Study suggests a direct link between screen time and ADHD in teens
(Natural News) Adding to the list of health concerns associated with excessive screen time, one study suggests that there could be a link between the length of time teenagers spend online and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The two-year study, which was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), observed more than 2,500 high school... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tips Provided for Budgeting in Medical Residency
THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 -- Medical residents should start budgeting and save for the future, according to an article published in the American Medical Association AMA Wire. Noting that medical residents are expected to manage complicated finances,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 4, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Sexual harassment and assault affects women’s health later in life
Sexual harassment and assault are psychologically traumatizing, but a new study has linked these attacks with long-term physical health consequences as well. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh found that women who had experienced harassment or assault were about twice as likely to have elevated blood pressure and insomnia. "When it comes to sexual harassment or sexual assault, our study shows that lived experiences may have a serious impact on women’s health, both mental and physical," Rebecca Thurston, a professor of psychiatry at the Pitt School of Medicine and the study’s senior author...
Source: ABC News: Health - October 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Examining the truth behind clinical trial costs
Last week, a study appearing in theJournal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine, evaluated the costs specifically associated with successful clinical trials for novel therapeutic medicines. The narrow findings of this study have been misconstrued to suggest that the research and development (R&D) investments needed to bring a new treatment to patients may not be as large as we thought.  (Source: The Catalyst)
Source: The Catalyst - October 2, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John Corea Tags: clinical research Fact Check Source Type: news

There ’s a Promising New Way to Treat Appendicitis That Doesn’t Involve Surgery
(CHICAGO) — When emergency tests showed the telltale right-sided pain in Heather VanDusen’s abdomen was appendicitis, she figured she’d be quickly wheeled into surgery. But doctors offered her the option of antibiotics instead. A new study from Finland shows her choice is a reasonable alternative for most patients with appendicitis. Five years after treatment with antibiotics, almost two-thirds of patients hadn’t had another attack. It’s a substantial change in thinking about how to treat an inflamed appendix. For decades, appendicitis has been considered a medical emergency requiring immediat...
Source: TIME: Health - September 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Disease healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Editor of America's top medical journal compares Trump's child separation policy to Tuskegee
In the latest issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), researchers show racist scandals have led to poorer care for minorities and women, who therefore have poorer health. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical researchers debate validity of including race in studies
Race and medical research have a long history together, much of it lamentable, and new genetic discoveries raise new questions about the role race should play in the future, three essays in the Journal of the American Medical Association indicate. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

A Prominent Researcher on Eating Habits Resigned After a Scandal Over His Studies
A prominent food researcher has resigned from his post at Cornell University after an investigation found major issues with his research. Six of his high-profile journal articles were retracted earlier this week. Brian Wansink, known for his buzzy behavioral science studies focusing on food, has been removed from all research and teaching at Cornell following an internal investigation that revealed academic misconduct, the school announced in a statement Thursday. “The committee found that Professor Wansink committed academic misconduct in his research and scholarship, including misreporting of research data, problem...
Source: TIME: Health - September 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news

Celebrated food researcher to step down after research is questioned
Cornell University professor Brian Wansink may have helped shape our country's relationship with food, but concerns about his research came to a head on Wednesday when leading medical journals retracted six of his articles, the Journal of the American Medical Association announced. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Residents Should Take Advantage of Paid Time Off
THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 -- Although there are many demands on residents, taking advantage of paid vacation time is one of the perks and should be maximized, according to an article published in the American Medical Association's AMA... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 20, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Journal of the American Medical Association shines spotlight on geroscience
(American Federation for Aging Research) Highlighting how geroscience paves the way for therapeutic interventions and extending healthspan at large, three articles co-authored by five AFAR experts will appear in the October 2, 2018 print edition of JAMA and are now available online. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Healthcare tech should be an asset, not a burden for doctors
Jack Resneck, Chair of the American Medical Association Board of Trustees, emphasizes the need for physicians to be involved in the early stages of app development to ensure they actually improve the overall care quality for patients. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - September 18, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Physician burnout taking center stage
(Reuters Health) - The medical establishment may finally be coming to grips with the issue of physician burnout. The evidence: two studies on the topic reported in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Shifting focus from life extension to 'healthspan' extension
(University of Illinois at Chicago) The Journal of the American Medical Association published an article by University of Illinois at Chicago epidemiologist S. Jay Olshansky on the need for researchers and clinicians to focus less on prolonging lifespan and more on prolonging 'healthspan.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDA hopes new disruptive wearables will lead to ‘ universal digital future in healthcare ’
The FDA is hopeful that devices like the new Apple (NSDQ:AAPL) Watch, which is designed to provide on-the-spot electrocardiogram tests and detect atrial fibrillation, will lead to a “reimagination of healthcare delivery,” according to a recent post from agency head Dr. Scott Gottlieb, but whether having that data will improve overall health has yet to be seen. In its unveiling of the new Apple Watch 4, the Cupertino, Calif.-based tech giant said it worked closely with the FDA to clear the device, which won de novo classification from the federal watchdog. Gottlieb confirmed that the agency “worked cl...
Source: Mass Device - September 14, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance AliveCor Apple Source Type: news

