You never know the life you save....become an organ donor!

The week of April 23-27 has been designated as National Pediatric Transplant Week.  This week is to bring attention to the great need for organ donations and to honor  donors and their families whose incredibly selfless gift has given someone the gift of life.While most of us will never experience the need for a transplant, there are many of us who know someone who has a debilitating condition such as kidney dialysis that are in need of a transplant.Right now there are almost 2,000 children on the national transplant list.  Those needing hearts, lungs, eyes, tissue, liver, kidney, or some other body part are waiting for help.  But they can ’t wait forever. Out of sight, out of mind is how we tend to live each day …if we aren’t experiencing the situation in our own circle of family and friends, we aren’t really affected by it.  But take a moment to think about it ….children who were burned in fires need skin tissue….others were born with heart defects that prevent them from living a full life. When you see these situations, your heart goes out to them. Can you imagine being the parent of a child needing a transplant …the worry, the stress, the fear that your child may die before an organ is available?Fortunately there is something each of us can do to help.  Become an organ donor. While adult sized organs can ’t always be used for a child, many things can such as eye...
Source: Pediatric Health Associates - Category: Pediatrics Tags: Volunteer Opportunities Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 1 March 2018Source: The SurgeonAuthor(s): Branislav Kollar, Bohdan PomahacAbstractHundred years ago, Sir Harold Gillies laid a foundation to the modern plastic surgery trying to reconstruct facial defects of severely disfigured soldiers of World War I. Some years later, Joseph Murray experimented with rejection of skin grafts aimed for treatment of burned patients who sustained their injuries on battlefields of World War II. In 1954, the acquired expertise and intensive research allowed him to perform the first successful kidney transplantation in the world at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital ...
Source: The Surgeon - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Abstract IgA nephropathy (IgAN) remains one of the most common glomerular lesions, which has a striking geographic distribution and is the most common form of primary glomerular disease in Asia. However, the exact prevalence or clinicopathological spectrum of IgAN in India is not well documented. This retrospective study analyzed the presentation in 126 patients of primary IgAN out of 298 native kidney biopsies (42.28%) performed over a period of three years (2013-2015). The patients were followed up for three months. This is the second highest prevalence recorded in the world after Japan. Among the clinical featu...
Source: Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 March 2018 Source:The Surgeon Author(s): Branislav Kollar, Bohdan Pomahac Hundred years ago, Sir Harold Gillies laid a foundation to the modern plastic surgery trying to reconstruct facial defects of severely disfigured soldiers of World War I. Some years later, Joseph Murray experimented with rejection of skin grafts aimed for treatment of burned patients who sustained their injuries on battlefields of World War II. In 1954, the acquired expertise and intensive research allowed him to perform the first successful kidney transplantation in the world at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Bo...
Source: The Surgeon - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Making human tissue in a lab has always been more sci-fi than sci-fact, but powerful genetic technologies may change that soon. For the most part, the only way to replace diseased or failing hearts, lungs, kidneys and livers is with donor organs. Even then, many people struggle to find a good biological match with a donor, and 8,000 die each year in the U.S. while waiting for an organ. In one promising solution to the shortage, researchers have been putting a new DNA editing tool called CRISPR through rigorous tests in organ regeneration. Last August, a group of scientists led by George Church, professor of genetics at Har...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Longevity organ transplants Source Type: news
Rationale: Povidone-iodine is a broad-spectrum antiseptic applied topically to treat wounds and prevent their infection. There have been several case reports of acute kidney injury (AKI) in burn patients after povidone-iodine irrigation and in patients receiving the substance as a sclerotherapy agent for management of lymphocele after renal transplantation. However, biopsy-confirmed AKI after ingestion of povidone-iodine has not previously been described. Patient concerns: A 47-year-old man who had apparently ingested povidone-iodine solution and presented with nausea, vomiting, and reduced urine output. Laboratory da...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
ConclusionA viable and reproducible NMP system was established and tested in porcine kidneys, which was able to simulate graft function extra‐corporeally. Further work is required to identify the most optimal perfusion conditions. Prior to its utilization in clinical transplantation, the system should be tested in non‐transplanted human kidneys.
Source: ANZ Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Burns are associated with substantial morbidity, including acute kidney injury and liver dysfunction. We aim to determine whether secondary injury is increased in patients with a history of organ transplantation.
Source: Journal of the American College of Surgeons - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Scientific poster presentation Source Type: research
Conclusion Vaccine companies have regularly used blood and body parts from killed cows, dogs, worms, mice, chickens, human babies, monkeys, guinea pigs, rabbits, hamsters, rats, etc., to make these vaccines, so using foreskin from newborn babies may not surprise some. For many, it is appalling. [28] Circumcisions fuel multi-billion dollar industries. If you see neonatal foreskin for sale, which is very easy to find on the internet, remember that these newborn children didn’t consent to being circumcised and they didn’t consent for their foreskin to be sold, used for research purposes, or to be injected into the...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Augustina Ursino Top Stories circumcision truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs
Until recently, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was the only curative option for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS). The first attempts at gene therapy for WAS using a -retroviral vector improved immunological parameters substantially but were complicated by acute leukemia as a result of insertional mutagenesis in a high proportion of patients. More recently, treatment of children with a state-of-the-art self-inactivating lentiviral vector (LV-w1.6 WASp) has resulted in significant clinical benefit without inducing selection of clones harboring integrations near oncogenes. Here, we describe a case of a presplenectomize...
Source: Blood - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: Immunobiology and Immunotherapy, Clinical Trials and Observations, Gene Therapy Source Type: research
Authors: Vyas KS, Burns C, Ryan DT, Wong L Abstract A 41-year-old man with past medical history of kidney-liver transplantation requiring chronic immunosuppression presented 2 years posttransplant with a necrotizing soft tissue infection of his right thigh. Serial debridement to remove necrotic tissue was performed, and a Matrix HD Allograft Fenestrated (RTI Surgical, Alachua, FL) was applied. At 5-months post grafting, the patient demonstrated fully vascularized and intact skin. Under normal circumstances, a cadaveric allograft sloughs over several weeks and is not usually considered a permanent solution for wound...
Source: Wounds - Category: General Medicine Tags: Wounds Source Type: research
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