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Nutrition Education Hasn't Reached the Ivory Tower

I am not a medicine basher. But I am frustrated by the near exclusive focus on new and expensive technologies in medicine over scientifically-proven lifestyle measures that are immediately accessible and inexpensive. This lack of attention to lifestyle permeates my field of cardiology but I was struck by how it appears to be true for cancer therapy also. I had the opportunity to strike up a conversation on an airplane last week with two prominent researchers in prostate cancer, one a urologist and one a scientist. Both served as department heads at large institutions. Although I do not keep up on all the literature on prostate cancer, so many of my heart patients also deal with this malady that I am familiar with the lifestyle literature. I brought up a groundbreaking series of peer reviewed trials of lifestyle in early stage prostate cancer led by Dr. Dean Ornish, a cardiologist known for demonstrating heart disease reversal in the Lifestyle Heart Trial. He embarked on studies of his plant based dietary program coupled with walking, stress management and group support in men with prostate cancer and began publishing in 2005 that markers of cancer growth reversed in the group following his program. None of the men following his program went on to need conventional therapies. I was dismayed that my two new academic friends were not aware of any of his papers on prostate cancer, all published in highly visible and esteemed journals. I then brought up their use of POMI-T, a c...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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A 65-year-old male patient who had been hospitalized in the ─▒ntensive care unit for pneumonia presented with hematemesis and melena. He was diagnosed with metastatic adenocarcinoma of prostate (multiple bone and lung metastases), which was accompanied by diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and coronary heart disease. The hemoglobin levels decreased from 11.4 g /dL to 7.3 g/dL during follow-up. Upper endoscopy revealed widespread distribution of numerous umbilicated nodules with varying sizes (from 0.5 to 2 cm) on gastric mucosa (A, B, C).
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: There are several essential strategies for increasing African-American men's participation in health research: ensuring the research team is culturally and gender-sensitive; recruiting in trusted environments; using respected gatekeepers; developing trust with participants; and being transparent. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Implementing strategies to include African-American men in health research has the potential to improve health disparities in the US. PMID: 29738190 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Nurse Researcher - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Nurse Res Source Type: research
This article describes the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including incidence and prevalence, mortality and morbidity, costs of care, and the overall impact on caregivers and society. The Special Report examines the benefits of diagnosing Alzheimer's earlier in the disease process, in the stage of mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease. An estimated 5.7 million Americans have Alzheimer's dementia. By mid-century, the number of people living with Alzheimer's dementia in the United States is projected to grow to 13.8 million, fueled in large part by the aging baby boom generation. In 201...
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Authors: Lin HC, Kao LT, Chung SD, Huang CC, Shia BC, Huang CY Abstract Alzheimer's disease and cancer are increasingly prevalent with advancing age. However, the association between Alzheimer's disease and prostate cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between prior Alzheimer's disease and subsequent prostate cancer using a population-based dataset in Taiwan. Data for this study were sourced from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. This case-control study included 2101 prostate cancer patients as cases and 6303 matched controls. We used conditional logist...
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
In Westwood, more than 100 faculty experts from 25 departments have embarked on anall-encompassing push to cut the health and economic impacts of depression in half by the year 2050. The mammoth undertaking will rely on platforms developed by the new Institute for Precision Health, which will harness the power of big data and genomics to move toward individually tailored treatments and health-promotion strategies.On the same 419 acres of land, researchers across the spectrum, from the laboratory bench to the patient bedside, are ushering in a potentially game-changing approach to turning the body ’s immune defenses a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
There’s no doubt antibiotics have saved a lot of lives. But because they’ve been overprescribed for so many years we’ve ended up with a slew of health problems. For one thing, overuse of antibiotics wreaks havoc on your microbiome… That’s your body’s ecosystem. Your microbiome has 100 trillion or so bacteria, viruses and fungi. It affects just about every organ and body system. Some of these gut bugs cause disease and infection. But other good bacteria are called “probiotics.” They boost your immune system. They help you digest your food and turn it into vitamins. But in...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Cancer Health Men's Health Source Type: news
Being diagnosed with breast cancer can make a person feel powerless, but there are some things women can do to potentially improve how they feel throughout the process. Here are some strategies recommended by experts—and others that are still being explored—which may help improve the effectiveness and symptoms of treatment. Physical activity “Exercise is one of the best things women can do for themselves,” says Dr. Ann Partridge, director of the Program for Young Women with Breast Cancer at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. “It doesn’t mean marathons or hot yoga, but walking three to five ti...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Breast Cancer breast cancer symptoms breast cancer treatment Exercise Meditation Nutrition TIME Health Breast Cancer yoga yoga cancer patients Source Type: news
Over the July 4th weekend, my non-physician husband with a history of skin cancer tried to justify not wearing sunscreen in order to get some vitamin D. My husband, of course, has no idea how much vitamin D he needs or why, and I suspect he is not alone. Why do we need vitamin D? The easy answer is for bones. Vitamin D facilitates absorption of calcium and phosphate, which are needed for bone growth. Without sufficient vitamin D, bones become brittle (in children this is called rickets and in adults it is called osteomalacia) and break more easily. Vitamin D is likely beneficial for other parts of the body as well; studies...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Prevention Source Type: blogs
Abstract Down's syndrome (DS; also known as trisomy 21; T21) is caused by a triplication of all or part of human chromosome 21 (chr21). DS is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability attributable to a naturally-occurring imbalance in gene dosage. DS incurs huge medical, healthcare, and socioeconomic costs, and there are as yet no effective treatments for this incapacitating human neurogenetic disorder. There is a remarkably wide variability in the 'phenotypic spectrum' associated with DS; the progression of symptoms and the age of DS onset fluctuate, and there is further variability in the biophysi...
Source: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology - Category: Cytology Authors: Tags: Cell Mol Neurobiol Source Type: research
You know the type. The macho guy who’s rough, tough, go-it-alone, leader-of-the-pack, help-not-wanted. Macho man may put off seeing a doctor for a checkup – because he thinks he’s invincible, doesn’t get sick, it’s a waste of time, only for the weak. Physicians at the University of Maryland Medical Center say some men only give in when they have symptoms, when major treatments are required, or when preventive steps are more demanding. Even so, it’s never too late to start on the road to health. June, Men’s Health Month, is a great time to focus on preventable health problems and en...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Health Tips Heart/Cardiac Care heart health mens health Source Type: blogs
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