Addressing bullying behaviour by patients and families - Ilse R, Neilipovitz D.
This article explores the ethical dilemma of maintaining patient experience and care team well-being when faced with coercive behaviour, specifically bullying by patients, families and substitute decision-makers, which is directed toward providers and heal... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

J & amp;J Recalls Ethicon Circular Staplers
Through investigation of complaints and returned products, Johnson & Johnson's Ethicon business confirmed uncut washers in the stapler and malformed staples occur with its intraluminal circular staplers due to insufficient firing, which can compromise staple line integrity. When the washer is cut, confirming completion of the firing cycle, the surgeon experiences an audible and tactile crunch. Failure to cut the washer suggests complete 360-degree staple line failure, FDA noted. Surgeons use Ethicon Endo-Surgery Intraluminal Staplers in the gastrointestinal tract for creating connections between structures ...
Source: MDDI - May 17, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

#ICYMI On May 16th, the @US_FDA identified a Class I Recall, the most serious type of recall: Ethicon recalls circular staplers for insufficient firing and failure to completely form staples. Find out more about the recall: https://go.usa.gov/xmd8Y   #FDA #MedicalDevicepic.twitter.com/Lc79LdjWhc
#ICYMI On May 16th, the @US_FDA identified a Class I Recall, the most serious type of recall: Ethicon recalls circular staplers for insufficient firing and failure to completely form staples. Find out more about the recall: https://go.usa.gov/xmd8Y  #FDA #MedicalDevice pic.twitter.com/Lc79LdjWhc (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - May 17, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: ( at FDADeviceInfo) Source Type: news

Is Medtech Thinking Big Enough?
Medical device companies may still have a lot to learn from the tech industry, and who better to share a few lessons than Scott Huennekens, previously the CEO of Verb Surgical (a collaboration between Google and Johnson & Johnson's Ethicon) and former founding CEO Volcano Corp. In a fireside chat with MassMEDIC President Brian Johnson during BIOMEDevice Boston on May 15, Huennekens shared how his experience working with the tech giant encouraged him to drive change in medtech. “You get off the plane in San Jose, and you feel the power of the possibility to change the world,&aci...
Source: MDDI - May 17, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: Business Source Type: news

U.S. FDA labels J & J surgical staplers' recall as severest
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned of risks of serious injury or death from surgical staplers made by Johnson& Johnson's Ethicon unit, labeling a recent recall of the device as its most serious. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Cochrane expresses thanks to Professor Prathap Tharyan for leading Cochrane South Asia for over 14 years
After leading Cochrane South Asia since 2005, first as a Branch of the Australasian Cochrane Centre, and from 2008 as a standalone Cochrane South Asia Centre, Professor Prathap Tharyan is retiring from his role as Director.Under Prathap ’s leadership, Cochrane South Asia, based at the Prof BV Moses Centre for Evidence Informed Health Care and Health Policy at CMC, Vellore, has contributed enormously to Cochrane's global efforts to increase the uptake of reliable evidence to inform health decisions. In the early years of the Centre, Prathap organized several very successful annual conferences on evidence-based health ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - May 16, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

New international open access journal on ancient and Christian ethics
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) The Ethics in Antiquity and Christianity research center of Johannes Gutenberg Unversity Mainz (JGU) recently founded the international open access Journal of Ethics in Antiquity and Christianity (JEAC), which provides a platform for specialized research in ancient ethics with a particular focus on its impact and interdependence with the development of Christian ethics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A Rival to Botox Invites Doctors to Party in Cancun, With Fireworks, Confetti and Social Media Posts
Plastic surgeons ’ Instagram accounts of the weekend trip didn ’ t note the drug company ’ s sponsorship, which some ethicists say should be disclosed. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: KATIE THOMAS Tags: Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Social Media Evolus Botox (Drug) Advertising and Marketing Plastic Surgery Online Advertising Jeaveau Federal Trade Commission Instagram Inc Truth in Advertising Inc your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

