Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Does Sex Matter?

Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Does Sex Matter? Curr Vasc Pharmacol. 2016 Jul 22; Authors: Wells GL Abstract Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death for women worldwide, most of which is believed to be preventable. Numerous risk factors for CHD are well described, and understanding these risk factors is the first step to reducing the burden of CHD. There are clear differences in risk factors between women and men. The incidence of myocardial infarction is much lower among women under the age of 50 years compared with men, but after menopause, the incidence in women dramatically increases to approach that of men. For this reason, estrogen is postulated to be cardioprotective but results of recent randomized clinical trials challenge this hypothesis. The significance of cardiovascular risk factors appears to vary between women and men, the reasons for which remain elusive but could include the interaction of these risk factors with hormones. Confounding this observation is that most early studies of cardiovascular risk factors enrolled primarily men. This review will focus solely on the differences in cardiovascular risk factors in women and men including the current role of hormone therapy in CHD prevention, sex differences in established CHD risk factors and emerging risk factors for CHD in women. PMID: 27456107 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Vascular Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Vasc Pharmacol Source Type: research

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Conclusions: Hostility was associated with incidence of CHD among postmenopausal women with diabetes, especially among incident diabetes. These results provide a basis for targeted prevention programs for women with a high level of hostility and diabetes.
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Conclusions: CaD did not consistently modify the effect of CEE therapy or CEE + MPA therapy on CVD events. However, the increased risk of stroke due to CEE therapy appears to be mitigated by CaD supplementation. In contrast, CaD supplementation did not influence the risk of stroke due to CEE + MPA.
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Conclusions Aging leads to a progressive decrease in androgen production that, in turn, leads to the development of LOH, defined by significant low T serum levels (in the lowest quartile) in the presence of signs and symptoms of hypogonadism (51). LOH could be due to both testicular and hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction (32), and ED is one of its main symptoms. ED in LOH is linked to increased oxidative stress, subclinical inflammation, and subsequent endothelial dysfunction (101). In elderly men, it has been shown that LOH is also linked to lower cAMP pool and to an alteration of the cGMP signaling pathway. PDE5 gene l...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: July 2018Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume 28, Issue 7Author(s): T. Sathyapalan, M. Aye, A.S. Rigby, N.J. Thatcher, S.R. Dargham, E.S. Kilpatrick, S.L. AtkinAbstractBackgroundHormone replacement therapy may be beneficial for cardiovascular disease risk (CVR) in post-menopausal women. Soy isoflavones may act as selective estrogen receptor modulators. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether soy isoflavones had an effect on CVR markers.MethodsThe expected 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality were calculated as a secondary endpoint from a double blind rand...
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Conclusion: In post-menopausal women, lower HRV was associated with a modestly higher, but statistically significant, risk for incident cardiovascular events, including fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction. Factors associated with lower HRV and cardiac autonomic impairment may be candidates for reducing CHD risk, such as better glycemic control and improved physical activity.
Source: Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Session Title: Predicting the Future Source Type: research
Conclusions:The available literature suggests that HT is a viable option for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. Newer trials will likely verify this assessment. If this is enough to change clinical practice, however, remains to be seen given the general fear of HT by many with prescriptive authority, and also the women in our care. Objective: Clinical trials in menopause have undergone much scrutiny over the years. This has led to significant shifts in the treatment of symptomatic menopause and a substantial impact on women. We aim to delineate the key studies contributing to this...
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Clinical Corner: Invited Review Source Type: research
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Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
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Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news
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Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Source Type: news
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