Racial Disparities Persist With Childhood Cancers
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - October 4, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Family Medicine, Oncology, Pediatrics, Research, News, Source Type: news

What Is the Survival Rate for Childhood Liver Cancer?
Title: What Is the Survival Rate for Childhood Liver Cancer?Category: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 9/29/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 9/29/2021 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - September 29, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Ethiopia: School Provides Support to Childhood Cancer Center
[Ethiopian Herald] ADDIS ABABA-IMS Makeup School donated various food items including oil, eggs and detergents to cancer patients at Tesfa Addis Parents Childhood Cancer Organization (TAPCCO). (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 19, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Inspiration4 Makes Space History With First-Ever All-Civilian Orbital Launch
In the end, the camping trip up the flank of Mt. Rainier that the Inspiration4 crew made back in April may have done more than anything else to prepare them for tonight’s successful launch into Earth orbit, at 8:02 p.m. ET from pad 39A at Cape Canaveral, Florida. Even the day before the launch, at a T-minus-27-hour press conference, they were still talking about the experience and what it taught them. Hayley Arceneaux, 29, a physician assistant at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and who tonight became the first person to fly in space with a prosthetic—a rod in place of her left femur, which she lost...
Source: TIME: Science - September 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Space Source Type: news

Why is St. Jude Children ’s Research Hospital Involved in SpaceX Launch?
The Inspiration4 launch is helping to raise money for the hospital, which helps treat pediatric cancer. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kenneth Chang Tags: St Jude Children ' s Research Hospital Children and Childhood Cancer Space and Astronomy Arceneaux, Hayley Source Type: news

New Tool Better Predicts Subsequent Cancers in Child Survivors New Tool Better Predicts Subsequent Cancers in Child Survivors
An eHealth cancer predisposition screening tool greatly increases the odds of predicting subsequent malignancies in childhood cancer survivors.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - September 15, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q & amp;A podcast: Cancer is the leading disease-related cause of death in children
One in every 266 children and adolescents will be diagnosed with cancer by age 20, according to the American Cancer Society. Sarcoma — the term for a group of cancers that begin in the bones and in the soft or connective tissues — is one of the more common types of childhood cancer.  Fortunately, recent treatment advances have increased survival rates. Of children diagnosed with cancer, 84% now survive five years or more. One of the… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - September 9, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Consumer Health: Childhood cancer
September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, which makes this a good time to learn about three of the most common types of cancers in children: acute lymphocytic leukemia, neuroblastoma and pediatric brain tumors. Acute lymphocytic leukemia Acute lymphocytic leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. It's the most common type of cancer in children, and treatments result in a good chance for a cure. Acute lymphocytic leukemia also can occur in adults, though… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - September 6, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Cancer symptoms: Two fruits have a 'strong protective effect against childhood leukaemia'
EVERY day in the UK, 12 children - and their carers - will receive the heart-breaking news that they have cancer. As September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, Express.co.uk are highlighting the latest research in this field. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Greater Cincinnati nonprofit adds former United Way CEO, Cincinnati Bell exec to board
Three prominent Greater Cincinnati business leaders have been tapped to join the board of a Loveland-based nonprofit that counts Cincinnati Children ’s Hospital as one of its largest grant recipients. CancerFree Kids, a Loveland-based nonprofit that supports childhood cancer research, said the new appointees will help it grow more relationships with the business community and expand its impact. The nonprofit earlier this summer announced its largest donation initiative to date.  The new board… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - August 25, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Liz Engel Source Type: news

