Zika brain damage may go undetected in pregnancy

(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) Zika virus may cause significant damage to the fetal brain even when the baby's head size is normal, according to a primate study. The damage can be difficult to detect even with sophisticated brain scans. It may also occur from infections during childhood and adolescence. Hard hit are brain regions that generate new brain cells. Fetal brain structures that may be injured include those where neural stem cells play a role in learning and memory.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

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Authors: Depoux A, Philibert A, Rabier S, Philippe HJ, Fontanet A, Flahault A Abstract While until recently the small and isolated Zika outbreaks in Eastern Asia and Pacific islands had been overlooked, the large-scale outbreak that started in Brazil in 2015 and the increase of microcephaly cases in the same place and time made media headlines. Considered as harmless until recently, Zika has given rise to an important global crisis that poses not only health challenges but also environmental, economical, social, and ethical challenges for states and people around the world. The main objective of this paper is to re...
Source: Public Health Reviews - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Public Health Rev Source Type: research
Authors: Pérez-Ávila J, Guzmán-Tirado MG, Fraga-Nodarse J, Handley G, Meegan J, Pelegrino-Martínez de la Cotera JL, Fauci AS Abstract After December 17, 2014, when the US and Cuban governments announced their intent to restore relations, the two countries participated in various exchange activities in an effort to encourage cooperation in public health, health research and biomedical sciences. The conference entitled Exploring Opportunities for Arbovirus Research Collaboration, hosted at Havana's Hotel Nacional, was part of these efforts and was the first major US-Cuban scientific confer...
Source: MEDICC Review - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: MEDICC Rev Source Type: research
In this study, researchers performed echocardiograms in infants with laboratory confirmation of in utero exposure to Zika to investigate a potential link between prenatal Zika exposure and congenital heart defects.METHODThe researchers performed cardiac echocardiograms in infants born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from November 2015 to January 2017. All infants were infected with the Zika virus during their mothers ’ pregnancy, as confirmed by laboratory tests.IMPACTWomen infected by Zika during pregnancy were 10 times more likely than the general population to give birth to infants with major cardiac defects. The resea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Zika Virus: Knowledge Assessment of Residents and Health-Care Providers in Roatán, Honduras, following an Outbreak. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2018 May 14;: Authors: Brissett DI, Tuholske C, Allen IE, Larios NS, Mendoza DJ, Murillo AG, Bloch EM Abstract Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of Zika virus (ZIKV) public health educational campaigns. Following a ZIKV educational campaign in Roatán, Honduras (October 2016), a survey was administered (March-May 2017) to residents (N = 348) and health-care professionals ([HCPs]; N = 44) to evaluate ZIKV knowledge, attitudes, and preventive prac...
Source: The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Trop Med Hyg Source Type: research
This article describes the laboratory based surveillance system in Suriname and the incidence of confirmed cases of ZIKV infection according to sex, age, and spatial and temporal distribution Methods General practitioners and public health centers located in different districts of Suriname were asked to send blood samples from suspicious cases to Academic Hospital for molecular diagnosis of Zika virus infection. In particular, in cases involving pregnant women, samples were screened for free upon request. Viral RNA was extracted from blood and urine samples using a RNeasy Mini Kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany). An in-house ...
Source: PLOS Currents Outbreaks - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
We describe the effects in mental health and the coping strategies that women use to deal with the Zika epidemic. Zika is taking a heavy toll on women's emotional well-being. They are coping with feelings of fear, helplessness, and uncertainty by taking drastic precautions to avoid infection that affect all areas of their lives. Coping strategies pose obstacles in professional life, lead to social isolation, including from family and partner, and threaten the emotional and physical well-being of women. Our findings suggest that the impacts of the Zika epidemic on women may be universal and global. Zika infection is a silen...
Source: Cadernos de Saude Publica - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Cad Saude Publica Source Type: research
Pregnant women are at risk for infection and may have significant morbidity or mortality. Influenza, pertussis, zika, and cytomegalovirus produce mild or asymptomatic illness in the mother, but have profound implications for her fetus. Maternal immunization can prevent or mitigate infections in pregnant women and their infants. The Advisory Committee of Immunization Practices recommends 2 vaccines during pregnancy: inactivated influenza, and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis during pregnancy. The benefits of MMR, varicella, and other vaccines are reviewed. Novel vaccine studies for use duri...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Limited data exist about U.S. travelers' knowledge, risk perceptions, and behaviors related to the Zika virus (ZIKV). Using an internet research panel, in March 2017, we surveyed 1,202 Americans in the continental United States and Puerto Rico who planned to travel to a Zika-affected country, state, or U.S. territory in 2017. We compared levels of knowledge and perceived risk of ZIKV, and intentions to practice ZIKV prevention behaviors across respondents from three regions: Puerto Rico, at-risk states, and other states. More than 80% of respondents correctly understood that a person could acquire ZIKV th...
Source: The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Trop Med Hyg Source Type: research
We describe a case of fetal death associated with a recent infection by Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in a Brazilian pregnant woman (positive RT-PCR in blood and placenta). Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during pregnancy was also identified, based on a positive RT-PCR in a fetal kidney specimen. The maternal infection caused by the ZIKV was asymptomatic and the CHIKV infection had a classical clinical presentation. The fetus had no apparent anomalies, but her weight was between the 3rd and 10th percentile for the gestational age.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Short Communicatio Source Type: research
Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus, which can induce fetal brain injury and growth restriction following maternal infection during pregnancy. Prenatal diagnosis of ZIKV-associated fetal injury in the absence of microcephaly is challenging due to an incomplete understanding of how maternal ZIKV infection affects fetal growth and the use of different sonographic reference standards around the world. We hypothesized that skeletal growth is unaffected by ZIKV infection and that the femur length can represent an internal standard to detect growth deceleration of the fetal head and/or abdomen by ultrasound.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Original Research: Obstetrics Source Type: research
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