Play an instrument? You probably react faster, too
(University of Montreal) Researchers at Universit é de Montr é al's audiology school find that musicians have faster reaction times than non-musicians -- and that could have implications for the elderly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 10, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Reflections on the Future of Medicine
Recently, I traveled through China. I climbed mountains, hiked through forests, crossed deep valleys. I visited cities of every size. I floated across lakes and traveled beautiful shorelines churning with life. As a man of a certain age, I began to compare the permanence of the timeless landscape with the evanescence of my own existence. Yet, as a scientist, I knew these reflections were flawed. Scientists are trained to think in terms of aeons, millenia, and lifetimes. Consider the paradox. Is it the solid mountain or fragile the forest that is permanent? Is it the massive shoreline cliffs or the teeming shore life that...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 9, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Balance performance of deaf children with and without cochlear implants - Ebrahimi AA, Movallali G, Jamshidi AA, Haghgoo HA, Rahgozar M.
 The aim of this study was to compare the static and dynamic balance performance of deaf children with and without cochlear implants. This is a cross-sectional study of 145 school children, aged between 7 and 12 years comprising 85 children with congenita... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 7, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

5 Ways The Zika Virus Is Here To Stay
Zika virus’ status as a global health threat may officially be over, but the disease’s impact is far from contained.  The World Health Organization decided in November to end its designation of Zika virus as a public health emergency, but that doesn’t mean that Zika virus has disappeared, explained Dr. Carlos Pardo-Villamizar, a clinical neurologist with an expertise in infectious disorders at Johns Hopkins Medicine. Alongside pressing concerns about how to prevent a resurgence of the disease, health care systems in Brazil and other countries that saw births of babies infected with the disease in ute...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

5 Ways The Zika Virus Is Here To Stay
Zika virus’ status as a global health threat may officially be over, but the disease’s impact is far from contained.  The World Health Organization decided in November to end its designation of Zika virus as a public health emergency, but that doesn’t mean that Zika virus has disappeared, explained Dr. Carlos Pardo-Villamizar, a clinical neurologist with an expertise in infectious disorders at Johns Hopkins Medicine. Alongside pressing concerns about how to prevent a resurgence of the disease, health care systems in Brazil and other countries that saw births of babies infected with the disease in ute...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 4, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Anemia and hearing loss: Is there a link?
Evidence is mounting of a relationship between iron deficiency anemia and hearing loss. New research takes a fresh look and bolsters the connection. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hearing / Deafness Source Type: news

Earwax There to Protect Your Hearing, Doctors Say
Title: Earwax There to Protect Your Hearing, Doctors SayCategory: Health NewsCreated: 1/3/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 1/4/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Hearing General)
Source: MedicineNet Hearing General - January 4, 2017 Category: Audiology Source Type: news

Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss?
Iron deficiency might keep ear cells from getting oxygen they need, study suggests Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Anemia, Hearing Disorders and Deafness (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - December 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Concurrent Disabilities Can Complicate EMS Assessment and Treatment in Emergency Situations
Nearly 20% of the population of the United States has some form of disability—that's about 56.7 million people. Of those, more than 12 million need help with daily living.1 It can be a challenge, sometimes, to sort out if the reason for the 9-1-1 call is related to a patient's disability or not. Although it's not practical to provide guidance on every possible disability, what follows are some general suggestions for working with patients who have special needs or disabilities, and who are experiencing either an unrelated medical or traumatic emergency or an exacerbation/complication of their current condition. The B...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 30, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Katherine Koch, PhD, NRP Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss?
Title: Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss?Category: Health NewsCreated: 12/29/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 12/30/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Hearing General)
Source: MedicineNet Hearing General - December 30, 2016 Category: Audiology Source Type: news

President Updates -- December 2016
NAD President Melissa takes a moment to thank our supporters, shares an update about the next NAD Board meeting, and asks you to consider hosting an ASL reading event for deaf children. If you're reading this from your mobile, watch her videohere. (Source: National Association of the Deaf)
Source: National Association of the Deaf - December 29, 2016 Category: Audiology Authors: admin Source Type: news

Cochlear implant allows young girl, 8, to hear her voice for the first time in four years
Tamzin Stockdale, from Wolverhampton, West Midlands, woke up unable to hear four years ago due to a rare virus she caught in the womb. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

