Meet the Scientists Running for Office
Science doesn’t have opinions — and it’s not especially interested in any that you’ve got either. Science does have hypotheses, and it does have data and it does run a whole lot of experiments to get still more data. And then it has results. You may or may not like the results, but if the work has been done right, you don’t get to deny them. In an era in which facts must wrestle with “alternative facts,” that is a memo that fewer and fewer elected officials seem to have gotten — or at least they haven’t read it. For every researcher studying childhood development who c...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - April 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Merck Announces New Phase 2 Data on Investigational Triple Combination Therapy MK-3682B for Chronic Hepatitis C
Dateline City: KENILWORTH, N.J. Findings Presented at The International Liver Congress ™ 2017 Show High Rates of Sustained Virologic Response (SVR12) in Genotype 1 Patients for Whom Direct-Acting Antiviral Therapy Had Previously FailedKENILWORTH, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Merck (NYSE: MRK), known as MSD outside of the United States and Canada, today announced the first sustained virologic response1 (SVR) results 12 weeks after completion of therapy (SVR12, considered virologic cure) fromC-SURGE, an ongoing, open label Phase 2 clinical trial evaluating MK-3682B [uprifosbuvir (MK-3682)2/grazoprevir3...
Source: Merck.com - Research and Development News - April 22, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Research and Development News Corporate News Latest News #Merck #MRK $MRK Hepatitis C MSD NYSE:MRK Source Type: news

Henrietta Lacks' Cells Are Still Helping Protect Women From Cervical Cancer
When Henrietta Lacks was being treated for cervical cancer more than 60 years ago, her cells were taken for medical research without her consent. This ethical controversy became the subject of a 2010 best-selling book, Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks, and now an HBO movie of the same name starring Oprah Winfrey. Despite radiation therapy and surgery, Lacks died from the cancer in 1951. But her cells, known to scientists as HeLa cells, have played a role in many scientific advancements ― and have helped protect other young women from the cervical cancer that took Lacks’ lif...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Henrietta Lacks' Cells Are Still Helping Protect Women From Cervical Cancer
When Henrietta Lacks was being treated for cervical cancer more than 60 years ago, her cells were taken for medical research without her consent. This ethical controversy became the subject of a 2010 best-selling book, Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks, and now an HBO movie of the same name starring Oprah Winfrey. Despite radiation therapy and surgery, Lacks died from the cancer in 1951. But her cells, known to scientists as HeLa cells, have played a role in many scientific advancements ― and have helped protect other young women from the cervical cancer that took Lacks’ lif...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Real-World Observational Study in the U.S. Veterans Affairs System Evaluating Use of Merck ’s ZEPATIER® (Elbasvir and Grazoprevir) Shows High Sustained Virologic Response Rates in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C
Dateline City: KENILWORTH, N.J. Study Evaluated VA Population with High Incidence of Co-MorbiditiesKENILWORTH, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Merck (NYSE: MRK), known as MSD outside of the United States and Canada, today announced the presentation of findings from a retrospective database analysis of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection who were administered ZEPATIER®in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare system.Language: EnglishContact: Merck& Co., Inc.Media:Doris Li, 908-740-1903orMichael Close, 267-305-1211orInvestors:Teri Loxam, 908-740-1986orAmy Klug, 90...
Source: Merck.com - Product News - April 21, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Hepatitis C Newsroom Prescription Medicine News Corporate News Latest News #Merck #MRK $MRK MSD NYSE:MRK ZEPATIER Source Type: news

Nigeria: Meningitis - Nigeria Not Out of the Woods Yet - - Prof Tomori
[Vanguard] Days after the Federal Government declared that it had contained the Serotype C strain of Cerebral Spinal Meningitis, CSM, renowned Professor of Virology and former Vice chancellor of Redeemer's University, Prof. Oyewale Tomori, has said Nigeria was not yet out of the woods. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 18, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Scientists engineer human-germ hybrid molecules to attack drug-resistant bacteria
Taking a cue from viruses that infect and kill bacteria, the researchers engineered molecules capable of targeting the bugs in a way the human immune system cannot—an approach that could be particularly valuable against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 17, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Science News antibiotic resistance Assaf Raz immunology Laboratory of Bacterial Pathogenesis and Immunology lysibodies lysins microbiology Vincent A. Fischetti Virology Source Type: news

