Specter of SARS Weighs on CDC as MERS Virus Lands in U.S.Specter of SARS Weighs on CDC as MERS Virus Lands in U.S.
When the SARS outbreak arrived in Toronto in 2003, the disease quickly spread to hospital workers and patients in area hospitals, ultimately infecting 257 individuals and killing 33 people. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - May 6, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

MERS Shows That The Next Pandemic Is Only a Plane Flight Away
MoreDeadly Middle East Virus in U.S. For First TimeSaudi Arabia Reports 26 More Cases of MERS as Egypt Reports First InfectionFears Rise Over MERS Outbreak While Saudis FumbleOn Feb. 21, 2003, a 64-year-old Chinese physician named Dr. Liu Jianlun traveled to Hong Kong to attend a wedding. He stayed in room 911 on the ninth floor of the Metropole Hotel. Liu, who had been treating cases of a mysterious respiratory disease in the neighboring Chinese province of Guangdong, was already sick when he arrived in Hong Kong, and the next day he checked into the city’s Kwong Wah hospital. Liu died on Mar. 4 of the disease docto...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - May 5, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Bryan Walsh Tags: Uncategorized Cameroon Centers for Disease Control emerging disease Global Viral health Infections MERS Metropole Hotel Nathan Wolfe SARS Saudi Arabia Source Type: news

MERS KSA Export To Munster Indiana Raises SARS Concerns
The commentary describes the KSA MERS export to Munster, Indiana. (05/03/14 10:45) (Source: Recombinomics)
Source: Recombinomics - May 3, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Six Jeddah MERS Exports Raise SARS Concerns
The commentary describes 6 Jeddah MERS exports which raise SARS concerns. (05/01/14 22:30) (Source: Recombinomics)
Source: Recombinomics - May 2, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Abu Dhabi MERS Superspreader Linked To 22 Confirmed
The commentary discusses the MERS superspreader in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates who is linked to 22 confirmed, raising SARS concerns. (04/23/14 14:00) (Source: Recombinomics)
Source: Recombinomics - April 24, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Spread of MERS in Saudi Arabia Accelerates With 17 New CasesSpread of MERS in Saudi Arabia Accelerates With 17 New Cases
Saudi Arabia has discovered another 17 cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), as the total number of confirmed infections of the SARS-like disease has jumped by a third in the kingdom in the past week. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - April 23, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Fears Rise Over MERS Outbreak While Saudis Fumble
The sudden spike in cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, in Saudi Arabia came soon after camel racing events at the Jenadriyah Festival in Riyadh. That suggested the surge in the incurable coronavirus, which resembles pneumonia but is fatal to one in three who contract it, confirmed what scientists already knew of the disease: that camels seem to be reservoirs for the virus, and transmit it to humans more easily than humans do to one another. MoreSaudi Arabia Confirms 20 New Cases of Deadly MERS VirusMERS Death Toll Climbs as Man Killed By Virus in Saudi ArabiaMen Charged With Toppling Ancient Rock Formation...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - April 22, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Karl Vick Tags: Uncategorized bird glue coronavirus H1N1 MERS middle east respiratory syndrome SARS Saudi Arabia Source Type: news

