O-019 COVID – Impact on reproduction and reproductive practice

Abstract textA highly infectious novel coronavirus (now referred to as SARS-CoV-2) was first noted in December 2019 in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, and by March 11, 2020, was declared a global pandemic by the WHO. The widespread community transmission of a virus, new to our species, continues to raise urgent questions about implications for pregnant women and those considering conception. Almost immediately, international committees, including ASRM and ESHRE, drew up guidelines to protect the public and our patients. Across the globe, clinics were closed, patients turned away and questions regarding spread of the virus, safety during early pregnancy and potential impact on fertility and pregnancy began to arise. Where are we now? What have we learned? And what more do we need to know to improve our ability to care for and counsel our patients?Clinic Practice – While there was considerable controversy in the U.S., closing clinics was the correct course of action when an unknown virus had entered our countries and so little was known and resources (think NY, think Italy) were inadequate. The majority of clinics pivoted to more virtual visits and stopped transfers and retrievals. The duration of these changes varied across states and countries, with most clinics now functioning at full capacity for procedures but still utilizing virtual visits for many patients. We will discuss what we learned from this process, including impact on clinics and pati ents, as well as the gr...
Source: Human Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research

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The coronavirus pandemic has had long lasting implications for everyone worldwide. For those pregnant, attempting pregnancy, or pursuing fertility treatment, there are many new questions to be considered, and answers can vary by region and situation. The vaccines available in the US for protection against the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19- produced by Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson &Johnson, have not been specifically tested for safety in pregnancy. For drug trials to deliberately include pregnant women is ethically complicated, as we want to avoid any remote possibility of causing harm to the pregnancy or the in...
Source: Cord Blood News - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: Cord Blood medical research pregnancy safety vaccines Source Type: blogs
Hong Kong Med J. 2021 Apr 15. doi: 10.12809/hkmj209078. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSevere acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) employs the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor in the renin-angiotensin system for viral entry. The ACE2 receptor is present in both female and male reproductive systems, and reports of multi-organ involvement have led to uncertainty regarding its effects on the reproductive system and fertility. We review the existing literature regarding the function of ACE2 and the renin-angiotensin system in the female and male reproductive systems to postulate the possible impl...
Source: Hong Kong Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionsThis was a complicated triplet pregnancy, in which, after maternal infection with COVID-19, despite mild maternal symptoms, exacerbated placental insufficiency occurred in two of the fetuses, and the third fetus had a positive COVID-19 test after birth. Therefore, in cases of pregnancy with COVID-19 infection, in addition to managing the mother, it seems that physicians would be wise to also give special attention to the possibility of acute placental insufficiency and subsequent fetal hypoxia, and also the probability of vertical transmission.
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) that arose in China in December 2019 resulted in an epidemic that quickly expanded with particular intensity in the United States and European countries, particularly Italy and Spain, devastating the foundations of our nations in one of the most significant public health threats of our time. Sadly, this disease has spread globally, and from March 12 on, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology made similarly cautious recommendations on managing patients who were undergoing infertility therapy or desiring pregnancy, but withou...
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Inklings Source Type: research
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