Henrietta Lacks's Cells Made These Breakthroughs Possible
Since its establishment in 1951, the HeLa cell line has been used to study everything from influenza to in vitro fertilization—and HeLa cells can now be found in laboratories the world over. Among the breakthrough medical moments Lacks’s DNA made possible: 1952 Jonas Salk develops the world’s first polio vaccine—but the lifesaving advancement must be tested before being given to children. Enter the first HeLa distribution center, created to produce trillions of cells and expose them to the virus. 1953 HeLa cells are mistakenly mixed with a liquid that causes their chromosomes to unclump, offering a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Henrietta Lacks's Cells Made These Breakthroughs Possible
Since its establishment in 1951, the HeLa cell line has been used to study everything from influenza to in vitro fertilization—and HeLa cells can now be found in laboratories the world over. Among the breakthrough medical moments Lacks’s DNA made possible: 1952 Jonas Salk develops the world’s first polio vaccine—but the lifesaving advancement must be tested before being given to children. Enter the first HeLa distribution center, created to produce trillions of cells and expose them to the virus. 1953 HeLa cells are mistakenly mixed with a liquid that causes their chromosomes to unclump, offering a...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Giant Virus Group Reported
A genomic analysis of“Klosneuviruses” suggests that they evolved from small viruses that accumulated genetic material over time, but not all virologists are convinced.  (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 6, 2017 Category: Science Tags: The Scientist, Daily News Source Type: news

New Giant Virus Group Reported
A genomic analysis of 'Klosneuviruses' suggests that they evolved from small viruses that accumulated genetic material over time, but not all virologists are convinced. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 6, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News,The Scientist Source Type: news

St. Louis startup attacking Zika raises $500,000 from Japanese firm
Precision Virologics, a St. Louis-based biotech startup, has raised $500,000 from a group of investors that includes Oncolys BioPharma, a biopharmaceutical company from Japan. The money will be used to help Precision further develop its targeted vaccine for emerging infectious diseases, such the Zika virus. Earlier this month, Precision, which is led by CEO Daniel Katzman, agreed to a licensing agreement with Washington University’s Office of Technology Management. That agreement will help commercialize… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 31, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Brian Feldt Source Type: news

For microbes fighting viruses, a fast response means a better defense
Researchers have found that the bacterial immune system targets an invading virus as soon as it enters the cell. This discovery answers a long-standing question about how microbes defend themselves. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 29, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News CRISPR CRISPR-Cas9 immunology Joshua W. Modell Laboratory of Bacteriology Luciano Marraffini microbiology spacer acquisition Virology Source Type: news

He Treated The Very First Ebola Cases 40 Years Ago. Then He Watched The World Forget.
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. KINSHASA, Congo ― In early 2014, few people worried that the Ebola virus, which is up to 90 percent fatal, would pose a global threat. So the World Health Organization sent shockwaves around the world when it announced that Ebola was spreading out of control in West Africa. Before the epidemic was over two years later, it had killed thousands of people. They died in terrifying and painful ways, often passing the disease on to family members before and even after death....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

He Treated The Very First Ebola Cases 40 Years Ago. Then He Watched The World Forget.
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. KINSHASA, Congo ― In early 2014, few people worried that the Ebola virus, which is up to 90 percent fatal, would pose a global threat. So the World Health Organization sent shockwaves around the world when it announced that Ebola was spreading out of control in West Africa. Before the epidemic was over two years later, it had killed thousands of people. They died in terrifying and painful ways, often passing the disease on to family members before and even after death....
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Silence is golden -- Suppressing host response to Ebola virus may help to control infection
(Boston University Medical Center) The Ebola virus causes a severe, often fatal illness when it infects the human body. Initially targeting cells of the immune system called macrophages, white blood cells that absorb and clear away pathogens, a new study has found a way to potentially 'silence' these Ebola virus-infected macrophages.The findings, which appear in the Journal of Virology, could lead to new treatment options for Ebola virus disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Rapid Risk Assessment: Human Infection with Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus; Fifth Update, 27 January 2017
European Union, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. 01/27/2017 This 14-page rapid risk assessment aims to summarize the epidemiological and virological information on human infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) viruses following an upsurge in cases since December 2016 in China. It provides background on the clinical aspects, spectrum of disease, and treatment of the disease. It assesses the risk to public health in the European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) and to EU/EEA citizens. At present, the most immediate threat to EU citizens is to those living or visiting influenza A(H7N9)-affected areas i...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - March 12, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Vitamin D decreases HCV cell replication & aids virologic response
Vitamin D decreased hepatitis C cell replication and appeared significantly associated with rapid virologic response in anti-viral therapy, according to study results published inHepatology Research.Healio (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - March 1, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Early Age at Start of ART for Better Virologic Control Early Age at Start of ART for Better Virologic Control
Initiating ART earlier in life may help improve virologic outcomes among infants and children with HIV.AIDS (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - February 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV/AIDS Journal Article Source Type: news

Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases (JJID)
An open-access journal from the National Institute of Infectious Diseases which publishes bimonthly on basic research on infectious diseases relevant to humans in the fields of bacteriology, virology, mycology, parasitology, medical entomology, vaccination, and toxicology, pathology, immunology, biochemistry, and blood safety. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - February 10, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation (JVDI)
JVDI is devoted to all aspects of veterinary laboratory diagnostic science, including anatomic pathology, bacteriology/mycology, clinical pathology, epidemiology, immunology, laboratory information management, molecular biology, parasitology, public health, toxicology, and virology. Content is open access after a 12-month embargo. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - February 10, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Highlighting the clinical complications associated with ART in HIV/TB coinfected patients
(Future Science Group) Today Future Science Group announces the publication of an article in Future Virology highlighting the clinical complications associated with antiretroviral therapy in Chinese HIV/ Tuberculosis (TB) coinfected patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 10, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nigeria: Govt Dismisses HIV/Aids Cure Claims
[Guardian] The Federal Government through the National Agency for the Control of AIDS (NACA) and the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) has dismissed the claims by a Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Clinical Virology at the Michael Okpara University of Agriculture Umudike, Abia State, Maduike Ezeibe, to have discovered a new drug for the cure of Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - February 7, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nigeria: NACA Dismisses HIV Cure Claim By Michael Okpara University Prof
[Vanguard] The National Agency for the Control of AIDS, NACA, has dismissed an HIV cure claim by Professor Maduike Ezeibe, a Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Clinical Virology at the Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Abia State. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - February 7, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Atomic-scale view of bacterial proteins offers path to new tuberculosis drugs
In studying a cousin of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, scientists have drawn a molecular map of the target for rifampicin, a common antibiotic. They are now using it in an effort to combat multi-resistant tuberculosis, for which existing treatments don’t work. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - February 3, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Science News chemical and structural biology Elisabeth Campbell immunology RNA polymerase Seth Darst tuberculosis Virology and Microbiology Source Type: news

Discovery helps explain why only some people develop life-threatening dengue infections
After contracting dengue fever once, certain people who encounter the virus again develop much more severe infections. New research identifies an immunological signature that could help identify and better treat these patients. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - January 31, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News antibody-dependent enhancement dengue Fc region immunology Jeffrey Ravetch Jeffrey V. Ravetch Leonard Wagner Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Immunology Taia Wang Virology Source Type: news

This Is When You're Most Likely To Catch The Flu
If you’re wondering when you might get the flu, a new study indicates you should keep an eye on your local weather report. According to research published in the Journal of Clinical Virology, a season’s first cold snap below 37 degrees Fahrenheit (or zero degrees Celsius, as defined in the study) preceded a mass spread of the flu in Gothenberg, a large metropolitan area of Sweden. The researchers suggest that if you keep your eye on the weather and watch for the first major dip in the temperature, you can essentially mark your calendar in anticipation for an influx of the illness.  “We believe that t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Is Exactly When You're More Likely To Catch The Flu
By Amanda MacMillan Cases of flu are on the rise, according to a recent statement from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and experts are warning that this year’s flu season will be worse than last. Now, a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Virology is shedding some light on exactly how cold weather and the spread of viruses are linked. It turns out, seasonal flu outbreaks first appear each year about a week after the winter’s first cold spell — or at least that’s what happened in Sweden, over the course of three years when researchers tracked weather...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists learn how to ramp up microbes ’ ability to make memories
Researchers have identified a mutation that prompts bacterial cells to acquire genetic memories 100 times more frequently than they do naturally. This discovery provides a powerful research tool and could bring scientists one step closer to developing DNA-based data storage devices. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - January 4, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News biotechnology Cas9 CRISPR I473F immunology Laboratory of Bacteriology Luciano Marraffini microbiology Robert Heler synthetic biology Virology Source Type: news

