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AMA Partners With IBM Watson, Cerner On Health Data Model
The American Medical Association is working with IBM Watson and Cerner to bring structure and best practices to patient information and related health data. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - October 16, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Japsen, Contributor Tags: NYSE:UNH NASDAQ:CERN NYSE:AET NYSE:IBM Source Type: news

Common fertility test is unreliable
The commonly used ovarian reserve test doesn’t accurately reflect whether a woman is able to conceive, according to a study published in theJournal of American Medical Association.Newsweek (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - October 13, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Glycaemic control improved with insulin pump use
Young people with type 1 diabetes using insulin pumps exhibit improved glycemic control and lower incidence of hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis, according to findings published in theJournal of the American Medical Association. Medscape (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - October 13, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Health2047-Celgene, Samsung-Tigertext, and more digital health deals
Health2047, the American Medical Association-backed technology incubator, is working with pharma company  Celgene to create a new healthcare information transfer system. As part of the deal, Health2047 is developing a new data transfer protocol for healthcare, focused on security, trustworthiness, and connectivity. More. ... (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - October 11, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Ovarian reserve tests fail to predict fertility, NIH-funded study suggests
(NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) Tests that estimate ovarian reserve, or the number of a woman's remaining eggs, before menopause, do not appear to predict short-term chances of conception, according to a National Institutes of Health-funded study of women with no history of infertility. The study appears in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Doctors Call For Background Checks, Gun Restrictions In Las Vegas' Wake
A parade of physician groups including the American Medical Association and American College of Physicians reiterated their calls this week for safety measures that include universal background checks, restrictions on the sale of assault weapons and the elimination of physician “gag laws.” (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - October 3, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Japsen, Contributor Source Type: news

Genetic testing may help determine appropriate dose of warfarin among patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty
Findings from a study published online in The Journal of the American Medical Association suggest that, compared to clinically guided dosing, genotype-guided warfarin dosing may reduce the risk of adverse events for joint arthroplasty patients.  (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - September 30, 2017 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Editors Choice News Source Type: news

The Republican Health Bill Is Targeting Votes From These Two States
(WASHINGTON) — Provisions shoehorned into the Republican health care bill dangle extra money for Alaska and Wisconsin, home states of one GOP senator whose vote party leaders desperately need and another who co-sponsored the legislation, according to analysts who’ve studied the legislation. The 140-page measure, which top Republicans hope to push through the Senate next week, is stuffed with language making some states winners and others losers. Aides say the legislation is still changing as leaders hunt the 50 GOP “yes” votes they’ll need to turn this summer’s jarring Senate rejection o...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alan Fram / AP Tags: Uncategorized Graham-Cassidy Health Care onetime Source Type: news

Aaron Hernandez Had CTE. How Much More Damage Can The NFL Take?
Is the chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) diagnosis for Aaron Hernandez, the convicted murderer and former New England Patriots tight end who committed suicide in April while serving a life sentence, all that surprising? Not really, given what we know about this degenerative brain disease. Several ex-NFL players (Junior Seau, Dave Duerson, Andre Waters, Ray Easterling) who took their own lives were diagnosed with CTE postmortem. CTE victims have struggled with impulse control, turned violent against their spouses, abused drugs, raged and acted irrationally. In 2012 Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher, who had C...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sean Gregory Tags: Uncategorized Aaron Hernandez CTE Football New England Patriots NFL Source Type: news

The Latest: Big doctors' group against GOP repeal effort
The American Medical Association is opposed to the latest, last-ditch Republican effort to dismantle Obamacare (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

AMA Says Latest Trumpcare Bill Violates'Do No Harm' Pledge
The American Medical Association and AARP joined patient advocates, healthcare and consumer groups opposing the Republican-led Senate ’s Graham-Cassidy effort to overhaul the Affordable Care Act, saying it would hurt patients with preexisting conditions and cause millions to lose coverage. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - September 19, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Japsen, Contributor Tags: NYSE:CNC NYSE:ANTM NYSE:MOH Source Type: news

