Ignorance based cardiology : How common is “ myocardial congestion ” in cardiac failure ?
We learn from basic physiology  lessons that human body is made up of 60 % water. What about heart ? There is no reason for the heart should behave differently from rest of the body . If my  assumptions are correct when the normal heart weighs 300g  , 180g of which should be  be water. The same thing could be applicable for LV mass( * Reference requested) Is there myocardial congestion in cardiac failure ? Genesis of edema in any tissue depends on local hydrostatic pressures, tissue resistive forces, osmotic balance, and cell membrane permeability. In the myocardium individual contri...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - November 27, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: cardiac failure Cardiac MRI Cardio Nephrology effect of dialysis on myocardial water content lv amss and myocardial edema myocardial edema and ckd chronic kidney failure myocardial interstitial edema myocardial water imaging water logging Source Type: blogs

TWiV 520: This old mouse
The TWiVidae review universal influenza vaccines that are in clinical trials, and discovery of an atypical parvovirus that causes chronic kidney disease in middle aged, immunocompromised laboratory mice.  Click arrow to play Download TWiV 520 (70 MB .mp3, 116 min) Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Show […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - November 18, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology chronic kidney disease clinical trial HA stalk vaccine immunocompromised immunosufficient influenza kidney fibrosis parvovirus peptide tubulointerstitial nephropathy universal influenza vaccine viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Leaving Koch behind
For the past 40 years, certain laboratory mice in Australia and the US have been unexpectedly dying in middle age, but the cause has remained elusive. A novel member of the parvovirus family appears to be the culprit. These unexpected deaths of laboratory mice are caused by kidney disease, as these organs appear shrunken and […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - November 16, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information chronic kidney disease inclusion body nephropathy interstitial fibrosis intranuclear inclusion bodies koch's postulates parvovirus tubular necrosis viral viruses Source Type: blogs

The Starting Five: Vitamins for Improved Health
You're reading The Starting Five: Vitamins for Improved Health, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. “By the proper intakes of vitamins and other nutrients…you can, I believe, extend your life and years of well-being by twenty-five or even thirty-five years,” said Nobel Prize winning scientist Linus Pauling. Modern research has confirmed Pauling’s belief as it has identified five vitamins that may improve overall health. Vitamin D Vitamin D provides many important health benefits. It ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - November 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: IndySummers Tags: featured health and fitness pickthebrain self improvement vitamins what vitamins should i take Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 3rd 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 2, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Articles on Senolytics are Starting to Look Just Like Articles on any Other Field of Medical Research and Development
It is probably worthy of note that press articles on the treatment of aging via senolytic therapies are becoming similar in tone and content to press articles on any other active field of medical development. Take this example, publicity for Unity Biotechnology and their work on senolytic therapies to clear senescent cells from old tissues and thus remove one of the contributing causes of aging and age-related disease. It is formatted as a discussion of trials, funding, and this company or that company, this lab or that lab. It exhibits little of the breathless nonsense as to why we shouldn't address aging and its conseque...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 31, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Role of Technology in Chronic Disease Management – #HITsm Chat Topic
We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 8/24 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Colton Ortolf (@ColtonOrtolf) who blogs at tech prescribed on the topic of “The Role of Technology in Chronic Disease Management“. Chronic disease is an incredibly broad term, but it can be simply defined as “a physical or mental health condition that lasts more than one year and causes functional restrictions or requires ongoing monitoring or treatment.” In all, 86% of $2 trillion in US healthcare expenditures eac...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - August 21, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: #HITsm Digital Health Healthcare HealthCare IT #HITsm Topics Chronic Care Management Chronic Disease Management Colton Ortolf tech prescribed Source Type: blogs

