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Trump's Approach To The Opioid Epidemic: Neglect Treatment, Ignore The Experts

WASHINGTON – Since taking office, President Donald Trump has systematically removed or limited the power of federal officials and government offices that have the expertise to confront the nation’s opioid epidemic. Trump asked Surgeon General Vivek Murthy to resign in late April. He still has an acting director running the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although he backtracked on his reported plan to essentially gut his Office of National Drug Control Policy, staffers would be wise to polish their resumes.  Trump’s new budget proposal cuts all federal drug prevention programs by roughly 11 percent. The former director of the CDC, Dr. Tom Frieden, vented on Twitter that the 1.2 billion cut to his former agency would thwart efforts at preventing the complications that come with heroin use such as HIV infections. These moves follow Trump’s recent endorsement of the House’s health care bill that would no longer require insurance companies to cover treatment for addiction. If signed into law in its current form, more than a million Americans could potentially lose their access to treatment services. That bill cuts Medicaid by $880 billion. And Trump’s proposed budget goes even further, with another $616 billion cut to Medicaid over 10 years that would effectively cripple the government’s ability to fund and expand care. We face a national opioid crisis. We need to use all the tools we have to help pe...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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When I was 12, my father got into a bicycle accident resulting in traumatic brain injury. Although I was unaware of it at the time, this day became the first day of the rest of my life. Despite having never seen either of my parents so much as have a sip of wine with dinner, I watched my father spiral into a crippling alcohol addiction that wreaked havoc on our lives. As I entered my rebellious teenage years, I learned an important lesson: addiction fuels in others a desire to be overly accommodating, even as they simultaneously ignore a dire situation until it becomes intolerable — often, way too late. The media has...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Pain Management Psychiatry Source Type: blogs
(TRENTON, N.J.) — New data show that the number of prescriptions for opioid painkillers filled in the U.S. fell dramatically last year. They showed their biggest drop in 25 years. The decline comes amid increasing legal restrictions and public awareness of the dangers of addiction. A health data firm released a report Thursday showing a 9 percent average drop nationwide in the number of prescriptions for opioids filled by retail and mail-order pharmacies. All 50 states and the District of Columbia had declines of more than 5 percent. The U.S. is estimated to consume roughly 30 percent of all opioids used worldwide. ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — New data show that the number of prescriptions for opioid painkillers filled in the U.S. fell dramatically last year. They showed their biggest drop in 25 years. The decline comes amid increasing legal restrictions and public awareness of the dangers of addiction. A health data firm released a report Thursday showing a 9 percent average drop nationwide in the number of prescriptions for opioids filled by retail and mail-order pharmacies. All 50 states and the District of Columbia had declines of more than 5 percent. The U.S. is estimated to consume roughly 30 percent of all opioids used worldwid...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news
To the Editor Drs Kolodny and Frieden outlined steps the government should take to curb the opioid epidemic, such as improving surveillance of prescribers through the use of databases, improving reporting and responses to overdoses, promoting more cautious guidelines for use of narcotics, increasing access and reimbursement for nonopioid and nonpharmacologic management of pain, interrupting supply of heroin and illicitly produced synthetic opioids, increasing access to addiction treatment, and reducing harm to current users. However, they left out the role the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) can play in its ability t...
Source: JAMA - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
The U.S. surgeon general, Dr. Jerome Adams, recently issued the first national public health advisory in 13 years. He wants more civilians to start carrying naloxone “to help combat the nation’s opioid crisis and save lives.” Since 2010, the number of Americans who die from opioid overdoses annually has more than doubled, and in 2016 there were more than 42,000 deaths. The need for a multifaceted strategy to combat this deadly epidemic is clear. Among many EMS providers, there’s a great deal of angst directed at civilian naloxone distribution programs, as well as at opioid overdoses in general. If y...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care Administration and Leadership Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 1 March 2018 Source:EXPLORE Author(s): Heather Tick, Arya Nielsen, Kenneth R. Pelletier, Robert Bonakdar, Samantha Simmons, Ronald Glick, Emily Ratner, Russell L. Lemmon, Peter Wayne, Veronica Zador Medical pain management is in crisis: from the pervasiveness of pain to inadequate pain treatment, from the escalation of prescription opioids to an epidemic in addiction, diversion and overdose deaths. The rising costs of pain care and managing adverse effects of that care has prompted action from state and federal agencies including the DOD, VHA, NIH, FDA and CDC. There is pressure for pain...
Source: EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Tuesday morning. Sarah wakes up at 4 a.m., like every other morning, to go to clinic to get a medicine she cannot function without.  But it’s not as easy as that. She has to take her three small children with her because she is a single parent and has no one else to stay at home with them.  She does this six days a week. This is her life. This is the reality of methadone clinics, and as a family physician, I worry about the impact this is having on the health and well-being of her family. The opioid epidemic is increasingly being recognized as one of the largest health care problems faci...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Meds Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs
High relapse rates perpetuate prescription opioid  addiction, which drives the current drug overdose epidemic in the US. Opioid agonist (buprenorphine, methadone) maintenance therapy is an effective treatment for prescription opioid relapse. Our goal is to establish an experimental procedure in rats trained to self-administer the prescription opio id oxycodone that will allow us to compare the efficacy of an established treatment (buprenorphine) with that of newer of opioid agonists currently developed for analgesia.
Source: Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
The U.S. Surgeon General, Dr. Jerome Adams, issued a public health advisory on Thursday urging more Americans to carry and learn to use the opioid overdose-reversing drug naloxone. Naloxone, which is often referred to by the brand name Narcan, can be lifesaving for people overdosing on opioids. As the nation’s opioid crisis has increased in recent years, first responders, emergency medical technicians and police officers have used naloxone to help revive people who are suspected of overdosing. Adams said Thursday that community members, family and friends of people using opioids, and individuals using the drugs thems...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Naloxone Narcan onetime Opioid opioids Source Type: news
The U.S. Surgeon General, Dr. Jerome Adams, issued a public health advisory on Thursday urging more Americans to carry and learn to use the opioid overdose-reversing drug naloxone. Naloxone, which is often referred to by the brand name Narcan, can be lifesaving for people overdosing on opioids. As the nation’s opioid crisis has increased in recent years, first responders, emergency medical technicians and police officers have used naloxone to help revive people who are suspected of overdosing. Adams said Thursday that community members, family and friends of people using opioids, and individuals using the drugs thems...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Naloxone Narcan onetime Opioid opioids Source Type: news
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