Stopping the vicious cycle of rebound headaches

Rebound headaches, also known as medication overuse headaches, are caused by the frequent or excessive use of pain-relieving and/or antimigraine drugs to treat headache attacks that are already in progress. (Note that these are not the same as oral prophylactic or preventive medicines, which should be taken daily.) In other words, the same medications that initially relieve headache pain can themselves trigger subsequent headaches if they are used too often. Medication overuse headaches can be disabling, forcing people with this condition to take sick leave and to be less productive at work and home. To be diagnosed with medication overuse headaches, a person must experience headaches on more than 15 days per month for at least three months while taking pain relieving and/or antimigraine drugs. In addition to headache, other symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, light sensitivity, sound sensitivity, irritability, difficulty concentrating, insomnia, restlessness, and constipation. Medication overuse headache is a common headache disorder. Approximately one to two out of every 100 people has experienced medication overuse headache in the past year. This headache is more common in women, and in people with chronic pain conditions and who have depression and anxiety. Medication, then medication overuse headache: a vicious cycle Pain relieving or antimigraine medications may stop headache attack when taken as needed to relieve headache. But if a person with a primary headache dis...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Drugs and Supplements Headache Health Source Type: blogs

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Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
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Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
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Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Topical Review Source Type: research
Both persistent pain and cognitive decline prevalence increase with advancing age and are associated with functional decline. However, the association of pain and cognitive decline has not been evaluated yet by a systematic assessment of longitudinal studies. We aimed to assess the association of persistent pain as a risk factor for cognitive decline in community older adults, using data from longitudinal studies in a systematic review and meta-analysis. Publications were identified using a systematic search on PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases from inception to June 2019. Because heterogeneity across studies ...
Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Source Type: research
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Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research
In conclusion, GRIP allows for high-resolution assessment and presentation of pain location and distribution with minimal use of time.
Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
This study used eye-gaze tracking to examine attentional biases to pain-related stimuli in a clinical sample of youth with chronic pain and pain-free controls. The moderating role of attentional control was also examined. Youth with chronic pain (n = 102) and pain-free controls (n = 53) viewed images of children depicting varying levels of pain expressiveness paired with neutral faces while their eye gaze was recorded. Attentional control was assessed using both a questionnaire and a behavioural task. Both groups were more likely to first fixate on high pain faces but showed no such orienting bias for moderate or low pain ...
Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
Classical Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (cEDS) is a connective tissue disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in one of the type V collagen-encoding genes, COL5A1 or COL5A2. cEDS is characterized by generalized joint hypermobility and instability, hyperextensible, fragile skin, and delayed wound healing. Chronic pain is a major problem in cEDS patients, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown, and studies in animal models are lacking. Therefore, we assessed pain-related behaviors in haploinsufficient Col5a1+/− mice, which clinically mimic human cEDS. Compared to wild-type (WT) littermates, 15 to 20-week-ol...
Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
This study evaluated the relative efficacy of 4 treatment sessions each of 4 nonpharmacological treatments: (1) hypnotic cognitive therapy (using hypnosis to alter the meaning of pain); (2) standard cognitive therapy; (3) hypnosis focused on pain reduction, and (4) pain education. One hundred seventy-three individuals with chronic pain were randomly assigned to receive 4 sessions of 1 of the 4 treatments. Primary (pain intensity) and secondary outcome measures were administered by assessors unaware of treatment allocation at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. Treatment effects were evaluated u...
Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
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