MERS: Low transmissibility, dangerous illness
(University of Bonn) The MERS coronavirus has caused disease outbreaks across the Arabian Peninsula and spread to Europe several times. The severe pneumonia virus has claimed the lives of several hundred people since its discovery in 2012. An international team of researchers led by virologists from the University of Bonn have now come to the conclusion, through direct observation, that the rate of human transmission is low. Still, a third of infected persons with symptoms die. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 29, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Raltegravir in Virologically Suppressed Overweight WomenRaltegravir in Virologically Suppressed Overweight Women
When women with central adiposity switch to RAL from a PI or NNRTI, they could experience a significant decrease in sCD14. HIV Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 25, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: HIV/AIDS Journal Article Source Type: news

Second doctor in Sierra Leone dies of Ebola
Dr. Modupeh Cole's death comes just two weeks after the loss of a leading virologist in the country (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - August 14, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa's first encounter with Ebola: A virologist's tale, part I
Peter Piot reveals the "reckless" methods by which a small lab in Belgium first identified the lethal Ebola virus in 1976 (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 11, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Switching Antiretrovirals May Not Enhance HIV TreatmentSwitching Antiretrovirals May Not Enhance HIV Treatment
Changing treatment when the viral load is suppressed can increase the risk for subsequent virologic failure, new research shows. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - August 8, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV/AIDS News Source Type: news

UTMB receives over $6 million to develop treatment for deadly Ebola and Marburg viruses
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) A University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researcher virologist Alex Bukreyev, professor of pathology, has been awarded two National Institutes of Health grants and a Department of Defense grant totaling more than $6 million to develop experimental drugs against both Ebola and Marburg. Each funded study involves collaborations among teams with different areas of expertise led by Christopher Basler, professor of microbiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 8, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

High HCV Response Rates With Daclatasvir/AsunaprevirHigh HCV Response Rates With Daclatasvir/Asunaprevir
A combination of daclatasvir plus asunaprevir yielded high rates of sustained virological response (SVR) in treatment-naive patients with hepatitis C 1B infection, including those with cirrhosis, in a multinational phase III trial. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 7, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Taxis, Planes and Viruses: How Deadly Ebola Can SpreadTaxis, Planes and Viruses: How Deadly Ebola Can Spread
For scientists tracking the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa, it's not about complex virology and genotyping but about how contagious microbes - like humans - use planes, bikes and taxis to spread. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 31, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Ebola risk low in England
PHE continues to work with the World Health Organisation and a wide range of partners including UNICEF and Médecins Sans Frontières to provide support to the affected countries. By the end of August, PHE will have deployed 10 staff to the affected areas, providing virological and epidemiological support. More .... (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - July 31, 2014 Category: UK Health Authors: Maria Axford Source Type: news

Ebola outbreak 'could reach UK'
A top virologist has warned that Ebola will "eventually reach the UK" but insisted it is hard to catch (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - July 30, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Sheik Umar Khan Liberia virus ebola outbreak symptoms Sierra Leone west Africa doctor Source Type: news

Ebola outbreak 'could reach UK'
A top virologist has warned that Ebola will "eventually reach the UK" but insisted it is hard to catch (Source: The Telegraph : Health Advice)
Source: The Telegraph : Health Advice - July 30, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Sheik Umar Khan Liberia virus ebola outbreak symptoms Sierra Leone west Africa doctor Source Type: news

Burnet and ARTES partner to develop new vaccine for malaria
Australia's largest virology and communicable disease research centre Burnet Institute has partnered with ARTES Biotechnology to develop a new vaccine to treat malaria. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - July 28, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Quidel Receives FDA Clearance for Its Hand-Held Molecular Diagnostic Test for Group A Strep
SAN DIEGO, CA--(Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) - Quidel Corporation (NASDAQ: QDEL), a provider of rapid diagnostic testing solutions, cellular-based virology assays and molecular diagnostic systems, announced today that it has received clearance fro... Diagnostics, FDAQuidel, AmpliVue, Streptococcus (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - July 28, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Herpes remains active even when no symptoms appear
(Australian National University) A large percentage of people carry the herpes virus -- and although it mostly seems dormant, Australian National University virologists have found our cells are having to fight the virus constantly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 28, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Ebola virus disease, West Africa – update
WHO continues to monitor the evolution of the Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea. The Ebola epidemic trend remains precarious, with community and health-facility transmissions of infection still taking place. Between 21 and 23 July 2014, 96 new cases and 7 deaths were reported from Liberia and Sierra Leone. In Guinea, 12 new cases and 5 deaths were reported during the same period. These include suspect, probable, and laboratory-confirmed cases. The surge in the number of new EVD cases in Guinea after weeks of low viral activity demonstrates that undetected chains of transmission existed...
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - July 27, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola virus, ebola fever, ebola virus disease, ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola virus, ebola fever, ebola virus disease, ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola virus, ebola fever, ebola virus disease, ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola viru Source Type: news

