How to Prevent Your Anxiety from Rubbing Off On Your Child

You're reading How to Prevent Your Anxiety from Rubbing Off On Your Child, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Sometimes, it seems like our kids aren’t learning anything from us—but that’s simply not the case. Kids absorb all the information around them and learn by example. While that can be a good thing, it can also be a problem if you don’t want to pass on certain behaviors you’re modeling for them, like anxiety. If you’re struggling with anxiety, first remember that it’s nothing to be ashamed of. Lots of people have trouble controlling their anxiety. But it’s also important to realize that your behavior is bound to transfer to your child and could cause them to develop anxiety problems of their own. With that in mind, it’s essential to address problems with your emotional health as soon as you possibly can. According to a pew research study, 70% of teens struggle with anxiety and depression, which can start when children are much younger. So how can you avoid passing on the anxiety that’s causing you nothing but distress? Here’s what you need to know. How Does Anxiety Affect Children? It shouldn’t be too surprising that children are sensitive to the emotions their parents may be experiencing. They pick up on even subtle cues and shape their world view of what’s &...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: depression family featured psychology self improvement Source Type: blogs

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Authors: Sancassiani F, Romano F, Balestrieri M, Caraci F, Di Sciascio G, Drago F, Hardoy MC, Moro MF, Roncone R, Piras M, Preti A, Dell'Osso L, Faravelli C, Carta MG Abstract Introduction: The study aimed to see if a community survey conducted by clinical interviewers with semi-structured psychiatric interviews shows lifetime prevalence rates of Specific Phobia (SP) similar to those found by surveys carried out by lay interviewers and if the high level of impairment found in SP may be confirmed. Methods: This is a community survey on an Italian nationwide sample randomly selected from registers of municipaliti...
Source: Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Clin Pract Epidemiol Ment Health Source Type: research
Conclusion It is clear that clinically, there is still much to be learnt about alexithymia and its relationship with a range of related phenomena. Firstly, is alexithymia a continuous and stable trait independent of psychological or somatic symptomology that is developed during childhood? Or is it instead a reactive state induced by trauma and distress at any age, which serves to defend against intense and upsetting emotions? This impacts on treatment options. For example, should we be focussing on early childhood interventions which target the child's emotional environment and parenting to encourage emotional exp...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
A highly effective psychotherapy called cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) focuses on how our thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes can affect our feelings and behavior. Traditional CBT treatment usually requires weekly 30- to 60-minute sessions over 12 to 20 weeks. A faster option now emerging is intensive CBT (I-CBT), which employs much longer sessions concentrated into a month, week, or weekend — or sometimes a single eight-hour session. CBT helps people learn tools to reframe different types of thinking, such as black-and-white thinking (I can’t do anything right) and emotional reasoning (I feel you dislike me, ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Mental Health Parenting Source Type: blogs
Conclusions Our results raise concerns regarding generic terminologies of “antipsychotics” and “antidepressants” since the conventional indication-based nomenclature does not fit well with the official indication. [...] © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New YorkArticle in Thieme eJournals: Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  Full text
Source: Pharmacopsychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Original Paper Source Type: research
Patients with mild general anxiety disorder (GAD) or panic disorder (PD) may be less likely to benefit from antidepressants than patients with severe cases of these disorders, suggests ameta-analysis inDepression and Anxiety.While previous studies have suggested that the benefits of antidepressants are smaller in patients with mild versus severe symptoms of depression, few have examined how symptom severity might influence other conditions for which antidepressants are prescribed.Ymkje Anna de Vries, Ph.D., and colleagues of the University of Groningen, The Netherlands, combined patient data from randomized, controlled tri...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: antidepressants Depression and Anxiety duloxetine fluoxetine general anxiety disorder meta-analysis panic disorder paroxetine Ymkje Anna de Vries Source Type: research
Common mental disorders including depression, generalised anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, phobias, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affect approximately 8% of the world population (WHO, 2017). Historically, emphasis of burden has been placed on severe, organic mental disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. In parallel to these types of neurological-based, chronic mental diseases, mental conditions considered to be more common in the community, while not typically considered 'severe', are by no means 'mild' (Goldberg, 1994).
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research paper Source Type: research
Conclusion. The audio-digital recording method provides a useful second opinion that can affirm the need for a different treatment intervention in these anxious patients. A second live assessment would have required additional clinic time and added patient burden. The audio-digital recording method is less burdensome than live second opinion assessments and might have utility in both research and clinical practice settings. Keywords: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), anxiolytic medications, anxious symptoms, audio-digital recording, dual review, second opinions Anxiety symptoms are prevalent in most populations wher...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Original Research anxiolytic medications anxious symptoms audio-digital recording dual review Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) second opinions Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewHistorically, anxiety disorders have not been considered as important determinants of suicide, but in the last years, many works have challenged this assumption. Here, we will review the available evidence on the relationship between suicide and anxiety disorders (e.g., obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and body dysmorphic disorder), with special emphasis on findings published in the last years.Recent FindingsOverall, anxiety disorders increase the risk of suicide. Specifically, 16% of patients with social anxiety disorder r...
Source: Current Psychiatry Reports - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety‐related disorders based on randomized placebo‐controlled trials. We included 41 studies that randomly assigned patients (N = 2,843) with acute stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder (PD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), or social anxiety disorder (SAD) to CBT or a psychological or pill placebo condition. Findings demonstrated moderate placebo‐controlled effects of CBT on target disorder symptoms (Hedges’ g = 0...
Source: Depression and Anxiety - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: REVIEW Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The age-appropriate CIDI65+ led to higher prevalence rates of anxiety disorders in the elderly, yet to weaker associations with comorbidities and impaired quality of life compared with previous studies. PMID: 29031568 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research
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