Abu Dhabi MERS Superspreader Raises SARS Concerns
The commentary discusses the MERS superspreader in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates who is linked to 14 confirmed health care workers, raising SARS concerns. (04/17/14 20:00) (Source: Recombinomics)
Source: Recombinomics - April 17, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Tamiflu® reduces risk of death by 25% in adults hospitalised with H1N1 pandemic influenza
Adults hospitalised with H1N1 influenza during the 2009-2010 pandemic were 25% less likely to die from the disease if they were given antiviral drugs called neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) such as Tamiflu®, according to a large meta-analysis involving more than 29 000 patients from 38 countries, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal. The findings also indicate that treatment within 2 days of flu symptoms developing halved the risk of death compared with later treatment or no treatment."Many governments have stockpiles of Tamiflu that are close to expiry. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 19, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Vigorous exercise tied to reduce flu risk
A report on a UK survey suggest that vigorous exercise may help reduce the risk of catching the flu. The survey finds no such link with moderate exercise. However, the report authors stress the results are preliminary and should be treated with caution.The findings come from the UK Flusurvey, in which more than 4,800 people have so far taken part this year. The online survey, which is now in its fifth year, is run by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Vigorous exercise tied to reduced flu risk
A report on a UK survey suggests that vigorous exercise may help reduce the risk of catching the flu. The survey finds no such link with moderate exercise. However, the report authors stress the results are preliminary and should be treated with caution.The findings come from the UK Flusurvey, in which more than 4,800 people have so far taken part this year. The online survey, which is now in its fifth year, is run by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Over 75% of people with the flu do not have symptoms
During flu season, sufferers may marvel at those individuals who just never seem to get sick. But a new study suggests they may actually be ill without knowing it, as three quarters of people with seasonal and pandemic flu do not exhibit symptoms.The researchers, led by Dr. Andrew Hayward of University College London in the UK, published the results of their study in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.They say about 1 in 5 people from the general population were infected in recent outbreaks of seasonal flu as well as the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 17, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

How the flu bug bit Google
Numbers and data can be critical tools in bringing complex issues into crisp focus. The understanding of diseases, for example, benefits from algorithms that help monitor their spread. But without context, a number may just be a number, or worse, misleading."The Parable of Google Flu: Traps in Big Data Analysis" is published in the journal Science, funded, in part, by a grant from the National Science Foundation. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 16, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Flu infections can lead to deadly cytokine storm that sparks lung inflammation
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have mapped key elements of a severe immune overreaction - a "cytokine storm" - that can both sicken and kill patients who are infected with certain strains of flu virus.Their findings, published in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, also clarify the workings of a potent new class of anti-inflammatory compounds that prevent this immune overreaction in animal models. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 4, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Strategies for developing new antiviral flu drugs
New analysis of the influenza A virus by scientists at the University of Hertfordshire shows potential for developing new anti-viral drugs which are more likely to be universally effective against the flu virus originating from avian, swine or human virus strains. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 3, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Scripps Research institute scientists describe deadly immune 'storm' caused by emergent flu infections
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have mapped key elements of a severe immune overreaction - a "cytokine storm" - that can both sicken and kill patients who are infected with certain strains of flu virus.Their findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, also clarify the workings of a potent new class of anti-inflammatory compounds that prevent this immune overreaction in animal models. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 3, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Self-administered patches could be the future for flu vaccination
The annual ritual of visiting a doctor's office or health clinic to receive a flu shot may soon be outdated, thanks to the findings of a new study published in the journal Vaccine.The research, which involved nearly 100 people recruited in the metropolitan Atlanta area, found that test subjects could successfully apply a prototype vaccine patch to themselves. That suggests the self-administration of vaccines with microneedle patches may one day be feasible, potentially reducing administration costs and relieving an annual burden on health care professionals. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 28, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

New target discovered for dengue virus vaccine
By re-engineering a tiny chain of amino acids in one type of dengue virus, Ralph Baric and Aravinda de Silva discover a new path toward solving the dengue vaccine dilemma. The research has the potential to transform vaccine development for other diseases, including SARS and HIV. Creating a vaccine that protects people from all four types of dengue virus has frustrated scientists for decades. But researchers at the University of North Carolina have discovered a new target for human antibodies that could hold the key to a vaccine for the world's most widespread mosquito-borne disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 28, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

