We ’ll soon know more about our bodies than ever before – but are we ready? | Daniel M Davis

Tests could show the probability of illnesses occurring in five, 10 or 20 years, with huge moral and ethical implicationsWe ’re soon going to have to make our own choices about social distancing, wearing masks and travel. When the legal enforcement of rules is lifted, the way in which each of us deals with the risk of Covid-19 will be down to personal judgment. But how well equipped are we to make these decisions?Graphs and data can help explain things, but what ’s also needed is a deep understanding of how science works, and, perhaps most important of all, a sense of how to weigh up the odds of coming down with the disease and how it might affect us. Not in an abstract way, but in our day-to-day lives. And what many people don’t realise is that Covid-1 9 is just the start.Very soon, we will be exposed to all kinds of complicated information about the state of our health, including our personal level of risk for any number of illnesses. More and more, we will have to make decisions, based on new science, about almost every aspect of our lives.This is because progress in human biology is accelerating at an unprecedented rate, and there ’s no sign of it slowing down. On the horizon are entirely new ways of defining, screening and manipulating health, completely new insights about diet, and any number of ideas for how babies can be born. Things are not moving along incrementally. Rather, we are on the brink of a revolution.We ’re used to thinking ab...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Medical research Science Biology Psychology Cancer research Health Health policy Society UK news Source Type: news

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During her career, Debbie DiCarlo had worked for nonprofits dealing with immigration, foster case, sex trafficking and domestic violence, but she never saw herself working for a cancer organization. That is, until her best friend was diagnosed with cancer, and she subsequently moved to the Valley from California to do just that.
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Source Type: news
One new case in Queensland as Melbourne CBD turned into no-go zone and police prepare to disrupt protest planned in SydneyNew Doherty modelling advises ‘medium’ Covid restrictions until 80% vaccination target reachedYouth corrections officer dies from CovidCovid vaccine rollout and rates tracker; Cases, trends and data trackerGet our free news app;get our morning email briefing2.05amBSTNSW isn ’t hosting a press conference today.Instead NSW Health ’sJeremy McAnulty is providing an update via NSW Health ’s Facebook page. You can watchhere.2.02amBSTNSW has recorded 1,331 new locally acquired cas...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus Australia news Infectious diseases Science Medical research Source Type: news
During her career, Debbie DiCarlo had worked for nonprofits dealing with immigration, foster case, sex trafficking and domestic violence, but she never saw herself working for a cancer organization. That is, until her best friend was diagnosed with cancer, and she subsequently moved to the Valley from California to do just that.
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: news
Source: Oral Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Mississippi health officials have issued an advisory that COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective and recommended to pregnant women after reports some were turned away at clinics.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
An influential federal advisory panel has overwhelmingly rejected a plan to give Pfizer booster shots against COVID-19 to most Americans, but it endorsed the extra doses for those who are 65 or older or run a high risk of severe disease
Source: ABC News: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news
While most eyes were on COVID-19, researchers have also made groundbreaking advancements in other fields. Here’s a look. The other big vaccine news Public-health officials have long sought a vaccine against malaria, which infects up to 600 million people a year and kills 400,000, mostly children. This year, there was dramatic prog­ress toward that goal. In a study of 450 children in Burkina Faso, published in the Lancet in April, researchers reported that a new malaria vaccine, called R21, is 77% effective—just clearing the World Health Organization’s 75% efficacy standard. However, the sample gro...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Innovation Magazine Source Type: news
In conclusion, PLG attenuates high calcium/phosphate-induced vascular calcification by upregulating P53/PTEN signaling in VSMCs. Tsimane and Moseten Hunter-Gatherers Exhibit Minimal Levels of Atrial Fibrillation https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2021/03/tsimane-and-moseten-hunter-gatherers-exhibit-minimal-levels-of-atrial-fibrillation/ Epidemiological data for the Tsimane and Moseten populations in Bolivia shows that they suffer very little cardiovascular disease in later life, despite a presumably greater lifetime burden of infectious disease (and consequent inflammation) than is the case for people i...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Body mass index, or BMI, has long been the standard tool for assessing weight status and health risk. A calculation of your size that takes into account your height and weight, BMI is frequently used because it’s a quick, easy, and inexpensive measurement tool. Yet, it lacks any assessment of how much fat a person has or how it’s distributed throughout the body, both of which are key indicators of metabolic health. A recent study published in The BMJ analyzed different measures of body shape — more specifically, of central or abdominal fat — to determine which measures were most predictive of premat...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
In the past year, we've become familiar with the factors that can make a person more vulnerable to COVID-19 infection. The elderly are more at risk, as are those who smoke and are already dealing with other diseases, such as cancer and Type 2 diabetes.At a deeper level, though, there are dozens of other factors that may come into play and influence a person's susceptibility to disease. A recent analysis of hospitalized COVID-19 patients in 14 states found that among patients ages 50-64 that obesity was the most prevalent underlying medical condition. Similarly, there's growing evidence to suggest that vitamin D deficiency ...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs
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