New drugs for hyperkalemia
FDA Approves Lokelma for Hyperkalemia The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved sodium zirconium cyclosilicate (Lokelma, AstraZeneca) — a medication that rapidly restores normal potassium levels — for adults with hyperkalemia. Formerly known as ZS-9, the drug is a “highly-selective, oral potassium-removing agent,” the company explains in a company news release. Hyperkalemia has become a significant problem.  With more type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, we are seeing an explosion of chronic kidney disease.  In patients with CKD 3b and 4, patients often develop hyporenin, hypoaldosterone...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - May 21, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 30th 2018
In conclusion, in the Framingham Heart Study population, in the last 30 years, disease duration in persons with dementia has decreased. However, age-adjusted mortality risk has slightly decreased after 1977-1983. Consequences of such trends on dementia prevalence should be investigated. Recent Research on the Benefits of Exercise in Later Life https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/04/recent-research-on-the-benefits-of-exercise-in-later-life/ A sizable body of work points to the ability of older individuals to continue to obtain benefits through regular physical activity, and particularly in the case ...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 29, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

DNA Demethylase Activation via Klotho Reduces Arterial Stiffening in Mice
In this study, we assessed if activation of the demethylase affects arterial stiffening and hypertension in aged mice. The Klotho gene was originally identified as a putative aging-suppressor gene in mice that extended lifespan when overexpressed and caused multiple premature aging phenotypes when disrupted. The Klotho level decreases with age, while the prevalence of arterial stiffness and hypertension increases with age. At age 70 years, the serum level of Klotho is only about one half of what it was at age 40 years. Moreover, the serum Klotho level is significantly decreased in patients with arterial stiffness in...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 23, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

So Digital Health Really Makes A Difference - Or Does It? Details Matter Interpreting Evidence!
This really encouraging article appeared last week.EHR-Integrated Tools Help Improve Chronic Kidney Disease CareTreatment involving EHR-integrated tools and patient engagement strategies are effective in improving areas of chronic kidney disease care. By Kate MonicaApril 05, 2018 - A quality improvement program combining EHR-integrated tools and patient engagement strategies can significantly improve quality of care for patients with chronic kidney disease, according to new research published in the American Journal of Managed Care (AJMC).Over a one-year period, Sequist et al. observed 153 primary care physicians trea...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - April 17, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 26th 2018
In conclusion, senescence of vascular cells promotes the development of age-related disorders, including heart failure, diabetes, and atherosclerotic diseases, while suppression of vascular cell senescence ameliorates phenotypic features of aging in various models. Recent findings have indicated that specific depletion of senescent cells reverses age-related changes. Although the biological networks contributing to maintenance of homeostasis are extremely complex, it seems reasonable to explore senolytic agents that can act on specific cellular components or tissues. Several clinical trials of senolytic agents are currentl...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 25, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Cellular Senescence in the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases of Aging
In conclusion, senescence of vascular cells promotes the development of age-related disorders, including heart failure, diabetes, and atherosclerotic diseases, while suppression of vascular cell senescence ameliorates phenotypic features of aging in various models. Recent findings have indicated that specific depletion of senescent cells reverses age-related changes. Although the biological networks contributing to maintenance of homeostasis are extremely complex, it seems reasonable to explore senolytic agents that can act on specific cellular components or tissues. Several clinical trials of senolytic agents are currentl...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 23, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

CMS Posts CY 2019 Notice and Call Letter
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has posted the calendar year (CY) 2019 Advance Notice and Call Letter explaining proposed methodological and payment changes for Medicare Advantage (MA) plans, as well as key policies under Part D. The proposal includes opioid prescribing limits in Medicare Part D and changes to MA utilization of encounter data. It also expands MA supplemental benefits and reducing payments to Employer Group Waiver Plans. Net Payment Impact For MA plans, CMS estimates a +1.84 percent net increase on average relative to CY 2018 because of Adv...
Source: Policy and Medicine - March 9, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 65-year-old man with chronic kidney disease
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 65-year-old man is evaluated during a follow-up visit for stage G3b/A3 chronic kidney disease due to diabetic nephropathy. He reports doing well with good baseline exercise tolerance and no shortness of breath. Medical history is also significant for type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Medications are basal bolus insulin and lisinopril, 20 mg/d. On physical examination, temperature is normal, blood pressure is 145/75 mm Hg, pulse rate is 82/min, and respiration rate is 16/min. BMI is 28. There i...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Nephrology Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 64-year-old man with diabetes
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 64-year-old man is evaluated for his quarterly diabetes care follow-up visit. Point-of-care HbA1c level is not at goal for this patient, who has high function, long life expectancy, few comorbidities, good support, health literacy, and access to care. Medical history is significant for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. His family history is notable for type 2 diabetes mellitus in his mother and hypertension and chronic kidney disease in his father. Medications are metformin, glipizide, hydroch...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 30, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Diabetes Endocrinology Source Type: blogs

