Monocyte/Granulocyte to Lymphocyte ratio and the MELD score as Prognostic Predictors for Early Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Trans-Arterial Chemoembolization.

Monocyte/Granulocyte to Lymphocyte ratio and the MELD score as Prognostic Predictors for Early Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Trans-Arterial Chemoembolization. Br J Biomed Sci. 2018 Jul 11; Authors: Elalfy H, Besheer T, El-Maksoud MA, Farid K, Elegezy M, El Nakib AM, El Aziz MA, El-Khalek AA, El-Morsy A, Elmokadem A, Elsamanoudy AZ, El-Bendary MA Abstract BACKGROUND: The first-line treatment option for intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma is transarterial chemoembolization. Certain blood indices, such as lymphocyte/monocyte ratio (LMR), lymphocyte count, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR), monocyte-granulocyte/lymphocyte ratio (MGLR) and red blood cell distribution width (RDW) are prognostic biomarkers in certain diseases. The model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) and Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) scores have been designed for patients with cirrhosis waiting for liver transplantation and in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. We hypothesised possible roles for these blood indices, and the clinical MELD and CTP scores as prognostic predictors for early recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after transarterial chemoembolization. METHODS: Routine laboratory indices determined the NLR, LMR, MGLR, RDW, PLR, and MELD the CTP scores in 147 patients. Sensitivity and specificity of the indices for hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence 36 months after transarterial chemoembolization were estimated by receiv...
Source: British Journal of Biomedical Science - Category: Laboratory Medicine Tags: Br J Biomed Sci Source Type: research

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 12 July 2018Source: The Brazilian Journal of Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Norma Arteiro Filgueira, Camilla Maria de Alencar Saraiva, Norma Thomé Jucá, Matheus Filgueira Bezerra, Claudio Moura LacerdaAbstractSchistosomiasis affects approximately 207 million people in 76 countries. The association between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and Schistosoma mansoni infection (SMI) has been investigated. Studies using animal models suggest that the parasite may accelerate the oncogenic process when combined with other factors, such as hepatitis C virus infection or exposure to a car...
Source: The Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2011Source: Digestive and Liver Disease Supplements, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): Marina BerenguerAbstractCirrhosis with/without hepatocellular carcinoma is the primary indication for liver transplantation (LT) in many countries. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) reinfection occurs universally resulting in HCV-graft disease with progression to cirrhosis in about one third of cases after 5 years. Graft failure secondary to recurrent HCV is now the most frequent cause of death, graft failure and need for retransplantation in these patients, with a cumulative risk of allograft failure due to recurrent disease ...
Source: Digestive and Liver Disease Supplements - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Publication date: October 2017Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical Gastroenterology, Volume 31, Issue 5Author(s): Hannes HagströmAbstractAlcohol is an established risk factor for cirrhosis. Current recommendations for a “safe” limit for alcohol consumption are usually set to around 30 g of alcohol per day for men and 20 g per day for women, but evidence is mounting that these cut-offs might be set too high. Also, inter-individual differences in the hepatic sensitivity for alcohol likely play into the risk of development of cirrhosis. In patients with concomitant liver diseases, a synergis...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2011Source: Digestive and Liver Disease Supplements, Volume 5, Issue 1Author(s): Marina BerenguerAbstractCirrhosis with/without hepatocellular carcinoma is the primary indication for liver transplantation (LT) in many countries. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) reinfection occurs universally resulting in HCV-graft disease with progression to cirrhosis in about one third of cases after 5 years. Graft failure secondary to recurrent HCV is now the most frequent cause of death, graft failure and need for retransplantation in these patients, with a cumulative risk of allograft failure due to recurrent disease ...
Source: Digestive and Liver Disease Supplements - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Publication date: October 2017Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical Gastroenterology, Volume 31, Issue 5Author(s): Hannes HagströmAbstractAlcohol is an established risk factor for cirrhosis. Current recommendations for a “safe” limit for alcohol consumption are usually set to around 30 g of alcohol per day for men and 20 g per day for women, but evidence is mounting that these cut-offs might be set too high. Also, inter-individual differences in the hepatic sensitivity for alcohol likely play into the risk of development of cirrhosis. In patients with concomitant liver diseases, a synergis...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Authors: Wong VW Abstract Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most common chronic liver disease worldwide and the second leading indication for liver transplantation and the third leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the United States. This chapter focuses on the prevention and management of NAFLD. Healthy lifestyle is the cornerstone for the prevention and management of NAFLD and should be recommended to every patient at risk or having established NAFLD. Despite the high prevalence of NAFLD, it should be recognized that the majority of patients will not develop liver-related complica...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Authors: Liu K, McCaughan GW Abstract Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the world and will soon become the number one cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), liver transplantation and liver-related mortality. The disease often occurs in the setting of metabolic conditions such as obesity and type II diabetes mellitus. These same metabolic drivers are also risk factors for NAFLD associated HCC which can occur even in the absence of cirrhosis or advanced fibrosis and appears to be phenotypically different to HCCs arising from other chronic liver diseases. The frequ...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Abstract Liver transplantation (LT) is one of the most effective treatments for end-stage liver disease caused by related risk factors when liver resection is contraindicated. Additionally, despite the decrease in the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) over the past two decades, the absolute number of HBsAg-positive people has increased, leading to an increase in HBV-related liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Consequently, a large demand exists for LT. While the wait time for patients on the donor list is, to some degree, shorter due to the development of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), th...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
The pandemic spreading of obesity and diabetes makes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) the growing most common cause of chronic liver disease and cirrhosis [1], an increasing risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma [2], and the emerging indication for liver transplantation [3]. Consistent with these data the management of patients with NAFLD-related cirrhosis represents a challenge in terms of epidemiological, clinical and economical burden. In this complex picture, the diagnosis of esophageal varices (EV) and especially large (grade 2/3) EV requiring primary prophylaxis (varices needing treatment, VNT), is of para...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
The pandemic spreading of obesity and diabetes makes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) the most rapidly growing cause of chronic liver disease and cirrhosis,1 an increasing risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma,2 and an emerging indication for liver transplantation.3 Consistent with these data, the management of patients with NAFLD-related cirrhosis represents a challenge in terms of epidemiological, clinical and economic burden. In this complex picture, the diagnosis of esophageal varices (EV) and especially large (grade 2/3) EV requiring primary prophylaxis (varices needing treatment [VNT]), is of paramount pr...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
More News: Biomedical Science | Cancer & Oncology | Carcinoma | Children | Cirrhosis | Hepatocellular Carcinoma | Laboratory Medicine | Liver | Liver Cancer | Liver Disease | Liver Transplant | Science | Transplants | UK Health | Urology & Nephrology