40 Cases of Measles Confirmed Amid Concerns the Pacific Northwest Outbreak May Spread

(VANCOUVER, Wash.) — A measles outbreak in the Pacific Northwest became more worrisome Wednesday with word that people infected with the extremely contagious viral illness traveled to Hawaii and central Oregon after being exposed. The revelation prompted public health officials in Oregon’s Deschutes County and in Hawaii to issue alerts, although no cases were confirmed in either location. “It raises concerns that this can go on for a long time, become geographically larger than it is and more cases over weeks and months,” said Dr. Alan Melnick, public health director for Clark County, in southern Washington, which is at the epicenter of the outbreak and has a lower-than-normal vaccination rate. There are 40 confirmed cases in the Northwest, including 38 clustered in southwest Washington, one in Portland and one in Seattle. Thirteen additional suspected cases were reported Wednesday, and some of those will likely be confirmed, Melnick said. Officials haven’t yet determined how the measles outbreak started. The first patient sought medical care on Dec. 31, but other sick people may not have gone to a doctor or hospital, he said. Clark County, where the first case was documented, has a 78 percent vaccination rate — far below the 95 percent required for “herd immunity” for such a contagious virus. Herd immunity, or community immunity, is when enough of the population is vaccinated to protect those who haven’t been vaccinated ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease onetime overnight Source Type: news

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We are in the midst of a measles outbreak here in the US, with cases being reported in New York City, New York state, and Washington state. In 2018, preliminary numbers indicate that there were 372 cases of measles — more than triple the 120 cases in all of 2017 — and already 79 cases in the first month of 2019 alone. Here are four things that everyone needs to know about measles. Measles is highly contagious This is a point that can’t be stressed enough. A full 90% of unvaccinated people exposed to the virus will catch it. And if you think that just staying away from sick people will do the trick, think ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Infectious diseases Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs
VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) — Public health officials scrambling to contain a measles outbreak in the U.S. Northwest warned people to vaccinate their children Monday and worried that it could take months to contain the highly contagious viral illness due to a lower-than-normal vaccination rate at the epicenter of the crisis. The outbreak near Portland has sickened 35 people in Oregon and Washington since Jan. 1, with 11 more cases suspected. Most of the patients are children under 10, and one child has been hospitalized. Health officials say the outbreak is a textbook example of why it's critical to vaccinate against measl...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Patient Care Operations Source Type: news
Conclusions The current policy on most college campuses requires verification that incoming students have received two doses of the MMR vaccination. The goal of this policy is to prevent the diseases measles and mumps. A longstanding federal trial against Merck, the pharmaceutical company responsible for making the MMR vaccine, accuses Merck of manipulating data to show the MMR to be more effective against mumps than it is. Recent outbreaks of mumps on college campuses by students vaccinated with the MMR vaccine provides additional evidence that the MMR vaccine is ineffective. Data from the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Michelle Goldstein Top Stories college vaccination Mandatory Vaccination MMR vaccine truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs
Follow me at @JohnRossMD The United States was declared free from ongoing measles transmission in 2000. So why are we still having measles attacks? An outbreak of measles is currently raging in Minnesota. In 2015, 125 cases of measles occurred in California, and in 2014, 383 people were infected with measles in an Amish community in Ohio. How measles outbreaks happen There are several reasons why we are still at risk for measles outbreaks. Travelers may get infected overseas, and bring the measles virus back into the country with them unawares. The 2015 measles outbreak in Ohio began when two infected members of the Amish ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Travel health Source Type: blogs
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The co-author of this post is Will Schupmann President Trump's possible appointment of Robert F. Kennedy Jr. to lead a commission on vaccine safety should frighten all American parents. Kennedy, a vocal believer in the thoroughly discredited notion that childhood vaccines lead to autism, could strengthen the anti-vaccination movement, which would undoubtedly result in the deaths of unvaccinated children. Today's anti-vaccination movement has already proved to be dangerous. The Disneyland-linked outbreak of measles in California two years ago brought attention to a significant decline in vaccination rates, which vaccine o...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Most of us weigh the risks and benefits of medical procedures prior to obtaining them. We sign an informed consent form with an understanding of the potential harm versus the perceived benefits. In the case of vaccinations, the great majority of parents obtain vaccinations for their children, influenced by the “sales pitch” and “scare tactics” used by physicians. We are assured that the vaccination is safe and will protect us and our children from the various targeted deadly diseases. If we blindly trust our doctors, as I once had, we readily agree. It is important that we think critically before ag...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Top Stories autism Centers for Disease Control (CDC) MMR vaccine vaccine injury Source Type: blogs
Abstract: Measles (Rubeola), although considered eradicated in the United States, still causes periodic outbreaks. Vaccine refusal leads to vulnerable pockets of individuals who may become infected once the virus is imported from countries where it is endemic. In turn, these individuals may spread the virus to young infants and to other vulnerable individuals. Many healthcare providers are not familiar with this disease or with the factors that contribute to the risk of spread. Measles causes a serious febrile illness that may lead to pneumonia, blindness, deafness, neurological disorders, and even death. Patients with mea...
Source: MCN: The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Feature: CE Connection Source Type: research
By Gail McGovern, President and CEO the American Red Cross  The unfolding outbreak of measles across the country has focused attention on whether parents should get their children vaccinated against measles and other diseases. This is a question the Red Cross answers approximately 100 million times a year around the world with life-saving vaccinations. Mothers and children wait in line to be vaccinated in Cotonou, Benin after being informed of the campaign by Red Cross house-to-house mobilizers. American Red Cross/Javier Acebal. Measles is one of the most contagious diseases ever known. When one person has measles, 90...
Source: Red Cross Chat - Category: Global & Universal Authors: Tags: International Source Type: news
Along with vaccines for polio and mumps, the measles vaccine was a triumph of investigative research and public health when it debuted in 1968. It quickly became part of the lineup of childhood injections that would inoculate the child and protect society from the scourge of the sometimes fatal and always painful disease and led to the elimination of measles in the U.S. in 2000 and the Americas (North, Central and South) in 2002. But a series of stumbling blocks -- notably, a fraudulent and discredited 1998 study linking vaccinations to the onset of autism -- set vaccination rates back in certain communities in the U.S. T...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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