Cetylpyridinium chloride is a potent AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) inducer and has therapeutic potential in cancer

Publication date: Available online 22 October 2019Source: MitochondrionAuthor(s): Sonia A. Allen, Sandipan Datta, Jose Sandoval, Alexey Tomilov, Thomas Sears, Kevin Woolard, James M. Angelastro, Gino A. CortopassiAbstractAMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a eukaryotic energy sensor and protector from mitochondrial/energetic stress that is also a therapeutic target for cancer and metabolic disease. Metformin is an AMPK inducer that has been used in cancer therapeutic trials. Through screening we isolated cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), a drug known to dose-dependently inhibit mitochondrial complex 1, as a potent and dose-dependent AMPK stimulator. Mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics changes have also been implicated in glioblastoma, which is the most aggressive form of brain tumors. Cetylpyridinium chloride has been administered in humans as a safe drug-disinfectant for several decades, and we report here that under in vitro conditions, cetylpyridinium chloride kills glioblastoma cells in a dose dependent manner at a higher efficacy compared to current standard of care drug, temozolomide.
Source: Mitochondrion - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research

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Antonio Lucena-Cacace1, Masayuki Umeda1, Lola E. Navas2,3 and Amancio Carnero2,3* 1Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan 2CIBERONC, ISCIII, Madrid, Spain 3Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBIS), Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío (HUVR), CSIC, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain Glioma Cancer Stem-Like Cells (GSCs) are a small subset of CD133+ cells with self-renewal properties and capable of initiating new tumors contributing to Glioma progression, maintenance, hierarchy, and complexity. GSCs are highly res...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Xuequn Xu†, J. N. Rashida Gnanaprakasam†, John Sherman† and Ruoning Wang* Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases, Hematology/Oncology &BMT, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States The adoptive transfer of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) through genetic engineering is one of the most promising new therapies for treating cancer patients. A robust CAR T cell-mediated anti-tumor response requires the coordination of nutrient and energy supplies with CAR T cell expansion and function. Howe...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusion The elucidation of the function of circRNAs is an emerging field of science with a tremendous potential after previously being dismissed as RNA artifacts. They are ubiquitously expressed and thousands of members have already been identified. This fact only expands their potential to possibly enhance our knowledge to understand the difference between health and disease. Owing to their structure stability and their presence in exosomes circRNAs may also exert their function in an autocrine, paracrine and possible endocrine fashion. In addition, the fact that circRNAs are widely distributed in the cellular compart...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
In this study, we designed and synthesized novel amino acid and polypeptide modified polysaccharide derivatives associated with fluorescent nanomaterials for producing nanohybrids with functionalities for bioimaging and cell penetrating. Carboxymethylcellulose (CMCel) was chemically biofunctionalized with L-cysteine (CMCelCys) or poly-L-arginine (CMCelPolyArg) and the conjugates were used as capping ligands for synthesizing fluorescent AgInS2 quantum dots (AIS-QDs) in aqueous colloidal media. These systems were characterized by FTIR, NMR, UV-Vis, TEM-EDX, DLS, zeta potential and PL for assessing physicochemical properties,...
Source: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Int J Biol Macromol Source Type: research
Qiancheng Deng1, Yangyang Luo1,2, Christopher Chang3, Haijing Wu1, Yan Ding4* and Rong Xiao1* 1Hunan Key Laboratory of Medical Epigenetics, Department of Dermatology, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China 2Department of Dermatology, Hunan Children's Hospital, Changsha, China 3Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, United States 4Department of Dermatology, Hainan Provincial Dermatology Disease Hospital, Haikou, China Autoimmune diseases are usually complex and multifactorial, characterized by aberrant produc...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
We examined concentration-dependent cytotoxic, genotoxic, apoptotic, and ROS generating effects of curcumin at C-6 cells and L-929 cells. The cells were incubated with different doses of curcumin (10-100 µM) for 24 hours. Higher doses of curcumin resulted in greater cellular death of cancer than of normal cells at higher concentrations. Curcumin also induced ROS generation in cancer than normal cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Our results showed that curcumin-induced DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.001). At high curcumin concentration such as 80 µM, the proportions of live cells in can...
Source: Cellular and Molecular Biology - Category: Molecular Biology Tags: Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand) Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 25 April 2018 Source:Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - General Subjects Author(s): Fernanda Nunes, Letícia Barros Silva, Evelyn Winter, Adny Henrique Silva, Leônidas João de Melo, Michele Rode, Marcos Antônio Pinto Martins, Nilo Zanatta, Sarah Coelho Feitosa, Hélio Gauze Bonacorso, Tânia Beatriz Creczynski-Pasa Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive glioma, characterized by brain invasion capability. Being very resistant to the current therapies, since even under treatment, surgery, and chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ), patients achi...
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) General Subjects - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
Abstract Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive glioma, characterized by brain invasion capability. Being very resistant to the current therapies, since even under treatment, surgery, and chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ), patients achieve a median survival of one year. In the search for more effective therapies, new molecules have been designed. For nervous system cancers, molecules able to cross the blood-brain barrier are handled with priority. Accordingly, tacrine was chosen for this study and the inclusion of spiro-heterocyclic rings was done in its structure resulting in new compounds. Cytotoxic a...
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Biochim Biophys Acta Source Type: research
CONCLUSION Cognitive impairment can affect daily functioning, quality of life, and capacity to work in patients with cancer and those in remission. Consequently, cognitive assessment is now an important and necessary part of a comprehensive oncological care plan. Cancer-related cognitive impairment might be due to the direct effects of the cancer itself, nonspecific factors, or comorbid conditions that are independent of the disease and/or due to the adverse effects of the treatment or combination of treatments given for the disease. The prevalence and extent of cognitive impairment associated with cancer is recognized but...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognition Current Issue Neuro oncology Neurology Review cancer chemotherapy cognitive impairment neuropsychological assessment treatment Source Type: research
When a neurosurgeon looks at a glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer, she sees a dark mass bullying its way through the brain. When an oncologist talks to a patient with glioblastoma, he tempers expectations, talking in months rather than years. When a molecular biologist thinks about glioblastoma, she thinks about the tumor ’s sweet tooth — the sugar it consumes to fuel its frenetic growth. And when you put all these people together — you get a plan to fight cancer.Armed with new research tools and a grant from the David Geffen School of Medicine ’s newSeed Grant Program, a team of UCLA ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
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