Geneticists reveal how mutation causes childhood cancer; use drug to reverse its effects
(Trinity College Dublin) Geneticists from Trinity College Dublin have discovered how a specific genetic mutation (H3K27M) causes a devastating, incurable childhood cancer, known as diffuse midline glioma (DMG), and - in lab studies working with model cell types - successfully reverse its effects to slow cancer cell growth with a targeted drug. Their landmark work - just published in leading international journal, Nature Genetics - translates crucial new understanding of the genetics of DMG progression into a highly promising, targeted therapeutic approach and offers significant hope of improved treatments in the future. (S...
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 22, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists link frailty and neurocognitive decline in childhood cancer survivors
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have shown that frailty contributes to neurocognitive decline in young adult survivors of childhood cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Forget the Bezos and Branson Spaceflights. The Real Deal Happens This Fall
This has been a big month for billionaires in space. On July 11, Richard Branson flew aboard his Virgin Galactic VSS Unity spacecraft 80 km (50 mi) up to suborbital altitude, returned safely to Earth, and earned his astronaut wings in the process. Tuesday morning, Jeff Bezos followed, flying his Blue Origin New Shepard ship even higher—100 km (62 mi) up—and similarly joined the astronaut club. The media did what the media will always do in situations like this—present company included—which was to find a catchy hook (Billionaire Space Race!) and devote no end of coverage to the Branson-Bezos doings....
Source: TIME: Science - July 20, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Zero Childhood Cancer to continue mission of curing childhood cancer with $600k donation
(Children's Cancer Institute Australia) The Lott's $600,000 contribution will be used to enhance the research capabilities of the Zero Childhood Cancer Program, to give every child with cancer in Australia the very best chance of survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 14, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New generation anti-cancer drug shows promise for children with brain tumors
(Walter and Eliza Hall Institute) A genetic map of an aggressive childhood brain tumour called medulloblastoma has helped researchers identify a new generation anti-cancer drug that can be repurposed as an effective treatment for the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 7, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Metabolic enzyme promotes neuroblastoma aggressiveness
(Boston University School of Medicine) High-risk neuroblastoma is an aggressive childhood cancer with poor treatment outcomes. Despite intensive chemotherapy and radiotherapy, less than 50 percent of these children survive for five years. While the genetics of human neuroblastoma have been extensively studied, actionable therapeutics are limited. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 7, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Dutch and German childhood cancer centers embark on unique research collaboration
(Princess M á xima Center for Pediatric Oncology) The Princess M á xima Center for pediatric oncology in the Netherlands is to embark on a close collaboration with German top centers in the field of childhood cancer research. With this strategic collaboration, the Princess M á xima Center and the Hopp-KiTZ childhood cancer center aim to accelerate development towards even better treatment options for children with cancer. With this 'Twinning Program', the organizations are joining forces as European centers of excellence in the field of pediatric cancer research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 5, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers on a mission to fight deadly childhood cancer
(University of South Australia) Neuroblastoma is the deadliest and most common solid cancer in young children the world over, accounting for 15 per cent of all childhood cancer deaths. But Australian researchers are taking the first steps to find the cause and better treatments for this devastating disease which affects children under the age of five. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 3, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Local Black philanthropists form committee to save children ’s lives
In the 1960s in the United States, with the civil rights movement in full swing, entertainer Danny Thomas took a stand for justice and equality that changed the course of history for kids diagnosed with childhood cancer. Thomas founded St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1962, making it the first fully integrated children’s hospital in the South. He chose the location in the segregated Jim Crow South by design: it would be a beacon — and national symbol —… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 1, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Laura Newpoff Source Type: news

Local Black philanthropists form committee to save children ’s lives
In the 1960s in the United States, with the civil rights movement in full swing, entertainer Danny Thomas took a stand for justice and equality that changed the course of history for kids diagnosed with childhood cancer. Thomas founded St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1962, making it the first fully integrated children’s hospital in the South. He chose the location in the segregated Jim Crow South by design: it would be a beacon — and national symbol —… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 1, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Laura Newpoff Source Type: news

NIDCR's Summer 2021 E-Newsletter
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. NIDCR's Summer 2021 E-Newsletter In this issue: NIDCR News Funding Opportunities & Related Notices NIH/HHS News Subscribe to NICDR News Science Advances   Grantee News   NIDCR News NIDCR to Release Report on Oral Health in America As a 20-year follow-up to the seminal Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General, NIDCR will release Oral Health in America: Advances and Challenges in the fall of 2021. The report will illuminate new directions...
Source: NIDCR Science News - July 1, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