Robot Therapists Need Rules
Interactions with artificial intelligence (AI) will become an increasingly common aspect of our lives. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now completed the first study of how "embodied AI" can help treat mental illness. Their conclusion: Important ethical questions of this technology remain unanswered. There is urgent need for action on the part of governments, professional associations and researchers. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - May 15, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Robot therapists need rules
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Interactions with artificial intelligence (AI) will become an increasingly common aspect of our lives. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now completed the first study of how 'embodied AI' can help treat mental illness. Their conclusion: Important ethical questions of this technology remain unanswered. There is urgent need for action on the part of governments, professional associations and researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Geisel Names New Swigart Fellows
Congratulations to Geisel School of Medicine’s new Swigart Fellows—Edel Auh ’22, Julia Berkowitz ’20, and Colin McLeish ’22. Now in its third year, the Olive M. and Joesph F. Swigart Ethic Fellowship Program is an opportunity for faculty and students to collaborate on scholarly research projects around ethics issues in patient care and medical education. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - May 14, 2019 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Susan Green Tags: Education News medical ethics Swigart Ethics Fellowship Source Type: news

Soda Taxes Are a ‘No-Brainer’ for Public Health, Says the Author of a New Study on Them
A new JAMA study suggests taxing sugary drinks really can make people buy fewer of them, potentially translating to better public health. Taxes on soda and other junk foods are frequently proposed as a way to coax Americans into eating more healthfully, and in turn cut rates of diet-related chronic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer and heart disease. While Americans are drinking less soda than they used to, it’s still a major source of sweeteners and empty calories for many people, contributing to an estimated 25,000 premature deaths a year. But lawmakers and health experts have debated whether taxes ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized diet embargoed study Food Nutrition public health soda tax Source Type: news

11th Croatian Cochrane Symposium (CroCoS)
 The 8th May was a hub of excitement at the University of Split School of Medicine as members ofCochrane Croatia were getting ready to host their 11th Annual Croatian Cochrane Symposium. This year ’s CroCoS was co-organised with the Social Sciences and Humanities Faculty of the University of Split, represented by Assist. Prof. Darko Hren.Thanks to collaboration between Prof. Ana Maru šić, Research Coordinator for Cochrane Croatia, and member of Cochrane’s Scientific Committee, and Howard White, CEO ofCampbell Collaboration, the 11th Croatian Cochrane Symposium was dedicated to systematic reviews in...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - May 13, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

A preliminary study of cortical morphology in schizophrenia patients with a history of violence - Storvestre GB, Valnes LM, Jensen A, Nerland S, Tesli N, Hymer KE, Rosaeg C, Server A, Ringen PA, Jacobsen M, Andreassen OA, Agartz I, Melle I, Haukvik UK.
Clinical studies of patients with schizophrenia and a history of violence are challenging both from an ethical and practical perspective, and the neurobiological underpinnings remain largely unknown. We here present a comprehensive account of the brain cor... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

'We are not monkeys': Inuit speak out about skin grafts done without consent in 1970s
Inuit remember researchers in Igloolik, Nunavut, removing pieces of their skin and grafting it on other people. The procedures are outlined in a 2005 memoir by a well-known Canadian physician who later became recognized as an expert in medical ethics. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/North Source Type: news

Prisoners implanted with unapproved addiction treatment 'pellet'
The first of 10 planned inmates of the Louisiana Department of Corrections has been surgically implanted with an experimental pellet to treat addiction, raising ethical questions. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Automated vehicles, big data and public health - Shaw D, Favrat B, Elger B.
In this paper we focus on how automated vehicles can reduce the number of deaths and injuries in accident situations in order to protect public health. This is actually a problem not only of public health and ethics, but also of big data-not only in terms ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

J & amp;J & #039;s Ethicon Spends $400M for Takeda ’s Fibrin Sealant Patch
Johnson & Johnson’s Ethicon is set to acquire Takeda Pharmaceutical’s Fibrin Sealant Patch for $400 million. The deal is set to close in the second half of 2019. The TachoSil is a surgical patch designed to achieve safe fast and reliable bleeding control. Upon close, about 80 employees will transition to Ethicon. Takeda said net sales for TachoSil were about $155 million for the 2018 fiscal year. Terms for the deal call for Ethicon to acquire the assets and licenses that support the manufacturing, licensing and commercialization of TachoSil, while Takeda maintains ownership of the ma...
Source: MDDI - May 9, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Source Type: news

Researchers Have Few Guidelines When It Comes To Using Your Data Ethically
Most people don ’t think about the amount of data they generate over the course of a normal day or how it's being used by researchers. We need better guidelines for consent, privacy& confidentiality, ownership, custodianship, and data sharing in order to protect data from being misused. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - May 9, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jessica Baron, Contributor Source Type: news