Age, Ethnicity Tied to Less Follow-Up Care in Childhood Cancer Survivors
MONDAY, Aug. 16, 2021 -- Age and ethnic background are associated with inadequate follow-up care among childhood cancer survivors, according to a study published online July 17 in JNCI Cancer Spectrum. Joel Milam, Ph.D., from the Keck School of... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 16, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Childhood cancer care in Africa hit hard by pandemic
Nearly 30,000 children in sub-Saharan Africa are believed to have died from cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the Regional Office of the World Health Organization (WHO).  (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - August 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nigeria: Protect Breastfeeding - Strengthening Workplace Policies for Exclusive Breastfeeding in Nigeria
[Nigeria Health Watch] Breastfeeding provides essential nutrients to newborns and infants, which translate to proper growth and development from childhood to adulthood. There are many benefits to breastfeeding for both infants and mothers. These include, a reduced risk of infections, heart disease, obesity and others, for the infant and a reduced risk of breast and ovarian cancers, heart disease, etc., for the mother. It also has future economic benefits for countries. Avoidable illnesses and deaths resulting from not breastfeed (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 12, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Four Civilian Astronauts. Three Days in Orbit. One Giant Leap. Meet the Inspiration4 Crew
Jared Isaacman is not likely to forget the day he almost died at 10,000 ft., back in 2011. He was flying closely alongside three others, all in F-14 Tomcats, tearing along at 460 m.p.h. over the desert southwest of Las Vegas. The group, part of Isaacman’s Black Diamonds aerobatic team, was rehearsing for an air show and trying to come up with a flashy new finish. What they decided on called for flying in a square formation and then suddenly veering toward one another, before pulling back at the last second. It would be a nifty thing to watch go right—and a terrible thing to watch go wrong. [time-brightcove not-...
Source: TIME: Science - August 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Magazine Space Special Project Source Type: news

Four Civilian Astronauts. Three Days in Orbit. One Giant Leap. Meet the Inspiration4 Crew
TIME Studios is producing the Netflix documentary series Countdown: Inspiration 4 Mission to Space, starting Sept. 6. Jared Isaacman is not likely to forget the day he almost died at 10,000 ft., back in 2011. He was flying closely alongside three others, all in L-39 fighter jets, tearing along at 460 m.p.h. over the desert southwest of Las Vegas. The group, part of Isaacman’s Black Diamonds aerobatic team, was rehearsing for an air show and trying to come up with a flashy new finish. What they decided on called for flying in a square formation and then suddenly veering toward one another, before pulling back at the l...
Source: TIME: Science - August 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Magazine Space Special Project Source Type: news

St. Jude ’s Fundraising Chief on Space Missions, ‘Pushing Boundaries’ and a Record-Setting Year
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, which looks after children with cancer while also researching how to eliminate the pediatric form of the disease, raised $2 billion in donations in its last fiscal year. It’s a record for an independent charity, and an impressive feat in a year when donors had more causes than ever vying for their attention and money. Richard Shadyac, the CEO of the American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities (St. Jude’s fundraising organization), attributes that success to a nimble pivot to different fundraising strategies—one of which was a collaboration with Inspiration4,...
Source: TIME: Science - August 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Belinda Luscombe Tags: Uncategorized Magazine Space Special Project Source Type: news

From Civilians to Astronauts: How the Inspiration4 Crew Trained to Go to Space
If you want to go to space, Inspiration4 commander Jared Issacman believes, it helps to climb a mountain first, in order to bond as a group over a shared physical struggle. Any mountain will do, really, but for the crew of Inspiration4—the first all-civilian team bound for orbital space, set to fly aboard a SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft next month—it was Mt. Rainier, the 14,100-ft. volcanic peak in western Washington State. “I wanted them to get comfortable with being uncomfortable,” says Isaacman, 39, “because not everything about space will be comfortable.” If that’s what he wan...
Source: TIME: Science - August 5, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Space Special Project Source Type: news

The First All-Civilian Team of Astronauts Is Headed to Orbit. Here ’s What to Know About the Inspiration4 Mission
The prospect of space travel will feel much different after the Inspiration4 mission—the first orbital mission with an all-civilian crew—launches this fall. Once that happens, the history of human spaceflight will instantly be divided into two eras. There will have been the six decades after the first human circled above the Earth in 1961, when orbital space was mostly a realm solely for nation-states and their hand-picked astronauts. And then there will be the post-2021 era following Inspiration4, when space travel will come definitively within the grasp of private corporations and citizens—an era in whi...
Source: TIME: Science - August 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized Space Special Project Source Type: news

