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Tech Tip: Finding Closed-Caption Content Online
Many streaming video providers offer movies and television shows with embedded text descriptions for those who cannot hear the words being spoken. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: J. D. BIERSDORFER Tags: Video Recordings, Downloads and Streaming Ears and Hearing Computers and the Internet Tablet Computers Deafness Source Type: news

Supporting mental health for all
A report from the London Assembly finds that the prevalence of mental ill health is significantly higher in LGBT+ communities and for disabled people, deaf people and offenders. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - February 2, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Visor Cards Help People Who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing Communicate with Law Enforcement
The Department of Health ServicesOffice for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing today introduced thecommunication visor card (PDF) , a tool to help drivers who are deaf and hard of hearing communicate with law enforcement. Originally created by theWisconsin Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, the updated card seeks to help people who are deaf or hard of hearing communicate...(see release) (Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases)
Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases - January 30, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Authors: millejcodn Source Type: news

Deaf children learn words faster than hearing children
(Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences) Each year many deaf children get a cochlear implant to connect to the world of sounds. So far, it was not clear which processes take place in these children when they start to learn language -- and why they differ in the level of language they achieve. Now, the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences found that deaf children with a cochlear implant learn words even faster than those with normal hearing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could this new jab mean the end of hearing aids?
For more than half a century, hearing aids have been the only effective treatment for the millions of Britons struggling with deafness.But that might not be the case for much longer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain imaging predicts language learning in deaf children
(Ann& Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago) MRI brain scans can predict language improvement after a cochlear implant, laying the foundation for creation of brain specific therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

"He felt it": Deaf boy hears live music for first time at NBA game
"It's just really great to see something that normally everybody else gets to experience with their kids. You know, hearing 'mom' and all that stuff. We didn't get that" (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CRISPR corrects deafness in mice
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kelly, P. N. Tags: twil Source Type: news

Technique treats hereditary deafness in mice
Researchers developed a genome editing strategy to treat hearing loss in a mouse model of hereditary deafness. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why listening to music could make you deaf
William Shapiro from New York University Langone warns people are ignoring advice. Loud music stresses the hairs in the cochlear and shears them, causing permanent damage. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Violence and disability: experiences and perceptions of victimization among deaf people - Admire A, Ramirez B.
Research on the unique experiences of deaf people is rare, and limited information exists regarding the nature and extent of violence against this population. Existing scholarship highlights the increased vulnerabilities of deaf individuals; however, there... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Social Etiologies and Disparities Source Type: news

Gene Editing In Mice May Help People Hear Too
Scientists use a new gene-editing technique to prevent mice destined to go deaf from losing their hearing. (This piece initially aired Dec. 20, 2017 on All Things Considered). (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Gene Editing Experiments In Mice May Help People Hear Too
Scientists use a new gene-editing technique to prevent mice destined to go deaf from losing their hearing. (This piece initially aired Dec. 20, 2017 on All Things Considered). (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Sudden Deafness May Flag CVD Risk
(MedPage Today) -- Interrupted vascular supply to the cochlea suggested as contributor (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - December 21, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Innovative gene editing method may prevent deafness
In many cases, hearing loss is hereditary and caused by genetic mutations. Experiments with novel gene editing methods may lead to a preventive treatment. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hearing / Deafness Source Type: news

Fish use deafness gene to sense water motion
(Case Western Reserve University) Fish sense water motion the same way humans sense sound, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Researchers discovered a gene also found in humans helps zebrafish convert water motion into electrical impulses that are sent to the brain for perception. The shared gene allows zebrafish to sense water flow direction, and it also helps cells inside the human ear sense a range of sounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Breakthrough for genetic hearing loss as gene editing prevents deafness in mice
Prospect of a new class of therapies that could transform future treatment of genetic hearing loss, at the root of nearly half of all cases of deafnessDeafness has been prevented in mice using gene editing for the first time, in an advance that could transform future treatment of genetic hearing loss.The study found that a single injection of a gene editing cocktail prevented progressive deafness in baby animals that were destined to lose their hearing.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Genetics Deafness and hearing impairment Science Health Disability Biology Society Source Type: news

Scientists Use Gene Editing To Prevents A Form Of Deafness in Mice
Success with a new gene-editing technique in mice prone to deafness highlights the potential for using it to prevent a form of inherited hearing loss in humans. But it has many hurdles to overcome.(Image credit: SPL/Science Source) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Scientists Use Gene Editing To Prevent A Form Of Deafness in Mice
Success with a new gene-editing technique in mice prone to deafness highlights the potential for using it to prevent a form of inherited hearing loss in humans. But it has many hurdles to overcome.(Image credit: SPL/Science Source) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Harvard scientists cure deaf mice with gene therapy
The new treatment, pioneered by Harvard University researchers, used a technique called Crispr CAS-9, which modifies DNA in living cells. Deafness is genetic in over 50 percent of cases. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CRISPR Helps Mice Hear
Researchers reduce the severity of hereditary deafness in mice with the delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 protein-RNA complexes that inactivate a mutant gene in their inner ears. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 20, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News,News & Opinion Source Type: news

