Nutrition Education Hasn't Reached the Ivory Tower

I am not a medicine basher. But I am frustrated by the near exclusive focus on new and expensive technologies in medicine over scientifically-proven lifestyle measures that are immediately accessible and inexpensive. This lack of attention to lifestyle permeates my field of cardiology but I was struck by how it appears to be true for cancer therapy also. I had the opportunity to strike up a conversation on an airplane last week with two prominent researchers in prostate cancer, one a urologist and one a scientist. Both served as department heads at large institutions. Although I do not keep up on all the literature on prostate cancer, so many of my heart patients also deal with this malady that I am familiar with the lifestyle literature. I brought up a groundbreaking series of peer reviewed trials of lifestyle in early stage prostate cancer led by Dr. Dean Ornish, a cardiologist known for demonstrating heart disease reversal in the Lifestyle Heart Trial. He embarked on studies of his plant based dietary program coupled with walking, stress management and group support in men with prostate cancer and began publishing in 2005 that markers of cancer growth reversed in the group following his program. None of the men following his program went on to need conventional therapies. I was dismayed that my two new academic friends were not aware of any of his papers on prostate cancer, all published in highly visible and esteemed journals. I then brought up their use of POMI-T, a c...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Conclusions and Perspectives In this review, we have discussed important milestones from the early description of “Serum-sickness” as being due to antibodies directed against Neu5Gc epitopes all the way to the present-day therapeutic implications of these antibodies in cancer therapy. Some of these milestones have been represented in a concise timeline (Figure 6). While the “Xenosialitis” hypothesis is well-supported in the human-like mouse models, it has yet to be conclusively proven in humans. It remains to be seen if “Xenosialitis” plays a role in other uniquely-human diseases. FI...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
We presented a new statistic T to use large public database as reference to reduce concern of potential population stratification. And the new statistic proposed here is effective to discover novel genome-wide significant loci with both small and large sample sizes. Author Contributions YW conceived the idea and developed the software. YL, MH, and XL contributed data analysis, generating tables and figures, and manuscript writing. YW, YL, MH, XL, YS, and LJ contributed the theoretical analysis and manuscript revision. MX helped support the GWAS datasets. YW, YL, MH, XL, MZ, JW, and MX contributed to scientific discussion...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Matt Hancock hails ‘game-changer’ but critics raise racial bias and ‘fatalism’ concernsThe health secretary is calling for predictive genetic tests for common cancers and heart disease to be rolled out on the NHS without delay.Matt Hancock, speaking at the Royal Society on Wednesday, revealed he recently took a commercial genetic test that showed he was at heightened risk of developing prostate cancer, saying he was shocked by the result. Hancock called for a national debate about the ethical issues around testing for diseases, some of which could not readily be treated.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Genetics NHS Health policy Matt Hancock & wellbeing Science Race Life and style Politics Public services policy Society Biology UK news Conservatives Source Type: news
Matt Hancock claims technology is ‘a game-changer’ but critics raise racial bias and ‘fatalism’ concernsThe health secretary is calling for predictive genetic tests for common cancers and heart disease to be rolled out on the NHS without delay.Matt Hancock, speaking at the Royal Society on Wednesday, revealed he recently took a commercial genetic test that showed he is at heightened risk of developing prostate cancer, saying he was shocked by the result. Hancock called for a national debate about the ethical issues around testing for diseases, some of which could not readily be treated.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Genetics Matt Hancock NHS Science UK news Race Health Source Type: news
HOW TO live longer: We all know the importance of eating a healthy, balanced diet, but certain foods can do more to boost life expectancy than others. According to experts, a particular ‘trendy’ treat which has grown in popularity in recent times may help to fight against diseases like prostate cancer and heart disease.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This article describes the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including incidence and prevalence, mortality and morbidity, use and costs of care, and the overall impact on caregivers and society. The Special Report examines the use of brief cognitive assessments by primary care physicians as a tool for improving early detection of dementia. An estimated 5.8 million Americans have Alzheimer's dementia. By mid-century, the number of people living with Alzheimer's dementia in the United States may grow to 13.8 million, fueled in large part by the aging baby boom generation. In 2017, official death certificates ...
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Men with advanced prostate cancer are typically treated with drugs that prevent the body from making or using testosterone. A hormone (or an androgen, as it’s known), testosterone drives prostate cancer cells to grow faster, so shutting it down is essential to keeping the illness in check. About 600,000 men with advanced prostate cancer in the United States today are undergoing this type of anti-hormonal treatment, which is called androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). But even as ADT helps men live longer, it exerts a toll on the body. Men can lose muscle and bone mass, gain weight, and they face higher risks for heart...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Living With Prostate Cancer Prostate Knowledge Treatments HPK Source Type: blogs
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 30801679 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Prostate Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Pharmacol Ther Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis with a variety of health conditions appears to prompt drinking cessation in older adults. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 30758044 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Clin Exp Res Source Type: research
AbstractBromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) inhibitors, acting via epigenetic mechanisms, have been developed recently as potential new treatments for cancer, including prostate cancer, and inflammatory conditions. Some BET inhibitors, such as RVX-208, also raise high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A-1 levels. A recent meta-analysis of three small trials (n = 798) found that RVX-208 protected against major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), raising the question as to whether this protective effect was an artefact, a chance finding, or mediated by HDL-C, anti-inflammatory pathwa...
Source: American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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