Incidence of suicide mortality among childhood cancer survivors: a population-based retrospective study - Fu XL, Wu H, Qian Y, Jin XH, Yu HR, Du L, Chen HL, Shi YQ.
The aim of our study was to investigate the suicide rates among childhood cancer survivors and assess factors associated with higher suicide risk. A review of data from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program from 1975 to 2016 was perfor... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 31, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Geneticists reveal how mutation causes childhood cancer; use drug to reverse its effects
(Trinity College Dublin) Geneticists from Trinity College Dublin have discovered how a specific genetic mutation (H3K27M) causes a devastating, incurable childhood cancer, known as diffuse midline glioma (DMG), and - in lab studies working with model cell types - successfully reverse its effects to slow cancer cell growth with a targeted drug. Their landmark work - just published in leading international journal, Nature Genetics - translates crucial new understanding of the genetics of DMG progression into a highly promising, targeted therapeutic approach and offers significant hope of improved treatments in the future. (S...
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 22, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists link frailty and neurocognitive decline in childhood cancer survivors
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have shown that frailty contributes to neurocognitive decline in young adult survivors of childhood cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Forget the Bezos and Branson Spaceflights. The Real Deal Happens This Fall
This has been a big month for billionaires in space. On July 11, Richard Branson flew aboard his Virgin Galactic VSS Unity spacecraft 80 km (50 mi) up to suborbital altitude, returned safely to Earth, and earned his astronaut wings in the process. Tuesday morning, Jeff Bezos followed, flying his Blue Origin New Shepard ship even higher—100 km (62 mi) up—and similarly joined the astronaut club. The media did what the media will always do in situations like this—present company included—which was to find a catchy hook (Billionaire Space Race!) and devote no end of coverage to the Branson-Bezos doings....
Source: TIME: Science - July 20, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Zero Childhood Cancer to continue mission of curing childhood cancer with $600k donation
(Children's Cancer Institute Australia) The Lott's $600,000 contribution will be used to enhance the research capabilities of the Zero Childhood Cancer Program, to give every child with cancer in Australia the very best chance of survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 14, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New generation anti-cancer drug shows promise for children with brain tumors
(Walter and Eliza Hall Institute) A genetic map of an aggressive childhood brain tumour called medulloblastoma has helped researchers identify a new generation anti-cancer drug that can be repurposed as an effective treatment for the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 7, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Metabolic enzyme promotes neuroblastoma aggressiveness
(Boston University School of Medicine) High-risk neuroblastoma is an aggressive childhood cancer with poor treatment outcomes. Despite intensive chemotherapy and radiotherapy, less than 50 percent of these children survive for five years. While the genetics of human neuroblastoma have been extensively studied, actionable therapeutics are limited. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 7, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Dutch and German childhood cancer centers embark on unique research collaboration
(Princess M á xima Center for Pediatric Oncology) The Princess M á xima Center for pediatric oncology in the Netherlands is to embark on a close collaboration with German top centers in the field of childhood cancer research. With this strategic collaboration, the Princess M á xima Center and the Hopp-KiTZ childhood cancer center aim to accelerate development towards even better treatment options for children with cancer. With this 'Twinning Program', the organizations are joining forces as European centers of excellence in the field of pediatric cancer research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 5, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers on a mission to fight deadly childhood cancer
(University of South Australia) Neuroblastoma is the deadliest and most common solid cancer in young children the world over, accounting for 15 per cent of all childhood cancer deaths. But Australian researchers are taking the first steps to find the cause and better treatments for this devastating disease which affects children under the age of five. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 3, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Local Black philanthropists form committee to save children ’s lives
In the 1960s in the United States, with the civil rights movement in full swing, entertainer Danny Thomas took a stand for justice and equality that changed the course of history for kids diagnosed with childhood cancer. Thomas founded St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1962, making it the first fully integrated children’s hospital in the South. He chose the location in the segregated Jim Crow South by design: it would be a beacon — and national symbol —… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 1, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Laura Newpoff Source Type: news

