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MERS Can Be Transmitted from Camel to Human, Study Confirms
Vienna virologists report finding coronavirus almost identical in both from same region Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Coronavirus Infections, International Health (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - May 6, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MERS: A Virologist's View From Saudi Arabia
Surge in cases caused by increase in testing and lack of hospital hygiene, says Christian Drosten (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 6, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Oral HCV Regimen Continues Strong Showing (CME/CE)
CHICAGO (MedPage Today) -- An all-oral antiviral combination led to sustained virologic response in more than 90% of patients with the most common type of hepatitis C virus in North America. (Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology)
Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology - May 5, 2014 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

The Anti-Vaxxers Simply Won’t Quit
It’s never easy to say oops. You know it if you’ve ever said something nasty during an argument and found it hard to apologize later. You know it if you’ve ever caused a fender bender on the road and been unable to say “my bad.” And you know it if you’ve ever failed to inoculate your baby against a range of disabling and deadly diseases that can be easily and harmlessly prevented with vaccines, in effect failing to perform the most basic job of parenthood, which is to keep your children safe. MoreMeasles Outbreaks Have Hit 13 States This Year, CDC Says‘Are Your Children Vaccinated?...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - May 5, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized anti-vaccinators extremists measles mumps Parents polio vaccines WHO whooping cough Source Type: news

Soy sauce molecule may unlock drug therapy for HIV patients
For HIV patients being treated with anti-AIDS medications, resistance to drug therapy regimens is commonplace. Often, patients develop resistance to first-line drug therapies, such as Tenofovir, and are forced to adopt more potent medications. Virologists now are testing the next generation of medications that stop HIV from spreading, and are using a molecule related to flavor enhancers found in soy sauce, to develop compounds that are more potent than Tenofovir. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 5, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Soy sauce molecule may unlock drug therapy for HIV patients
(University of Missouri-Columbia) For HIV patients being treated with anti-AIDS medications, resistance to drug therapy regimens is commonplace. Often, patients develop resistance to first-line drug therapies, such as Tenofovir, and are forced to adopt more potent medications. Virologists at the University of Missouri now are testing the next generation of medications that stop HIV from spreading, and are using a molecule related to flavor enhancers found in soy sauce, to develop compounds that are more potent than Tenofovir. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 5, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Oral HCV Regimen Continues Strong Showing
CHICAGO (MedPage Today) -- An all-oral antiviral combination led to sustained virologic response in more than 90% of patients with the most common type of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in North America. (Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology)
Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology - May 4, 2014 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Fears Rise Over MERS Outbreak While Saudis Fumble
The sudden spike in cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, in Saudi Arabia came soon after camel racing events at the Jenadriyah Festival in Riyadh. That suggested the surge in the incurable coronavirus, which resembles pneumonia but is fatal to one in three who contract it, confirmed what scientists already knew of the disease: that camels seem to be reservoirs for the virus, and transmit it to humans more easily than humans do to one another. MoreSaudi Arabia Confirms 20 New Cases of Deadly MERS VirusMERS Death Toll Climbs as Man Killed By Virus in Saudi ArabiaMen Charged With Toppling Ancient Rock Formation...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - April 22, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Karl Vick Tags: Uncategorized bird glue coronavirus H1N1 MERS middle east respiratory syndrome SARS Saudi Arabia Source Type: news

