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Artificial intelligence, brain MRI aid kids with hearing loss
U.S. and Chinese researchers have developed a machine-learning algorithm that...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 3T MRI fetal scans should not affect newborns' hearing SIIM: AI poised to enhance all aspects of radiology fMRI helps predict kids' language skills MRI may hurt patients with cochlear implants (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 15, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Brain imaging predicts language learning in deaf children
(Ann& Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago) MRI brain scans can predict language improvement after a cochlear implant, laying the foundation for creation of brain specific therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Billionaire-owned Hearing Aid Manufacturer's Former Executives On Trial For Embezzlement, Fraud
Two former executives from America ’s largest hearing aid manufacturer, Starkey Hearing Technologies, are set to go on trial this week in Minneapolis on charges of fraud and embezzlement. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Michela Tindera, Forbes Staff Source Type: news

Cochlear implant surgery and the risk of falls in an adult population - Louza J, Klappert CL, Ledderose G, G ürkov R, Krause E.
OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of cochlear implant surgery on the balance and risk of falls in an adult patient population using a mobile posturograph. DESIGN: Prospective clinical pilot study. SETTING: Cochlear implant center at a tertiary ref... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

"He felt it": Deaf boy hears live music for first time at NBA game
"It's just really great to see something that normally everybody else gets to experience with their kids. You know, hearing 'mom' and all that stuff. We didn't get that" (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Labyrinthitis (Inner Ear Inflammation) Symptoms, Causes, Contagious, Treatment Cure
Title: Labyrinthitis (Inner Ear Inflammation) Symptoms, Causes, Contagious, Treatment CureCategory: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 1/10/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 1/11/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Hearing General)
Source: MedicineNet Hearing General - January 11, 2018 Category: Audiology Source Type: news

CRISPR corrects deafness in mice
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kelly, P. N. Tags: twil Source Type: news

Technique treats hereditary deafness in mice
Researchers developed a genome editing strategy to treat hearing loss in a mouse model of hereditary deafness. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why listening to music could make you deaf
William Shapiro from New York University Langone warns people are ignoring advice. Loud music stresses the hairs in the cochlear and shears them, causing permanent damage. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Violence and disability: experiences and perceptions of victimization among deaf people - Admire A, Ramirez B.
Research on the unique experiences of deaf people is rare, and limited information exists regarding the nature and extent of violence against this population. Existing scholarship highlights the increased vulnerabilities of deaf individuals; however, there... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Social Etiologies and Disparities Source Type: news

New Hope for 'Ringing' in the Ears
Title: New Hope for 'Ringing' in the EarsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 1/3/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 1/4/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Hearing General)
Source: MedicineNet Hearing General - January 4, 2018 Category: Audiology Source Type: news

Your ears are not equal: Research finds people process information better from the right side
(Natural News) Everyone the world over knows Shakespeare’s “lend me your ears” quote from the play Julius Caesar, but a recently published study from audiology researchers from Auburn University may change that definition to just lending your right ear. The study, which was presented at the 174th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, revealed that people rely on... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gene Editing In Mice May Help People Hear Too
Scientists use a new gene-editing technique to prevent mice destined to go deaf from losing their hearing. (This piece initially aired Dec. 20, 2017 on All Things Considered). (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Gene Editing Experiments In Mice May Help People Hear Too
Scientists use a new gene-editing technique to prevent mice destined to go deaf from losing their hearing. (This piece initially aired Dec. 20, 2017 on All Things Considered). (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