The Ethical Responsibility to Manage Pain and Suffering The Ethical Responsibility to Manage Pain and Suffering
A new position statement from the American Nurses Association offers ethical guidance regarding the optimal care of patients experiencing pain.OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nursing Journal Article Source Type: news

Otago ethicist shines light on lack of discussion about body donation after euthanasia
(University of Otago) As New Zealand considers a bill looking to legalise euthanasia, an Otago University ethicist considers it's time to shine the light on the ethical complications surrounding body donation and assisted dying. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

DGIST acquired the first KELAF Certification as a Daegu-Gyeongbuk Educational Institution
(DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology)) Designated as a KELAF and held signboard hanging ceremony as organized by the Ministry of Drug and Food Safety. They will lay the foundation for advanced bio research by securing the reliability and ethicality of animal experiments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nursing home cameras aim to protect the vulnerable but present ethical dilemmas
(University of Washington) With reports of crimes against nursing home residents gaining media attention around the country, seven states have passed laws regulating the use of cameras in care facilities. An assistant professor in the University of Washington School of Social Work outlines the list of legal and moral issues that surveillance raises. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sun Pharmaceuticals to set up an ethics committee to oversee corporate governance-related matters
Sudhir Valia to focus more on pursuits outside Sun, but continues to be a valuable resource for the company. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - May 6, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Is fair play in running more important than fairness to Caster Semenya as a human? | Gaby Hinsliff
All her life, the South African athlete has been portrayed as a freak. Her case is as much about ethics as about sport or scienceWhen she was a girl, growing up in rural South Africa,the runner Caster Semenya would sometimes face a humiliating ritual before a race. She grew accustomed, her coaches once said, to having to retreat to the bathroom with a member of a suspicious rival athletics team and physically show them that she was not a boy. From her childhood, people had gossiped about her body; by the time she had begun competing internationally she must have been used to the whispers, the open stares in changing rooms....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Gaby Hinsliff Tags: Caster Semenya Sport IAAF Sport politics Athletics Gender World news South Africa Olympic Games Ethics Science Source Type: news

A Scientology Cruise Ship Has Been Quarantined for Measles. Here ’s What to Know
The Church of Scientology’s cruise ship Freewinds with 300 passengers aboard has been quarantined in port by the Caribbean nation of St. Lucia for measles after a female crew member was diagnosed with the highly contagious, preventable disease. MarineTraffic.com lists the vessel in port at St. Lucia as the Freewinds. A ship with that name is owned by a Panamanian company linked to the Church of Scientology. NBC News also reported that a St. Lucia coast guard official confirmed that the quarantined vessel belonged to the church. The Church of Scientology did not respond to TIME’s requests for comment. St. Luci...
Source: TIME: Health - May 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease onetime Travel Source Type: news

Why Making A 'Designer Baby' Would Be Easier Said Than Done
Ethical concerns aside, the genetic ingredients for human traits are so complex that editing a few embryonic genes is unlikely to have much effect — or achieve the fantasy of enhancing humans.(Image credit: BlackJack3D/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

Theranos whistleblower talks ethics in health tech startups
Erika Cheung recently launched the  Ethics in Entrepreneurship venture in Hong Kong and the US to help startups navigate ethics in innovation.  (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - May 2, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

The Guardian view on net-zero carbon emissions: sooner is better | Editorial
Government advisers have explained how to erase the nation ’s carbon footprint. Science dictates that we do it as fast as we canBy the end of this year we should expect UK law to mandate net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Thursday ’sreport by the Committee on Climate Change (CCC), which advises the government, sets out not only why this new target is needed, but how it can be achieved. Last year the UN warned ofgreatly increased dangers if countries do not stick to the lower end of the 1.5-2C of global warming mandated by the Paris agreement. Experts highlighted sea level rises and risks to insect and c...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Climate change Environment Science Politics UK news Michael Gove Extinction Rebellion Fossil fuel divestment Fossil fuels Energy Greenhouse gas emissions Carbon footprints Ethical and green living Source Type: news

Widespread Concern Over Europe & #039;s Uncertain Regulatory Future Highlights Region & #039;s Importance
Concern has been mounting about the future of Europe’s regulatory environment for medicines and medical technology, but the growing anxiety isn’t limited to Brussels, London or Munich. Companies from Boston to Tel Aviv to Singapore have a lot riding on Europe. For better or worse, the unease being felt around the world is a mark of both how important the healthcare products sector is to Europe and how important Europe is to the global healthcare products sector. Europe’s Position as Key Hub for Medicine, Healthcare Europe comprises about 29% of the global medtech market...
Source: MDDI - May 1, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Paul Brooks Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