Improved understanding of influenza evolution
Researchers at Columbia University and the University of Cologne have created a new model to successfully predict the evolution of the influenza virus from one year to the next. This advance in our understanding of influenza suggests a new, systematic way to select influenza vaccine strains. The findings appear in the journal Nature.The flu is one of the major infectious diseases in humans. Seasonal strains of the influenza A virus account for about half a million deaths per year. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 28, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Birds' migration secrets to be revealed by space tracker
Icarus, a wildlife receiver circling above Earth, will monitor the epic journeys of tiny birds and insects, helping to warn us of volcanic eruptions and to protect us from diseasesSmall birds, butterflies, bees and fruitbats will be fitted with tiny radio transmitters and tracked throughout their lifetimes from space when a dedicated wildlife radio receiver is fitted to the International Space Station next year.The ability to follow the movements of very small organisms hour by hour from space will revolutionise our understanding of long-distance bird migrations, and give advance warnings of volcanic eruptions and earthqua...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 19, 2014 Category: Science Authors: John Vidal Tags: Bird flu World news Health Society Birds Animals International Space Station Insects The Observer Environment Science Wildlife Source Type: news

PDL-1 antibody could help immune system fight off influenza viral infection, study suggests
An antibody that blocks a component of a key signaling pathway in the respiratory airways could help the immune system rid the body of the influenza virus, a new study suggests. The findings, from a team at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, not only offer a new approach to treating the flu, but also add new information about how the immune system responds to respiratory viral infections. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 2, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

WHO Says 4 New Saudi Cases of MERS Virus, One FatalWHO Says 4 New Saudi Cases of MERS Virus, One Fatal
Four more people in Saudi Arabia have been infected with the SARS-like Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus and one of them - an elderly man - has died. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

WHO says 4 new Saudi cases of MERS virus, one fatal
LONDON (Reuters) - Four more people in Saudi Arabia have been infected with the SARS-like Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus and one of them - an elderly man - has died, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Friday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Nyack hospital implements procedures to protect patients during flu season
Nyack Hospital has implemented a "Masks on" policy to protect patients from Influenza while hospitalized in response to the New York State Commissioner of Health's declaration that flu is prevalent in New York. Effective Friday, December 20th, any staff member at Nyack Hospital who has not received the Influenza vaccine will be required to wear a mask in accordance with regulations set by the N.Y.S. Department of Health. "We are committed to the health and safety of our patients," said Dr. Michael Rader, Vice President and Medical Director at Nyack Hospital. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Flu and cold top the 2013 chart of medical search terms
The top 10 trending health issues of 2013 have been released by Google, and top of the list of searches are flu and cold, with labor coming in at third place.The results are found in the year-end zeitgeist, the search giant's annual "spirit of the times" analysis. The appearance of the term labor as a highly popular search in the health issues list comes as "royal baby" made it to seventh place in the total Google search activity across 2013, a chart topped by "Nelson Mandela. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 23, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