Nigeria: Institute Urges Government to Raise Funding for HIV/Aids
[Guardian] Abuja -The Institute of Human Virology Nigeria has called on the Federal Government to develop a pool of fund to enable it to cope with the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the country instead of relying on grants from donors and partners. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - December 27, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Janssen reports positive results in Phase III combination trial to treat HIV
Janssen Sciences Ireland (Janssen) has reported positive results in the first of the two Phase III studies that evaluate the safety and efficacy of switching virologically suppressed patients from a three or four drug anti-retroviral regimen to the t … (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - December 21, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Advanced Cirrhosis Patients Respond to DAAs in Real-world Study
High sustained virologic response rates were seen among patients with decompensated cirrhosis in European compassionate care cohort. (Source: ConsultantLive)
Source: ConsultantLive - December 7, 2016 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Mark L. Fuerst Tags: Hepatitis C Source Type: news

UTMB researchers find how Ebola disables the immune system
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) A new study at The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston sheds light on how Ebola so effectively disables the human immune system. Virologist Alex Bukreyev, UTMB professor and senior author of the study, said the research team engineered versions of the Ebola virus in order to study how the components responsible for thwarting or disabling our immune defenses wreak their havoc. The findings are described in the new edition of PLOS Pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 6, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Occult HCV May Persist in Treated Patients After Liver Transplant Occult HCV May Persist in Treated Patients After Liver Transplant
Despite a sustained virologic response for 12 weeks (SVR12) to direct-acting antiviral agents for recurrent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection following liver transplantation, some patients continue to have occult infection.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines)
Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines - December 2, 2016 Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Pterosaurs Hijack Royal Society Evo Meeting
Image: Life in Utah; or, the Mysteries and Crimes of Mormonism, J. H. Beadle (1870) I brought some copies of my book, Royal Society: The Public Evolution Summit to London and passed them around the gathering of distinguished evolution enthusiasts at 7 Carlton House Terrace, anticipating that the November 7-9 Royal Society "new trends" conference would fall short of its billing. Indeed, one of the opening speakers referred to himself as representing the Jurassic Age of science and pointed out that the content of the previous speaker's lecture -- which put more than the jet-lagged in the audience to sleep...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Nigeria: Who Donates Polio Modular Laboratory to UCH
[Premium Times] The World Health Organisation, WHO, will on Friday hand over a new Modular Polio Laboratory to the premier polio laboratory in the Department of Virology, University of Ibadan, Oyo State. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 18, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Virologists unravel mystery of late C20th gibbon leukaemia outbreak
(University of Nottingham) The mystery of an outbreak of lymphoma and leukaemia in gibbon colonies in the US, Bermuda and Thailand in the late 1960s and early 1970s has been solved by animal disease detectives at The University of Nottingham. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 17, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Nigeria: WHO Donates Polio Lab to Uniibadan
[Daily Trust] The World Health Organization (WHO) will hand over a new modular polio laboratory to Nigeria's premier polio laboratory in the Department of Virology, University of Ibadan, Oyo state Friday. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 16, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Virological Response of Daclatasvir Plus Sofosbuvir for HCV Virological Response of Daclatasvir Plus Sofosbuvir for HCV
The results of this study support a regimen of daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir, with or without ribavirin, in patients with chronic HCV infection, including those with severe liver disease.Gut (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

DAA Combination Confirmed Highly Effective Against HCV in Real-word Setting
Sustained virologic response was seen in 99% of subjects, reflecting rates seen in pre-registration studies. Adverse events were mild. (Source: ConsultantLive)
Source: ConsultantLive - November 14, 2016 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Mark L. Fuerst Tags: Hepatitis C Source Type: news

DAA Combination Confirmed Highly Effective Against HCV in Real-world Setting
Sustained virologic response was seen in 99% of subjects, reflecting rates seen in pre-registration studies. Adverse events were mild. (Source: ConsultantLive)
Source: ConsultantLive - November 14, 2016 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Mark L. Fuerst Tags: Hepatitis C Source Type: news