South Carolina baby girl gets to hear for Christmas
Maggie, of South Carolina grinned and gaped when she heard her mother's voice for the first time Wednesday. She has two right-ear hearing defects, but got her first hearing aid just in time for Christmas. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Joyful moment that baby girl gets to hear for Christmas
Maggie, of South Carolina grinned and gaped when she heard her mother's voice for the first time Wednesday. She has two right-ear hearing defects, but got her first hearing aid just in time for Christmas. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Advanced Bionics to connect cochlear implants to cell phones, TVs using Sonova ’ s chip tech
Advanced Bionics said today that it plans to integrate Sonova‘s Sword chip and wireless radio tech into its sound processors. Sonova’s technology can connect hearing devices to almost any kind of cell phone, the company explained, without the need for an extra streaming device. “By offering a solution to the entire market – including the more than 80% of the world’s smartphone owners who purchased Android devices – Sonova becomes the first and only major hearing solutions company to unlock the enormous potential of universal direct connectivity,” Sonova CEO Lukas Braunschweiler sai...
Source: Mass Device - December 21, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Implants mHealth (Mobile Health) Otolaryngology Ear, Nose & Throat Advanced Bionics LLC Sonova Holding AG Source Type: news

Sudden Deafness May Flag CVD Risk
(MedPage Today) -- Interrupted vascular supply to the cochlea suggested as contributor (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - December 21, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Innovative gene editing method may prevent deafness
In many cases, hearing loss is hereditary and caused by genetic mutations. Experiments with novel gene editing methods may lead to a preventive treatment. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hearing / Deafness Source Type: news

Fish use deafness gene to sense water motion
(Case Western Reserve University) Fish sense water motion the same way humans sense sound, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Researchers discovered a gene also found in humans helps zebrafish convert water motion into electrical impulses that are sent to the brain for perception. The shared gene allows zebrafish to sense water flow direction, and it also helps cells inside the human ear sense a range of sounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Breakthrough for genetic hearing loss as gene editing prevents deafness in mice
Prospect of a new class of therapies that could transform future treatment of genetic hearing loss, at the root of nearly half of all cases of deafnessDeafness has been prevented in mice using gene editing for the first time, in an advance that could transform future treatment of genetic hearing loss.The study found that a single injection of a gene editing cocktail prevented progressive deafness in baby animals that were destined to lose their hearing.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Genetics Deafness and hearing impairment Science Health Disability Biology Society Source Type: news

Scientists Use Gene Editing To Prevents A Form Of Deafness in Mice
Success with a new gene-editing technique in mice prone to deafness highlights the potential for using it to prevent a form of inherited hearing loss in humans. But it has many hurdles to overcome.(Image credit: SPL/Science Source) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Scientists Use Gene Editing To Prevent A Form Of Deafness in Mice
Success with a new gene-editing technique in mice prone to deafness highlights the potential for using it to prevent a form of inherited hearing loss in humans. But it has many hurdles to overcome.(Image credit: SPL/Science Source) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Harvard scientists cure deaf mice with gene therapy
The new treatment, pioneered by Harvard University researchers, used a technique called Crispr CAS-9, which modifies DNA in living cells. Deafness is genetic in over 50 percent of cases. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CRISPR Helps Mice Hear
Researchers reduce the severity of hereditary deafness in mice with the delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 protein-RNA complexes that inactivate a mutant gene in their inner ears. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 20, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News,News & Opinion Source Type: news

Ex-Starkey CFO Pleads Guilty to Conspiracy
Scott Arthur Nelson, who was scheduled to go on trial January 16 with five other men, entered the plea in U.S. District Court in Minneapolis. Still facing trial are Starkey’s former president, Jerry Ruzicka, and former human resources senior vice president Larry Miller, as well as two friends of Ruzicka—Jeffrey Taylor, former president of miniature parts supplier Sonion, and Lawrence Hagen, who also aided in the alleged conspiracy.   Nelson, Ruzicka and Miller were fired from Starkey in 2015. Original charges in the case, which covers a complex web of activity over a nine-year period, range from making fin...
Source: MDDI - December 20, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Medical Device Business Source Type: news