NIH study uncovers clues about why common cancer drug causes hearing loss
(NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders) Cisplatin is retained in the cochlea indefinitely following chemotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

High definition hearing: Deaf sufferers joy as scientists invent bionic ear
HIGH definition “bionic hearing” using light to activate nerves in the ears of the deaf is being developed by scientists. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence and accessible theater for the deaf and blind
(Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) Researchers at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have developed pioneering technology, called Stage-sync, so that people with visual and auditory impairment can enjoy musical stage shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

As Hearing Fades with Age, Dementia Risk May Rise
Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia, Hearing Disorders and Deafness (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Life after deafness: Why treating hearing loss immediately is important
STEVE Mintern ’s life was turned upside down when he woke up one morning to discover he had gone completely deaf. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

To Build a Stronger Global Health Workforce, We Must Be Good Stewards
December 05, 2017To all frontline health workers without a voice:  We are listening.It may seem that we are losing ground. From celebrity tax havens to Black Friday bargain brawls, it may seem that the great divide between the 2% and the 98% has swallowed our moral compass. That we have lost our direction, and our human north is pointing toward despair.But many of us are still working to build a healthier, safer world. And we can ’t do it without health workers, particularly those working on the front lines of care in areas around the world most in need.For those frontline health workers without a voice, and for...
Source: IntraHealth International - December 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Noisy Commutes Could Cause Long-Lasting Damage
Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Hearing Disorders and Deafness, Noise (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - December 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How dirt, danger and chaos sparked the taming of lightning
(Springer) Death and misfortune were often the spark for engineers and technologists to turn scientific discovery into everyday electronic appliances. Alexander Graham Bell was a specialist teacher of the deaf, while it took many deaths from contaminated food before the first cooling machines were constructed. This book shows how, over a hundred years, a few basic inventions spawned the huge range of electronic devices that have changed the way we live. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NICE finally advises ban on vaginal mesh implants
For years women have complained about damage caused by the plastic mesh inserted to treat their post childbirth damage — complaints that seemed to fall on deaf ears, until now. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

REVEALED: How commuting on public transport 'could be making you DEAF'
COMMUTING on public transport or by bike could be making you deaf, scientists claim. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - November 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Vest That Allows the Deaf to'Hear'A Vest That Allows the Deaf to'Hear '
Neuroscientist David Eagleman talks about time perception, synesthesia, and the vastness of human creativity.Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Expert Interview Source Type: news

South Africa:Are South African Health Workers Being Silenced Into Malpractice?
[Daily Maverick] "There is really no such thing as the 'voiceless'. There are only the deliberately silenced, or the preferably unheard." The words of Arundhati Roy, a writer turned human rights activist, rang particularly true through the course of the Life Esidimeni saga. The 118 deceased residents who have now risen to 141 were the preferably unheard - their cries for help through pressure sores and other unaccounted wounds, signs of starvation and dehydration, all fell on deaf ears. However, it is only in retrospect we (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 17, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

UTSA researchers receive $147,000 grant to train school psychologists in deaf education
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Educational psychology researchers from UTSA received a grant for a new program that integrates educational psychology and deaf education. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Optogenetic Therapies Move Closer to Clinical Use
With a clinical trial underway to restore vision optogenetically, researchers also see promise in using the technique to treat deafness, pain, and other conditions. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - November 16, 2017 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion,News Analysis,The Scientist Source Type: news

The contribution of cochlear implants to postural stability - Shayman CS, Mancini M, Weaver TS, King LA, Hullar TE.
OBJECTIVES: To determine whether spatial auditory cues provided by cochlear implants can improve postural balance in adults with severe deafness. METHODS: In the presence of spatial white noise, 13 adult cochlear implantees wore head and lumbar-mou... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Inner ear stem cells may someday restore hearing
(Rutgers University) Want to restore hearing by injecting stem cells into the inner ear? Well, that can be a double-edged sword. Inner ear stem cells can be converted to auditory neurons that could reverse deafness, but the process can also make those cells divide too quickly, posing a cancer risk, according to a study led by Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 7, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Uganda:Sign Language App Will Ease Communication
[Monitor] The Uganda National association of the Deaf last week launched a mobile application to ease communication for people with hearing impairment. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 6, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