What the Radiologist should Know about Artificial Intelligence - An ESR White Paper
This paper aims to provide a review of the basis for application of AI in radiology, to discuss the immediate ethical and professional impact in radiology, and to consider possible future evolution. Even if AI does add significant value to image interpretation, there are implications outside the traditional radiology activities of lesion detection and characterisation. In radiomics, AI can foster the analysis of the features and help in the correlation with other omics data. Imaging biobanks would become a necessary infrastructure to organise and share the image data from which AI models can be trained. AI can be used as a...
Source: eHealth News EU - April 30, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured White Papers Download Source Type: news

This is what happens when an entire generation of youth flat-out refuses to work: McDonald's now hiring SENIORS because they actually show up
(Natural News) McDonald’s is teaming up with the AARP to recruit a fleet of “mature” workers to meet their employment needs. Taking aim at the over-50 set, the fast food giant is looking to fill an assortment of positions ranging from early-morning shift roles all the way up to management. The work ethic of older... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘ Digital Graveyard ’ On Facebook Raises Ethical Questions
BOSTON (CBS) — A new analysis from the University of Oxford predicts the number of Facebooks accounts for deceased people may outnumber the number of those for the living within 50 years. Researchers call it a “digital graveyard.” This raises ethical and logistical questions like, who should have the right to all of the data that still live on the pages of people who have died? How should the data be managed in the interest of the deceased and their families? And should future historians be able to use this wealth of data to understand the past? It’s is expected that 1.4 billion Facebook users from ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Facebook Source Type: news

Facebook ’ s ‘ Digital Graveyard ’ Raises Ethical Questions
BOSTON (CBS) — A new analysis from the University of Oxford predicts the number of Facebooks accounts for deceased people may outnumber the number of those for the living within 50 years. Researchers call it a “digital graveyard.” This raises ethical and logistical questions like, who should have the right to all of the data that still live on the pages of people who have died? How should the data be managed in the interest of the deceased and their families? And should future historians be able to use this wealth of data to understand the past? It’s is expected that 1.4 billion Facebook users from ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Tech Dr. Mallika Marshall Facebook Source Type: news

Murder, abortion, contraception, greenhouse gas emissions and the deprivation of non-discernible and non-existent people: a reply to Marquis and Christensen - McLachlan HV.
Marquis's account of the ethics of abortion is unsatisfactory but not as Christensen implies baseless. It requires to be amended rather than abandoned. It is true, as Marquis asserts that murder and abortion both might deprive people of something of value ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Responses to environmental tragedies often make matters worse, ethicists find
(Oregon State University) Without sound decision-making, responses to seeming environmental tragedies can often make matters worse, according to ethicists who analyzed a controversial goat removal program on an Australian island. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 29, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Animal Rule Information
Links to information about the Animal Rule, which may be used to grant marketing approval of certain products when human challenge studies would not be ethical or feasible (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - April 27, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: FDA Source Type: news

Transforming health care: How artificial intelligence is reshaping the medical landscape
Computers that think like humans are changing hospitals and will soon play a role in giving diagnoses. But some experts warn that serious ethical questions remain. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - April 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Research calls for analysis of corporate ethics in the global sports industry
(University of Kent) A new book co-written by a University of Kent sports scientist recommends corporations and organisations engage more effectively with communities -- rather than taking a 'top down' approach -- to improve relationships and outcomes in the sport sector. Such outcomes include approaches to the financial resourcing of schools and community groups, shared development of sport-based educational material, and the general promotion of sport and physical activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

We Need More Evaluation Criteria for Using Artificial Intelligence in Global Health
By Wayan Vota, Director of Digital HealthApril 24, 2019Wanted: Your input on a  new framework to assess the what, where, and how of using AI in global health.This year ’s technology buzzword is artificial intelligence (AI), which means you ’ve already been asked how your organization can incorporate AI and machine learning in your health programming. You may already be using aspects of AI to augment and enhance, not replace, activities such as running natural language chatbots and utilizing pattern recognition satellite imagery.Yet, as AI is such a new technology, there are few, if any, resources av...
Source: IntraHealth International - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

