Jordan V. Wang, Mackenzie O ’Connor, Kathleen McGuinn, Christian A. Albornoz, Matthew Keller Tags: Comment and Controversy Source Type: research

The growing trend of cannabidiol in skincare products
Recently, cannabidiol has garnered considerable attention in the public and media as a trendy and popular ingredient in skincare products. Cannabidiol is a cannabinoid that lacks psychoactive properties. It has been marketed to consumers as being antiinflammatory, analgesic, hydrating, moisturizing, and wrinkle-reducing. Others claim it to be a cure for skin aging, acne, eczema, psoriasis, and pruritus. However, current data is limited regarding its safety and efficacy. Clinicians should be aware of current regulatory concerns and the limited available evidence. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Nikita Jhawar, Elizabeth Schoenberg, Jordan V. Wang, Nazanin Saedi Tags: Comment and Controversy Source Type: research

Henry Granger Piffard, MD and his photogenic pistol cartridges
A leading physician in New York during the last quarter of the 19th century, Henry G. Piffard, MD, was a pioneer dermatologist in New York. He had a propensity to invent, and he used that ability to advance the nascent field of instantaneous photography. The recent discovery of a few survivors of Piffard ’s patented “photogenic (flash) cartridges” prompted an examination of his connection to a leading photographic supply house of his time. The study provided insights into his system and revealed that Piffard had combined the use of his patent with his passion for skin diseases. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Frederick C. Gaede Tags: Clio Dermatologica Source Type: research

Beh çet syndrome: A great imitator
Beh çet syndrome is considered to be a multisystemic vasculitis involving the skin, mucosa, eyes, joints, nervous system, cardiovascular system, and gastrointestinal system. The exact pathogenesis of the disease is unknown, but autoimmune factors are thought to play the main role. Vasculitis in Behçet syndrome can involve any kind and size of vessels, and this explains why the disease has the ability of multisystemic involvement. The commonest clinical presentation of Behçet syndrome is recurrent and painful mucocutaneous ulcerations known as aphthosis. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Necmettin Akdeniz, Ömer Faruk Elmas, Ayşe Serap Karadağ Source Type: research

Leprosy: A great imitator
In recent years, advances in medical diagnosis and treatment have greatly attracted our attention, whereas some rare diseases, such as leprosy, have not found a place in the medical education curriculum; their existence may even be forgotten. Although the prevalence and incidence rates for leprosy have been significantly reduced as a result of the control strategies of the World Health Organization, new cases still appear. A total of 214,783 new cases were reported from 143 countries during 2016, corresponding to the global new-case detection rate of 2.9 per 100,000 population. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Nihal Kundakci, Cengizhan Erdem Source Type: research

Mal de Meleda: A great imitator
Mal de Meleda is an hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma named for the Mljet Island in Croatia. The lives of those affected by this disease represent a complex situation that encompasses members of a vulnerable group. They require enlightenment and should be approached with awareness, taking into account their overall psychophysical status and the environment of each patient. Those afflicted with Mal de Meleda not only have to deal with a difficult life due to their affliction, but they also must cope with the hardships of socialization while trying to realize a normal life within their island community. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Ana Bakija-Konsuo, Maja Zitinski, Stella Fatovic-Ferencic Source Type: research

Mycosis fungoides: A great imitator
Mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, typically presents in its early stage as inflammatory erythematous patches or plaques, with epidermotropism as the histopathologic hallmark of the disease. Over the past 30 years, numerous atypical types of MF, which deviate from the classic Alibert-Bazin presentation of the disease, have been described. These variants can simulate a wide variety of benign inflammatory skin disorders either clinically, both clinically and histopathologically, or mainly histopathologically. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Emmilia Hodak, Iris Amitay-Laish Source Type: research