ADA (Americans with Disability Act) National Network Learning Session: Emergency Communications Approaches During and After an Emergency
ADA [Americans with Disabilities Act] National Network. 03/09/2017 This one-hour, 30-minute webinar discusses how to identify potential gaps in accessibility for deaf and hard of hearing community members during emergency/disaster response. It details how to understand the importance of multiple agency partnerships in addressing identified gaps, and the participation and training requirements necessary for professionals providing accessibility during emergency/disaster response. It discusses strengthening awareness on the importance of having a separate event for disaster survivors who are deaf, deaf-blind, and hard of hea...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

How We Used VR to Explore What Music Feels Like to a Deaf Person
With the help of two deaf collaborators, virtual reality producers at The Times made an immersive video about the experience of hearing music after receiving a cochlear implant. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MAUREEN TOWEY Tags: Virtual Reality (Computers) Deafness Music Cochlear Implants Disabilities Santa Fe Opera Source Type: news

Liberal publication "deaf shames" disabled ballet dancer by photoshopping away her cochlear implant for its glamour ad
(Natural News) Virgin Active, which is a chain of health clubs located in South Africa, Italy, Spain, Australia and a few other countries, has recently come under fire for allegedly editing out the cochlear implant of one of their models, 27-year-old Simone Botha Welgemoed. Naturally, when Welgemoed noticed that her implants were not in the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Improving Outcomes for Disorders of Human Communication (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)
Funding to improve the health outcomes for individuals with deafness and other communication disorders through effectiveness and health services research in the NIDCD mission areas of hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech and language. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Improving Outcomes for Disorders of Human Communication (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)
Funding to improve the health outcomes for individuals with deafness and other communication disorders through effectiveness and health services research in the NIDCD mission areas of hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech and language. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Navigating the genome to cure deafness
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) A new Tel Aviv University study solves a critical piece of the puzzle of human deafness by identifying the first group of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the auditory system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preparedness training programs for working with deaf and hard of hearing communities and older adults: lessons learned from key informants and literature assessments - Kamau PW, Ivey SL, Griese SE, Qari SH.
The objectives of this study were to (1) identify available training programs for emergency response personnel and public health professionals on addressing the needs of Deaf and hard of hearing individuals and older adults, (2) identify strate... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Vote now for your health hero
The hard-working heroes who keep the NHS running – often in unsung ways – are being recognised in the second annual Health Heroes awards, organised by Skills for Health and sponsored by Health Education England. After a successful debut in 2016, this year the awards include three new categories: integrated team of the year, workforce planning team of the year and apprentice of the year, alongside the established clinical and operational services support worker of the year awards. UNISON is once more sponsoring one of the awards and head of health Sara Gorton commented: “Every day behind the scenes in the ...
Source: UNISON Health care news - October 23, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Tony Braisby Tags: Article News health care NHS one team one team for patient care Our Health Heroes Our Health Heroes Awards Source Type: news

Older Neandertal survived with a little help from his friends
(Washington University in St. Louis) An older Neandertal from about 50,000 years ago, who had suffered multiple injuries and other degenerations, became deaf and must have relied on the help of others to avoid prey and survive well into his 40s, indicates a new analysis published Oct. 20 in the online journal PLoS ONE. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What is Usher Syndrome?
Discussion Over 7000 diseases are considered rare disorders according to the National Organization for Rare Disorders® (NORD, rarediseases.org). NORD is a patient advocacy organization dedicated to individuals with rare diseases and the organizations that serve them. They have information on about 1200 rare diseases on their website (https://rarediseases.org/for-patients-and-families/information-resources/rare-disease-information/). Hearing loss (HL) is not rare and is a common problem across the ages. It affects 360 million people worldwide which is about 5% of the population. There are many causes of hearing loss an...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - October 23, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Hidden hearing aid that can give deaf people 24/7 sound
NHS England surgeons are restoring deaf patients ’ hearing with a revolutionary ‘bionic ear’ implant with no external parts – making it impossible to tell a person has it fitted. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIH awards almost $10 million to UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment
The National Institutes of Health, recognizing UCLA ’s leadership in understanding and developing interventions for autism spectrum disorder, has renewed its support of the UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment with a five-year, $9.7 million grant.The Autism Center of Excellence grant is directed by Susan Bookheimer, director of the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center at UCLA. It supports research projects led by autism experts Mirella Dapretto, Dr. Shafali Jeste, Connie Kasari, Elizabeth Laugeson, Dr. Daniel Geschwind and Dr. Jim McCracken.“This renewed support will allow UCLA t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news