American Hearing Loss In Decline
Despite the ubiquity of headphones these days, a new study indicates hearing loss among American is in decline. Our host speaks with the study's co-author, audiologist Gregory Flamme. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How loud is too loud when listening to music?
One pediatric audiologist said there are "pockets of young people who have worse hearing than you would expect" (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - December 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Deaf History That -- " Deaf Community Gatherings "
To share news, stories, and updates -- deaf people always gathered often, sometimes even traveled for hours just to meet in town. If you're reading this from your mobile, watch the videohere. (Source: National Association of the Deaf)
Source: National Association of the Deaf - December 22, 2016 Category: Audiology Authors: admin Source Type: news

December 2016 #NADhandwave
For December, the NAD would like to recognize two wonderful people, Kim Anderson and Chriz Dally, for their hard work in passing LEAD-K (Language Equality and Acquisition for the Deaf Kids) Legislation, SB 323, in the state of Kansas. Both Chriz and Kim were instrumental in making sure steps were taken for the bill to go through both chambers and get signed into law. Thanks to their efforts, the bill passed and was signed into law on June 1, 2016. Chriz was the spokesperson for the bill while Kim was the team leader.read more (Source: National Association of the Deaf)
Source: National Association of the Deaf - December 21, 2016 Category: Audiology Authors: admin Source Type: news

Hearing Aid Prices, Features And Effectiveness - AARP
1 day ago ... Results of a survey of more than 360 audiologists about what brands and features consumers ask for most when buying a hearing aid. (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - December 21, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

WHEN THE DOLPHIN BROKE MY EAR: Can Deaf People Recover Hearing?
From 1972-87, I worked as a professional scuba diver for Marine World/Africa USA, an aquarium-zoo in Redwood City, California. Most of the work was plain hard labor, scrubbing algae off the walls, floors, and windows of the giant salt-water tanks. But the creatures we swam with? Sharks, dolphins, eels, seals and killer whales -- magic. Sometimes we brought the dolphins to the vets for medical attention. This was not always as easy as it might sound. In later years, tanks were made with rising floors, which made the situation less stressful for all concerned. But in those days, we would put a net in the water, to narrow...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 20, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Queen Elsa Would Love This Talented Girl Signing Along To 'Let It Go'
“Frozen” is responsible for yet another cool cover, and this time it’s bringing awareness to a useful skill. In January, Sally Featon and Kate McCallum in the United Kingdom used a language program called Makaton to perform the hit song “Let It Go.” The Makaton that they are signing is based on British Sign Language. According to The Makaton Charity, Makaton uses signs and symbols and is designed to help people who can hear but have difficulty learning or communicating. British Sign Language is for the deaf community in the U.K. The video from Featon, a Makaton tutor, and McCallum, an expert i...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Everyday Pain Relievers May Be Linked to Hearing Loss in Some Women
Title: Everyday Pain Relievers May Be Linked to Hearing Loss in Some WomenCategory: Health NewsCreated: 12/19/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 12/20/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Hearing General)
Source: MedicineNet Hearing General - December 20, 2016 Category: Audiology Source Type: news

Everyday Pain Relievers May Be Linked to Hearing Loss in Some Women
But degree of impairment tied to acetaminophen and ibuprofen was modest, researchers say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Hearing Disorders and Deafness, Pain Relievers, Women's Health (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - December 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DeafBlind Triathlete Sues Ironman
Lake Placid, New York– Kathleen Borrone, a DeafBlind trialthlete, filed suit today against World Triathlon Corporation and USA Triathlon who own and operate iconic triathlons around the world including the Ironman Lake Placid. In 2015 and 2016, Borrone successfully completed the Ironman Lake Placid, which consists of a grueling 2.4 mile open water swim, followed by a 112 mile bike ride, and a 26.2 mile marathon.read more (Source: National Association of the Deaf)
Source: National Association of the Deaf - December 19, 2016 Category: Audiology Authors: admin Source Type: news

