SARS-CoV-2 Transmission Associated With a Bar Opening Event SARS-CoV-2 Transmission Associated With a Bar Opening Event
Forty-six cases of COVID-19 were linked to an indoor bar opening event, demonstrating that SARS-CoV-2 transmission originating in a business such as a bar may impact an entire community.Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health & Prevention Journal Article Source Type: news

Interpreting a lateral flow SARS-CoV-2 antigen test, BMJ
The risks and benefits of using these tests for widespread testing of asymptomatic people are the subject of ongoing uncertainty and debate. This practice pointer considers how to interpret and communicate test results based on current understanding of the tests'performance. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - June 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Methodology from GWAS accurately flags more deadly SARS-CoV-2 variant
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) methodology to analyze whole-genome sequencing data of SARS-CoV-2 mutations and COVID-19 mortality data can identify highly pathogenic variants of the virus that should be flagged for containment, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and MIT researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 23, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Research may help identify more dangerous strains of the virus that causes COVID-19
(Wiley) Viral mutations during the COVID-19 pandemic could cause the SARS-CoV-2 virus to become more dangerous. A new study published in Genetic Epidemiology has examined the genetic code of SARS-CoV-2 viruses that have infected patients, looking for links between different mutations and patient deaths. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 23, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Low-cost method for finding new coronavirus variants
(Karolinska Institutet) Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a technology for cost-effective surveillance of the global spread of new SARS-CoV-2 variants. The technique is presented in the scientific journal Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 23, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Had COVID-19? One vaccine dose enough; boosters for all, study says
(American Chemical Society) Two mRNA vaccines against COVID-19 have proven safe and effective in clinical trials, as well as in the millions of people who have been vaccinated so far. But how prior SARS-CoV-2 infection affects vaccine response, and how long that response lasts, are still uncertain. Now, a new study in ACS Nano supports increasing evidence that people who had COVID-19 need only one vaccine dose, and that boosters could be necessary for everyone in the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 23, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

June 30 Webinar: Using NCBI Datasets to download sequence and annotation for genomes and genes
Join us on June 30, 2021 at 12PM eastern time to learn how to use the new NCBI Datasets resource to find and download gene, genome and SARS-CoV-2 sequence and annotation. You will learn how to access these datasets through either the web interface or the new command-line tools that allow you to incorporate these data … Continue reading June 30 Webinar: Using NCBI Datasets to download sequence and annotation for genomes and genes → (Source: NCBI Insights)
Source: NCBI Insights - June 22, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: NCBI Staff Tags: What's New Datasets Downloading data SARS-CoV-2 Webinars Source Type: news

Coronavirus can infect testicles finds new study - possible symptom in men to look for
RESEARCHERS continue to uncover new ways SARS-CoV-2 - the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 - can impact on the body. New research has found the virus can infect the testes of infected hamsters - a finding that may account for a particular symptom in men. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New universal vaccine targets coronaviruses to prevent future pandemics
(University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) The SARS-CoV-2 is not the first coronavirus to jump from animals to humans - and it won't be the last. To prevent future coronavirus pandemics, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill developed a universal vaccine that's effective in mice and could provide protection from multiple coronaviruses and a dangerous variant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Engineering nanobodies as lifesavers when SARS-CoV-2 variants attack
(Ohio State University) Scientists are pursuing a new strategy in the protracted fight against the SARS-CoV-2 virus by engineering nanobodies that can neutralize virus variants in two different ways. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

SARS-CoV-2 positivity, mask utilization among health care workers
(JAMA Network) What The Study Did: Researchers report their study found no association in SARS-CoV-2 positivity rates among health care workers wearing respirator masks compared with medical masks when performing nonaerosolizing routine patient care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 22, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Tree pollen carries SARS-CoV-2 particles farther, facilitates virus spread
(American Institute of Physics) A study on the role of microscopic particles in virus transmission suggests pollen is nothing to sneeze at. In Physics of Fluids, researchers investigate how pollen facilitates the spread of an RNA virus like the COVID-19 virus. The study draws on cutting-edge computational approaches for analyzing fluid dynamics to mimic the pollen movement from a willow tree, a prototypical pollen emitter. Airborne pollen grains contribute to the spread of airborne viruses, especially in crowded environments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 22, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Vaccine side effects should be welcomed as a sign of efficacy, immunologists say in new focus
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) The rapid development of safe and efficacious vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 has offered hope that the global COVID-19 pandemic may soon be under control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 22, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