Lawmaker Under Fire for Questioning Rural Nurses' Work Ethic Lawmaker Under Fire for Questioning Rural Nurses' Work Ethic
Washington State Senator Maureen Walsh's comments that nurses"probably play cards for a considerable amount of the day" sparked backlash on social media. She has apologized.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nursing News Source Type: news

Leading Doctors Discussed Creating Ethical Medical Miracles at the TIME 100 Summit
Speaking at the first Time 100 Summit in New York City on Tuesday, prominent geneticist George Church admitted that for about 10 years, he knew biological weapons could be specifically targeted to individual people. But he kept it to himself. Church, a professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School, participated in a panel discussing how to introduce breakthroughs in medicine, which can become life-saving miracles, in ethical and responsible ways. He discussed his decision not to share his knowledge widely as an example of a line he consciously decided not to cross for ethical reasons. “I kept that a secret and didn...
Source: TIME: Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized 2019 TIME 100 t100summit Source Type: news

Delivering Bad News: Is There a Wrong Way to Do It? Delivering Bad News: Is There a Wrong Way to Do It?
Is there a place for remote communications technology in delivering bad news to a patient and family? Medscape readers debate the ethics of telemedicine when giving patients dire news.Medscape Family Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care Article Source Type: news

Medical privacy versus public safety in aviation - Kenedi CA, Appel JM, Friedman SH.
Confidentiality, considered a fundamental principle of medical ethics, is potentially at odds with public safety when an airplane pilot is experiencing symptoms of mental illness. Reporting requirements for pilots vary across the world, and pilots can be s... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Problematizing sexual harassment in residential long-term care: the need for a more ethical prevention strategy - Grigorovich A, Kontos P.
ABSTRACTSupporting sexual rights in residential long-term care is ethically complex. The well-being of care workers and residents is inextricably linked, and increasingly recognized empirically, yet public policy in Canada generally continues to exclusivel... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Pig experiment raises ethical questions around brain damage
(Case Western Reserve University) The brain is more resilient than previously thought. In a groundbreaking experiment published in this week's issue of Nature, neuroscientists created an artificial circulation system that successfully restored some functions and structures in pig brains. The result challenges the notion that mammalian brains are fully and irreversibly damaged by a lack of oxygen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Revived' dead pig brains offer new research hopes
Ethicists fear research animals could end up in a 'grey-area - not alive, but not completely dead' Related items fromOnMedica Report helps explain Gulf War illness One in two women and one in three men will develop neurological disease NICE sets care standards for spasticity ‘Suicide tourism’ to Switzerland doubles in four years Head injuries linked to Alzheimer ’s and other disorders (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 18, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

‘ Partly Alive ’ : Scientists Revive Cells in Brains From Dead Pigs
In research that upends assumptions about brain death, researchers brought some cells back to life — or something like it. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Brain Ethics and Official Misconduct Animal Abuse, Rights and Welfare Research National Institutes of Health Nature (Journal) Yale University Nita Farahany your-feed-science Source Type: news

Scientists Restore Some Brain Activity in Recently Slaughtered Pigs
(NEW YORK) — Scientists restored some activity within the brains of pigs that had been slaughtered hours before, raising hopes for some medical advances and questions about the definition of death. The brains could not think or sense anything, researchers stressed. By medical standards “this is not a living brain,” said Nenad Sestan of the Yale School of Medicine, one of the researchers reporting the results Wednesday in the journal Nature. But the work revealed a surprising degree of resilience among cells within a brain that has lost its supply of blood and oxygen, he said. “Cell death in the brai...
Source: TIME: Science - April 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MALCOLM RITTER / AP Tags: Uncategorized Brain Activity onetime Source Type: news

Scientists Restore Some Brain Activity in Recently Slaughtered Pigs
(NEW YORK) — Scientists restored some activity within the brains of pigs that had been slaughtered hours before, raising hopes for some medical advances and questions about the definition of death. The brains could not think or sense anything, researchers stressed. By medical standards “this is not a living brain,” said Nenad Sestan of the Yale School of Medicine, one of the researchers reporting the results Wednesday in the journal Nature. But the work revealed a surprising degree of resilience among cells within a brain that has lost its supply of blood and oxygen, he said. “Cell death in the brai...
Source: TIME: Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized Brain Activity onetime Source Type: news