Emergency Access Initiative
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has activated the Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) in response to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey which devastated Florida and several Caribbean islands, as well as parts of South Carolina, Texas, and Louisiana. The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from more than 650 biomedical journals and more than 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or supplement for libraries affected by disasters that...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - September 19, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Disaster / Emergency Preparedness News from NLM/NIH Source Type: news

How Physicians Can Get Started With MACRA How Physicians Can Get Started With MACRA
Dr David Barbe, president of the American Medical Association, says most physicians are unprepared for MACRA. Here he recommends some first steps to take as well as tools that may be helpful.Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Public Libraries Spotlight: Susan K. McClelland, Health & Wellness Librarian, Oak Park Public Library, IL
Name: Susan K. McClelland Title: Health & Wellness Librarian, Oak Park Public Library Education: BA, Art History, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; MLIS, University of Illinois, GSLIS. How did you become interested in focusing on Health and Wellness? For a number of years I was a library associate at the American Hospital Association headquarters library in Chicago, IL and later as a medical indexer for publications at the American Medical Association library in Chicago, I became familiar with a host of medical specialties, specialty board certification rigors and consumer health organizations. I was fascinat...
Source: The Cornflower - September 19, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Bobbi Newman Tags: Public Libraries Public Libraries Spotlight health and wellness librarian oakpark public library Source Type: news

Emergency Access Initiative Activated for Harvey and Irma
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has activated the Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) for September 15, 2017 – October 14, 2017 in response to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey which devastated Florida and several Caribbean islands, as well as parts of South Carolina, Texas, and Louisiana. The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from more than 650 biomedical journals and more than 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or sup...
Source: MCR News - September 15, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: liaison Tags: Community College/Academic Libraries Health Sciences Public Libraries Source Type: news

Henry Ford Macomb Hospital, AMA partner on prediabetes patient registry
(Henry Ford Health System) Henry Ford Macomb Hospital, in partnership with the American Medical Association (AMA), is piloting a patient registry that could become a national model for enrolling patients with prediabetes into evidence-based diabetes prevention programs and reducing their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Society Advocacy Continues to Make Impact Amid Uncertainty
Amid growing uncertainly inside the Washington, DC beltway, AMDA – the Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine continues to make an impact through its advocacy work. Through the first half of 2017, the Society has worked to expand its reach in coalitions and has had a direct impact on policies adopted by the American Medical Association (AMA) as well as Centers for Medicare& Medicaid Services regulations. Although health care reform continues to be unpredictable, there is almost unanimous agreement that the system will continue its shift from fee-for-service to value-based medicine. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - August 30, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Alex Bardakh Tags: PUBLIC POLICY Source Type: news

New Economic Analysis Based On Repatha ® (Evolocumab) Outcomes Data Published In JAMA Cardiology
Repatha Used in Patients at High-Risk For Cardiovascular Events is Cost-Effective at Net Prices at or Below $9,669 THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., Aug. 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) today announced results from a new Repatha® (evolocumab) economic analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Cardiology. The study identifies the clinical and economic consequences of treating a population of patients at high-risk of cardiovascular (CV) events and defines the cost-effectiveness of Repatha under various clinical scenarios. The analysis is based on the clinical outcomes from t...
Source: Amgen News Release - August 23, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

SPM in Real Life: Summer ‘17
NEW MEMBERS: Summer ‘17 Welcome new member, Geoffrey Milos! Geoffrey writes that he has a great interest in electronic health records (EHR) and how they enable individuals to more fully participate in the management of their own health care. Patient access to their respective, complete EHR is key to this empowerment. Individuals seem to be making progress on this front, slowly but surely. Geoffrey is interested in active innovators in the personal health care application space, specifically applications that can accept provider-sourced EHR inputs and other organizations that actively promote individual acce...
Source: Society for Participatory Medicine - August 18, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Nanette Mattox Tags: Newsletter Community Members New Members Summer '17 Source Type: news