Firearm Deaths Up Globally From 1990 to 2016
THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 -- Firearm deaths increased globally between 1990 and 2016, according to a study published in the Aug. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Mohsen Naghavi, M.D., Ph.D., from University of Washington... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Residents Working Long Hours Can Increase Alertness
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12, 2018 -- Medical residents can take steps to maintain their energy and alertness during long shifts, according to an article published in the American Medical Association's AMA Wire. For seasoned residents, shifts can last up to... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 12, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Do You Support Single-Payer Health Insurance? Do You Support Single-Payer Health Insurance?
For the first time, the American Medical Association has given the idea a full hearing.Medscape Reader Polls (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

Semiautomatic Rifles May Make Mass Shootings Deadlier, Study Says
Mass shooters appear to injure and kill more people when the use semiautomatic rifles instead of handguns, other types of rifles, or shotguns, according to a new analysis in the Journal of The American Medical Association. But the research has significant limitations. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - September 11, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Matthew Herper, Forbes Staff Source Type: news

Vitamin E helps diminish a type of fatty liver disease in children
A specific form of vitamin E improved the most severe form of fatty liver disease in some children, according to a study funded by the NIH. Results appear in the April 27 issue of theJournal of the American Medical Association. A previous study found vitamin E effective in some adults with the disease. (Source: NIDDK News)
Source: NIDDK News - September 10, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Robotic Surgeries Up, but Cost Questions Remain
MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 -- Use of robotic surgery is continuing to increase, according to a research letter published in the Aug. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Christopher P. Childers, M.D., and Melinda Maggard-Gibbons,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 10, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Spreading the word: Noninvasive brain stimulation may soon reach more aphasia patients
(Medical University of South Carolina) In an article published online on Aug. 20, 2018 by the Journal of the American Medical Association Neurology, researchers tested the use of transcranial direct current stimulation in stroke patients with aphasia. Their results justify the creation of a large clinical trial to test the new treatment in a number of patients who have lost some or all of their use of language after stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adding Pharmacist to Team Can Improve Patient Outcomes
TUESDAY, Sept. 4, 2018 -- Integration of pharmacists into team-based care practice models can improve patient outcome, especially in chronic diseases, such as diabetes, according to a report published in the American Medical Association's AMA... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 4, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

AMA Adopts Policy Promoting Health Equity As a Goal
FRIDAY, Aug. 24, 2018 -- The American Medical Association (AMA) House of Delegates has adopted a policy that sets health equity as a goal for the U.S. health care system, according to a report published in the organization's AMA Wire. The action,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 24, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Uninsured major cardiac-related hospitalizations declined in first year after ACA
(Rutgers University) States that expanded eligibility for their Medicaid program in 2014 when the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was implemented, saw fewer uninsured patients among major cardiac-related hospitalizations in the first year compared with states that did not expand the program, according to a study released today by the Journal of the American Medical Association Network. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New cervical cancer screening guidelines offer more options
New cervical cancer screening guidelines published in the Journal of the American Medical Association include more screening options including longer intervals between tests for women over 30. The two types of cervical cancer screening include cervical cytology, also known as a Pap smear, and high-risk HPV (hrHPV) testing, both of which can be done by swabbing the cervix during a pelvic exam. A Pap smear can detect abnormal cells or tissues while the hrHPV test looks for the presence of a virus… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 23, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