More than 16 million Americans undiagnosed with COVID-19 during first wave, estimates antibody analysis
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) As many as 16.8 million Americans had undiagnosed SARS-CoV-2 infections - 5 times the rate of diagnosed infections - by the end of July of 2020, according to an analysis of antibodies from more than 8,000 previously undiagnosed adults collected during the pandemic's first wave. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 22, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Expanded prevent COVID U study also includes adults 18-29 who are not affiliated with a university
(Public Relations Pacific LLC) The Prevent COVID U study, which launched in late March 2021 to evaluate SARS-CoV-2 infection and transmission among university students vaccinated with the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine, has expanded beyond the university setting to enroll young adults ages 18 through 29 years and will now also include people in this age group who choose not to receive a vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 22, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Measles vax effective in kids against Covid: Study
The Pune findings support a much-discussed hypothesis that children are fairly protected against SARS-CoV-2 because of 'non-specific immunity' following inoculation with live attenuated vaccines, including measles-containing vaccines (MCVs) and the Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) shot. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - June 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Not-So-Happy-Birthdays: Parties Helped Spread COVID, Study Finds
MONDAY, June 21, 2021 -- Birthday celebrations raised the risk of spreading SARS-CoV-2 by 30% last year in U.S. counties with high rates of COVID-19, according to a new study. No such surge was seen in places with low rates of infection. For the... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 21, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Fauci emails reveal a paranoid and panicked NIH, doing damage control to conceal lab origins of SARS-CoV-2
(Natural News) A Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request has unveiled over 3,000 emails involving disgraced public health official, Dr. Anthony Fauci. The emails are from the early days of covid-19. The emails are redacted in areas of significant concern, but they provide valuable insight into the deceitful motivations of Dr. Fauci, the director of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

GSK and Vir Biotechnology announce continuing progress of the COMET clinical development programme for sotrovimab
GlaxoSmithKline plc and Vir Biotechnology, Inc. today announced final, confirmatory results from the Phase 3 COMET-ICE (COVID-19 Monoclonal antibody Efficacy Trial - Intent to Care Early) trial demonstrating that sotrovimab, an investigational SARS-CoV-2 monoclonal antibody, significantly reduced the risk of hospitalisation or death among high-risk adult outpatients with mild-to-moderate COVID-19. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - June 21, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured GlaxoSmithKline Business and Industry Source Type: news

Using birthdays to assess association between social gatherings, COVID-19 risk
(JAMA Network) What The Study Did: Using administrative healthcare data on 2.9 million households, this study suggests that events that lead to small and informal social gatherings, such as birthdays, and in particular, children's birthdays, are a potentially important source in SARS-CoV-2 transmission. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Association between race, COVID-19 outcomes among children in England
(JAMA Network) What The Study Did: Results of this study suggest race-specific disparities in SARS-CoV-2 testing and COVID-19 hospital outcomes seen in adults also exist among children, after accounting for several clinical and sociodemographic factors thought to play a role in the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Keeping a vigilant watch on SARS-CoV-2
(King Abdullah University of Science& Technology (KAUST)) New lateral flow test Vigilant is cheaper, easier to use and as reliable as the current gold standard PCR test for diagnosing SARS-CoV-2 infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The paths through which COVID-19 spread across Brazil
(Associa ç ã o Alberto Santos Dumont para Apoio à Pesquisa) A multidisciplinary analysis by a group of Brazilian scientists, published on-line in the journal Scientific Reports on June 21, 2021, revealed that three major factors accounted for the geographic spread of SARS-COV-2 across Brazil, as well as the massive flow of people in search of hospital care throughout the country, during the first wave of the pandemic in 2020. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Birthdays and COVID-19
(Harvard Medical School) Risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection increased 30% for households with a recent birthday in counties with high rates of COVID-19, but no such jumps seen in areas with low rates of infection. Findings suggest informal social gatherings such as birthday parties played role in infection spread at the height of the coronavirus pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A tapeworm drug against SARS-CoV-2?
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Researchers from the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) at Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin and the University of Bonn have examined the way in which SARS-CoV-2 reprograms the metabolism of the host cell in order to gain an overall advantage. According to their report in Nature Communications, the researchers were able to identify four substances which inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication in the host cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Antibody disease enhancement of COVID-19 does not appear to occur in animal models
(Duke University Medical Center) In a study published in the journal Cell, Duke investigators demonstrated in mice and monkeys that human antibodies lacked the ability to make SARS-CoV-2 infection worse and, instead, exerted their defensive powers against the infection. The findings help reinforce evidence that antibodies are safe when given as treatments or induced by COVID-19 vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 21, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