Researchers identify a new variant of Ebola virus in Guinea
In a new article, researchers have published their initial findings on the characteristics of the Ebola virus discovered in Guinea. Initial virological investigations enabled them to identify Zaire ebolavirus as the pathogen responsible for this epidemic. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 22, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Inserm and the Institut Pasteur identify a new variant of Ebola virus in Guinea
(INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale)) In an article which appeared in The New England journal of Medicine on 16 April, researchers from Inserm and the Institut Pasteur have published their initial findings on the characteristics of the Ebola virus discovered in Guinea. Initial virological investigations enabled them to identify Zaire ebolavirus as the pathogen responsible for this epidemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 22, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Community-based HIV prevention can boost testing, help reduce new infections
Communities in Africa and Thailand that worked together on HIV-prevention efforts saw not only a rise in HIV screening but a drop in new infections, according to a new study in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet Global Health.   The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health's Project Accept — a trial conducted by the HIV Prevention Trials Network to test a combination of social, behavioral and structural HIV-prevention interventions — demonstrated that a series of community efforts boosted the number of people tested for HIV and resulted in a 14 percent reduction in new HIV infections, compared ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 18, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Community-based HIV prevention can boost testing, help reduce new infections
Communities in Africa and Thailand that worked together on HIV-prevention efforts saw not only a rise in HIV screening but a drop in new infections, according to a new study in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet Global Health.   The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health's Project Accept — a trial conducted by the HIV Prevention Trials Network to test a combination of social, behavioral and structural HIV-prevention interventions — demonstrated that a series of community efforts boosted the number of people tested for HIV and resulted in a 14 percent reduction in new HIV infections, compared with contr...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 14, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New hepatitis C drug treatment 'shows promise'
Conclusion Although designed as an RCT, the study had an analysis of drug effectiveness that becomes more like a single cohort of people receiving an active treatment, with no comparison arm. People were assigned to the five-drug combination or matching placebos for 12 weeks. During this time, the side effects in both treatment groups were monitored and these could be compared, with itching and anaemia occurring more commonly in the active treatment group. However, the double-blind drug treatment period was completed at 12 weeks and response outcomes were then assessed 12 weeks later. Twelve weeks later, the active treatm...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 14, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Medical practice Source Type: news

New hepatitis C drug treatment 'shows promise'
Conclusion Although designed as an RCT, the study had an analysis of drug effectiveness that becomes more like a single cohort of people receiving an active treatment, with no comparison arm. People were assigned to the five-drug combination or matching placebos for 12 weeks. During this time, the side effects in both treatment groups were monitored and these could be compared, with itching and anaemia occurring more commonly in the active treatment group. However, the double-blind drug treatment period was completed at 12 weeks and response outcomes were then assessed 12 weeks later. Twelve weeks later, the active treatm...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 14, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Medical practice Source Type: news

Being Creative with Sickle Cell Disease
When Cindy Hahn was a young girl, her father, a virologist, used to let her sit at his microscope and look at immune cells fighting a pig virus. The pig virus sticks in her memory; it sparked a passion for science she is now pursuing as an MD-PhD student at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - April 10, 2014 Category: Hospital Management Authors: derik.hertel at dartmouth.edu (Derik Hertel) Source Type: news

Leading virologists join together to address urgent viral threat
(Global Virus Network) Causing victims to suffer severe fever and pain, chikungunya virus has reached the Caribbean and South America and is predicted to soon cause outbreaks in the United States. The Global Virus Network (GVN), whose scientific director includes virologist, Dr. Robert Gallo, will announce the formation of the GVN Chikungunya Task Force. The announcement coincides with World Health Day -- April 7: Vector-borne diseases are the theme and Chikungunya is spread by vector-borne mosquitoes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 7, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chikungunya poised to invade the Americas
(American Society for Microbiology) A team of French and Brazilian researchers warn that chikungunya virus is poised to invade, and become epidemic in the Americas according to research published ahead of print in the Journal of Virology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 7, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Preparation of Herpes Simplex Virus-Infected Primary Neurons for Transmission Electron Microscopy
Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides the resolution necessary to identify both viruses and subcellular components of cells infected with many types of viruses, including herpes simplex virus. Recognized as a powerful tool in both diagnostic and research-based virology laboratories, TEM has made possible the identification of new viruses and has contributed to the elucidation of virus life cycle and virus–host cell interaction. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - April 3, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study fingers chickens, quail, in spread of H7N9 influenza virus
Among the copious species of poultry in China, quail and chickens are the likely sources of infection of H7N9 influenza virus to humans, according to a paper published ahead of print in the Journal of Virology."Knowing the likely poultry species lets us target our interventions better to prevent human infections," says corresponding author David Suarez, of the United States Department of Agriculture.The H7N9 avian influenza virus was first reported in humans in March 2013 in China. Since then over 375 human cases have been confirmed and over 100 have died. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 20, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Bird Flu / Avian Flu Source Type: news

