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Trump's Approach To The Opioid Epidemic: Neglect Treatment, Ignore The Experts

WASHINGTON – Since taking office, President Donald Trump has systematically removed or limited the power of federal officials and government offices that have the expertise to confront the nation’s opioid epidemic. Trump asked Surgeon General Vivek Murthy to resign in late April. He still has an acting director running the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although he backtracked on his reported plan to essentially gut his Office of National Drug Control Policy, staffers would be wise to polish their resumes.  Trump’s new budget proposal cuts all federal drug prevention programs by roughly 11 percent. The former director of the CDC, Dr. Tom Frieden, vented on Twitter that the 1.2 billion cut to his former agency would thwart efforts at preventing the complications that come with heroin use such as HIV infections. These moves follow Trump’s recent endorsement of the House’s health care bill that would no longer require insurance companies to cover treatment for addiction. If signed into law in its current form, more than a million Americans could potentially lose their access to treatment services. That bill cuts Medicaid by $880 billion. And Trump’s proposed budget goes even further, with another $616 billion cut to Medicaid over 10 years that would effectively cripple the government’s ability to fund and expand care. We face a national opioid crisis. We need to use all the tools we have to help pe...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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With the 64,000 deaths from opioid overdoses last year alone, the medical community is struggling to contain the out-of-control opioid epidemic. Now, CVS, one the nation’s largest pharmacy benefit managers that oversees prescription drug benefits for 90 million people through its CVS Caremark plan, is attempting to address opioid abuse by no longer reimbursing opioid prescriptions beyond the first week for people filling these prescriptions for the first time. Beginning in February, the company announced, it will adhere to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) guidelines for prescribing opioids...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized CVS CVS health CVS pharmacy Drugs Opioid opioid epidemic opioid prescription opioid prescriptions opioid prescriptions cvs opioid use disorder opioids Source Type: news
In the last two decades, prescribing rates for opioids have increased nearly three-fold, from 76 million prescriptions in 1991 to approximately 207 million prescriptions in 2013.  This remarkable volume of opioid prescribing is unique to the United States, where 2015 prescribing amounts were nearly four times those in Europe.   Sadly, this much more frequent prescribing of addictive medications is connected to an epidemic of deaths related to abuse of opiates and other drugs of abuse.  Drug overdose deaths are now considered a national emergency, topping 59,000 in 2016.  The abuse of opioids can be...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Costs and Spending Insurance and Coverage Organization and Delivery Payment Policy opiods PBMs Source Type: blogs
As so often happens, a frantic mother called us about her 19-year-old daughter, who I’ll call Jen. A heroin addict, Jen had been shuttled between multiple treatment centers and sober homes by greedy marketers looking to cash in on the teenager’s insurance benefits by keeping her perpetually in recovery, but never sober. As our investigator searched Palm Beach County for Jen, her mother finally reached her by phone. She pleaded with her daughter to leave Florida, to which Jen replied, “Why would I come home? I have all I need here.” In the ensuing months, Jen has become a victim of a vicious cycle kn...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Addiction Affordable Care Act Drugs Health Care Source Type: news
As so often happens, a frantic mother called us about her 19-year-old daughter, who I’ll call Jen. A heroin addict, Jen had been shuttled between multiple treatment centers and sober homes by greedy marketers looking to cash in on the teenager’s insurance benefits by keeping her perpetually in recovery, but never sober. As our investigator searched Palm Beach County for Jen, her mother finally reached her by phone. She pleaded with her daughter to leave Florida, to which Jen replied, “Why would I come home? I have all I need here.” In the ensuing months, Jen has become a victim of a vicious cycle kn...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Addiction Affordable Care Act Drugs Health Care Source Type: news
In a new study of the leading causes of death in the U.S., researchers say that opioids have contributed to a shortening of life expectancy. Scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report in JAMA that while life expectancy in the U.S. increased overall from 2000 to 2015, that improvement was blunted by deaths from opioid overdoses. (According to other recent research, deaths from opioid overdoses nearly doubled in the U.S. from 2009 to 2015.) The life expectancy for people born in 2015 increased by two years compared to people born in 2000, from 76 years to 78. Much of that gain was due to decreases ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized are opioids painkillers drug addiction Drugs leading causes of death opioid addiction opioid epidemic opioid overdose opioid overdoses opioid pain killers what are opioids what is the leading cause of death Source Type: news
3.5 out of 5 stars Controversies and carfentanil: We have much to learn about the present state of opioid poisoning. Cole JB, Nelson LS. Am J Emerg Med 2017 Aug 24 [Epub ahead of print] Reference I have argued — both in a post on this blog and a column in Emergency Medicine News — that the idea of a “heroin overdose” is a completely outdated concept that is never coming back. The fact is, when a patient comes in today with a history of shooting or snorting heroin, none of us have any firm idea about exactly what drug or drugs were involved. The chance that such a patient was exposed only to heroin i...
Source: The Poison Review - Category: Toxicology Authors: Tags: Medical carfentanil fentanyl opiates opioids Source Type: news
Recently I was speaking with a couple whose adult son died two months ago of a drug overdose. These parents adored him and knew he was dealing with emotional challenges. They did what they could to let him know he was loved and they were with him come what may. They attempted to get him help. He was surrounded by a multi-generational family who thought the world of him. As we processed their experience and they openly shared their grief, they said something that in all my years as a therapist, I had not considered. They both acknowledged that as we approached the threshold between summer and autumn, they were experiencing ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Family Grief and Loss Parenting Psychology Psychotherapy Stories Bereavement grieving Heroin Addiction opioid crisis Opioid Epidemic Prescription Drug Addiction Seasonal Affective Source Type: blogs
BOSTON (CBS) – It’s been well over a year since Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker signed a landmark law to fight the opioid epidemic here in Massachusetts. Since then he has also joined the President Donald Trump’s commission to tackle the crisis nationwide. David Wade sat down with the Governor to talk about what’s working, what we can do better, and how Massachusetts could set an example for other states when it comes to confronting the crisis. David Wade: What is the priority, do you think, for our state? Gov. Baker: I think the big thing is to stay on the stuff that’s we’ve done and r...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Local News Politics Syndicated Local Charlie Baker Confronting The Crisis David Wade opioid crisis Source Type: news
In the midst of an opioid addiction epidemic, a new survey of Americans has found that most prefer to try a non-drug approach to treating their pain over taking medications prescribed by their doctor. The new report, part of the Gallup-Palmer College of Chiropractic Annual Study of Americans, surveyed about 6,300 adults. Nearly two thirds said that they had neck or back pain so great they sought a health care provider for relief, and 54% said they had neck or back pain for at least five years. Yet 78% said they preferred to try other ways to address their physical pain before taking drugs. Still, many Americans said they ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Addiction Back Pain back pain relief chronic pain Gallup Heroin how to treat back pain how to treat pain natural pain relief Opioid opioids pain killers prescription pain killers Source Type: news
States struggling to cope with the overdose epidemic are suing companies and distributors
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
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