The story of the FeNa test
Previously published at Centor’s Corner (an MDCalc blog)   September, 1976: I was a 2nd year internal medicine resident at the Medical College of Virginia. My attending physician, Dr. Carlos Espinel, had just published a now-classic article: The FENa test. So that month, I had the wonderful opportunity to understand the rationale behind a test that I now have used for over 40 years. To understand the test, one must first understand the assumptions. Dr. Espinel defined clearly that one could use this test to help differentiate between volume contraction and acute tubular necrosis (ATN) in olig...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - October 24, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Medgadget Visits The Medical Alley Innovation Summit in Minneapolis 2017
MedTech Strategist working together with The Medical Alley Association for the very first time brought their premier innovation summit to Minnesota, a place now considered by many to be the global epicenter of health innovation and care. Over the two-day long event more than 35 start-up and emerging medical companies presented their technologies and devices to representatives of leading venture capitalist and investment banks, and also to large medical device companies. Considering that funding is of major importance to the field of medical innovation, this event gave both investors and entrepreneurs a chance to explore fu...
Source: Medgadget - October 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kenan Raddawi Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 16th 2017
In this study, we have shown that the lipid chaperones FABP4/FABP5 are critical intermediate factors in the deterioration of metabolic systems during aging. Consistent with their roles in chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in young prediabetic mice, we found that FABPs promote the deterioration of glucose homeostasis; metabolic tissue pathologies, particularly in white and brown adipose tissue and liver; and local and systemic inflammation associated with aging. A systematic approach, including lipidomics and pathway-focused transcript analysis, revealed that calorie restriction (CR) and Fabp4/5 deficiency result ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 15, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Cellular Senescence in Chronic Kidney Disease
There is good evidence for the growing number of senescent cells present in old tissues to be an important root cause of fibrosis, the breakdown of normal regenerative processes that results in scar-like structures in place of functional tissue. Chronic kidney disease is one of a number of age-related condition driven by fibrosis, all of which presently lack effective forms of treatment, capable of significantly turning back the progression of fibrosis. Fortunately, change is coming: researchers are exploring the link between fibrotic diseases and cellular senescence with an eye to producing new classes of treatment. Numer...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 11, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

An Algorithm Using Medical Record Data Predicts Risk for Parkinson's Disease
We are entering an era when algorithms will be used to analyze data in the LIS and EHR databases and predict the risk of a patient developing various disease(s) in the future. This field is often referred to aspredictive healthcare analytics. A recent article discussed this process in terms of predicting the onset of Parkinson's disease (see:Algorithm scans medical records for higher Parkinson ’s risk), Below is an excerpt from it:Researchers have developed an algorithm that could check patients ’ medical histories to find signs of increased risk for developing Parkinson’s disease and alert doctors to...
Source: Lab Soft News - September 28, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Electronic Health Record (EHR) Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Information Technology Lab Industry Trends Medical Consumerism Medical Ethics Medical Research Source Type: blogs