Study fingers chickens, quail, in spread of H7N9 influenza virus
(American Society for Microbiology) Among the copious species of poultry in China, quail and chickens are the likely sources of infection of H7N9 influenza virus to humans, according to a paper published ahead of print in the Journal of Virology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 18, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Role of Human Papillomaviruses in Esophageal CarcinomaRole of Human Papillomaviruses in Esophageal Carcinoma
Studies have shown that HPV increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma at least threefold. What impact could vaccines have on prevention? Future Virology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 11, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

New 96-Week ACTG Study Results Presented at CROI 2014; First Large Study Comparing ISENTRESS® (raltegravir) Regimen to Two Protease Inhibitor Regimens in Previously Untreated Adults with HIV-1
Dateline City: BOSTON BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Merck (NYSE:MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, said today that in a new 96-week, open-label AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) study designed to compare three different NNRTI-sparing HIV regimens in treatment-naïve patients – one containing Merck’s twice-daily ISENTRESS® (raltegravir) and two containing different once-daily ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors, atazanavir and darunavir -- all three regimens achieved high and equivalent levels of efficacy, as measured by time to...
Source: Merck.com - Product News - March 5, 2014 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Prescription Medicine News Corporate News Latest News Source Type: news

New 96-Week ACTG Study Results Presented at CROI 2014; First Large Study Comparing ISENTRESS® (raltegravir) Regimen to Two Protease Inhibitor Regimens in Previously Untreated Adults with HIV-1
Dateline City: BOSTON BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Merck (NYSE:MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, said today that in a new 96-week, open-label AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) study designed to compare three different NNRTI-sparing HIV regimens in treatment-naïve patients – one containing Merck’s twice-daily ISENTRESS® (raltegravir) and two containing different once-daily ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors, atazanavir and darunavir -- all three regimens achieved high and equivalent levels of efficacy, as measured by time t...
Source: Merck.com - Research and Development News - March 5, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Research and Development News Source Type: news

Dr. Gary J. Nabel
Chief Scientific Officer for SanofiDr. Nabel has an extensive and distinguished background of academic and hospital appointments, and committee memberships including numerous prestigious awards and honors and an extensive publication record. He graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1975 and continued his graduate studies at Harvard University, completing his Ph.D. in 1980 and his M.D. in 1982. He served as a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of David Baltimore at MIT’s Whitehead Institute. Before his appointment at the Vaccine Research Center, Dr. Nabel served as the Henry Sewall Professor of Internal...
Source: PHRMA - February 28, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Sabrina Source Type: news

Light zaps viruses: How photosensitization can stop viruses from infecting cells
A UCLA-led team of researchers has found evidence that photosensitizing a virus's membrane covering can inhibit its ability to enter cells and potentially lead to the development of stronger, cheaper medications to fight a host of tough viruses.   The UCLA AIDS Institute study, published in the February issue of the Journal of Virology, is part of ongoing research on a compound called LJ001, a "broad-spectrum" antiviral that can attack a wide range of microbes.   The current paper advances the science by showing that the process of photosensitization — heightening a biological organism's sens...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 28, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Françoise Barré-Sinoussi: 'Ruling out a cure for Aids would not be French'
The scientist who helped discover the HIV retrovirus talks about her work and why she is convinced a cure for Aids can be foundFor Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, San Francisco holds poignant memories. The Nobel prize-winning virologist based at the Pasteur Institute in Paris is attending a conference on how to rid the world of Aids. But the city reminds her of the terrible early years of the disease. She first met a person dying from Aids in a hospital in San Francisco in 1984. "It was a very moving moment," she recalls. "He told me, 'Thank you' and I didn't understand why. So I asked and he said, '...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Zoë Corbyn Tags: Medical research Nobel prizes Society Features Aids and HIV The Observer Science Source Type: news

Long distance signals protect brain from viral infections
(American Society for Microbiology) The brain contains a defense system that prevents at least two unrelated viruses -- and possibly many more -- from invading the brain at large. The research is published online ahead of print in the Journal of Virology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 10, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Effects of TB Treatment on Virologic and CD4 Response to ARTEffects of TB Treatment on Virologic and CD4 Response to ART
Does TB treatment at ART initiation affect virologic and CD4 count response in HIV-infected adults? AIDS (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - January 27, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV/AIDS Journal Article Source Type: news