Sarcoidosis: A great imitator
Sarcoidosis is a chronic multisystemic, inflammatory disease with specific granulomatous cutaneous lesions. The cutaneous form may be considered a “great imitator,” due to its extensive clinical morphology that occurs in upwards of 20% to 35% of patients. Cutaneous lesions may have a variety of presentations including papules, plaques, nodules, infiltrative scars, annular, angiolupoid, psoriasiform, hypopigmented, atrophic, ulcerative lesi ons, scarring and nonscarring alopecia, erythroderma, and ichthyosiform lesions. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Ay şe Serap Karadağ, Lawrence Charles Parish Source Type: research

Self-induced dermatoses: A great imitator
The self-induced dermatoses represent about 2% of dermatology patient visits, and include the recurrent body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRB) (skin-picking or excoriation disorder, trichotillomania, onychophagia and onychotillomania), dermatitis artefacta, and features of other psychiatric disorders, for example, secondary to excessive grooming in body dysmorphic disorder, skin picking in delusional infestation, or secondary to self-harm in depressive disease. Among the BFRBs, onychophagia and onychotillomania are most likely to be associated with lesions that mimic other dermatologic conditions (eg, nail psoriasis, lic...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Madhulika A. Gupta, Aditya K. Gupta Source Type: research

Syphilis: A great imitator
Despite advances in the control, diagnosis, and treatment of syphilis, its recognition is ill- understood or often not considered by dermatologists and other physicians who either have little specialized training in the minutiae of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or whose dermatologic practice is only occasionally consulted by individuals from communities where STIs are prevalent. Our aim is to highlight contemporary ideas and findings on syphilis so that not only is an accurate diagnosis of syphilis made and recognized treatment given, but also necessary measures, such as counseling to exclude other STIs and to pre...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Seray K ülcü Çakmak, Emine Tamer, Ayşe Serap Karadağ, Michael Waugh Source Type: research

Cutaneous tuberculosis: A great imitator
Tuberculosis (TB) is still prevalent in many developing countries and can pose a new potential threat to global health due to international migration. As an uncommon form of extrapulmonary TB, cutaneous TB is complicated in its clinical manifestation, pathogenesis, and classification. Cutaneous TB can be divided into two major categories, true cutaneous TB and tuberculid, depending on the source of infection, the route of transmission, the amount of bacteria, and the immune state of the host. Clinical manifestations may include patches and plaques (lupus vulgaris, TB verrucosa cutis), macules and papules (acute miliary TB,...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Qiquan Chen, WenChieh Chen, Fei Hao Source Type: research

Viral exanthems in children: A great imitator
Viral exanthems are frequent in children and are mostly self-limited. Early recognition and differentiation from other childhood illnesses are important to direct further investigations and treatment initiation. The clinical presentation of viral exanthems in children includes a polymorphic spectrum of skin eruptions ranging from classic viral exanthems to “atypical” presentations that can mimic nonviral diseases; thus, viral exanthems of childhood can be readily diagnosed on clinical grounds, but not rarely do they represent a diagnostic challenge. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Nicole Kn öpfel, Lucero Noguera-Morel, Irene Latour, Antonio Torrelo Source Type: research

Comment to the contribution, “Assessment and treatment of trichotillomania (hair pulling disorder) and excoriation (skin picking) disorder,” by Jones and colleagues
We have read with interest the contribution by Jones and colleagues1 entitled, “Assessment and treatment of trichotillomania (hair pulling disorder) and excoriation (skin picking) disorder,” recently published in Clinics in Dermatology. In particular, we have focused our attention on the paragraphs dedicated to skin picking, a body-focused repetitive behavior disorder that is characterized by excessive scratching or picking of normal or slightly irregular skin and affecting up to 5% of the general population. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Maria Luca, Antonina Luca Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

In response to, “How I learned to stop worrying and love machine learning”
I read with great interest the recent contribution, “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Machine Learning,”1 in which the authors describe common fears surrounding the use of convolutional neural networks (ie, machine learning) for the diagnosis of skin cancers from clinical and dermatoscopic images. As a matter of fact, the potential of arti ficial intelligence (AI) in dermatology was first introduced over 30 years ago with expert systems, a computational method based on a set of reasoning rules, to aid in the differential diagnosis of facial tumors. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Randie H. Kim Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Great imitators in dermatology: Part I
The great imitator or the great masquerader are terms used to describe medical conditions featuring diverse manifestations. Each could be confused with a number of other diseases. In dermatology, these imitators might be such common diseases as viral exanthems with atypical manifesations or uncommon diseases as cutaneous lymphomas that mimick benign conditions. The best examples are the three ancient infectious diseases - syphilis, tuberculosis, and leprosy, which have been long considered to be the classic imitators for medicine. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Ay şe Serap Karadağ, WenChieh Chen Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

