The Impact of Environmental Chronic and Toxic Stress on Asthma

AbstractSeveral factors have been associated with the development of asthma and asthma-related morbidity and mortality. Exposures in the environment such as allergens and air pollutants have traditionally been linked to the risk of asthma and asthma outcomes. More recent literature has identified chronic psychosocial stress as an additional environmental exposure to consider in relation to asthma. Adverse childhood events (ACEs) and chronic and toxic stress have been associated with chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Chronic stress has also been shown to result in biological changes such as expression of immunologic genes, changes in expression of the beta-adrenergic (B2AR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR- α) genes, cytokine regulation, and alterations in the hypothalamic pituitary axis and cortisol levels which all may affect asthma pathophysiology and therapeutic response among patients exposed to chronic stress. Recent research has revealed associations between ACEs and chronic and toxic stress and asthma risk in pre-conception to early childhood as well as morbidity and response to asthma treatments among pediatric and adult age groups. As some populations are more significantly impacted by asthma such as racial and ethnic minority groups, the influence of psychosocial stress has also been explored as a potential factor responsible for observed disparities in asthma prevalence and outcomes among th...
Source: Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

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In conclusion, this study elucidated that combination of cisplatin and XAV-939 exerted cytotoxic and genotoxic effect to abrogate CSC mediated chemoresistance in HNSCC in synergistic manner.
Source: Mutation Research Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 17 August 2019Source: Revista Clínica Española (English Edition)Author(s): J. Masip, J.R. Germà LluchAbstractRecent epidemiological studies have shown that alcohol consumption can increase the risk of arterial hypertension, atrial fibrillation and gastrointestinal and breast cancer. Various sectors are therefore promoting abstinence from alcohol. However, light alcohol consumption has once again been shown to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction and diabetes but with an unclear effect on cerebrovascular disease. The decision to consume alcohol should therefore be ...
Source: Revista Clinica Espanola - Category: Internal Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusion Analysis of the pleiotropic effects of IL-33 on multiple immunological cells (macrophages, mastocytes), as well as neurological cells of medulla oblongata, dorsal root ganglion, antigen-induced arthritis system, carrageen, and formalin, shows that this alarmin plays curtail, yet not fully known role in mediating inflammation, especially in chronic inflammatory pulmonary diseases such as asthma, COPD, and OSA. Taken into consideration the engagement in this process, in particular of mastocytes and their secretion of CXCL2, 4, 8, and other cytokines, there is no doubt regarding the etiopathogenic role of IL-33 in...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Discussion There are numerous microbial communities inhabited in the human body, which is critical to human health. The relationship between human microbiome and diseases received much attention from both medical and bioinformatics community recently. However, traditional methods to detect their association is costly and labor-intensive. Thus, we proposed here a new computational model called NBLPIHMDA to infer potential microbe-disease associations. NBLPIHMDA first combined known microbe-disease associations in HMDAD and the Gaussian interaction profile kernel similarity to construct disease similarity network and microb...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Conclusion Human microbiome is normal flora for humans, which has been proved to be of symbiotic relationship with humans and harmless to humans. If the microbes that breed in the human body become “unhealthy,” it will definitely affect the host's physical condition. People are continuing to explore the pathologic relationship between microorganisms and the human body through high-throughput sequencing technologies and analysis systems. However, it is a pity that their pathogenesis cannot be fully understood as yet. Considering that relying only on conventional experimental methods is time-consuming an...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Author Affiliations open 1Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada 2Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland 3University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland 4Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands 5MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK 6National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA 7University Medical Center Groningen, Gron...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: Peroral arsenic has little effect on local airway immune responses to bacteria but compromises respiratory epithelial barrier integrity, increasing systemic translocation of inhaled pathogens and small molecules. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1878 Received: 09 March 2017 Revised: 14 August 2017 Accepted: 16 August 2017 Published: 28 September 2017 Address correspondence to M.B. Fessler, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 111 T.W. Alexander Dr., P.O. Box 12233, Maildrop D2-01, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 USA. Telephone: (919) 541-3701. Email: fesslerm@niehs.nih.gov *Current address: UN...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: These findings suggest that the potential magnitude of health benefits of air quality policies targeting O3, health co-benefits of climate mitigation policies, and health implications of climate change-driven changes in O3 concentrations, are larger than previously thought. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1390 Received: 17 November 2016 Revised: 19 June 2017 Accepted: 20 June 2017 Published: 28 August 2017 Address correspondence to C.S. Malley, Stockholm Environment Institute, Environment Dept., Environment Building, Wentworth Way, University of York, York, YO10 5NG, UK. Telephone: 44 1904 323685. Email: chri...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Author Affiliations open 1Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden 2European Institute for Systems Biology and Medicine, CNRS-ENS-UCBL, Université de Lyon, Lyon, France 3Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden 4Department of Paediatrics, Sachs’ Children’s Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden 5Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden PDF Version (136 KB) Abstract About This Article Supplemental Material Background: Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution can lead ...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusion: Going beyond the powerful scientific and economic arguments for urgent action to reduce the burning of fossil fuels is the strong moral imperative to protect our most vulnerable populations. Citation: Perera FP. 2017. Multiple threats to child health from fossil fuel combustion: impacts of air pollution and climate change. Environ Health Perspect 125:141–148; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP299 Address correspondence to F.P. Perera, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 722 West 168th St. ...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Commentaries Children's Health February 2017 Source Type: research
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