A step closer to developing a 'universal' flu vaccine
Every year the approach of flu season sets off a medical guessing game with life or death consequences. There are many different strains of flu and they vary from year to year. So each season authorities must make an educated guess and tell manufacturers which variants of the flu they should produce vaccines against.Even when this system works, flu-related illnesses can kill 3,000 to 49,000 Americans annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A bad guess or the unexpected emergence of a virulent strain could send the death toll higher. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Will we have a flu-free Christmas? UK reporting half the number of flu cases compared to this time last year
Preliminary results from the first month of the Flusurvey run by scientists at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine indicate that flu is yet to take hold of the UK, with just 6,000 cases per 100,000 people reported, compared to 12,000 cases per 100,000 people for the same period in 2012.Findings from http://www.flusurvey.org.uk/ show that where some cases of influenza-like illness have been reported, the highest rates were on the South East Coast, followed by Scotland and Wales. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Reducing flu viruses' glucose supply weakens the microbes' ability to infect mammalian cells in lab cultures
Reducing glucose metabolism dials down influenza viral infection in laboratory cell cultures, providing an entirely new approach for combating seasonal flu, according to research presented at the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) annual meeting in New Orleans.While annual flu shots are based on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC)'s predictions of the viruses that will be in widest circulation each flu season, the new approach targets one metabolic requirement of all influenza viruses: glucose. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Scientists find first definitive proof of MERS coronavirus in dromedary camels
Scientists from the Netherlands and Qatar have produced the first definitive evidence that Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infects camels. The researchers used gene-sequencing techniques to show that three camels from a site where two humans contracted MERS-CoV were infected with the virus. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Goji berries protect against the flu in new study
Since current flu vaccines do not completely protect against influenza infection, researchers have been looking for alternative measures. Now, a new mouse study has shown that older mice are given extra protection from the flu with a diet that incorporates goji berries.The research comes from scientists at the Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University. The study was recently published in the Journal of Nutrition. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Effectiveness of influenza vaccines may be significantly improved by brief laser-light treatment
Pretreating the site of intradermal vaccination - vaccine delivered into the skin rather than to muscles beneath the skin - with a particular wavelength of laser light may substantially improve vaccine effectiveness without the adverse effects of chemical additives currently used to boost vaccine efficacy. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Genetic defect protects mice from infection with influenza viruses
A new study published in the scientific journal PLOS Pathogens points out that mice lacking a protein called Tmprss2 are no longer affected by certain flu viruses. The discovery was made by researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig in collaboration with colleagues from Göttingen and Seattle.Whether it is H1N1, H5N1 or H7N9: The flu virus influenza A exists in many different types as its two coating proteins haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) can be combined in various ways. Theoretically, more than 100 different pairings are possible. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Effectiveness of Marinomed's antiviral nasal spray confirmed in clinical trial for common cold
Marinomed Biotechnologie GmbH has announced that new clinical data confirmed the effectiveness of a Carragelose®-based nasal spray in the therapy of common cold. The data, generated in collaboration with researchers from the Department of Otolaryngology at the Medical University of Vienna, were published in the international medical journal Respiratory Research. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

New test uses sugar and gold to detect flu strains
Researchers have created a new test that uses sugar and gold nanoparticles to detect the influenza virus within 30 minutes, and it can even distinguish between human and avian strains. This is according to a study published in the journal Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry.The research team, led by Prof. Robert Field of the John Innes Centre and Prof. David Russell of the University of East Anglia in the UK, says the new flu test is based on previous work that uses "optically-based molecular recognition systems."Prof. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Researchers predict seasonal flu outbreaks in 108 cities across the US
Scientists were able to reliably predict the timing of the 2012-2013 influenza season up to nine weeks in advance of its peak. The first large-scale demonstration of the flu forecasting system by scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health was carried out in 108 cities across the United States.Results are published online in the journal Nature Communications.The flu forecasting system adapts techniques used in modern weather prediction to turn real-time, Web-based estimates of influenza infection into local forecasts of the seasonal peak by locality. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Respiratory expert warns that staff who refuse flu vaccine 'risk patient lives'
A leading respiratory expert based at Southampton's teaching hospitals has warned NHS staff who refuse to have a flu vaccine are "risking the lives" of chronically ill and frail patients. Dr Ben Marshall, a consultant respiratory physician at Southampton General Hospital, said the failure of more than half of all frontline staff in England to take up the vaccination was "unacceptable". "Influenza can be a troublesome infection for the average healthy person but it can be life-threatening for patients with chronic illnesses, immunodeficiency or frail conditions," he explained. (Source: Health N...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 3, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