CU Cancer Center researcher studies oil & gas exposure effect on childhood leukemia risk
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) A pilot study of childhood leukemia patients living near Colorado's oil and gas drilling sites recently led to an American Cancer Society (ACS) grant award for CU Cancer Center member Lisa McKenzie PhD, MPH. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

International study of rare childhood cancer finds genetic clues, potential for tailored therapy
Rhabdomyosarcoma, or RMS, is a rare cancer that affects the muscles and other soft tissues. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - June 24, 2021 Category: American Health Source Type: news

New microscopy method reveals single childhood cancer cells in unprecedented detail
(Princess M á xima Center for Pediatric Oncology) A new technique to look at tumors under the microscope has revealed the cellular make-up of Wilm's tumors, a childhood kidney cancer, in unprecedented detail. This new approach could help understand how tumors develop and grow, and fuel research into new treatments for children's cancers. Scientists at the Princess M á xima Center for pediatric oncology developed a new imaging technique to study millions of cells in 3D tissue, revealing hundreds of features from each individual cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetic discovery could help guide treatment for aggressive childhood cancer
(Institute of Cancer Research) A new study could lead to improved decision making in assigning treatments for children with the aggressive cancer rhabdomyosarcoma after revealing key genetic changes underlying development of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Searching for the cell of origin of childhood brain cancer
(Universit à di Trento) Promising findings from a study coordinated by a research team of the University of Trento on medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children affecting the central nervous system. For the first time, scientists have grown organoids in the laboratory to simulate tumor tissue, and have identified the type of cell from which the tumor may originate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 24, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

International study of rare childhood cancer finds genetic clues, potential for tailored therapy
(NIH/National Cancer Institute) In children with rhabdomyosarcoma, or RMS, a rare cancer that affects the muscles and other soft tissues, the presence of mutations in several genes, including TP53, MYOD1, and CDKN2A, appear to be associated with a more aggressive form of the disease and a poorer chance of survival. This finding is from the largest-ever international study on RMS, led by scientists at the National Cancer Institute ’ s (NCI) Center for Cancer Research, part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 24, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study reveals racial and ethnic disparities in childhood cancers by single year of age
(Wiley) New research uncovers substantial differences in rates of childhood cancers when considering single year of age rather than grouping several years together. The study published by Wiley early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, also found that minority children have different risks than white children for many types of cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Targeted therapy could be first line treatment for childhood cancer
(Newcastle University) Scientists studying a common childhood cancer have made a major breakthrough which could lead to a cure for some youngsters who would not have survived the condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 21, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Nerve tumor in children: better tolerable chemotherapy without loss of efficacy
(St. Anna Children's Cancer Research Institute) The initial chemotherapy of aggressive childhood nerve tumors, so-called high-risk neuroblastomas, is crucial for ultimate survival. It has now been shown that the chemotherapy regimen used by the European Neuroblastoma Study Group is equally efficacious but better tolerated than a highly effective regimen from the US. This was the conclusion of an international trial coordinated by St. Anna Children's Cancer Research Institute. The study was published in the prestigious Journal of Clinical Oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study sheds light on treatment options for devastating childhood brain cancer
(Washington University School of Medicine) Research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that children with average risk medulloblastoma can receive radiation to a smaller volume of the brain at the end of a six-week course of treatment and still maintain the same disease control as those receiving radiation to a larger area. But the dose of preventive radiation treatments given to the whole brain and spine over the six-week regimen cannot be reduced without reducing survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 10, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