Local Black philanthropists form committee to save children ’s lives
In the 1960s in the United States, with the civil rights movement in full swing, entertainer Danny Thomas took a stand for justice and equality that changed the course of history for kids diagnosed with childhood cancer. Thomas founded St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1962, making it the first fully integrated children’s hospital in the South. He chose the location in the segregated Jim Crow South by design: it would be a beacon — and national symbol —… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 1, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Laura Newpoff Source Type: news

NIDCR's Summer 2021 E-Newsletter
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. NIDCR's Summer 2021 E-Newsletter In this issue: NIDCR News Funding Opportunities & Related Notices NIH/HHS News Subscribe to NICDR News Science Advances   Grantee News   NIDCR News NIDCR to Release Report on Oral Health in America As a 20-year follow-up to the seminal Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General, NIDCR will release Oral Health in America: Advances and Challenges in the fall of 2021. The report will illuminate new directions...
Source: NIDCR Science News - July 1, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

CU Cancer Center researcher studies oil & gas exposure effect on childhood leukemia risk
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) A pilot study of childhood leukemia patients living near Colorado's oil and gas drilling sites recently led to an American Cancer Society (ACS) grant award for CU Cancer Center member Lisa McKenzie PhD, MPH. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

International study of rare childhood cancer finds genetic clues, potential for tailored therapy
Rhabdomyosarcoma, or RMS, is a rare cancer that affects the muscles and other soft tissues. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - June 24, 2021 Category: American Health Source Type: news

New microscopy method reveals single childhood cancer cells in unprecedented detail
(Princess M á xima Center for Pediatric Oncology) A new technique to look at tumors under the microscope has revealed the cellular make-up of Wilm's tumors, a childhood kidney cancer, in unprecedented detail. This new approach could help understand how tumors develop and grow, and fuel research into new treatments for children's cancers. Scientists at the Princess M á xima Center for pediatric oncology developed a new imaging technique to study millions of cells in 3D tissue, revealing hundreds of features from each individual cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetic discovery could help guide treatment for aggressive childhood cancer
(Institute of Cancer Research) A new study could lead to improved decision making in assigning treatments for children with the aggressive cancer rhabdomyosarcoma after revealing key genetic changes underlying development of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Searching for the cell of origin of childhood brain cancer
(Universit à di Trento) Promising findings from a study coordinated by a research team of the University of Trento on medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children affecting the central nervous system. For the first time, scientists have grown organoids in the laboratory to simulate tumor tissue, and have identified the type of cell from which the tumor may originate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 24, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

International study of rare childhood cancer finds genetic clues, potential for tailored therapy
(NIH/National Cancer Institute) In children with rhabdomyosarcoma, or RMS, a rare cancer that affects the muscles and other soft tissues, the presence of mutations in several genes, including TP53, MYOD1, and CDKN2A, appear to be associated with a more aggressive form of the disease and a poorer chance of survival. This finding is from the largest-ever international study on RMS, led by scientists at the National Cancer Institute ’ s (NCI) Center for Cancer Research, part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 24, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study reveals racial and ethnic disparities in childhood cancers by single year of age
(Wiley) New research uncovers substantial differences in rates of childhood cancers when considering single year of age rather than grouping several years together. The study published by Wiley early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, also found that minority children have different risks than white children for many types of cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Targeted therapy could be first line treatment for childhood cancer
(Newcastle University) Scientists studying a common childhood cancer have made a major breakthrough which could lead to a cure for some youngsters who would not have survived the condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 21, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Nerve tumor in children: better tolerable chemotherapy without loss of efficacy
(St. Anna Children's Cancer Research Institute) The initial chemotherapy of aggressive childhood nerve tumors, so-called high-risk neuroblastomas, is crucial for ultimate survival. It has now been shown that the chemotherapy regimen used by the European Neuroblastoma Study Group is equally efficacious but better tolerated than a highly effective regimen from the US. This was the conclusion of an international trial coordinated by St. Anna Children's Cancer Research Institute. The study was published in the prestigious Journal of Clinical Oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study sheds light on treatment options for devastating childhood brain cancer
(Washington University School of Medicine) Research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that children with average risk medulloblastoma can receive radiation to a smaller volume of the brain at the end of a six-week course of treatment and still maintain the same disease control as those receiving radiation to a larger area. But the dose of preventive radiation treatments given to the whole brain and spine over the six-week regimen cannot be reduced without reducing survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 10, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

