The American Medical Association is asking tech companies to stop the spread of vaccine misinformation
Doctors are worried that social media is encouraging parents to skip out on vaccinations for their kids. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AMA Enlists Social Media Giants To Stop Spread Of Vaccine Misinformation
The American Medical Association urged big social media and tech companies including Amazon, Facebook and Google to stop vaccine misinformation on their platforms. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 13, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Japsen, Contributor Source Type: news

AMA Enlists Social Media Giants To Stop Spread Of Anti-Vaccine Misinformation
The American Medical Association urged big social media and tech companies including Amazon, Facebook and Google to stop vaccine misinformation on their platforms. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 13, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Japsen, Contributor Source Type: news

Diet Quality in Midlife Not Linked to Later Risk for Dementia
TUESDAY, March 12, 2019 -- Diet quality in midlife is not associated with subsequent dementia risk, according to a study published in the March 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Tasnime N. Akbaraly, Ph.D., from the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 12, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Despite what Big Pharma says, opioids do almost nothing to treat pain – study
(Natural News) A placebo pill is almost as effective as opioids for killing pain, suggests a new meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. This is because the physiological pain-killing effects of opioids decrease over time. As the pain-killing effects wane, a larger dose is needed, causing opioid addiction. The researchers warn... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Saranas ’ Early Bird catches nod from FDA
Saranas said today that FDA has granted its Early Bird endovascular bleed monitoring system de novo designation. The Early Bird device includes a vascular access sheath with embedded sensors that are designed to detect and monitor bleeding from a blood vessel accidentally injured during endovascular procedures, such as TAVR, large-bore hemodynamic support device placement, or other complex cardiovascular interventions in which the femoral artery or vein is used to obtain vascular access. The technology was invented at the Texas Heart Institute. A recent study of more than 17,000 large-bore transcatheter interventions from ...
Source: Mass Device - March 6, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Cardiovascular Featured Food & Drug Administration (FDA) News Well Patient Monitoring saranas Source Type: news

AMA: Trump family-planning abortion rule risks health crisis
The American Medical Association and Planned Parenthood in a lawsuit are claiming that a new Trump administration rule for family-planning grants could trigger a national public health crisis (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Planned Parenthood, American Medical Association sue Trump administration over abortion ‘gag rule’
The announcement comes a day after California and a coalition of 20 states and the District of Columbia sued the Trump administration over the the same Title X program changes. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ariana Eunjung Cha Source Type: news

Integrated therapy treating obesity and depression is effective
(University of Illinois at Chicago) An intervention combining behavioral weight loss treatment and problem-solving therapy with as-needed antidepressant medication for participants with co-occurring obesity and depression improved weight loss and depressive symptoms compared with routine physician care, according to an article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDA Head Says the Federal Government May Have to Set Vaccine Policies If State Laws Continue to Allow Outbreaks
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said the federal government might someday regulate vaccine policies if “lax” state vaccine laws “force [its] hand” by allowing the resurgence of vaccine-preventable diseases like measles to continue. Vaccine laws are currently decided at the state level. While all 50 states require certain vaccines for students, all but three — California, Mississippi and West Virginia — allow non-medical exemptions for people who have either religious or philosophical beliefs contrary to vaccination. But with preventable diseases like me...
Source: TIME: Health - February 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Infectious Disease onetime Source Type: news

Another medication more dangerous than the condition it treats: Blood-thinning drugs increase risk of internal bleeding, death
(Natural News) Using antithrombotic or blood-thinning medications was found to increase the risk of hematuria, or the presence of blood in urine, and other related complications. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) found that antithrombotic medications such as warfarin and aspirin may cause adverse health events. The study involved 2,518,064... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

IBM Watson Health announces slew of AI-based research partnership deals
IBM Watson Health today announced a number of new partnership deals, including an expanded collaborative deal with the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and 10-year, $50 million collaborative research deals with the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The Cambridge, Mass.-based IBM division said that it inked an extended partnership with the Broad Institute looking to analyze and explore genomics data to better understand the intrinsic possibility individuals have for a certain disease. The newly inked initiative aims to incorporate population-based and hospital-based biob...
Source: Mass Device - February 13, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Featured Software / IT IBM Watson Health Source Type: news

