Targeting Senescent Cells to Reverse the Aging of the Heart

Almost a decade has passed since the first compelling demonstration that clearance of senescent cells in mice could produce rejuvenation. This validated decades of prior evidence, largely ignored in the research community, indicating that accumulation of senescent cells is a significant cause of degenerative aging. It was a wake-up call. Since then, numerous research groups have shown that targeted clearance of senescent cells reverses many age-related conditions and extends healthy life span in mice. It is easy to accomplish in the lab. Near any approach works, to the degree that it can destroy senescent cells without harming normal cells. As a consequence, a new biotech industry has come into being, a range of startups and programs working on clinical development of the first generation of senolytic drugs capable of safely removing senescent cells from aged tissues. As a result of this field of research, it has been shown that accumulation of senescent cells is an important part of the development of cardiovascular disease. Senescent foam cells accelerate the progression of atherosclerosis, driving the growth of fatty lesions that narrow and weaken blood vessels, leading to stroke and heart attack. Senescent cells drive the calcification of blood vessels, and degrade the function of smooth muscle tissue in blood vessel walls. Senescent cells are a part of the dysfunction that leads to cardiac hypertrophy, the enlargement and weakening of heart muscle that causes hear...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

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ConclusionCREDEM-DKD is an important new tool in the evaluation of treatment interventions in the DKD population.Trial RegistrationClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT02065791.
Source: Diabetes Therapy - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
In conclusion, elevated brain amyloid was associated with family history and APOE ε4 allele but not with multiple other previously reported risk factors for AD. Elevated amyloid was associated with lower test performance results and increased reports of subtle recent declines in daily cognitive function. These results support the hypothesis that elevated amyloid represents an early stage in the Alzheimer's continuum. Blood Metabolites as a Marker of Frailty https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/04/blood-metabolites-as-a-marker-of-frailty/ Frailty in older people is usually diagnosed in a sympt...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Health Heart Health Surgery Source Type: blogs
This study is par for the course, looking at Japanese Olympic participants. Interestingly, it hints at the upper end of the dose-response curve for physical activity, in that a longer career as a professional athlete may be detrimental in comparison to lesser degrees of exercise and training. From this large, retrospective cohort study targeting 3546 Japanese Olympic athletes, we observed significant lower mortality among Olympians compared with the Japanese general population. The overall standardised mortality ratio (SMR) was 0.29. The results were consistent with previous studies conducted in other non-Asian co...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we investigated the link between AF and senescence markers through the assessment of protein expression in the tissue lysates of human appendages from patients in AF, including paroxysmal (PAF) or permanent AF (PmAF), and in sinus rhythm (SR). The major findings of the study indicated that the progression of AF is strongly related to the human atrial senescence burden as determined by p53 and p16 expression. The stepwise increase of senescence (p53, p16), prothrombotic (TF), and proremodeling (MMP-9) markers observed in the right atrial appendages of patients in SR, PAF, and PmAF points toward multiple inter...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 19 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Simon Correa, Jessy Korina Pena-Esparragoza, Katherine M. Scovner, Sushrut S. Waikar, Finnian R. Mc CauslandBackgroundMyeloperoxidase (MPO) catalyzes the formation of reactive nitrogen species and levels are elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although increased oxidative stress and inflammation are associated with progression of CKD and cardiovascular disease (CVD), relationships between MPO concentration, CKD progression, CVD, and death remain unclear.Study DesignProspective cohort.Setting &Par...
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, high-dose NR induces the onset of WAT dysfunction, which may in part explain the deterioration of metabolic health. Towards a Rigorous Definition of Cellular Senescence https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/towards-a-rigorous-definition-of-cellular-senescence/ The accumulation of lingering senescent cells is a significant cause of aging, disrupting tissue function and generating chronic inflammation throughout the body. Even while the first senolytic drugs capable of selectively destroying these cells already exist, and while a number of biotech companies are working on the productio...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Exercise and Fitness Health Heart Health Source Type: blogs
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