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This book starts with memoirs of a family at a time when Great Britain was a leading world power with tight connections to the colonies in Asia and elsewhere. Some part of the Ryan family made their living in South India, and this would have a significant impact on the author ’s later life. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - March 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Uwe Wollina Tags: Book Review Source Type: research

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Since the discovery of the cosmetic applications of botulinum toxins (BoNTs) in the late 1980s by ophthalmologist Dr. Jean Carruthers and her dermatologist spouse, Dr. Alistair Carruthers, BoNTs have become one of the most versatile pharmaceuticals used worldwide. It is currently the treatment of choice, alone or in combination with other rejuvenating procedures, for hyperkinetic lines and facial contouring. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - March 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Maria M. Tsoukas Tags: Book Review Source Type: research

Commentary: The rash from nuisance to life-threatening
“When you begin practice, I would advise that you specialize in dermatology, because nobody ever dies of a skin disease, and nobody ever gets well.”Louis A. Duhring (1845-1913)1 (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - March 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Ronni Wolf, Lawrence Charles Parish, Jennifer L. Parish Source Type: research

The rash that becomes an erythroderma
Erythroderma is a dermatologic emergency with potentially serious consequences. Several diseases with different etiologies characteristically appear as erythroderma. Depending on the age groups, congenital ichthyosiform disorders, infections, preexisting dermatoses, drug eruptions, and internal malignancies commonly present with, or progress to, erythroderma. The course, prognosis, and management strategies also vary depending on the cause of erythroderma; hence, an accurate diagnosis is essential in minimizing associated morbidity and mortality. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - March 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Arun C. Inamadar, Shivanna Ragunatha Source Type: research

The rash that leads to eschar formation
When confronted with an existent or evolving eschar, the history is often the most important factor used to put the lesion into proper context. Determining whether the patient has a past medical history of significance, such as renal failure or diabetes mellitus, exposure to dead or live wildlife, or underwent a recent surgical procedure, can help differentiate between many etiologies of eschars. Similarly, the patient ’s overall clinical condition and the presence or absence of fever can allow infectious processes to be differentiated from other causes. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - March 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Carly Dunn, Ted Rosen Source Type: research

The rash with maculopapules and fever in adults
We describe various conditions that result in a fever and maculopapular rash in adults. These include infectious processes (meningococcemia, infectious mononucleosis, West Nile virus, zika virus, rubella, primary human immunodeficiency virus, parvovirus B19, ebolavirus), tick-borne illnesses (Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis), and hypersensitivity reactions (exanthematous drug reactions). (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - March 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Sonal Muzumdar, Marti Jill Rothe, Jane M. Grant-Kels Source Type: research

The rash with maculopapules and fever in children
Several medical conditions can cause children to present with fever and a maculopapular rash Although some presentations are benign, others may be medical emergencies, which warrant a prompt diagnosis. We review some of the more common causes of fever and maculopapular dermatitirs, rash including infectious processes (roseola; rubeola; rubella; parvovirus B19; hand, foot, and mouth disease; scarlet fever; meningococcemia; Epstein-Barr virus infection), hypersensitivity reactions (exanthematous drug reactions), and vasculitis syndromes (Kawasaki disease). (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - March 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Sonal Muzumdar, Marti Jill Rothe, Jane M. Grant-Kels Source Type: research

The rash with painful and erythematous nodules
Erythematous painful cutaneous nodular lesions are associated with a host of disorders that may erupt acutely as a generalized or localized dermatitis or be associated with chronic and/or recurrent illnesses. This review discusses such disorders presenting with painful nodular lesions and attempts to provide a systematic approach to their clinical diagnosis. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - March 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Arun C. Inamadar, Keshavmurthy A. Adya Source Type: research