People Are Now Taking Placebo Pills to Deal With Their Health Problems —And It’s Working
For over 20 years, Linda Buonanno lived in fear that her irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) would suddenly interrupt her daily routine with frequent trips to the bathroom and unbearable cramping. Buonanno, now a 71-year-old medical assistant and hairdresser from Methuen, Mass., tried everything from drugs to dairy-free diets. Nothing worked. She remembers a particularly tough period over 10 years ago, when she was working on the factory floor of a medical-device company for up to 10 hours a day, six days a week. When an IBS episode would strike, her co-workers would cover for her as she huddled in a corner, keeled over in pain...
Source: TIME: Health - August 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized medicine Research Source Type: news

People Are Now Taking Placebo Pills to Deal With Their Health Problems —And It’s Working
For over 20 years, Linda Buonanno lived in fear that her irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) would suddenly interrupt her daily routine with frequent trips to the bathroom and unbearable cramping. Buonanno, now a 71-year-old medical assistant and hairdresser from Methuen, Mass., tried everything from drugs to dairy-free diets. Nothing worked. She remembers a particularly tough period over 10 years ago, when she was working on the factory floor of a medical-device company for up to 10 hours a day, six days a week. When an IBS episode would strike, her co-workers would cover for her as she huddled in a corner, keeled over in pain...
Source: TIME: Health - August 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized medicine Research Source Type: news

People Are Now Taking Placebo Pills to Deal With Their Health Problems —And It’s Working
For over 20 years, Linda Buonanno lived in fear that her irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) would suddenly interrupt her daily routine with frequent trips to the bathroom and unbearable cramping. Buonanno, now a 71-year-old medical assistant and hairdresser from Methuen, Mass., tried everything from drugs to dairy-free diets. Nothing worked. She remembers a particularly tough period over 10 years ago, when she was working on the factory floor of a medical-device company for up to 10 hours a day, six days a week. When an IBS episode would strike, her co-workers would cover for her as she huddled in a corner, keeled over in pain...
Source: TIME: Health - August 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized medicine Research Source Type: news

Study: Home baby pulse oximetry monitors may be inaccurate, unnecessary
This study compares a consumer product for use in healthy babies with a hospital-based product being used in ill infants. Even in the hospital we don’t react to a single abnormal oximetry alarm, rather than to a trend or critically low values. As I read this study, both trending and critical hypoxia are preserved, especially device A [the Owlet]. Before we use the data in this study to discard a device that may make collection of population-based infant oximetry data possible, we need to be clear about the purpose for which the device is intended,” Dr. Larry Consenstein of SUNY Upstate said in a prepared s...
Source: Mass Device - August 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Diagnostics Pediatrics Masimo Source Type: news

Accuracy of Hypoxia-Based Baby Monitors Is Concerning
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 22, 2018 -- Findings regarding the accuracy of two pulse oximetry-based baby monitors are concerning, according to a research letter published in the Aug. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Christopher P.... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 22, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Patient Education Urged to Prevent Opioid OD After Sobriety
TUESDAY, Aug. 21, 2018 -- The American Medical Association (AMA) encourages patient education to raise awareness of the risks associated with opioid use after a prolonged period of sobriety, according to a report in the organization's AMA Wire. The... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 21, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Two Strategies for Preventing Diabetes in Minority Patients
THURSDAY, Aug. 16, 2018 -- Recognizing the barriers to care for minority patients with type 2 diabetes could reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes nationwide, according to an article published by the American Medical Association's AMA Wire. Noting... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 16, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

TBI Linked to Increased Suicide Risk
TUESDAY, Aug. 14, 2018 -- Individuals with medical contact for traumatic brain injury (TBI) have increased risk of suicide, according to a study published in the Aug. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Trine Madsen, Ph.D.,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

AMA Adopts New Policy on Housing for Homeless
TUESDAY, Aug. 14, 2018 -- The American Medical Association (AMA) calls for stable, affordable housing, without mandated therapy or service compliance, in order to improve housing stability and quality of life among individuals who are chronically... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Completing Sepsis Bundle Within an Hour Cuts Pediatric Mortality
TUESDAY, Aug. 14, 2018 -- Completion of a one-hour sepsis bundle within one hour cuts mortality in pediatric patients, according to a study published in the July 24/31 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Idris V.R. Evans, M.D.,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