Ask Howard Anything / December 2016
 NAD CEO Howard A. Rosenblum shares the process of how the NAD Board chooses the site for a Biennial NAD Conference. The AHA Series is also available atwww.nad.org/AHA. If you're reading this from your mobile, watch the videohere. (Source: National Association of the Deaf)
Source: National Association of the Deaf - December 19, 2016 Category: Audiology Authors: admin Source Type: news

Woman who got 'a bad cold' during pregnancy is shocked to discover she passed common but little-known virus to her unborn baby which left him profoundly deaf
Queensland mother Rebekka Murray contracted Cytomegalovirus (CMV) for the first time while pregnant, passing the virus on to her unborn baby. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Hearing loss and how hearing aids may help
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: Why do hearing aids work for some people but not others? ANSWER: The type of hearing loss?you have and how severe it is can impact how well a hearing aid works for you. A variety of hearing aids are available, so if the first one you try isn?t helpful, ask your audiologist [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 17, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Fewer Americans Under 70 Have Hearing Loss, Study Finds
Title: Fewer Americans Under 70 Have Hearing Loss, Study FindsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 12/15/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 12/16/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Hearing General)
Source: MedicineNet Hearing General - December 16, 2016 Category: Audiology Source Type: news

Musicians’ virtuosity shows cues for hard of hearing
At a lively cocktail party, a noisy bar or busy restaurant, musicians are best at following conversations, and brain scans are revealing how this can be used to help the hard of hearing. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - December 16, 2016 Category: Research Source Type: news

Musicians virtuosity shows cues for hard of hearing
At a lively cocktail party, a noisy bar or busy restaurant, musicians are best at following conversations, and brain scans are revealing how this can be used to help the hard of hearing. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - December 16, 2016 Category: Research Source Type: news

NAD Commends FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheelerannounced on December 15, 2016 that he will leave the FCC on January 20, 2017. The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) expresses its gratitude to Chairman Wheeler for his steadfast support to ensuring accessibility in telecommunications, television, and the Internet.read more (Source: National Association of the Deaf)
Source: National Association of the Deaf - December 15, 2016 Category: Audiology Authors: admin Source Type: news

The Big Lie: Monsanto and the New York Times
Most of us have told a lie a time or two and probably a variety of them. For example, there is the excuse lie as in the timeless "my dog at my homework," and the proverbial "white lie" as in "No you really do look great in those jeans." But the "The Big Lie" is different. The term refers to a propaganda or advertising technique by which first you say the opposite of an obvious truth about an event or product, and then keep repeating and repeating that lie until it becomes an unquestioned mantra for the public. So no matter how much the lie defies common sense it over time becomes com...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Zika-linked birth defects more extensive than previously thought, UCLA-led research finds
UCLADr. Karin NielsenNew UCLA-led research finds that Zika-linked abnormalities that occur in human fetuses are more extensive — and severe — than previously thought, with 46 percent of 125 pregnancies among Zika-infected women resulting in birth defects in newborns or ending in fetal death.Thestudy, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, suggests that damage during fetal development from the mosquito-borne virus can occur throughout pregnancy and that other birth defects are more common than microcephaly, when babies are born with very small heads. Further, these defects may only be detected weeks o...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 15, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Fewer Americans Under 70 Have Hearing Loss, Study Finds
It's still common, but noise-safety rules and changing smoking patterns may have helped, researcher says Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Hearing Disorders and Deafness, Noise, Seniors' Health (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - December 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Long-term painkiller use 'linked to hearing loss in women'
Conclusion Many people use medicines like paracetamol or ibuprofen for aches and pains. There's no suggestion from this study that occasional use to manage a headache or muscle strain is harmful. But the study is a reminder that regular use – defined by the researchers as two days or more a week – could have health consequences over time. However, this study has some limitations. As a cohort study, it can't prove cause and effect between paracetamol and NSAIDs and hearing loss. And it mainly included white women, all in the US, so we don't know if the results apply to other groups. Also, the increased risk ...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Prolonged use of some painkillers tied to hearing loss in women
A study of over 55,000 women finds longer use of NSAIDs and acetaminophen - but not aspirin - is tied to slightly higher risk of hearing loss in women. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hearing / Deafness Source Type: news