NIDCR Science News - June 2021
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. A monthly update of NIDCR-supported science advances, as reported by grantee institutions and NIH. The Creatures Crawling Within  Cell migration study could shed light on cancer spread NIDCR • May 6, 2021 New Wiki on Salivary Proteins May Transform Diagnostic Testing and Personalized Medicine University at Buffalo • May 25, 2021 A Gentler Strategy for Avoiding Childhood Dental DecayUniversit...
Source: NIDCR Science News - June 2, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Optic nerve firing may spark growth of vision-threatening childhood tumor
NIH-funded pre-clinical study supports key role of neural activity in brain cancers. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - June 1, 2021 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Cancer in Kids May Present as Musculoskeletal Symptoms, Complicating Diagnosis Cancer in Kids May Present as Musculoskeletal Symptoms, Complicating Diagnosis
Childhood cancer may present with musculoskeletal symptoms that mimic the features of rheumatic diseases, potentially leading to misdiagnosis, diagnostic delay and inappropriate treatment, caution researchers in Italy.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 1, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Optic nerve firing may spark growth of vision-threatening childhood tumor
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) In a study of mice, researchers showed how the act of seeing light may trigger the formation of vision-harming tumors in young children who are born with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) cancer predisposition syndrome. The research team, funded by the National Institutes of Health, focused on tumors that grow within the optic nerve, which relays visual signals from the eyes to brain. They discovered that the neural activity which underlies these signals can both ignite and feed the tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 1, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Childhood cancer discovery may stop tumour spread before it starts
(University of British Columbia) A new discovery in Ewing sarcoma, an aggressive and often fatal childhood cancer, has uncovered the potential to prevent cancer cells from spreading beyond their primary tumour site. Researchers with the University of British Columbia and BC Cancer have learned that Ewing sarcoma cells--and likely other types of cancer cells--are able to develop a shield that protects them from the harsh environment of the bloodstream and other locations as they search for a new place to settle, or metastasize. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 1, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Blood test detects childhood tumors based on their epigenetic profiles
(St. Anna Children's Cancer Research Institute) A new study exploits the characteristic epigenetic signatures of childhood tumors to detect, classify and monitor the disease. The scientists analyzed short fragments of tumor DNA that are circulating in the blood. These " liquid biopsy " analyses exploit the unique epigenetic landscape of bone tumors and do not depend on any genetic alterations, which are rare in childhood cancers. This approach promises to improve personalized diagnostics and, possibly, future therapies of childhood tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies risk for some childhood cancer patients developing secondary leukaemia
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) New study used whole genome sequencing to gain further understanding of why some children develop secondary leukaemia after neuroblastoma treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 28, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New insight into when CAR T is effective against childhood leukaemia
(University College London) Scientists and clinicians at UCL and Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) studying the effectiveness of CAR T-cell therapies in children with leukaemia, have discovered a small sub-set of T-cells that are likely to play a key role in whether the treatment is successful. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 24, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Anthony Fauci, 100 Days Into the Biden Administration, Is Finally Getting to Do His Job
When Dr. Anthony Fauci arrived at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. for his first White House press briefing under the new Biden Administration, he could see things would be different. It was the day after the Inauguration, and President Joe Biden was eager to get the country’s COVID-19 response back on track. Five minutes before he addressed the public, Fauci spoke with the new President. “He said, ‘I want you to just go and tell the science, explain to people that if we make mistakes, we’re going to fix the mistakes and we’re not going to dwell on the mistakes. Let science be communicated to the public...
Source: TIME: Health - May 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Multimodal therapy may hold key to treating aggressive childhood cancer
(Children's Cancer Institute Australia) Scientists at Children's Cancer Institute found combination of therapies appears to be effective against high-risk neuroblastoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 16, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers pinpoint possible way to prevent permanent hearing loss caused by cancer drug
(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine& Dentistry) University of Alberta scientists have identified a receptor in cells that could be key to preventing permanent hearing loss in childhood cancer survivors who are being treated with the drug cisplatin. The researchers believe by inhibiting the receptor, they may be able to eliminate toxic side-effects from the drug that cause the hearing loss. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Adverse childhood experiences and risk of cancer during adulthood: a systematic review and meta-analysis - Hu Z, Kaminga AC, Yang J, Liu J, Xu H.
BACKGROUND: Research findings on the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and the risk of cancer were inconsistent. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to perform a quantitative synthesis of the preceding research findings... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Higher BMI in childhood may help protect women against breast cancer in later life, both before and after the menopause
(European Association for the Study of Obesity) A study of more than 173,000 women in Denmark, presented at the European Congress on Obesity (ECO) held online this year, suggests that girls with a higher body mass index (BMI) during childhood are less likely than their peers with a lower BMI to develop breast cancer as adults, both before and after the menopause. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

23andMe, startup cell therapy company line up SPAC mergers as another young biotech eyes IPO
A consumer genetics company working with a Big Pharma player on therapeutics, a cutting-edge Stanford spinout focused on making stem cell transplants more efficient and effective and a childhood cancer drug startup hope to be the 10th, 11th and 12th Bay Area life sciences companies to go public so far this year. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - May 6, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