Insurance rules make it harder to treat opioid use disorder
(Oregon Health& Science University) Insurance industry cost-control measures may be worsening the nation's opioid epidemic by limiting access to a key medication that treats addiction, according to a research letter published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Despite the medical profession's growing acceptance of the need for medications for addiction treatment that give hope to people suffering with opioid use disorder, a new study finds that insurance rules increasingly limited the use of buprenorphine among Medicare beneficiaries between 2007 and 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What is the best way to lose weight and keep it off? Scientists chime in
(Natural News) If you’re desperate to lose weight, you need to remember that the road to fitness is one that requires self-discipline. Don’t fall for weight-loss program commercials with empty promises and drugs that could be linked to negative side effects. According to a paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), shortcuts to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Small Increase in HbA1c Seen With Switch to Human Insulin in T2DM
THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 -- Switching from analogue to human insulin is associated with a small increase in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, according to a study published in the Jan. 29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Jing... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 31, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Many suffering children in Somaliland need surgery, but most of those needs go unmet
(Baylor University) Children in Somaliland suffer a significant burden of health conditions -- particularly congenital deformities and wound-related conditions -- that could be eased by surgery, but most of those needs go unmet, according to a study by Baylor University and Duke University published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Doctors Call California's Probe of Opioid Deaths a'Witch Hunt'Doctors Call California's Probe of Opioid Deaths a'Witch Hunt '
The president of the American Medical Association called the investigation'terrifying'and said it may discourage physicians from prescribing medications for those who truly need relief from pain.Kaiser Health News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

Daily aspirin does more harm than good for ‘worried well’
King ’s College London scientists reviewed 13 trials of 160,000 participants. Their findings were published in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Frequent use of aspirin can lead to increased bleeding
A new study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has found that taking aspirin on a regular basis to prevent heart attacks and strokes, can lead to an increase risk of almost 50% in major bleeding episodes. The systematic review from scientists at King's College London and King's College Hospital looked at the overall effects on patients who did not have known cardiovascular disease. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - January 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Frequent use of aspirin can lead to increased bleeding
(King's College London) A new study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has found that taking aspirin on a regular basis to prevent heart attacks and strokes, can lead to an increase risk of almost 50 percent in major bleeding episodes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Review Shares Best Practices for Evaluating Penicillin Allergy
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 -- A new review, published in the Jan. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, addresses best practices for the evaluation and management of reported penicillin allergies. Erica S. Shenoy, M.D., Ph.D.,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 16, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

94% of Americans who grew up during the era of leaded gasoline found to be lead poisoned and brain damaged
(Natural News) A recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that 94 percent of Americans who were exposed to leaded gasoline in childhood may show signs of lower IQ scores and socioeconomic status in adulthood. Health experts pooled data from blood samples of than 500 participants who grew up in... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical marketing has skyrocketed in the past two decades, while oversight remains limited
(The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy& Clinical Practice) In an article recently published in the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA), researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice reviewed medical marketing (the marketing of prescription drugs, disease awareness, laboratory tests and health services to consumers and professionals) over a 20-year period from 1997 through 2016 and found that while it had increased dramatically from about $17.7 billion to $29.9 billion, regulation has not. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 8, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Ring in the New Year Resolved to Improve Your Health
FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 -- If you're thinking about making some health-related resolutions for 2019, the American Medical Association (AMA) has some suggestions. " This is the perfect time of year for each of us to consider our personal goals, and how... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 28, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

10 New Year ’s Resolutions Doctors Actually Want You to Make
Each year, Americans’ most popular New Year’s resolutions are more or less the same: get healthy, get organized, save money. But doctors at the American Medical Association (AMA) have some more specific thoughts in mind for 2019. The AMA this week released a list of 10 wellness-focused resolutions that could “help Americans make the most impactful, long-lasting improvements to their health in 2019.” Here’s what they are — and how to make them happen. Learn your risk for type 2 diabetes Diabetes is one of the most common chronic health conditions in the U.S., affecting an estimated 30 mil...
Source: TIME: Health - December 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Holidays 2018 public health Source Type: news

10 New Year's Resolutions Doctors Actually Want You to Make
Each year, Americans’ most popular New Year’s resolutions are more or less the same: get healthy, get organized, save money. But doctors at the American Medical Association (AMA) have some more specific thoughts in mind for 2019. The AMA this week released a list of 10 wellness-focused resolutions that could “help Americans make the most impactful, long-lasting improvements to their health in 2019.” Here’s what they are — and how to make them happen. Learn your risk for type 2 diabetes Diabetes is one of the most common chronic health conditions in the U.S., affecting an estimated 30 mil...
Source: TIME: Health - December 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Holidays 2018 public health Source Type: news