Real-World Evidence Complements Randomized Controlled Trials In Clinical Decision Making
Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are considered the gold-standard study design for comparative effectiveness research, which involves directly comparing the effectiveness of one treatment to another. Despite their many benefits, RCTs have important limitations that can reduce their utility for certain types of comparative effectiveness research and limit the external validity of their findings. For this reason, real-world evidence—data about outcomes in actual patients who are receiving a treatment in a usual care setting—is gaining traction as a key source of evidence for comparative effectiveness research....
Source: Health Affairs Blog - September 27, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Daniel Blumenthal, Kristina Yu-Isenberg, John Yee and Anupam Jena Tags: Drugs and Medical Innovation chronic disease comparative effectiveness research efficacy-effectiveness gap health care innovation measuring care value randomized controlled trials real-world evidence Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 18th 2017
In this study, researchers put some numbers to the correlation, and improve on previous attempts to rule out wealth and other effects as significant contributing causes. A study finds that a Chinese policy is unintentionally causing people in northern China to live 3.1 years less than people in the south, due to air pollution concentrations that are 46 percent higher. These findings imply that every additional 10 micrograms per cubic meter of particulate matter pollution reduces life expectancy by 0.6 years. The elevated mortality is entirely due to an increase in cardiorespiratory deaths, indicating that air poll...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 17, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Circular Relationship Between Senescent Cells and Chronic Kidney Disease
Growth in the number of senescent cells that linger in tissues is one of the root causes of aging. In this context, the open access paper noted here illustrates a couple of points that are worth bearing in mind while thinking about the biochemistry of aging, the first of which is that aging is a feedback loop of damage. Cell and tissue damage generates more cell and tissue damage, which is why aging accelerates as it progresses. The same rough structure of events is found in the age-related failure of any complex machinery. The second point is that many of the mechanisms and relationships established in past researc...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 11, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Managed Care Companies Should Publish Lessons Learned From Studying Their Own Big Data
In this era of big data, managed care companies have comprehensive data sets from which to extrapolate and report precise and meaningful findings about health services. With pay-for-performance models championed by the Affordable Care Act and pursued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the value and relevance of these data in improving health is likely greater than ever. That is why we agree that managed care companies have an imperative to participate in quality improvement initiatives, conduct rigorous, transparent research with our data, and widely share and disseminate those findings so that others may l...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 18, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Stuart L. Lustig and Liana D. Castel Tags: Diffusion of Innovation Featured Insurance and Coverage Population Health Quality big data health services research managed care companies peer-reviewed studies quality improvement initiatives Source Type: blogs

5 ways to make dealing with death easier
My husband, the anesthesiologist, came home one evening, he was solemn, affected, not himself. His patient died in the recovery room. It was sudden and unexpected for my husband. Despite the team’s swift efforts and perfectly executed code, the patient died anyway. It’s relevant to note that his patient was an almost 90-year-old man with significant congestive heart failure, probably chronic kidney disease, and complete occlusion of one of his carotids who sustained hip fracture and thus required the surgery to pin his hip for both healing and comfort. This is the ultimate catch-22 in medicine (or at least in g...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 19, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/shannon-tapia" rel="tag" > Shannon Tapia, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Geriatrics Palliative care Source Type: blogs

An interesting finding, and absence of another, in an intoxicated patient found down
CONCLUSION: Administration of subcutaneous terbutaline obviates the need for intravenous access and should be considered as an alternative to nebulized or inhaled beta-agonists to treat acute hyperkalemia in patients with CKD. As with the use of any beta-adrenergic agonist, close cardiovascular monitoring is necessary to avoid or minimize toxicity during therapy.Hypokalemic effects of intravenous infusion or nebulization of salbutamol in patients with chronic renal failure: comparative study.AULiou HH, Chiang SS, Wu SC, Huang TP, Campese VM, Smogorzewski M, Yang WC SOAm J Kidney Dis. 1994;23(2):266. To exami...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - July 1, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Search strategy for chronic kidney disease
Chronic kidney disease? Chronic kidney failure?  Chronic renal failure?There are many ways to describe this (1). After a few searches on the topic, I tried to come up with a Medline strategy. I think it may include some conditions that Hsu and Chertow would not, but I have this:1.            ((endstage or “end stage” or established or chronic or progressive) adj1 (renal or kidney) adj1 (failure or disease* or insufficienc*)).ti,ab2.            (Chronic adj1 nephropath*).ti,ab3.&...
Source: Browsing - April 21, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: literature searching nephrology Source Type: blogs