NIDCR Science News - June 2021
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. A monthly update of NIDCR-supported science advances, as reported by grantee institutions and NIH. The Creatures Crawling Within  Cell migration study could shed light on cancer spread NIDCR • May 6, 2021 New Wiki on Salivary Proteins May Transform Diagnostic Testing and Personalized Medicine University at Buffalo • May 25, 2021 A Gentler Strategy for Avoiding Childhood Dental DecayUniversit...
Source: NIDCR Science News - June 2, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Optic nerve firing may spark growth of vision-threatening childhood tumor
NIH-funded pre-clinical study supports key role of neural activity in brain cancers. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - June 1, 2021 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Cancer in Kids May Present as Musculoskeletal Symptoms, Complicating Diagnosis Cancer in Kids May Present as Musculoskeletal Symptoms, Complicating Diagnosis
Childhood cancer may present with musculoskeletal symptoms that mimic the features of rheumatic diseases, potentially leading to misdiagnosis, diagnostic delay and inappropriate treatment, caution researchers in Italy.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 1, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Optic nerve firing may spark growth of vision-threatening childhood tumor
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) In a study of mice, researchers showed how the act of seeing light may trigger the formation of vision-harming tumors in young children who are born with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) cancer predisposition syndrome. The research team, funded by the National Institutes of Health, focused on tumors that grow within the optic nerve, which relays visual signals from the eyes to brain. They discovered that the neural activity which underlies these signals can both ignite and feed the tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 1, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Childhood cancer discovery may stop tumour spread before it starts
(University of British Columbia) A new discovery in Ewing sarcoma, an aggressive and often fatal childhood cancer, has uncovered the potential to prevent cancer cells from spreading beyond their primary tumour site. Researchers with the University of British Columbia and BC Cancer have learned that Ewing sarcoma cells--and likely other types of cancer cells--are able to develop a shield that protects them from the harsh environment of the bloodstream and other locations as they search for a new place to settle, or metastasize. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 1, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Blood test detects childhood tumors based on their epigenetic profiles
(St. Anna Children's Cancer Research Institute) A new study exploits the characteristic epigenetic signatures of childhood tumors to detect, classify and monitor the disease. The scientists analyzed short fragments of tumor DNA that are circulating in the blood. These " liquid biopsy " analyses exploit the unique epigenetic landscape of bone tumors and do not depend on any genetic alterations, which are rare in childhood cancers. This approach promises to improve personalized diagnostics and, possibly, future therapies of childhood tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies risk for some childhood cancer patients developing secondary leukaemia
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) New study used whole genome sequencing to gain further understanding of why some children develop secondary leukaemia after neuroblastoma treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 28, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New insight into when CAR T is effective against childhood leukaemia
(University College London) Scientists and clinicians at UCL and Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) studying the effectiveness of CAR T-cell therapies in children with leukaemia, have discovered a small sub-set of T-cells that are likely to play a key role in whether the treatment is successful. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 24, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Anthony Fauci, 100 Days Into the Biden Administration, Is Finally Getting to Do His Job
When Dr. Anthony Fauci arrived at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. for his first White House press briefing under the new Biden Administration, he could see things would be different. It was the day after the Inauguration, and President Joe Biden was eager to get the country’s COVID-19 response back on track. Five minutes before he addressed the public, Fauci spoke with the new President. “He said, ‘I want you to just go and tell the science, explain to people that if we make mistakes, we’re going to fix the mistakes and we’re not going to dwell on the mistakes. Let science be communicated to the public...
Source: TIME: Health - May 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Multimodal therapy may hold key to treating aggressive childhood cancer
(Children's Cancer Institute Australia) Scientists at Children's Cancer Institute found combination of therapies appears to be effective against high-risk neuroblastoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 16, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news