Delivery Mode Tied to Pelvic Floor Disorder Risk Post-Childbirth
TUESDAY, Dec. 18, 2018 -- After childbirth, the risk for pelvic floor disorders varies by delivery mode, according to a study published in the Dec. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Joan L. Blomquist, M.D., from the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 18, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Federal Judge Rules Against Obama ’s Affordable Care Act
WASHINGTON — A conservative federal judge in Texas has ruled the Affordable Care Act “invalid” on the eve of the sign-up deadline for next year. But with appeals certain, even the Trump White House said the law will remain in place for now. In a 55-page opinion, U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor ruled Friday that last year’s tax cut bill knocked the constitutional foundation from under “Obamacare” by eliminating a penalty for not having coverage. The rest of the law cannot be separated from that provision and is therefore invalid, he wrote. Supporters of the law immediately said th...
Source: TIME: Health - December 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR / AP Tags: Uncategorized Affordable Care Act onetime Texas Source Type: news

Federal Judge Rules Obama ’s Affordable Care Act Is Unconstitutional
WASHINGTON — A conservative federal judge in Texas has ruled the Affordable Care Act “invalid” on the eve of the sign-up deadline for next year. But with appeals certain, even the Trump White House said the law will remain in place for now. In a 55-page opinion, U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor ruled Friday that last year’s tax cut bill knocked the constitutional foundation from under “Obamacare” by eliminating a penalty for not having coverage. The rest of the law cannot be separated from that provision and is therefore invalid, he wrote. Supporters of the law immediately said th...
Source: TIME: Health - December 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR / AP Tags: Uncategorized Affordable Care Act onetime Texas Source Type: news

Over a million people DIE from chemotherapy every year, but only 750,000 pass away from cancer – what's WRONG with this picture?
(Natural News) Chemical warfare on humanity was launched nearly a century ago by the American Medical Association when they eliminated nutrition classes from medical colleges and approval-stamped any chemical medication that came down the pike as the drug of choice for whatever ailment any doctor chose to manage for their “patients for life.” Then came... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Just 15% Of U.S. Doctors Use Telehealth In Their Practices
Just 15.4 percent of U.S. physicians worked in practices that used telemedicine in 206 " for a wide spectrum of patient interactions, including e-visits, " American Medical Association researchers report in the December issue of Health Affairs (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - December 3, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Japsen, Contributor Tags: NYSE:TDOC Source Type: news

Judge threatens to delay or even spike $70m CVS-Aetna merger
A federal judge last week reportedly threatened to derail the already-closed $70 billion buyout of health insurer Aetna (NYSE:AET) by CVS Health (NYSE:CVS), saying he felt “kept in the dark, kind of like a mushroom.” At a normally routine hearing last week prior to approving the deal, Judge Richard Leon, of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, said he might put off a decision until the summer or even spike the deal altogether, Reuters reported. “I was reviewing your motion, which, of course is not opposed. And I kind of got this uneasy feeling that I was being kep...
Source: Mass Device - December 3, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Featured Mergers & Acquisitions Wall Street Beat Aetna CVS Health Source Type: news

Opioids Are In the Spotlight. But Meth Hospitalizations Are Surging
The number of people hospitalized because of amphetamine use is skyrocketing in the United States, but the resurgence of the drug largely has been overshadowed by the nation’s intense focus on opioids. Amphetamine-related hospitalizations jumped by about 245% from 2008 to 2015, according to a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. That dwarfs the rise in hospitalizations from other drugs, such as opioids, which were up by about 46%. The most significant increases were in Western states. The surge in hospitalizations and deaths due to amphetamines “is just totally off the radar,” ...
Source: TIME: Health - November 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Anna Gorman / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Cleveland Clinic genetic analysis links obesity with diabetes, coronary artery disease
(Cleveland Clinic) A Cleveland Clinic genetic analysis has found that obesity itself, not just the adverse health effects associated with it, significantly increases the risk of Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. The paper was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Network Open. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Q & A: American Medical Association President Barbara McAneny, MD
(MedPage Today) -- AMA's top doc discusses sexual harassment in healthcare, alternative payment models (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - November 15, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

CDC: Many Americans May Have Prediabetes and Not Know It
THURSDAY, Nov. 15, 2018 -- More than one-third of Americans have prediabetes, but 90 percent of them do not know they have it, medical experts say. Nov. 14 was World Diabetes Day, and the American Medical Association and U.S. Centers for Disease... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - November 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