NIH study uncovers clues about why common cancer drug causes hearing loss
(NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders) Cisplatin is retained in the cochlea indefinitely following chemotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New cochlear implant allows people to take direct calls
Most people can take a call on their mobile or use their phone to listen to music without a second thought.But for those with severe hearing loss these simple activities can be frustrating and complex. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sensorion, Cochlear collab to study combo therapies for patients with cochlear implants
Sensorion, a biotech working on therapies for inner ear diseases, said today that it inked a deal with Cochlear Ltd (ASX:COH) to study combination therapies for patients with cochlear implants. According to the deal, the companies will combine Sensorion’s SENS-401 compound with cochlear implants in preclinical studies starting next year. The drug-device therapies could be in clinical trials as early as 2019, the companies reported. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Sensorion, Cochlear collab to study combo therapies for patients with cochlear implants appeared firs...
Source: Mass Device - December 18, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Drug-Device Combinations Otolaryngology Ear, Nose & Throat Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Wall Street Beat Cochlear Ltd. sensorion Source Type: news

High definition hearing: Deaf sufferers joy as scientists invent bionic ear
HIGH definition “bionic hearing” using light to activate nerves in the ears of the deaf is being developed by scientists. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here & #039;s the Secret Behind Boston Scientific & #039;s New DBS Device
Unlike traditional deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems that are built from pacemaker technology, Boston Scientific's Vercise DBS is modeled from cochlear implant technology and the precise stimulation of auditory nerves it uses to replicate hearing. The device is now FDA approved for the treatment of Parkinson's disease symptoms, the company announced this week. "The cochlear implant technology, when you think about it, is really designed and engineered to precisely stimulate the auditory nerves to produce a sense of hearing," Maulik Nanavaty, a senior vice president at Boston Scientific and president of th...
Source: MDDI - December 12, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Implants Source Type: news

Boston Scientific wins FDA nod for Vercise DBS for treating Parkinson ’ s disease
Boston Scientific (NYSE:BSX) said yesterday it won FDA approval for its Vercise deep brain stimulation system designed to treat symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. The device, initially launched in Europe in 2012, was developed based on cochlear implant technology and is designed to stimulate a targeted region of the brain through implanted leads powered by an implantable pulse generator.  The device also has the ability to independently control the amount of current delivered on each lead, the company said. “This approval marks an important step for patients who will now have the choice to be treat...
Source: Mass Device - December 12, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Regulatory/Compliance Boston Scientific Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence and accessible theater for the deaf and blind
(Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) Researchers at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have developed pioneering technology, called Stage-sync, so that people with visual and auditory impairment can enjoy musical stage shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

As Hearing Fades with Age, Dementia Risk May Rise
Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia, Hearing Disorders and Deafness (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Tip: How a Cochlear Implant Works
-- A cochlear implant is a small, electronic device that when surgically placed under the skin, stimulates the nerve endings in the cochlea to provide a sense of sound to a person who is severely hard of hearing. The U.S. Food and Drug... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 7, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Health Tip: How a Cochlear Implant Works
Title: Health Tip: How a Cochlear Implant WorksCategory: Health NewsCreated: 12/7/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 12/7/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Hearing General)
Source: MedicineNet Hearing General - December 7, 2017 Category: Audiology Source Type: news

Using your right ear helps you to be a better listener
Audiology researchers at Auburn University in Alabama found that both children and adults depend more on their right ear than their left for processing and retaining what they hear. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Swimmer's Ear (Symptoms, Prevention, Treatment)
Title: Swimmer's Ear (Symptoms, Prevention, Treatment)Category: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 12/31/1997 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 12/6/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Hearing General)
Source: MedicineNet Hearing General - December 6, 2017 Category: Audiology Source Type: news

Want to listen better? Lend a right ear
(Acoustical Society of America) Listening requires sensitive hearing and the ability to process information into cohesive meaning. Add everyday background noise and constant interruptions, and the ability to comprehend what is heard becomes that much more difficult. Audiology researchers at Auburn University have found that in such demanding environments, both children and adults depend more on their right ear for processing and retaining what they hear. They will present their work at the 174th ASA Meeting, Dec. 4-8. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 6, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Life after deafness: Why treating hearing loss immediately is important
STEVE Mintern ’s life was turned upside down when he woke up one morning to discover he had gone completely deaf. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Noisy Commutes Could Cause Long-Lasting Damage
Title: Noisy Commutes Could Cause Long-Lasting DamageCategory: Health NewsCreated: 12/4/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 12/5/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Hearing General)
Source: MedicineNet Hearing General - December 5, 2017 Category: Audiology Source Type: news