SARS-CoV-2 infections may trigger antibody responses against multiple virus proteins
(PLOS) All coronaviruses produce four primary structural proteins and multiple nonstructural proteins. However, the majority of antibody-based SARS-CoV-2 research has focused on the spike and nucleocapsid proteins. A study published in PLOS Biology by Anna Heffron, Irene Ong and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA, suggests that immune responses may develop against other proteins produced by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ontario health guidance downplays aerosol spread of COVID-19. Critics say this puts lives at risk
Lessons from SARS were ignored in Ontario's COVID-19 pandemic response, health experts say. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - June 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Toronto Source Type: news

Researchers explore microbial ecosystem in search of drugs to fight SARS-CoV-2
(American Society for Microbiology) Researchers from Yonsei University in South Korea have found that certain commensal bacteria that reside in the human intestine produce compounds that inhibit SARS-CoV-2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study evaluates potential causes of increased transmission in SARS-CoV-2 variants
(American Society for Microbiology) Although two SARS-CoV-2 variants are associated with higher transmission, patients with these variants show no evidence of higher viral loads in their upper respiratory tracts compared to the control group, a Johns Hopkins School of Medicine study found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

EU vaccine rollout suffers another blow as CureVac's efficacy fails to clear minimum threshold of 50%
(Natural News) Germany’s CureVac coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine has been found to be only 47 percent effective against the SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind the pandemic, dropping the company’s shares in Frankfurt and New York by more than 50 percent and erasing more than £5 billion ($6.9 billion) from its market value. The interim results from the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

For brain MRI, a reduced dose of gadobutrol shows promise
A 25% reduced dose of gadobutrol for contrast-enhanced brain MRI is "noninferior...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI shows how head impacts affect brains of young football players Are brain MRI findings connected to SARS-CoV-2 in spinal fluid? Darmiyan's BrainSee nabs breakthrough status from FDA AI enables noninvasive tumor pathology mapping on brain MRI Up to 40% of COVID-19 survivors experience neurological effects (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 18, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Q & A: Human Challenge Studies of COVID-19 Underway in UK
Researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Oxford are exposing healthy volunteers to SARS-CoV-2 for science. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 18, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

In hunt for Covid ’s origin, new studies point away from lab leak theory
Amid the heavily politicised debate, a lot of evidence now points to a natural spillover event – but other causes cannot be ruled outCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe coronavirus pandemic has raised so many questions as it has continued its inexorable spread across the planet, but perhaps the first of them remains the most contentious: where did Sars-CoV-2 come from?In recent weeks there has been renewed focus on whether it could have escaped from a Chinese laboratory. However, new findings strengthen the case for a natural origin, in what has become a heavily politicised debate.Co...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Laura Spinney Tags: Coronavirus China Infectious diseases Science Asia Pacific World news Source Type: news

Human Waste Could Be The Next Big Weapon in Controlling COVID-19
If you’re a student or a faculty member who spends any time on the University of California, San Diego campus, you may know a lot more about what’s in your pee and poop—and that of your colleagues—than you might care to admit. Members of the UCSD community can download an app that tells them the COVID-19 status of the wastewater generated in the buildings where they spend the most time. In fact, it offers quite a bit of additional detail too, telling users whether any disease-causing microbes are flourishing in that sewage. If the COVID-19 virus is detected, campus regulars get a notification that t...
Source: TIME: Health - June 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The true spread of SARS-CoV-2 infection is much greater than that observed by capturing only swab-diagnosed COVID-19 cases
(European Alliance of Associations for Rheumatology) COVID-19: The MAINSTREAM project in Lombardy, Italy -- The true prevalence of COVID-19 is still unknown due to the high proportion of subclinical infection. Measuring seroprevalence may be crucial to improve knowledge about the impact of COVID-19 in rheumatic patients. Data shared at the 2021 EULAR congress highlight that the spread of SARS-CoV-2 infection is much greater than that observed by capturing only swab-diagnosed COVID-19 cases, but consistent with healthy population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 18, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

COVID-19 in Spain
(JAMA Network)What The Study Did:Researchersdescribe the local transmission pattern of SARS-CoV-2 in Valencia, thethird most populatedcity inSpain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 18, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