Daclatasvir–sofosbuvir combo effective in chronic HCV infection
Research shows that the combination of daclatasvir and sofosbuvir leads to high rates of sustained virologic response in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection, including those who have not responded to previous therapy. (Source: MedWire News - Gastroenterology)
Source: MedWire News - Gastroenterology - January 24, 2014 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

FASEB announces 2014 Science Research Conference: Virus Structure and Assembly
(Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology) This 2014 FASEB Science Research Conference focuses on structural virology and the application of structure to our understanding of the progression of events that are the virus lifecycle: receptor binding, entry, intracellular trafficking, uncoating, replication, assembly, and exit. Virus assembly includes the process of constructing virions and of marshaling host resources for that purpose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 22, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bacteria-invading virus yields new discoveries
(Florida State University) Innovative work by two Florida State University scientists that shows the structural and DNA breakdown of a bacteria-invading virus is being featured on the cover of the February issue of the journal Virology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 10, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Robert Gallo, Co-Discoverer of HIV, Weighs In on "Functional Cures"
When perusing the newswires today, we couldn't help but stop on an interview with Robert Gallo conducted by Dan Rodricks of The Baltimore Sun. Gallo, the virologist who is credited with the co-discovery of the HIV virus alongside Luc Montagner and Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, has always been shrouded in this thin veil of controversy. Not only because of the lingering contentions as to who-really-discovered-what in isolating and identifying the HIV virus, but because he frequently takes the contrarian view as to the direction current research is taking....Read Full Post (Source: About AIDS / HIV)
Source: About AIDS / HIV - January 6, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Quidel Receives FDA Clearance for Its Hand-Held Molecular Diagnostic Test - AmpliVue(R) Group B Strep Assay
SAN DIEGO, CA--(Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) - Quidel Corporation (NASDAQ: QDEL), a provider of rapid diagnostic testing solutions, cellular-based virology assays and molecular diagnostic systems, announced today that it has received 510(k) cleara... Diagnostics, FDAQuidel, AmpliVue, Strep assay, Streptococcus (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - December 30, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Researchers identify new anti-HIV drug target
University of Minnesota researchers have discovered a first-of-its-kind series of compounds possessing anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity. The compounds present a new target for potential HIV drug development and future treatment options.Complete findings are printed in today's issue of the Journal of Virology.The compounds, known as ribonucleoside analogs 8-azaadenosine, formycin A, 3-deazauridine, 5-fluorocytidine and 2'-C-methylcytidine, were found to stop the replication and spread of HIV by blocking HIV DNA synthesis or by inducing lethal mutagenesis. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: HIV / AIDS Source Type: news

Nigeria: HIV/Aids - Institute Offers Treatment for 28,000 People in 2013
[Leadership]The Institute of Human Virology, Nigeria (IHVN) says that it has placed no fewer than 28,000 persons living with HIV and AIDS on treatment this year. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 27, 2013 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Critics of H5N1 Studies Lobby European Commission
Virologists' letter in support of Ron Fouchier was "misleading," 56 scientists write (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - December 20, 2013 Category: Science Source Type: news

Recent HIV/AIDS News from NIAID, NIH, and FDA
December 18, 2013: Animal Vaccine Study Yields Insights That May Advance HIV Vaccine Research “A vaccine study in monkeys designed to identify measurable signs that the animals were protected from infection by SIV, the monkey version of HIV, as well as the mechanism of such protection has yielded numerous insights that may advance HIV vaccine research.” Read the NIAID press release.   December 17, 2013: NIH Names Leadership, Research Units for Restructured HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Networks “Principal investigators and clinical trials units (CTUs) have been chosen to lead and conduc...
Source: AIDSinfo At-a-Glance: Offering Information on HIV/AIDS Treatment, Prevention, and Research, A Service of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) - December 20, 2013 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New anti-HIV drug target identified by University of Minnesota researchers
(University of Minnesota Academic Health Center) University of Minnesota researchers have discovered a first-of-its-kind series of compounds possessing anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity. The compounds present a new target for potential HIV drug development and future treatment options. Complete findings are printed in today's issue of the Journal of Virology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Gilead obtains FDA approval for expanded indication of single tablet HIV-1 regimen Complera
Gilead Sciences has received approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its once-daily single tablet HIV-1 regimen Complera, for use in certain virologically suppressed adult patients on a stable antiretroviral regimen to replace the… (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - December 17, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Collaborating proteins allow Nipah virus to 'break into' cells
Scientists from Washington State University claim to have discovered how one of the planet's most deadly viruses uses teamwork to "break into" the human cell.Virologist Hector Aguilar-Carreno and his team of researchers were studying how the Paramyxovirus family of viruses, which includes the deadly Nipah virus (NiV), infiltrate cells. The results, published in PLOS Pathogens, reveal that two proteins on the surface of the virus collaborate to gain entry to the cell. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