AMA to Collect Data on Suicide Among Doctors-in-Training
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 -- By collecting data on suicides by medical students, residents, and fellows, the American Medical Association hopes to identify ways to reduce suicides among doctors-in-training. The data collection policy was approved at... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - November 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

U.S. physicians urge FDA to bolster labeling on high-sugar foods
The American Medical Association (AMA) is urging the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ramp up labeling of high-sugar foods, it said in a statement on Tuesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

AHA: Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Updated
TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 -- Key guidelines for recommended physical activity in Americans have been updated, according to a special report published online Nov. 12 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with the annual meeting... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - November 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New Physical Activity Guidelines Offer Simple Advice: Move More, Sit Less
Americans should sit less and move more, even if that activity comes in tiny chunks, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) latest physical activity guidelines. The core recommendations in the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, which were published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, aren’t all that different from the previous iteration, which was released in 2008. The tone, however, has shifted to include more manageable forms of activity and to promote benefits of exercise that go beyond physical health, such as improved cognitive function, me...
Source: TIME: Health - November 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness onetime overnight Source Type: news

Move More, Sit Less: Government Issues New Exercise Guidelines
By Arman Azad, CNN (CNN) — If you’re sitting down while reading this, stand up. Guidelines released Monday by the federal government show that most Americans are not getting the exercise they need, costing the health care system over $100 billion each year. The new standards are similar to those released 10 years ago, but the government is scrapping a recommendation that physical activity occur in 10-minute blocks, instead telling Americans to “move more and sit less” whenever possible. Any amount of exercise has some health benefits, officials say, and some benefits are even immediate, like better ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Exercise Source Type: news

AMA Announces Initiative to Reinvent Physician Training
TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 -- The American Medical Association (AMA) today announced a new $15 million competitive grant initiative, the " Reimagining Residency " initiative, aimed at improving residency training. The AMA will award $15 million over five... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 30, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Pace of Change Has Accelerated in Alternative Payment Models
THURSDAY, Oct. 25, 2018 -- The impact of alternative payment models (APMs) on physician practices has been described in a study published by the RAND Corp. and the American Medical Association. In a follow-up to a 2014 study that examined the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 25, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

If the Government Redefines Gender to Exclude Trans People, It Could Worsen an Urgent Public Health Crisis
The New York Times reports that the Trump Administration, via the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), is circulating a memo that seeks to define gender “on a basis that is clear, grounded in science, objective and administrable.” This definition, to potentially apply throughout several federal government agencies, states: “The sex listed on a person’s birth certificate, as originally issued, shall constitute definitive proof of a person’s sex unless rebutted by reliable genetic evidence.” Whatever else one might believe about this definition and its goals, it is not grounded i...
Source: TIME: Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tia Powell, Jules Chyten Brennan, Viraj Patel, Vafa Tabatabaie Tags: Uncategorized medicine Source Type: news

Cleveland Clinic shows better cardiorespiratory fitness leads to longer life
(Cleveland Clinic) Cleveland Clinic researchers have found that better cardiorespiratory fitness leads to longer life, with no limit to the benefit of aerobic fitness. Researchers retrospectively studied 122,007 patients who underwent exercise treadmill testing at Cleveland Clinic between Jan. 1, 1991, and Dec. 31, 2014, to measure all-cause mortality relating to the benefits of exercise and fitness. The paper was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Network Open. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weight loss surgery in diabetics may decrease risk of heart attacks
Weight loss surgery for obesity may lower the risk of heart attacks in type-2 diabetes patients, according to research in theJournal of the American Medical Association. Daily Mail (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - October 17, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

AAFP Breaks From AMA, Adopts Neutral Aid-in-Dying Stance AAFP Breaks From AMA, Adopts Neutral Aid-in-Dying Stance
American Academy of Family Physicians delegates took a neutral stance, opting to let families, physicians, and states make aid-in-dying decisions, in opposition to American Medical Association policy.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

Study suggests a direct link between screen time and ADHD in teens
(Natural News) Adding to the list of health concerns associated with excessive screen time, one study suggests that there could be a link between the length of time teenagers spend online and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The two-year study, which was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), observed more than 2,500 high school... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tips Provided for Budgeting in Medical Residency
THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 -- Medical residents should start budgeting and save for the future, according to an article published in the American Medical Association AMA Wire. Noting that medical residents are expected to manage complicated finances,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 4, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news