MERS and SARS Similarities Increase
The commentary discusses the increasing similarities between MERS and SARS. (11/28/13 18:00) (Source: Recombinomics)
Source: Recombinomics - December 2, 2013 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Rapid testing to diagnose influenza leads to more appropriate care in the ED
When patients in the emergency department (ED) are diagnosed with influenza by means of a rapid test, they get fewer unnecessary antibiotics, are prescribed antiviral medications more frequently, and have fewer additional lab tests compared to patients diagnosed with influenza without testing, according to a new study. Published online in the Journal of the Pediatrics Infectious Diseases Society, the findings suggest that diagnosing influenza with a rapid diagnostic test leads to more appropriate, specific, and efficient care. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Annual UK Flusurvey tracks the spread of flu and extends monitoring to schools
Are Northerners really more likely to get flu? Does regular exercise help you to recover faster? And what impact will the new childhood flu vaccinations have on the spread of the virus in schools? These are just some of the questions scientists from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine want to explore as they launch the annual nationwide Flusurvey, collecting data from men, women and children of all ages around the country. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Taiwan: first human case of new bird flu virus
The world's first case of a wild avian influenza A H6N1 virus has been confirmed in a 20-year-old Taiwanese woman. Scientists who analyzed the virus found it has a genetic mutation, allowing it to get into human cells and cause infection.Results of their findings were published in a study in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.The woman entered a hospital in central Taiwan in May 2013 with flu-like symptoms and difficulty breathing. Her doctors say she fully recovered after treatment with oseltamivir (Tamiflu). (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Camel tests positive for Mers virus
A camel tests positive for the Sars-like virus that emerged in the Middle East last year and has killed 64 people worldwide. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - November 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Colds and sore throats not helped by ibuprofen
A study published recently in the British Medical Journal raises doubts about the advice patients receive when they complain of colds or sore throats. Apart from some exceptions, it questions the wisdom of treating these conditions with ibuprofen and suggests steam inhalation does not help either. Researchers from the University of Southampton in the UK carried out a trial with 889 primary care patients aged 3 and over with acute respiratory tract infections (colds and sore throats)... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Gelatin allergies and the flu shot: caution advised
If putting marshmallows in your hot chocolate or eating gummy bears makes your tongue swell or causes itchiness, experts say you may want to be cautious about getting a flu shot this winter, as certain vaccines contain gelatin. As flu vaccine coverage is on the rise in the US, experts from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) warn that individuals who are allergic to gelatin could have a mild to severe reaction to the flu vaccine... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Pickled turnip from Japan - new superfood to prevent flu infection?
Scientists have discovered that bacteria found in a traditional Japanese pickle can prevent flu. Could this be the next superfood? The research, which assesses the immune-boosting powers of Lactobacillus brevis from Suguki - a pickled turnip, popular in Japan - in mice that have been exposed to a flu virus, is published in the SfAM journal, Letters in Applied Microbiology. Lead researcher, Ms Naoko Waki of KAGOME CO., LTD. in Japan said: "Our results show that when a particular strain of Lactobacillus brevis is eaten by mice, it has protective effects against influenza virus infection... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Researchers say bats were original host of SARS coronavirus in 2002
BEIJING, Nov. 2 (UPI) -- Researchers in China say a species of Chinese bat was the cause of the 2002 SARS outbreak, during which an estimated 800 people died. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - November 2, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lab Notes: Faux HDL and Civet Cats Off the SARS Hook
(MedPage Today) -- Researchers have used the same technology used in inkjet printers to produce material that mimics the "good cholesterol." And it turns out that coronaviruses like SARS and MERS may be able to jump directly from bats to humans, without needing, say, a civet cat as intermediary. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - November 2, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Featured in NEJM Journal Watch: Chinese Horseshoe Bats — the SARS-CoV Reservoir? (FREE)
By the NEJM Journal Watch Editors A virus closely related to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - November 1, 2013 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Bats confirmed to carry SARS
Caroline Lee(UPI) -- New research suggests it's luck -- not prevention -- behind the lack of cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome reported since 2004. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

SARS-like Coronavirus Found in Chinese Horseshoe Bats
10 years after SARS outbreak Ecohealth Alliance finds plausible evidence for direct bat to human transmission. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - October 31, 2013 Category: Disability Tags: Influenza Colds and Flu Source Type: news

A step ahead of influenza; honeybee sex
Staying a step ahead of influenza Every fall, the latest batch of flu vaccines attempts to keep society a step ahead of the evolution of the flu virus. Heroic worldwide surveillance efforts have avoided a repeat of the 1918 flu pandemic, but as shown in the recent H1N1 outbreak, viruses can still outwit even the best public health efforts. During the H1N1 outbreak, antiviral drugs offered the only hope against emergent flu strains... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news