To Build a Stronger Global Health Workforce, We Must Be Good Stewards
December 05, 2017To all frontline health workers without a voice:  We are listening.It may seem that we are losing ground. From celebrity tax havens to Black Friday bargain brawls, it may seem that the great divide between the 2% and the 98% has swallowed our moral compass. That we have lost our direction, and our human north is pointing toward despair.But many of us are still working to build a healthier, safer world. And we can ’t do it without health workers, particularly those working on the front lines of care in areas around the world most in need.For those frontline health workers without a voice, and for...
Source: IntraHealth International - December 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Noisy Commutes Could Cause Long-Lasting Damage
Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Hearing Disorders and Deafness, Noise (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - December 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nigeria:Antibiotics, Meningitis, Others Lead to Hearing Loss, Says Audiologist
[Guardian] Hearing loss has been linked to several factors such as meningitis, measles, jaundice, antibiotics, insufficient oxygen and infection at birth among other factors. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 4, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

These 10 medtech companies care a lot about research
Among the world’s largest medtech companies, these 10 spent the largest portion of their budgets on research and development. So what have they produced? [Image from Unsplash]Every year, Medical Design & Outsourcing pulls financial regulatory filings and reaches out to major, companies in some cases to create a list of the 100 largest medical device companies in the world, ranked by annual revenue for their medical device operations. On top of ranking by annual revenue, we also look at R&D spending because companies that spend a large portion of their budgets on research are worth keeping an eye on. Such comp...
Source: Mass Device - November 29, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News Diabetes Drug-Device Combinations Research & Development Abiomed Accuray Inc. Analogic AtriCure Inc. Big 100 BioMerieux Inc. cochlear Dexcom Edwards Lifesciences Insulet royalphilips Spectranetics Corp Source Type: news

How dirt, danger and chaos sparked the taming of lightning
(Springer) Death and misfortune were often the spark for engineers and technologists to turn scientific discovery into everyday electronic appliances. Alexander Graham Bell was a specialist teacher of the deaf, while it took many deaths from contaminated food before the first cooling machines were constructed. This book shows how, over a hundred years, a few basic inventions spawned the huge range of electronic devices that have changed the way we live. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NICE finally advises ban on vaginal mesh implants
For years women have complained about damage caused by the plastic mesh inserted to treat their post childbirth damage — complaints that seemed to fall on deaf ears, until now. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

REVEALED: How commuting on public transport 'could be making you DEAF'
COMMUTING on public transport or by bike could be making you deaf, scientists claim. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - November 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA clears remote adjustments for Cochlear ’ s Nucleus implants
The FDA last week approved remote programming adjustments for Cochlear Ltd.‘s (ASX:COH) Nucleus cochlear implant, removing the need for a select group of users  to make repeat visits for in-person programming sessions. The newly-cleared remote programming feature is indicated for patients with 6 months of experience with their cochlear implant sound processors and who are comfortable with the programming process, according to an FDA release. Normally, such implants would require regular programming visits with an audiologist in which electronic settings that control how the implant stimulates nerves in the ear a...
Source: Mass Device - November 21, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Otolaryngology Ear, Nose & Throat Regulatory/Compliance Cochlear Ltd. Source Type: news

Advanced Bionics wins FDA nod for HiFocus Slimj cochlear implant electrode
Advanced Bionics said late last week it won FDA approval for its HiFocus SlimJ electrode designed for use with the company’s HiRes Ultra cochlear implant. The Valencia, Calif.-based company touts the new electrode as featuring a thin, straight design for easier insertion during procedures and a slim profile to protect the delicate structures of the cochlea during insertion. “The HiFocus SlimJ electrode addresses the surgeon need for an alternate type of electrode whilst still offering full spectrum coverage and maintaining the performance potential of the individual. And surgeons have commented that it is easy ...
Source: Mass Device - November 20, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Otolaryngology Ear, Nose & Throat Regulatory/Compliance Advanced Bionics LLC Source Type: news