Evidence for Senescent Cells to Promote Vascular Calcification
The progressive stiffening of blood vessels is an important proximate cause of age-related hypertension and cardiovascular disease. One cause of this stiffening is a process of calcification, deposition of calcium into the tissues of blood vessel walls. Recent evidence shows that this process is caused by changes in cellular behavior, which opens up a range of potential targets for therapy and prevention. Here, researchers further demonstrate that the activities of senescent cells are probably involved in this picture. This is good news if validated, as targeted clearance of senescent cells as an approach to the treatment ...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 13, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Investigating the Mechanisms of Slowed Kidney Fibrosis via Calorie Restriction
The objective of CRM research is to identify compounds that mimic the effects of CR by targeting metabolic and stress response pathways affected by CR without actually restricting caloric intake. With respect to how short-term CR and CRM treatment might directly impact cellular senescence and EMT, one interesting candidate is the AMPK-mTOR signaling pathway. In the in vivo experiments, we demonstrated that AMPK/mTOR signaling in kidney was downregulated with age, and that this was reversed by short-term CR and CRM treatment. In order to further verify this pathway, we induced EMT and cellular senescence of proximal...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 28, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 55-year-old man with gout
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 55-year-old man is evaluated during a follow-up visit for gout. Two years ago, he had been treated with allopurinol and developed a hypersensitivity reaction. Over the past several months, he has had recurrent attacks of acute, episodic swelling of the first metatarsophalangeal joints with increasing involvement of other joints, including the ankles and knees. Laboratory studies showed significant hyperuricemia. History is also significant for Crohn disease, hypertension, chronic kidney disease (estima...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 25, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

Targeting PAD4 Reduces Age-Related Fibrosis
Fibrosis is the inappropriate formation of scar-like tissue, and it is an important component in the pathology of a range of age-related diseases. Fibrosis causes loss of function where it disrupts the normal tissue structure of organs, and at present there is little in the medical toolkit that can be used to help. Better known examples of conditions in which fibrosis is significant include the progression of chronic kidney disease and damage to aged heart tissue. Here researchers note the possibility for an intervention that slows down the progression of fibrosis in mice, and may form the basis for a human therapy: ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 31, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Coronary artery disease: Primary care and prevention – 4
Previous Prevention of CAD Prevention is classified into primordial, primary and secondary. Primordial prevention is community level intervention to reduce risk factors and mostly not under the purview of the individual physician. Primary prevention is by controlling the risk factors. Non modifiable risk factors for CAD Age, gender, race/ethnicity and genetic predisposition or family history are considered the non modifiable risk factors for CAD. Prevalence of CAD increases as age advances and it is definitely more common in males. A strongly positive family history of premature coronary artery disease increases the r...
Source: Cardiophile MD - December 20, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Short Quiz on radio contrast (iodinated ‘ dye ’ )
Short quiz on contrast used for angiography. Quiz on radiocontrast Please wait while the activity loads. If this activity does not load, try refreshing your browser. Also, this page requires javascript. Please visit using a browser with javascript enabled. If loading fails, click here to try again Congratulations - you have completed Quiz on radiocontrast. You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%% Your answers are highlighted below. Question 1Iodixanol is a —- radiocontrast:AIso-osmolarBLow osmol...
Source: Cardiophile MD - December 9, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Reduced ATF4 Slows the Progression of Vascular Calcification in Mice
In this study, we demonstrate that ATF4 expression in VSMCs plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification using a series of mouse models. As an initial model, we used global ATF4-haploinsufficient mice, which showed significantly smaller aortic medial calcified lesions under both CKD and normal kidney condition (NKD) conditions. We also used an SMC-specific ATF4-deficient model, in which both medial and atherosclerotic calcifications under NKD and CKD conditions were attenuated. Finally, we generated a mouse model that overexpresses ATF4 only in SMCs, in which severe medial and atherosclerotic calcif...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 7, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Predictors of contrast induced AKI – Cardiology MCQ
Predictors of contrast induced acute kidney injury:   a) Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) b) ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) c) Cardiogenic shock d) All of the above e) None of the above Correct answer: d) All of the above   These are also the strongest predictors of AKI requiring dialysis. Roxana Mehran and associates developed a comprehensive risk prediction score which included age, hemoglobin level, pre-existing chronic kidney disease, volume of contrast administered during the percutaneous intervention, need for IABP (intra aortic balloon counterpulsation) and a few other variables...
Source: Cardiophile MD - October 31, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Launch! at Health 2.0
By MATTHEW HOLT Launch! is always one of the most fun and most exciting sessions at Health 2.0. Ten new companies demo their product on stage for the very first time during at the 10th Annual Fall Conference. Previous Launch! winners have included Castlight Health, Basis, and OM*Signal and last year’s winner MedWand, which just beat out Gliimpse–itself since bought by Apple. This year’s finalists are: Valeet Healthcare‘s platform gives patients personalized health information while allowing providers to have a rounding tool and giving healthcare systems a dashboard to track metrics. gripAble&nbs...
Source: The Health Care Blog - September 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Holt Tags: Health 2.0 THCB Albeado cricket health DayTwo Docent Health gripable Launch! MDwithMe Quizda Regeneration Health Siren Care Valeet Healthcare Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 12th 2016
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 11, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Cellular Cause for Calcification of Blood Vessels
The publicity materials and paper linked below discuss the identification of a cell type and related mechanisms responsible for calcification of blood vessels. The focus is on the environment of kidney disease, and thus on kidney tissue, but we might hope that this has a broader relevance to the age-related calcification that occurs in all blood vessels over the years. The more that is known of blood vessel calcification, the better the odds that something might be done about it soon enough to matter for you and I. The deposition of calcium in blood vessel walls is considered to be an important contribution to the loss of ...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 8, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