AMA Adopts Policy on Augmented Intelligence
FRIDAY, Aug. 10, 2018 -- The American Medical Association (AMA) House of Delegates has adopted a policy on augmented intelligence, according to a report published in the association's AMA Wire. Though computational methods, techniques, and systems... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 10, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Maine's Physician, Nurse Practitioner,`x and Physician Assistant Workforce in 2018 (July 2018)
This report uses two sources of data to describe Maine's 2018 physician, nurse practitioner (NP), and physician assistant (PA) workforce supply: Maine health professions license data and the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - August 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AMA Adopts Policy to Advance Gender Equity in Medicine
THURSDAY, Aug. 9, 2018 -- The American Medical Association (AMA) House of Delegates has adopted a new policy to study, act for, and advocate to advance gender equity in medicine, according to a report published in the association's AMA Wire. As part... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 9, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

American Medical Association opposes CVS-Aetna merger
The American Medical Association begged the Department of Justice to block the $69 billion pending merger between CVS and Aetna, saying the union will kill competition and raise drug prices. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AMA Opposes Merger of CVS and Aetna AMA Opposes Merger of CVS and Aetna
The American Medical Association, which represents U.S. physicians, urged the U.S. Justice Department on Wednesday to stop CVS Health Corp's plan to buy insurance provider Aetna Inc, saying the deal could result in higher prices for prescription medicines.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

American Medical Association opposes merger of CVS and Aetna
The American Medical Association, which represents U.S. physicians, urged the U.S. Justice Department on Wednesday to stop CVS Health Corp's plan to buy insurance provider Aetna Inc, saying the deal could result in higher prices for prescription medicines. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

AMA Calls for Greater Electronic Cigarette Regulation
TUESDAY, Aug. 7, 2018 -- The American Medical Association (AMA) has adopted several policies to improve the regulation of tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), according to an article published in the association's AMA... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 7, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

For iRhythm, two new JAMA studies could translate to big sales
iRhythm Technologies reported a promising second quarter from a financial standpoint, citing  a revenue of $35.5 million, up 55 percent from this time last year. But CEO Kevin King's major focus on the call was not earnings, but a pair of scientific studies published last month in the Journal of the American Medical Association and JAMA Cardiology. These studies and what they represent could crack the market wide open for iRhythm, King suggested. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - August 6, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Cohesive Teams Can Help Blend Clinical Care With Education
MONDAY, Aug. 6, 2018 -- Building cohesive teams in teaching clinics can help blend clinical care with education for residents, according to an article published in the American Medical Association's AMA Wire. A group of physician-educators visited... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 6, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

AMA Calls for Alleviating Racial Housing Segregation
THURSDAY, Aug. 2, 2018 -- The American Medical Association (AMA) opposes policies that enable racial housing segregation, according to an article published in the association's AMA Wire. As part of its efforts, the AMA will not only oppose policies... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 2, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

AMA Opposes Proposed Cuts, Gag Orders for Reproductive Health
MONDAY, July 30, 2018 -- The American Medical Association (AMA) strongly objects to the Trump administration's plan to withhold federal family planning funding from Planned Parenthood and other entities, according to a statement released by the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 30, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Testosterone Prescribing Down Since 2013
WEDNESDAY, July 18, 2018 -- The percentage of U.S. men receiving testosterone prescriptions decreased from 2013 through 2016, according to a research letter published in the July 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. In an... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 18, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Alternative Payment Models Should Include Precision Medicine
TUESDAY, July 17, 2018 -- The American Medical Association has committed to working to integrate precision medicine into alternative payment models (APMs), according to an article published in the association's AMA Wire. Implementation of the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Junk science supreme: JAMA publishes bizarre study claiming election of President Trump linked to opioid drug use
(Natural News) The politicization of science is moving full steam ahead with a new study published in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) that associates voting for Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election with opioid drug use. Apparently aiming to capitalize on all of the negative publicity surrounding the alleged opioid... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news