Intensive CBT: How fast can I get better?

A highly effective psychotherapy called cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) focuses on how our thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes can affect our feelings and behavior. Traditional CBT treatment usually requires weekly 30- to 60-minute sessions over 12 to 20 weeks. A faster option now emerging is intensive CBT (I-CBT), which employs much longer sessions concentrated into a month, week, or weekend — or sometimes a single eight-hour session. CBT helps people learn tools to reframe different types of thinking, such as black-and-white thinking (I can’t do anything right) and emotional reasoning (I feel you dislike me, so it must be true) and other potentially harmful thought patterns that fuel mental health problems and undermine relationships, work, and daily life. Once learned, the coping strategies taught during CBT or I-CBT sessions can help people deal with a variety of problems throughout life. Can intensive CBT help people with anxiety, depression, and other issues? I-CBT has been used to treat many people suffering from mood and anxiety disorders, trauma-related disorders, and other issues. Some programs treat children or teens who have mild autism spectrum disorder (mild ASD), selective mutism, or prenatal alcohol exposure, or who are struggling with school refusal. There are I-CBT programs that focus in specific areas, such as: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) anxiety disorders, including agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social an...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Mental Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

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