Ibuprofen and paracetamol cause 'severe hearing loss': Women at risk from painkillers
PARACETAMOL or ibuprofen could cause long-term deafness, experts have revealed. Scientists have revealed the effects could caused by taking the painkillers for as frequently as two days a week for six years. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women who take paracetamol and ibuprofen risk going deaf
As many as one in 20 women suffering partial deafness could blame their painkiller use, a study by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cochlear implants: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute
In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Douglas Sladen tells us about cochlear implants. To listen, click the link below. Cochlear Implants (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 14, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

5 Things That Are Utterly Ridiculous For Medicare Not To Cover
Medicare, the federal government’s program that provides health care to those 65 and older, while a confusing package of rules and regulations, is generally highly regarded by its users. That, of course, matters little to the ilk of Paul Ryan and PEOTUS Donald Trump who appear hell-bent on replacing it with a voucher program. It is the ultimate “if it ain’t broke, why fix it?” situation and already seniors are justifiably getting concerned. Frankly, if any changes are to be made to the program, we’d like to start with this short list of five things that traditional Medicare unbelieva...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Historic Captioning Agreement with Airlines
Sorry, you need to install flash to see this content.Thanks to the NAD and other Advocates: Airlines will provide captioned in-flight entertainment to passengers, increasing accessibility in the air for deaf and hard of hearing passengers.read more (Source: National Association of the Deaf)
Source: National Association of the Deaf - December 12, 2016 Category: Audiology Authors: admin Source Type: news

Federal Register: Immediately in Effect Guidance Document: Conditions for Sale for Air-Conduction Hearing Aids; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability
The FDA is announcing the availability of the guidance ``Immediately in Effect Guidance Document: Conditions for Sale for Air-Conduction Hearing Aids.'' FDA is issuing this guidance to communicate to consumers, hearing aid dispensers, hearing aid manuf... (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - December 12, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

FDA Announces Steps to Improve Hearing Aid Accessibility
U.S. Food and Drug Administration announces steps to better support consumer access to hearing aids (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - December 8, 2016 Category: Disability Tags: Assistive Hearing Devices Source Type: news

FDA takes steps to improve hearing aid accessibility
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced important steps to better support consumer access to hearing aids. The agency issued a guidance document explaining that it does not intend to enforce the requirement that individuals 18 and up receive a medical evaluation or sign a waiver prior to purchasing most hearing aids. This guidance is effective immediately. Today, the FDA is also announcing its commitment to consider creating a category of over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids that could deliver new, innovative and lower-cost products to millions of consumers. “Today’s actions are an example of the F...
Source: Mass Device - December 8, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Blog FDA Source Type: news

FDA Eases Up on Hearing Aid Rules
Title: FDA Eases Up on Hearing Aid RulesCategory: Health NewsCreated: 12/7/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 12/8/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Hearing General)
Source: MedicineNet Hearing General - December 8, 2016 Category: Audiology Source Type: news

FDA Eases Up on Hearing Aid Rules
Devices should be easier to obtain, less expensive under new guidelines (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - December 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Eases Up on Hearing Aid Rules
Devices should be easier to obtain, less expensive under new guidelines Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Hearing Aids (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - December 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Eases Up on Hearing Aid Rules
WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7, 2016 -- Getting a hearing aid should be less of a hassle -- and eventually less expensive -- under new rules introduced by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The FDA said on Wednesday it will no longer enforce a requirement... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 7, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

FDA takes steps to improve hearing aid accessibility
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced important steps to better support consumer access to hearing aids. The agency issued a guidance document explaining that it does not intend to enforce the requirement that individuals 18 and up receive a medical evaluation or sign a waiver prior to purchasing most hearing aids. This guidance is effective immediately. Today, the FDA is also announcing its commitment to consider creating a category of over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids that could deliver new, innovative and lower-cost products to millions of consumers. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - December 7, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Improving Hearing Aid Accessibility
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - December 7, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Hearing Aid Debate Reaches Congress
(Source: MDDI)
Source: MDDI - December 6, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: mthibault Tags: News Regulatory and Legal Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

How Loud Are Your Headphones?
There are many headphones for sale with different noise levels, but an audiologist helped The Times create a safe experiment with a common model of headphones. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: THE NEW YORK TIMES Tags: Headphones and Headsets Ears and Hearing Noise Tests and Examinations Source Type: news