Doctors raise concerns over Express Scripts program to limit opioids
A new opioid management program from Express Scripts is drawing criticism from members of the American Medical Association. The program aims to help prevent the overuse and abuse of opioids by limiting the strength and amount of the drugs prescribed to first-time users. However, doctors are objecting, saying treatment plans should be left to physicians and their patients, the Associated Press reports. "We want to be p ro-active in making sure the alternatives are available versus a sort of blunt,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 17, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Angela Mueller Source Type: news

Nation's Largest Pharmacy Benefit Manager Puts Limits on Opioid Prescriptions
ST. LOUIS (AP) — The nation's largest pharmacy benefit manager will soon limit the number and strength of opioid drugs prescribed to first-time users as part of a wide-ranging effort to curb an epidemic affecting millions of Americans. But the new program from Express Scripts is drawing criticism from the American Medical Association, the largest association of physicians and medical students in the U.S., which believes treatment plans should be left to doctors and their patients. About 12.5 million Americans misused prescription opioids in 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. More tha...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - August 16, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jim Salter, Associated Press Tags: News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Nation's Largest Pharmacy Benefit Manager Puts Limits on Opioid Prescriptions
ST. LOUIS (AP) — The nation's largest pharmacy benefit manager will soon limit the number and strength of opioid drugs prescribed to first-time users as part of a wide-ranging effort to curb an epidemic affecting millions of Americans. But the new program from Express Scripts is drawing criticism from the American Medical Association, the largest association of physicians and medical students in the U.S., which believes treatment plans should be left to doctors and their patients. About 12.5 million Americans misused prescription opioids in 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. More tha...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - August 16, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jim Salter, Associated Press Tags: News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Express Scripts to limit opioids; doctors concerned
Nation's largest pharmacy benefit manager will soon limit opioids prescribed to first-time users; American Medical Association criticizes move (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - August 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

A quarter of people who groom their pubic hair get hurt
An American Medical Association said that few injuries resulting from pubic hair grooming require medical attention but those that do are 'severe' and can require surgical treatment. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Flimsy evidence behind many FDA approvals
(Reuters Health) - Many drugs granted accelerated approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lack clear evidence of safety and effectiveness, and the same is true for most high-risk medical devices, according to two new reports in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Top six diseases and disorders that barely existed in America 100 years ago, yet most MDs tell us they're "genetic" … Why?
(Natural News) The number one way for medical doctors to ensure that their patients don’t consume organic food and natural supplements to prevent and cure diseases is to convince them that all of their health problems are inherited. Whether the lies are funneled down to these MDs from the American Medical Association, or the doctors... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers advise caution about recent US advice on aggressively lowering blood pressure
Medical researchers at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, are advising caution when treating blood pressure in some older people - after results from a study contrasted with recent advice from the US to attempt to aggressively lower blood pressure in all adults to targets of 120mmHg. Researchers from the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College Dublin, in collaboration with Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, have recently published the findings in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA Internal Medicine). (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - August 9, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

HeartFlow touts 4 positive BCBS policy decisions for its FFRct tech
HeartFlow said today it won positive medical policy decisions from 4 different Blue Cross Blue Shield groups across the US for its HeartFlow FFRct fractional flow reserve technology. The Redwood City, Calif.-based company said that Horizon BCBS of New Jersey, BCBS of Arizona, BCBS of Idaho and BCBS of Kansas City issued determinations supporting the use of the company’s noninvasive FFRct, following a positive coronary computed tomography angiogram, for patients with stable chest pain. “These new coverage decisions add to the growing number of payers that have reviewed evidence from clinical trials demonstr...
Source: Mass Device - August 8, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Blood Management Business/Financial News Cardiovascular HeartFlow Source Type: news

