Adjuvant Anthracyclines in Breast Cancer: What Is Their Role?

This article provides an update of data that help inform clinicians of the role anthracyclines should play in adjuvant breast cancer therapy. Two recently reported large randomized trials—the Anthracycline in Early Breast Cancer and Western German Study Plan B studies—compared a taxane and cyclophosphamide regimen with an anthracycline, taxane, and cyclophosphamide regimen. Although the studies had conflicting results, together these studies suggest that the benefit of adjuvant anthracycline therapy over a nonanthracycline taxane‐containing regimen is modest at best and may be primarily seen in patients with especially high‐risk disease (i.e., triple‐negative breast cancer, involvement of multiple lymph nodes). A third study—the MINDACT study—compared an anthracycline‐based regimen to a nonanthracycline regimen, with similar outcomes in both groups. Despite the toxicities, no adjuvant breast cancer regimen has been shown to be superior to an anthracycline‐taxane regimen in high‐risk patients. These data can directly inform clinical decision‐making in determining which patients warrant use of adjuvant anthracycline therapy. Future research may focus on confirming subgroups for whom it is reasonable to forgo adjuvant anthracyclines and validating predictive biomarkers or scores for anthracycline benefit.Implications for Practice.In patients with early breast cancer, the choice of adjuvant chemotherapy should be based on its effectiveness in...
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review, Breast Cancer Source Type: research

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In this study, we interrogated the US Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry to analyze the risks of ALL in cancer patients treated with RT, CT or combined modality regimens at the population level.MethodsWe used our previously validated R program, SEERaBomb (Leukemia 2016; 30: 285-94) to query all 18 SEER registries, 1973-2014. We identified all first cancer cases treated with RT and/or CT that subsequently developed ALL ≥1 year after diagnosis of the first cancer. First cancer cases of lymphoid lineage were excluded. Diagnosis was derived from the International Classification of Diseases. Relative r...
Source: Blood - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: 612. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Clinical Studies: Improving Outcomes with Cellular Therapy Source Type: research
CONCLUSION Cognitive impairment can affect daily functioning, quality of life, and capacity to work in patients with cancer and those in remission. Consequently, cognitive assessment is now an important and necessary part of a comprehensive oncological care plan. Cancer-related cognitive impairment might be due to the direct effects of the cancer itself, nonspecific factors, or comorbid conditions that are independent of the disease and/or due to the adverse effects of the treatment or combination of treatments given for the disease. The prevalence and extent of cognitive impairment associated with cancer is recognized but...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognition Current Issue Neuro oncology Neurology Review cancer chemotherapy cognitive impairment neuropsychological assessment treatment Source Type: research
The already available expensive conventional therapies for cancer like chemotherapy and radiotherapy have a number of side effects such as myelosuppression and neurological, cardiac, pulmonary, and renal toxicity, which pose serious harm to the quality of life. Therefore, there is a need to develop treatment options that include more potent and less toxic anticancer drugs as compared to existing drugs. Studies have shown that regular consumption of fruits and vegetables because of phytochemical compounds extracted from them inhibiting the activity of antioxidant and free radicals which in turn showing anti-cancer activitie...
Source: International Journal of Phytomedicine - Category: Science Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractChemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a dose-limiting toxicity caused by several chemotherapeutic agents. Currently, CIPN is managed by empirical dose modifications at the discretion of the treating physician. The goal of this research is to quantitate the dose-CIPN relationship to inform the optimal strategies for dose modification. Data were obtained from the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 40502 trial, a randomized phase III trial of paclitaxel vs. nab-paclitaxel vs. ixabepilone as first-line chemotherapy for locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. CIPN was measured using a subset of th...
Source: The AAPS Journal - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
In this study we demonstrate the use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based epigenome editing to alter cell response to inflammatory environments by repressing inflammatory cytokine cell receptors, specifically TNFR1 and IL1R1. This has applications for many inflammatory-driven diseases. It could be applied for arthritis or to therapeutic cells that are being delivered to inflammatory environments that need to be protected from inflammation." In chronic back pain, for example, slipped or herniated discs are a result of damaged tissue when inflammation causes cells to create ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract PURPOSE: The current shift in site of care from community oncology practices to the hospital outpatient department to deliver oncology services may have significant implications for the economic and clinical outcomes of cancer care. Therefore, this study compares health care use and costs among patients with cancer receiving intravenous (IV) chemotherapy in physician offices (PO) versus in hospital outpatient settings (HOP). METHODS: This retrospective study, which was based on medical and pharmacy claims data, included patients (age, 18 to 64 years) initiating IV chemotherapy/biologic treatment betw...
Source: JOP - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: J Oncol Pract Source Type: research
Japanese scientist Yoshinori Ohsumi, 71, won the 2016 Nobel Prize on Monday for his research on autophagy ― a metabolic recycling process in which cells eat parts of themselves to survive and stay healthy. His initial work, first started in 1992, focused on the genes behind the autophagy process in yeast cells. Autophagy, however, has implications for several human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, infectious diseases and diabetes. Now drugs that can target the process are being tested in early-stage clinical trials in human beings, which could fundamentally change everything from the way ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: By literature review, these 2 cases do not support the relationship between primary tumor treatment and secondary cancer, but strongly suggest the need for histologic samples when bone metastasis occurred after years from diagnosis of breast cancer. In this setting, the oncologist should take into account a secondary bone marrow tumor before starting treatment for breast cancer. PMID: 26979247 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Tumori - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Tumori Source Type: research
Antibody‐drug conjugates (ADCs) combine highly specific monoclonal antibodies with potent cytotoxic drugs. Their synergy allows for targeted delivery of toxic drugs to cancer cells while sparing systemic exposure. In this review, we focus on the history and clinical applications of ADCs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of cancer and highlight new ADCs in the drug development pipeline. Three ADCs have received FDA approval thus far. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, although withdrawn from the U.S. market, may still be an effective treatment modality in subsets of patients with acute myeloid ...
Source: Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Review of Therapeutics Source Type: research
Authors: Chae YK, Yousaf M, Malecek MK, Carneiro B, Chandra S, Kaplan J, Kalyan A, Sassano A, Platanias LC, Giles F Abstract Statins, the most commonly prescribed class of drug, have demonstrated effects beyond cholesterol reduction including anti-tumor and immunomodulatory properties. Several epidemiological studies have suggested an anti-neoplastic effect of statins evidenced by reductions in cancer incidence and cancer-related mortality. Clinical trials on statins as part of therapy for cancer have generated interest in the oncology community. Statins have been investigated for a variety of cancers, early and la...
Source: Discovery Medicine - Category: Research Tags: Discov Med Source Type: research
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