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Trump's Approach To The Opioid Epidemic: Neglect Treatment, Ignore The Experts

WASHINGTON – Since taking office, President Donald Trump has systematically removed or limited the power of federal officials and government offices that have the expertise to confront the nation’s opioid epidemic. Trump asked Surgeon General Vivek Murthy to resign in late April. He still has an acting director running the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although he backtracked on his reported plan to essentially gut his Office of National Drug Control Policy, staffers would be wise to polish their resumes.  Trump’s new budget proposal cuts all federal drug prevention programs by roughly 11 percent. The former director of the CDC, Dr. Tom Frieden, vented on Twitter that the 1.2 billion cut to his former agency would thwart efforts at preventing the complications that come with heroin use such as HIV infections. These moves follow Trump’s recent endorsement of the House’s health care bill that would no longer require insurance companies to cover treatment for addiction. If signed into law in its current form, more than a million Americans could potentially lose their access to treatment services. That bill cuts Medicaid by $880 billion. And Trump’s proposed budget goes even further, with another $616 billion cut to Medicaid over 10 years that would effectively cripple the government’s ability to fund and expand care. We face a national opioid crisis. We need to use all the tools we have to help pe...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House says the true cost of the opioid drug epidemic in 2015 was $504 billion, or roughly half a trillion dollars. In an analysis to be released Monday, the Council of Economic Advisers says the figure is more than six times larger than the most recent estimate. The council said a 2016 private study estimated that prescription opioid overdoes, abuse and dependence in the U.S. in 2013 cost $78.5 billion. Most of that was attributed to health care and criminal justice spending, along with lost productivity. The council said its estimate is significantly larger because the epidemic has worsen...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news
CHICAGO (AP) — The first U.S. study to compare two treatments for opioid addiction finds a monthly shot works as well as a daily drug to prevent relapse. The shot requires days of detox first and that proved to be a stumbling block for many. For those who made it past that hurdle, the shot Vivitrol worked about the same as an older treatment, Suboxone. Both drugs had high relapse rates and there were overdoses, including fatal ones, in the experiment in 570 adults. The study , published Tuesday in the journal Lancet, is the first to compare the two drugs in the United States, where an opioid addiction epidemic has do...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news
The widespread U.S. opioid &overdose crisis is an ever-increasing tragic concern for everyone: writhing victims, family members being fain to see their relatives suffer or die, doctors prescribing opioid pain-killers what they thought before as safe, and regulators imposed to handle a tough situation. Addiction. It’s painful to even read about the skyrocketing numbers of people suffering, thus we decided to map how digital health could help tackle the opioid crisis. Why is it so difficult to deal with the opioid crisis? Once you become addicted, it sticks with you for a long time, if not for life, just as a ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Bioethics Mobile Health Virtual Reality in Medicine AI artificial intelligence data data analytics drugs future gc3 Innovation opioid opioid crisis pharma technology wearables Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurpose of ReviewClinicians in every setting have been charged with relief of pain as part of their mission as providers. Pain relief has been listed as one of the drivers of patient satisfaction and, in many settings, of reimbursement. Manyhealth care practitioners equate aggressive pain relief with administration of narcotic analgesia. Given the scourge ofnarcotic addiction, and evidence that many patients started on narcotic analgesics in the emergency setting will still betaking narcotics one year later, and may die from narcotic addiction or overdose, the possibility of providing pain reliefwithout the use of ...
Source: Current Emergency and Hospital Medicine Reports - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2017 Source:Journal of Integrative Medicine, Volume 15, Issue 6 Author(s): Arthur Yin Fan, David W. Miller, Bonnie Bolash, Matthew Bauer, John McDonald, Sarah Faggert, Hongjian He, Yong Ming Li, Amy Matecki, Lindy Camardella, Mel Hopper Koppelman, Jennifer A.M. Stone, Lindsay Meade, John Pang The United States (U.S.) is facing a national opioid epidemic, and medical systems are in need of non-pharmacologic strategies that can be employed to decrease the public's opioid dependence. Acupuncture has emerged as a powerful, evidence-based, safe, cost-effective, and available treatment modality suitab...
Source: Journal of Integrative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
The United States is experiencing a serious epidemic of opioid-related drug addiction that includes a 200% increase in the number of opioid-related overdose deaths from 2000 to 2014. In 2015, there were 52  404 drug overdose deaths in the United States with 33 091 (63.1%) involving an opioid. An important contributor to this epidemic is semisynthetic prescription opioid pain medications (eg, oxycodone and hydrocodone) that are frequently used for nonmedical purposes and are implicated in many opio id overdose deaths.
Source: JAMA - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Following the release of thefinal report by the President ’s Commission on Combating Drug Abuse and the Opioid Crisis on Wednesday, APApledged its support to work with the Trump administration, Congress, and states to address the nation ’s opioid crisis.“The APA welcomes the final report because it helps bring much-needed attention to this crisis,” said APA CEO and Medical Director Saul Levin, M.D., M.P.A. "Our organization trains thousands of clinicians each year in the diagnosis and treatment of those with opioid use disorders. Additionally, we are an active partner in the Providers’ Cl...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: mental health parity opioid crisis President ’s Commission on Combating Drug Abuse and the Opioid Crisis samhsa Saul Levin stigma Trump administration Source Type: research
In 2015, the opioid crisis was escalating to emergency-level proportions, claiming as many lives as car accidents. As the daughter of a longtime drug addict, the current burgeoning opioid epidemic managed to be both familiar and strange to me at the same time. My mother developed her addictions during the height of drug epidemics that occurred in New York City in the mid-1980s. The timeframe also marked the infancy of the AIDS crisis and the height of Reagan-era “Just Say No” programs. Back then, addiction was treated and viewed more as a crime than a disease, supposedly committed by scoundrels and misfits. The...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Behavioral Health Source Type: blogs
​Part 1 in a Four-part SeriesA 32-year-old man was taken to the ED by EMS after being found unresponsive in a subway station. His pupils were pinpoint, and he was breathing at fourth breaths per minute. He had a blood pressure of 94/63 mm Hg, pulse oximetry of 91% on room air, and a heart rate of 51 beats per minute. He was given 2 mg of intranasal Narcan by EMS and became more responsive, breathing at 14 breaths per minute with a blood pressure of 125/82 mm Hg, heart rate of 74 bpm, and 98% on room air. He admitted in the ED to using three bags of heroin.​The opioid epidemic is a national public health crisis in the U...
Source: The Tox Cave - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
By DAVID HARLOW, MD The opioid crisis has been upon us for years now, and we are now seeing the problem become more pervasive, with more than 90 deaths per day in the U.S. due to this scourge. The president recently said he would be declaring a public health emergency (which would free up some funds) but has not done so as of this writing. The public health threat is so persistent that it calls for responses on many levels, and those responses are coming. Some have been in place for a while, some are more recent. These responses may be broken down into a number of different categories: Broader availability of naloxone (an...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Charlie Baker Harlow Internet Massachussetts Opioid Opioid crisis Source Type: blogs
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