The life-threatening rash of poisoning
Dermatology is frequently viewed by physician and surgical colleagues as a specialty with few emergencies. Although the majority of dermatology practice is in the office setting, cutaneous emergencies do occur through referrals from primary care and as ward consults. Even though cutaneous signs of poisoning would be an uncommon emergency consultation, it is important for dermatologists to be aware of the clinical presentations so as to be able instigate appropriate time critical treatments. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - March 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Michael Joseph Lavery, Ronni Wolf Source Type: research

The rash that presents as target lesions
We have explored the rash that appears as target lesions, with the central and dominant diseases belonging to the Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis group. After presenting the clinical patterns of an individual target lesion and classifying them into different types of lesions, the contribution has been organized with groups characterized by such specific findings according to the type of lesion: flat or raised, typical or atypical, presence or absence of fever, presence or absence of mucosal ulcerations, presence or absence of arthralgias, and/or internal organ involvement. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - March 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Ronni Wolf, Jennifer L. Parish, Lawrence Charles Parish Source Type: research

Mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis and the role of the skin microbiome in psoriasis: A review
The pathogenesis of psoriasis may involve a breakdown of immune tolerance to cutaneous microorganisms. Psoriasis is associated with a higher incidence of Crohn disease and periodontitis, two diseases involving impaired tolerance and abnormal immune activation in response to intestinal and oral microbiota, respectively. In addition, guttate and chronic plaque psoriasis are associated with Streptococcus pyogenes colonization. The aim of this review is to characterize the microorganisms implicated in psoriasis by examining results of major association studies and possible mechanisms of pathogenesis. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - March 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Daniel J. Lewis, Warren H. Chan, Tiffany Hinojosa, Sylvia Hsu, Steven R. Feldman Tags: Investigative Rounds Source Type: research

Editorial Board
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Source: Clinics in Dermatology - March 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - March 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

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Delivering on its objective of presenting common reconstructive techniques for Mohs surgery defects, Facial Reconstruction After Mohs Surgery provides an organized, thorough overview for management of the post-Mohs patient (Figure 1). In giving a comprehensive text, there is a myriad of information ranging from basics of skin grafting to the intricacies of nasal reconstruction. The authors of the textbook are from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, an institution nationally renowned for its plastic surgery and dermatology departments. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - December 14, 2018 Category: Dermatology Authors: Priyanka Patel, Artem Sergeyenko Tags: Book Review Source Type: research

Business administration training for dermatology residents: preparing for the business of medicine
Previous studies have evidenced the lack of practice management and business training components in the residency curriculum, and that satisfaction with this training, when provided, was low. Whether considered good or bad, medicine has been moving increasingly toward becoming more business centric. Dermatology represents a unique field, because most residents choose to pursue private practice, where competent business skills are helpful to running a successful clinic. Our study examines the current state of business administration training for dermatology residents in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education &...
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - December 14, 2018 Category: Dermatology Authors: Jordan V. Wang, Christian A. Albornoz, Ezra Hazan, Matthew Keller, Nazanin Saedi Tags: Comment and Controversy Source Type: research

Editorial Board with barcode
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - December 14, 2018 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - December 14, 2018 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Thirteenth World Congress of the International Academy of Cosmetic Dermatology (IACD), Dubrovnik, Croatia, June 28 to July 1, 2018
The Thirteenth World Congress of the International Academy of Cosmetic Dermatology (Figure 1) was held in Dubrovnik, Croatia, from June 28 to July 1, 2018, under the joint presidency of Dr Branka Marinovic and Dr Zrinka Bukvic Mokos. This pearl of the Adriatic Coast, a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization World Heritage Site (1979) and one of the most prominent tourist destinations in the Mediterranean Sea, helped to make the Congress a great success. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)
Source: Clinics in Dermatology - December 14, 2018 Category: Dermatology Authors: Vesna Petronic-Rosic Tags: Congress Report Source Type: research