Merck Announces Findings for Investigational Triple-Combination Chronic Hepatitis C Therapy Showing High Rates of Sustained Virologic Response in People with Genotypes 1, 2 or 3 Infection
Dateline City: KENILWORTH, N.J. Phase 2 Data Presentations at The Liver Meeting® Detail SVR12 Rates from Two Studies as Well as SVR8 Rates in Patients for Whom Direct-Acting Antiviral Treatment Previously FailedKENILWORTH, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Merck (NYSE:MRK), known as MSD outside of the United States and Canada, today announced the presentation of results from three Phase 2 clinical trials evaluating MK-3682B (MK-3682/grazoprevir/ruzasvir1), the company ’s investigational all-oral, triple-combination regimen for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection (informally referred ...
Source: Merck.com - Corporate News - November 13, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Hepatitis C Newsroom Corporate News Latest News #Merck #MRK $MRK MSD Source Type: news

A Promising Study Reveals New Hope For An HIV Cure
A new experimental HIV vaccine, when combined with a compound that stimulates a person’s immune system, demonstrated potential for a path to curing HIV. The small study, involving rhesus monkeys who had the monkey equivalent of HIV, revealed that this novel combination was effective at suppressing the virus to undetectable levels in a few of the subjects, without the need for antiretroviral treatments.  If the combination of the HIV vaccine and immune system compound is shown to be effective in people, it could mean one step toward a cure for HIV, said lead investigator Dan Barouch, director for the Center for V...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Promising Study Reveals New Hope For An HIV Cure
A new experimental HIV vaccine, when combined with a compound that stimulates a person’s immune system, demonstrated potential for a path to curing HIV. The small study, involving rhesus monkeys who had the monkey equivalent of HIV, revealed that this novel combination was effective at suppressing the virus to undetectable levels in a few of the subjects, without the need for antiretroviral treatments.  If the combination of the HIV vaccine and immune system compound is shown to be effective in people, it could mean one step toward a cure for HIV, said lead investigator Dan Barouch, director for the Center for V...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Investigational HIV therapeutic vaccine found to control SIV in preclinical studies
Researchers have found that an investigational treatment combining therapeutic vaccine and an immune stimulator was successful for improving virologic control and delay viral rebound after the discontinuation of anti-retroviral therapy (ART). (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - November 11, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Predators can drive increase in virus populations, new study shows
(University of Nebraska-Lincoln) In what scientists say could be a potential 'game-changer' in the study of virology, a new study shows that a predator's consumption of prey can catalyze the natural rise and fall of chlorovirus populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 10, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Investigational HIV therapeutic vaccine approach helps control SIV in preclinical studies
(The U.S. Military HIV Research Program (MHRP)) An investigational treatment combination of a therapeutic vaccine and an immune-stimulator improves virologic control and delays viral rebound following the discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy in non-human primates infected with SIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

NCI grant funds SMU research into cancer-causing viruses that hide from the immune system
(Southern Methodist University) The National Cancer Institute is funding research at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, into cancer-causing viruses that hide from the immune system. Genes common to both the human T-cell leukemia virus and high-risk human papillomaviruses activate survival mechanisms in cancer cells. SMU virologist and cancer researcher Robert Harrod leads his lab's effort to find ways to inhibit those genes to halt the development of cancer. The hope is to ultimately develop a chemotherapy drug. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 8, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

A Virus Mutation Is What Made The 2014 Ebola Outbreak So Deadly
The Ebola outbreak that devastated West Africa in 2014 was a product of multiple factors, including a population that relies increasingly on global travel, poverty and inadequate public health infrastructure on the ground and local burial practices that conflicted with medical advice. Now, we know about another factor that helped the outbreak spread: the virus mutated. Mutation is standard among viruses, and according to two cell model studies published in the journal Cell in November, an Ebola mutation may have allowed the virus to infect humans more easily than the original. The 2014 outbreak resulted in approximate...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

A Virus Mutation Is What Made The 2014 Ebola Outbreak So Deadly
The Ebola outbreak that devastated West Africa in 2014 was a product of multiple factors, including a population that relies increasingly on global travel, poverty and inadequate public health infrastructure on the ground and local burial practices that conflicted with medical advice. Now, we know about another factor that helped the outbreak spread: the virus mutated. Mutation is standard among viruses, and according to two cell model studies published in the journal Cell in November, an Ebola mutation may have allowed the virus to infect humans more easily than the original. The 2014 outbreak resulted in approximate...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news