Texting while parenting: Mobile program improves safety of sleeping infants
(Yale University) Mother's latest little helper is already in her pocket: A new educational intervention delivered in the form of texts and emails has been found to increase adherence to safe sleep practices for infants, concluded researchers at the Yale, University of Virginia, and Boston University schools of medicine in a joint study published July 25 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pharma-controlled Journal of the American Medical Association waging full-scale attack on Vitamin D in effort to push flu shots for toddlers
(Natural News) A recent headline in the U.K.’s Daily Mail boldly declares, “Vitamin D will NOT protect your child from a cold: Myth-busting study says ‘more isn’t always better’ to help toddlers stay healthy.” This disingenuous headline infers that vitamin D has no protective effect against colds and flu. In fact, the study it goes... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Science: Assess pre-diabetes risk...with puppies
Just a minute. Would you rather spend a minute taking a pre-diabetes risk assessment or looking at adorable puppies? The American Medical Association has launched an awareness campaign that lets you do both at the same time. If you visit this website, you can take a one-minute quiz to help determine your pre-diabetes risk while you watch a pack of French bulldog puppies tumble around. One in three Americans are pre-diabetic, a condition marked by high blood sugar levels that is a precursor to Type… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 26, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Brain study of deceased NFL players shows 99% had signs of CTE
A recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association revealed that the brains of 110 out of 111 surveyed NFL players showed signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a disease linked to repeated hits to the head. The study's authors are unsure how many current players or living former players suffer from CTE. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - July 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Pressure mounts to curtail surgery on intersex children
The American Medical Association is considering a proposal to ban genital surgery on intersex children. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Results of NRG-RTOG 0436 highlight need for biomarkers in treatment of esophageal cancer
(NRG Oncology) NRG-RTOG 0436 has determined that adding an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor to a chemo-radiation regimen does not improve overall survival for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer treated in a non-operative manner. These results are reported in 'Effect of the Addition of Cetuximab to Paclitaxel, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy for Patients with Esophageal Cancer -- The NRG Oncology RTOG 0436 Phase 3 Randomized Clinical Trial,' which was recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Avoiding 'middle-age spread' reduces the risk of diabetes
According to a large study, published in theJournal of the American Medical Association,avoiding weight gain in middle age significantly reduces the risks of developing type 2 diabetes.The Express  (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - July 20, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Vitamin D will not protect your child from a cold
Children aged one to five did not benefit more from increased amounts of vitamin D during the winter, according to a study published by the Journal of American Medical Association (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High doses of vitamin D don't help toddlers avoid colds
Children aged one to five did not benefit more from increased amounts of vitamin D during the winter, according to a study published by the Journal of American Medical Association (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DermTech Secures Billing Codes for its Proprietary Melanoma Test
LA JOLLA, Calif., July 13, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- DermTech, Inc., the global leader in non-invasive molecular dermatology, reported today that the American Medical Association (AMA) has granted the company Category 1, Tier 2 Mol... Diagnostics, Oncology, Reimbursement DermTech, Pigmented Lesion Assay, melanoma (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - July 13, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Effective protection against hip fracture during cortisone treatment
(University of Gothenburg) There is effective protection against hip fracture for the many elderly people whose skeleton is declining in strength, as a side effect of cortisone treatment. If patients receive the osteoporosis medication alendronate, it reduces the risk of hip fracture by 65 percent, as a study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) reveals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Radiofrequency denervation may not be effective for pain reduction for certain patients with chronic low back pain
Findings from a study conducted in the Netherlands and published in the July 4 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association suggest that radiofrequency denervation may not reduce pain for patients with chronic low back pain who and are treated with a standardized exercise program.  (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - July 9, 2017 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Editors Choice News Source Type: news

GE Healthcare inks deal to integrate HeartFlow FFRct into CT scanners
GE Healthcare (NYSE:GE) said today it inked a collaborative deal with HeartFlow to integrate its FFRct fractional flow technology into GE’s computed tomography scanners. HeartFlow’s FFRct software is designed to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected coronary artery disease, providing insight into the extent of the CAD and the impact it is having on blood flow to the heart. “GE has collaborated with HeartFlow over the last five years, and this agreement reinforces our joint commitment to patients worldwide. Along with our industry-leading cardiac CT systems and clinical applica...
Source: Mass Device - July 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Blood Management Business/Financial News Cardiovascular Imaging Software / IT GE Healthcare HeartFlow Source Type: news