Suppressed but Still InfectiousSuppressed but Still Infectious
HIV RNA can still be detected in the semen of men, despite being on suppressive ART. What are the HIV transmission rates in these patients? Future Virology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 9, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Identification of emerging threats may be aided by 1950s pandemic bird flu virus
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have evidence that descendants of the H2N2 avian influenza A virus that killed millions worldwide in the 1950s still pose a threat to human health, particularly to those under 50. The research has been published in an advance online edition of the Journal of Virology.The study included 22 H2N2 avian viruses collected from domestic poultry and wild aquatic birds between 1961 and 2008, making it the most comprehensive analysis yet of avian H2N2 viruses.Researchers reported the viruses could infect human respiratory cells. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Bird Flu / Avian Flu Source Type: news

1950s pandemic influenza virus remains a health threat, particularly to those under 50
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have evidence that descendants of the H2N2 avian influenza A virus that killed millions worldwide in the 1950s still pose a threat to human health, particularly to those under 50. The research has been published in an advance online edition of the Journal of Virology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 3, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Study: Antiviral Treatment Effective against CFS; polyDNA Recommends...
A study published on August 19, 2013 in the Journal of Medical Virology found that valganciclovir (VGCV) “may have clinical benefit in a subset of CFS patients (1).” polyDNA reviews the literature on...(PRWeb November 27, 2013)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/11/prweb11366523.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - November 28, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

HCV Viral Load at Baseline Sets Need for Protease Inhibitors (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Hepatitis C genotype I patients with low viral load and sustained virologic response may be able to cut protease inhibitors from therapy, researchers found. (Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology)
Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology - November 27, 2013 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

One Health: The Human-Animal-Environment Interfaces in Emerging Infectious Diseases
Food Safety and Security, and International and National Plans for Implementation of One Health Activitiesseries:Current Topics in Microbiology and ImmunologyThe second volume on One Health explains in detail how to implement three key aspects of the One Health paradigm—food safety and security, national plans for a holistic one health approach, and relevant new technologies and approaches. The fourteen chapters, each by an internationally recognized authority, are organized into three sections of four or five chapters each, that break new ground ... (Source: Springer Biomedical Sciences titles)
Source: Springer Biomedical Sciences titles - November 24, 2013 Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Virology Source Type: news

On This Day in Science History - November 17 - Hans Zinsser
November 17th is Hans Zinsser's birthday. Zinsser was an American virologist who built his career on the typhus fever. He traveled the world with the Red Cross investigating outbreaks of ...Read Full Post (Source: About.com Chemistry)
Source: About.com Chemistry - November 16, 2013 Category: Chemistry Source Type: news

Dr. Robert Gallo named first Homer & Martha Gudelsky Distinguished Professor in Medicine
(University of Maryland Medical Center) Robert C. Gallo, M.D., has been named the first Homer & Martha Gudelsky Distinguished Professor in Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine during a ceremony November 7. The ceremony also honored the Gudelsky Family Foundation for their extraordinary generosity in supporting the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, MD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 12, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Vaccine fraud exposed: Measles and mumps making a huge comeback because vaccines are designed to fail, say Merck virologists
Disclaimer: I am not an opponent of the theory of inoculation. Nor am I opposed to science. What I am opposed to is fraudulent science, and that's what this article is all about. Measles and mumps are making a huge comeback in the United States, but doctors and journalists... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news