Pediatric Cancer Survivors at Risk for Opioid Misuse Pediatric Cancer Survivors at Risk for Opioid Misuse
Survivors of childhood cancers are at increased risk for prescription opioid misuse compared with their peers, a review of a claims database revealed.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - May 6, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Water contaminant NDMA linked to cancer cluster in Massachusetts
N-nitrosodimethylamine, or NDMA, has been linked to a 1990s spike in childhood cancer in the town of Wilmington, Massachusetts. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - May 4, 2021 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Meet the Inspiration4 Team, the World ’s First Non-Astronaut Space Crew
Sian Proctor may owe her life to Apollo 11—literally. Born in Guam—the daughter of an engineer who worked at the local tracking station that helped NASA maintain communications with its lunar crews—she was the fourth child of a couple that she suspects did not plan for so many kids, and came into the world just nine months after Apollo 11 stuck its historic first moon landing. “I think I was a celebration baby,” she says with a laugh. “I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for human space flight.” Proctor herself has a lot to celebrate this year. Come September, if all goes t...
Source: TIME: Science - April 23, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Meet the Inspiration4 Team, the World ’s First Non-Professional Astronaut Space Crew
Sian Proctor may owe her life to Apollo 11—literally. Born in Guam—the daughter of an engineer who worked at the local tracking station that helped NASA maintain communications with its lunar crews—she was the fourth child of a couple that she suspects did not plan for so many kids, and came into the world just nine months after Apollo 11 stuck its historic first moon landing. “I think I was a celebration baby,” she says with a laugh. “I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for human space flight.” Proctor herself has a lot to celebrate this year. Come September, if all goes t...
Source: TIME: Science - April 23, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Australian researchers find new way to target deadly childhood cancer
(Children's Cancer Institute Australia) Research by Australian scientists could pave the way to a new treatment for a currently incurable brain cancer in children called Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma, or DIPG. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 14, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Unusual treatment shows promise for kids with brain tumors
Scientists are reporting progress against a deadly type of childhood cancer with an unusual treatment (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - April 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Exclusive: CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky Unveils Agency Initiative to Address Racism in Health
If the COVID-19 pandemic has taught us anything, it is that health is a commodity bestowed readily on some and denied to so many others. Within months of the COVID-19 virus reaching U.S. shores, it became clear that the disease hit certain groups harder, contributing to more severe illness and higher hospitalization and death rates among Black, Latinx and American Indian/Alaska Native communities, and those of lower socioeconomic status. The reason for that skewed impact doesn’t have so much to do with biology or genetics as it does a myriad of other factors, such as where people live, how clean the air they breathe ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

What are the risk factors for experiencing side effects from childhood cancer treatments?
(Wiley) Steroids are essential for treating children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a type of cancer of the blood and bone marrow, but they can cause severe side effects such as psychological reactions and sleep problems. An analysis published in Psycho-Oncology of all relevant studies published to date indicates that there's insufficient high-quality research investigating the risk factors for these side effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Inside Ibogaine, One of the Most Promising and Perilous Psychedelics for Addiction
Amber Capone had become afraid of her husband. The “laid-back, bigger than life and cooler than cool” man she’d married had become isolated, disconnected and despondent during his 13 years as a U.S. Navy SEAL. Typically, he was gone 300 days of the year, but when he was home, Amber and their two children walked on eggshells around him. “Everyone was just playing nice until he left again,” Amber says. In 2013, Marcus retired from the military. But life as a civilian only made his depression, anger, headaches, anxiety, alcoholism, impulsivity and violent dreams worse. Sometimes he’d get up...
Source: TIME: Health - April 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mandy Oaklander Tags: Uncategorized Drugs feature Magazine Mental Health Source Type: news

Adding in Stem Cell Therapy Helps Beat a Common Childhood Leukemia
Title: Adding in Stem Cell Therapy Helps Beat a Common Childhood LeukemiaCategory: Health NewsCreated: 4/2/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 4/2/2021 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - April 2, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Low-calorie diet and mild exercise improve survival for young people with leukemia
In some cancers, including leukemia in children and adolescents, obesity can negatively affect survival outcomes. Obese young people with leukemia are 50% more likely to relapse after treatment than their lean counterparts.Now,a study led by researchers at UCLA and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles has shown that a combination of modest dietary changes and exercise can dramatically improve survival outcomes for those with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common childhood cancer.The researchers found that patients who reduced their calorie intake by 10% or more and adopted a moderate exercise program imm...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 1, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Stem cell transplants prevent relapses of most common childhood cancer
(University of Virginia Health System) Children and young adults who receive CAR T-cell therapy for the most common childhood cancer - acute lymphoblastic leukemia - suffer remarkably fewer relapses and are far more likely to survive when the treatment is paired with a subsequent stem cell transplant, a new study finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 1, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Low-calorie diet and mild exercise improve survival for young people with leukemia
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) A study led by researchers at UCLA and CHLA has shown that a combination of modest dietary changes and exercise can dramatically improve survival outcomes for those with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common childhood cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 1, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

COVID-19 Impacting Caregivers of Children With Cancer
MONDAY, March 15, 2021 -- Caregivers of childhood cancer survivors are experiencing changes to medical care, financial disruptions, and emotional distress due to COVID-19, according to a study published in the April issue of Pediatric Blood&... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 15, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Placenta is a dumping ground for genetic defects
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) The first study of the genomic architecture of the human placenta confirms that the normal structure of the placenta is different to any other human organ and resembles that of a tumour, harbouring many of the same genetic mutations found in childhood cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 10, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news