HeartFlow wins AMA CPT codes for FFRct cardiac tech
HeartFlow said today it won a new set of category III Current Procedural Terminology codes from the American medical Association for its FFRct fractional flow reserve technology. The newly won CPT code application was submitted by the American College of Cardiology, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography and the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, the Redwood City, Calif.-based company said. HeartFlow said the new codes show that the company’s FFRct “is a unique and distinct analysis that provides important and actionable clinical information above and beyond that of a coronary ...
Source: Mass Device - July 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiovascular HeartFlow Source Type: news

Novo Nordisk touts late-stage trial data for Tresiba insulin injection
Novo Nordisk (NYSE:NVO) touted data today from 2 Phase IIIb trials comparing Tresiba insulin degludec to insulin glargine in adults with Type I and Type II diabetes. The results were published in the Journal of  the American Medical Association. The Switch trials are the 1st double-blinded insulin trials to compare the hypoglycemia rates and risks in patients using Tresiba and insulin glargine for Type I diabetes and Type II diabetes. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Novo Nordisk touts late-stage trial data for Tresiba insulin injection appeared first on MassDevice...
Source: Mass Device - July 3, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Diabetes Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Wall Street Beat Novo Nordisk Source Type: news

Should you see a chiropractor for back pain?
Treatment TermsSpine Overview Nearly everyone suffers from back pain at some point. One treatment option is chiropractic care, which includes spinal manipulation (also called manual manipulation). A review of research, published in theJournal of the American Medical Association, found that spinal manipulation can help relieve pain and improve function in people with acute low-back pain, one of the most common types of back pain. Content Blocks ContentDuke chiropractorEugene Lewis, DC, MPH, answers questions about how chiropractic care can help. Section Features Text Content Header What kinds of conditions does a ch...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - June 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mf205 at duke.edu Source Type: news

AMA Says McConnell's Trumpcare Bill Violates'Do No Harm' Principle
The American Medical Association Monday blasted the Senate Republican ’s Better Care Reconciliation Act, saying its rollback of Medicaid benefits and skimpier benefits are sure to raise costs for more than those losing coverage. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - June 26, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Japsen, Contributor Source Type: news

Doctors want sugary and processed meats out of hospitals
The American Medical Association issued a statement that asked for medical centers across the nation to eliminate sugary drinks and processed meats from menus. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study Finds Survival Rates Higher at Teaching Hospitals
Author Debbe Geiger Overview If you ’re hospitalized for a common medical condition or surgical procedure, your chance of surviving is better if your care is provided at a major teaching hospital. That’s according to an analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Content Blocks CTA HeaderMore information CTA LinkRead the JAMA article Section Features Call To Action Header Survival Rates for Common Conditions, Procedures Analyzed ContentThe study ’s authors looked at Medicare data for 21 million hospitalizations at more than 4,000 hospitals, including teaching ho...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - June 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dg62 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Doctors group calls for action on 'exorbitant' drug prices
The American Medical Association is calling for more transparency in drug pricing amid skyrocketing costs that are putting some lifesaving medications out of reach. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Leading U.S. Doctors' Group Takes Aim at Rising Drug Prices
THURSDAY, June 15, 2017 -- The American Medical Association is calling for more transparency in drug pricing amid skyrocketing costs that are putting some lifesaving medications out of reach for patients and communities. During its annual meeting,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 15, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Texas Physician, Medical Student Leaders Elected to AMA Positions
The American Medical Association (AMA) elected four Texas Medical Association (TMA) physicians and four medical student members to AMA leadership positions. AMA elected the Texans during its annual policymaking meeting taking place this week in Chicago. The physician and medical student leaders are part of the Texas delegation to the AMA. (Source: TMA News Room)
Source: TMA News Room - June 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news