What's in a name?
You have waited a long time for this post, I notice!  I am sure you have had plenty to do while waiting.In their articleChronic renal confusion, Chi-yuan Hsu and Glenn Chertow looked at the wide variety of terms used to describe the same level of kidney function, and the wide range of renal function described by the use of a term like " chronic renal failure " .   They examined a sample of literature to reach their conclusions (1).They argue that some terms should be dropped - a term like " chronic renal failure " has negative connotations for patients, and a term like " pre-dialysis...
Source: Browsing - September 1, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: literature searching nephrology systematic reviews Source Type: blogs

What PPIs and the Kardashians have in common
The science we conduct often reflects the society we live in. One phenomenon of current society is the rise of the reality television show. Participants are promised instant media fame without having to struggle through acting school. I worry that this has rubbed off on some of the studies we now conduct. Sir Richard Doll and Austin Hill, the architects of modern epidemiology, realized that it was hard for epidemiology to prove or disprove anything. Their studies were driven by clear hypotheses as some took five to 10 years to complete. Furthermore, their landmark paper on smoking and lung cancer devoted over a page of dis...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 24, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/dr-paul-moayyedi" rel="tag" > Dr. Paul Moayyedi < /a > Tags: Conditions GI Source Type: blogs

When too many cooks … the problem of too many consultants
Recently I communicated with a patient’s mother in another state.  She had great angst when a series of subspecialists gave her different opinions on the ongoing plan for her grown son. This problem happens too often in 2016.  Each subspecialist seems to see the patient solely through the prism of their expertise.  We have seen one consultant call 3 or 4 other consultants. Many hospitalists will tell you this story.  At many community hospitals the consultants do not just provide an opinion, but rather they write orders.  This practice leads to confusion and sometimes conflict amongst the sub...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - August 24, 2016 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Absolution
By ANISH KOKA, MD Like many cities, Philadelphia is a city defined by its neighborhoods.  I practice in two neighborhoods separated by a few miles but leagues apart in every other way.  One of the hospitals is a tertiary care facility in the heart of Center City – a well to do upcoming part of town – and the other is a small community hospital a few miles South.  The patients at the two locations are quite different, and the mechanism of health care delivery is also starkly different.  Medical care at the Center City campus is provided mostly by employed physicians, and care ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