COVID-19 morbidity and mortality in people with rheumatic diseases
(European Alliance of Associations for Rheumatology) Population-based data shared at the EULAR 2021 congress -- The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus (SARS-CoV-2) is of particular concern for people with inflammatory diseases, and there are concerns that these people may be at higher risk and have poorer outcomes. However, at present the implications remain poorly understood. Population-based data from Spain show individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had an increased risk of COVID-19 diagnosis and hospitalization compared to the general population. Similarly, data fr...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 18, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CSIR, Tata MD partner to ramp up Covid testing capacity across tier 2, 3 towns and rural areas
The initiative will utilise CSIR's network of labs across India and help increase testing capacity in smaller locations in the country. The CSIR and Tata MD will jointly develop the testing capacity and the RT-PCR CRISPR test will be done using the Tata MD CHECK SARS-CoV-2 test kits that are powered by FELUDA technology from CSIR-IGIB. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - June 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The U.S. Government Placed a Big Bet on an Antiviral Pill to Fight COVID-19
We’re not going to vaccinate our way completely out of this pandemic. With epidemiologists around the world increasingly accepting the reality that SARS-CoV-2 and its variants will become endemic viruses—like the seasonal flu—the push is on to develop antiviral medications that can be taken at home to prevent infections from leading to hospitalization and death. Today, the Department of Health and Human Services announced that the Biden Administration has authorized $3.2 billion to accelerate the development of antivirals already in the R&D pipeline, with the hope that at least one will be ready for r...
Source: TIME: Health - June 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The U.S. Government Placed a Big Bet on an Antiviral Pill to Fight COVID-19
We’re not going to vaccinate our way completely out of this pandemic. With epidemiologists around the world increasingly accepting the reality that SARS-CoV-2 and its variants will become endemic viruses—like the seasonal flu—the push is on to develop antiviral medications that can be taken at home to prevent infections from leading to hospitalization and death. Today, the Department of Health and Human Services announced that the Biden Administration has authorized $3.2 billion to accelerate the development of antivirals already in the R&D pipeline, with the hope that at least one will be ready for r...
Source: TIME: Science - June 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

New Evidence Shows COVID-19 Was in US Weeks Before Thought
Some of the blood specimens collected in the United States for the NIH's All of Us research program starting on January 2, 2020, have antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 17, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Is there a link between COVID-19 vaccines and myocarditis?
Is there a link between the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine and myocarditis identified o...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Cardiac MRI boosts myocarditis detection in college athletes 7-fold Heart disease rare in pro athletes after COVID-19 Cardiac complications are common in COVID-19 cases 3D T2 maps enhance assessment of myocarditis on MRI 15% of athletes have myocarditis after COVID-19 recovery (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 17, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Digital Droplet PCR for SARS-CoV-2 Resolves Borderline Cases Digital Droplet PCR for SARS-CoV-2 Resolves Borderline Cases
Could droplet digital PCR technology help confirm borderline positive SARS-CoV-2 results?American Journal of Clinical Pathology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

Assessment and procurement of coronavirus (COVID-19) tests, DHSC (updated 17th June 2021)
How the government assesses offers of COVID-19 tests from developers for procurement and use in the UK. 17 June 2021Added attachments'Coronavirus test device authorisations operating process for SARS-CoV-2 tests'and'Private testing desktop review (stage 2): operating process for SARS-CoV-2 tests'. 15 June 2021Updated the'National technical validation process for manufacturers of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) tests'document to update the'Validation stage'table. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - June 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Mystery of the Origins of the Pandemic: Can It Be Solved?
The world is calling on China to cooperate with investigations into the source of SARS-CoV-2. Will this pressure be fruitful — or could it backfire?(Image credit: Hector Retamal /AFP via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Will Stone Source Type: news

Risk of hospital admission for patients with SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.1.7: cohort, BMJ
Study (n=839,278) found those with the SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.1.7 (alpha variant) had an increased risk for hospital admission than wild type SARS-CoV-2 (4.7% vs 3.5%, HR 1.52, 95%CI 1.47-1.57). Authors report the higher severity may be specific to adults older than 30 years. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - June 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Passing the COVID test in just five minutes
(Osaka University) Osaka University researchers create an intelligent nanopore system sensitive enough to detect single SARS-CoV-2 virus particles. By training a machine-learning algorithm, the platform was able to identify between various coronaviruses in just five minutes. This work may lead to fast and accurate point-of-care testing for COVID and other communicable diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 17, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Targeting cellular response to SARS-CoV-2 holds promise as new way to fight infection
(University of Cambridge) A new treatment approach focused on fixing cell damage, rather than fighting the virus directly, is effective against SARS-CoV-2 in lab models. Combination of two drugs reduces spread of SARS-CoV-2 infection in cells by up to 99.5%.If found safe for human use, this anti-viral treatment would make COVID-19 symptoms milder and speed up recovery times. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 17, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

'Nanodecoy' therapy binds and neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 virus
(North Carolina State University) Nanodecoys made from human lung spheroid cells (LSCs) can bind to and neutralize SARS-CoV-2, promoting viral clearance and reducing lung injury in a macaque model of COVID-19. By mimicking the receptor that the virus binds to rather than targeting the virus itself, nanodecoy therapy could remain effective against emerging variants of the virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 17, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news