States' New Opioid Limits Being Met With Some Resistance

This piece comes to us courtesy of Stateline. Stateline is a nonpartisan, nonprofit news service of the Pew Charitable Trusts that provides daily reporting and analysis on trends in state policy. For governors and lawmakers in nearly every state, the soaring overdose death toll from prescription painkillers, heroin and fentanyl has become an urgent priority. Lawmakers in dozens of states took decisive action this year to stanch the flow of prescription pain drugs and help those addicted to them. Roughly 2.5 millionAmericans are addicted to opioids, and more than 28,000 people died of overdosesof painkillers or heroin in 2014, the highest toll ever. To keep even more people from becoming addicted to medicines such as Percocet, OxyContin and Vicodin, lawmakers in five states set limits on the number of pills a physician can prescribe to a patient for the first time. Twenty-nine states beefed up monitoring of filled prescriptions to prevent addicts from “doctor shopping” for more pills. Sixteen states expanded the use of naloxone, an overdose antidote drug few lawmakers had heard of just a year ago. And at least nine states adopted requirements that Medicaid and other insurers pay for all medically recommended addiction services, just as they would for other diseases, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL). Among lawmakers, governors and the medical community, there is broad support for measures aimed at rescuing people from fatal overdoses...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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CAMBRIDGE (CBS NEWS) — Researchers in Massachusetts believe they may be on the brink of creating a revolutionary non-addictive painkiller. Developed by Blue Therapeutics, Blue-181 could be a big step forward in dealing with the growing opioid crisis. The team there said it wanted to make a drug that is a total replacement for the opioids currently on the market – something that people could safely stop using without the possible dangerous side effects. Mark Loccisano felt a gratification from painkillers with his very first pill. They were prescribed by a doctor for a sports injury. It was the beginning of an o...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Cambridge Local TV opioid crisis Source Type: news
The crushing toll of the opioid crisis is daily news, including stories about ways to “fix” it. A wide array of initiatives has been brought forward in an attempt to curb this epidemic and the damage it causes. Prescription monitoring programs (PMPs) are one of them. The goal of PMPs is a good one — to identify patients who are being prescribed multiple medications by multiple clinicians. It is a means to introduce some stewardship for preventing overuse and misuse of prescription drugs. How prescription monitoring programs work Prescription monitoring programs are state-based electronic databases that pr...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Drugs and Supplements Health Source Type: blogs
A  story in today’s Wall Street Journal discusses the latest report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development on ”prime age” (25-54) labor-force participation rates among its 35 member countries through the last quarter of 2017. While the US rate has improved, it remains below the average OECD rate, lagging behind such developed countries as Japan and the UK. What’s puzzling is why the authors of the report decided to weigh in on the opioid overdose issue.Noting that per capita opioid prescriptions in the US are “significantly higher” than in othe...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
It isn't the first time FDA has turned to medtech for solutions to opioid misuse and abuse, but now the agency is officially challenging the medical device and diagnostics industry to step up in the ongoing war on opioids. FDA recently launched an innovation challenge to spur the development of devices, digital health technologies, and diagnostic tests that could provide novel solutions in response to the opioid epidemic. That's not to say the industry hasn't already put forth some effort in this area. Manufacturers of naloxone products – a drug designed to potentially save a person's life in the event of an opioid o...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: R & D Digital Health Source Type: news
Abstract Opioid addiction has been cast as a "disease of despair."1 I agree, but I wonder still: If tobacco and opioids were on a spectrum relative to the relief they provide from social, emotional, financial, and other sources of pain in the lives of the disenfranchised, could it be that they are indeed 2 sides of the same coin? For individuals in despair, pain relief is a complicit actor in what will become pleasure seeking and, for smokers, vice versa. Every year, almost as many people are dying by incidentally being near smokers as are dying by accidentally overdosing. Our opioid epidemic has been de...
Source: American Journal of Health Promotion : AJHP - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Am J Health Promot Source Type: research
By Lloyd I. Sederer, MD, author of The Addiction Solution: Treating Our Dependence on Opioids and Other Drugs (out now on Simon &Schuster) It’s clear to me, as a public health doctor and journalist, that there have been fewer news stories on the opioid epidemic in recent months, in print, online, and on the radio and TV. While I don’t have a major survey to point to, my work demands that I pay attention to this epidemic and the stories written about it — and that I encourage others to take it seriously as well. Have we grown numb to the people who are dying every day? To the families thrown into ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health opioid epidemic Simon & Schuster Source Type: news
The devastating opioid epidemic is one of the largest public health problems facing the U.S. Over 2.5 million people in the U.S. suffer from opioid use disorder. Four in five new heroin users started out misusing prescription painkillers. A 2015 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found people who are addicted to painkillers are 40 times more likely to be addicted to heroin. The epidemic actually began more than three decades ago. In 1980, crack and cocaine addiction contributed to the thousands of overdose deaths, whereas now people die from pain relievers and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl. In ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Pain Management Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs
Many states have taken the cue from the federal government and started their own investigation and research into opioids and the way opioids affect their particular state. Recently, Oklahoma joined the ranks of the states who have not just looked into the situation, but also went so far as to pass legislation to stymy the state’s opioid epidemic. One of the pieces of legislation passed was Senate Bill 1446, which asks the Oklahoma Board of Medical Licensure and Supervision to require continuing medical education (CME) for prescribers on opioid abuse and misuse, and also restricts initial prescriptions for opioids to...
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 1 March 2018 Source:EXPLORE Author(s): Heather Tick, Arya Nielsen, Kenneth R. Pelletier, Robert Bonakdar, Samantha Simmons, Ronald Glick, Emily Ratner, Russell L. Lemmon, Peter Wayne, Veronica Zador Consortium Pain Taskforce White Paper Summary Evidence-based Nonpharmacologic Strategies for Comprehensive Pain Care Supplementary information can be found in the online version at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.explore.2018.02.001. Medical pain management is in crisis; from the pervasiveness of pain to inadequate pain treatment, from the escalation of prescription opioids to an epidemic in addict...
Source: EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
The US Surgeon General, Dr. Jerome Adams, recently released an advisory on naloxone and opioid overdose. In his advisory, Dr. Adams writes: For patients currently taking high doses of opioids as prescribed for pain, individuals misusing prescription opioids, individuals using illicit opioids such as heroin or fentanyl, health care practitioners, family and friends of people who have an opioid use disorder, and community members who come into contact with people at risk for opioid overdose, knowing how to use naloxone and keeping it within reach can save a life. This was the first surgeon general advisory issued in 13 years...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Health Source Type: blogs
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