A doctor turns to social media for organ donation
A guest column by the American College of Physicians, exclusive to KevinMD.com. A couple of months ago I received a Facebook invitation to “like” a page. That was not unusual, and usually the pages are on silly or obscure topics, but this page was different. The name of the page was New Kidney for Stu. Stuart Himmelstein, MD, FACP, is one of my Facebook friends. Stu is a solo internist in private practice in Delray Beach, Florida. He is also a past Governor of the Florida Chapter of the American College of Physicians (ACP), which is how I met and got to know him. His ACP service is just one of his many contribu...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 29, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/yul-ejnes" rel="tag" > Yul Ejnes, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Nephrology Source Type: blogs

The story of the man who could see the invisible
Once upon a time long, long ago there lived a man who could see things that other people simply could not see. He was not born with this skill but cultivated it slowly and continuously with years of focused attention. He worked as a physician in a large hospital and would sometimes have students go with him to see patients. As far as the students were concerned, he could really see the invisible. When he was asked what afflicted a patient, he would share his impressions and then carefully and systematically explicate the chain of observational evidence that lead to his indisputable conclusion. For example, after shaking an...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 25, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mark-e-williams" rel="tag" > Mark E. Williams, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Health IT Hospital Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 27th 2016
In conclusion, we showed for the first time that 7-KC induces oxidative stress via lysosomal dysfunction, resulting in exacerbation of calcification. CHIMERIC ANTIGEN RECEPTOR CANCER THERAPIES CAN NOW TARGET SOLID TUMORS https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2016/06/chimeric-antigen-receptor-cancer-therapies-can-now-target-solid-tumors/ If the research community is to win in the fight to cure cancer, and win soon enough to matter for all of us, then the focus must be on technology platforms that can be easily and cheaply adapted to many different types of cancer. The biggest strategic problem in the field is tha...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 26, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

7-ketocholesterol Accumulation Speeds Calcification of Blood Vessels
In conclusion, we showed for the first time that 7-KC induces oxidative stress via lysosomal dysfunction, resulting in exacerbation of calcification. Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/enhanced/doi/10.1111/gtc.12301 (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - June 22, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 6th 2016
This study teaches us that poor wound healing and wrinkling and sagging that occur in aging skin share similar mechanisms." Reduced cell cohesiveness of outgrowths from eccrine sweat glands delays wound closure in elderly skin Human skin heals more slowly in aged vs. young adults, but the mechanism for this delay is unclear. In humans, eccrine sweat glands (ESGs) and hair follicles underlying wounds generate cohesive keratinocyte outgrowths that expand to form the new epidermis. Our results confirm that the outgrowth of cells from ESGs is a major feature of repair in young skin. Strikingly, in aged s...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 5, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Reviewing What is Known of FGF23 and Klotho Signaling in Aging
In past years researchers have demonstrated in animal studies that reduced levels of klotho can shorten life span while increased levels modestly extend life span. The underlying mechanisms are complex and not fully understood. As is also the case for other longevity-related proteins, altering levels in circulation through gene therapy or other methods changes many aspects of cellular metabolism. Unraveling this complexity is a slow and expensive process. One small part of the bigger picture in this case is the relationship between klotho and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). The review paper below examines what is know...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 30, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

In Rural States Policy Changes To Improve Access To Home Dialysis Are Vital
By its very nature, chronic kidney disease can rob individuals of their independence. It gradually causes a person to lose the ability to filter wastes from the body, and should kidneys fail entirely, a patient must rely on renal replacement therapy (dialysis) to live. An estimated 26 million Americans have chronic kidney disease of varying degrees; more than 600,000 have end-stage kidney failure. In my home state of West Virginia, some 3,500 patients were on dialysis in 2013, and for most of the past two decades, our state has led the nation in per capita numbers of patients starting dialysis. Dialysis can be provided thr...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 12, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Rebecca Schmidt Tags: Costs and Spending Health IT Health Professionals Public Health Quality chronic disease dialysis kidney disease nephrology rural health Telehealth Source Type: blogs