Rx Switching Tied to HIV Viral Breakthrough
(MedPage Today) -- MELBOURNE, Australia -- Patients on stable antiretroviral regimens who switch to another therapy have a significantly increased risk of experiencing HIV virologic failure, a retrospective database analysis suggested. (Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease)
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - July 24, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Top Ebola doctor in Sierra Leone contracts virus
Sheik Umar Khan, a virologist who has treated over 100 people sickened with the deadly disease that has no cure, is now fighting for his life (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 23, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Montreal hosts International Union of Microbiology Societies congresses
(INRS) Emerging infectious diseases, vaccination, antibiotic resistance, and cheating in science are among the topics to be discussed by leading bacteriology, virology, and mycology experts in Montreal at the three International Union of Microbiological Societies congresses from July 27 to August 1, 2014. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Combination treatment for hep C associated with favorable response among HIV patients
HIV-infected patients also infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) who received a combination of the medications sofosbuvir plus ribavirin had high rates of sustained HCV virologic response 12 weeks after cessation of therapy, according to a study. Up to 7 million persons worldwide are infected with both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 19, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Combination treatment for Hep C associated with favorable response among patients with HIV
(The JAMA Network Journals) HIV-infected patients also infected with hepatitis C virus who received a combination of the medications sofosbuvir plus ribavirin had high rates of sustained HCV virologic response 12 weeks after cessation of therapy, according to a study in the July 23/30 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 19, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Serum Carnitine Level in Chronic Viral HepatitisSerum Carnitine Level in Chronic Viral Hepatitis
What is the relationship between serum carnitine levels and chronic viral hepatitis? Future Virology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 2, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Scientist recreates H1N1 flu virus RESISTANT to vaccine
Dr Yoshihiro Kawaoka, professor of virology at University of Wisconsin at Madison, has tweaked the 2009 strain of pandemic influenza to make it resistant the human immune system's antibodies. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 2, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Expat virologist takes to YouTube to challenge “pseudoscience” behind Egyptian devices
Military-supported devices claim to noninvasively detect viruses in blood and treat infected people (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 30, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Evolution of equine influenza led to canine offshoot which could mix with human influenza
(American Society for Microbiology) Equine influenza viruses from the early 2000s can easily infect the respiratory tracts of dogs, while those from the 1960s are only barely able to, according to research published ahead of print in the Journal of Virology. The research also suggests that canine and human influenza viruses can mix, and generate new influenza viruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Leading virologists join together to tackle viruses, leukemia and neurologic disorders
(Global Virus Network) GVN announces launch of Task Force on HTLV, Human T-Lymphotropic Virus (HTLV). Experts from 11 countries, led by Dr. Robert Gallo, GVN co-founder/scientific director and director of the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Dr. Luc Willems (Research Director, National Fund for Scientific Research at University of Liège) and Dr. Hideki Hasegawa (Director, Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Japan) met last month. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 17, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Unboosted ATV vs Ritonavir-Boosted PI Maintenance TherapyUnboosted ATV vs Ritonavir-Boosted PI Maintenance Therapy
This meta-analysis compares unboosted atazanavir with ritonavir-boosted PI for long-term antiretroviral therapy in adults with virological suppression. HIV Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 10, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: HIV/AIDS Journal Article Source Type: news

Reverse Genetics of Influenza Virus
Reverse genetics is the creation of a virus from a full-length cDNA copy of the viral genome, referred to as an “infectious clone,” and is one of the most powerful genetic tools in modern virology. Since its development in 1999, plasmid-based reverse genetics has been effectively applied to numerous aspects of influenza studies which include revolutionizing the production of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine seed strains. Although continual improvement in reverse genetics system is being made in different laboratories for the efficient rescue of the influenza virus, the basic concept of synthesizing viral...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - June 6, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Hemorrhagic Fevers Can Be Caused by Body's Antiviral Interferon Response
Virologists and immunologists have found a major clue to the mystery of “hemorrhagic fever” syndromes. The team showed that Interferon Type I immune proteins are key drivers of a viral syndrome in mice that closely mimics human hemorrhagic fevers. Hemorrhagic fevers caused by Lassa, dengue and other viruses affect more than one million people annually and are often fatal, yet scientists, until now, have never understood why only some virus-infected people come down with the disease and others do not. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 4, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hemorrhagic fevers can be caused by body's antiviral interferon response
(Scripps Research Institute) Virologists and immunologists at The Scripps Research Institute have found a major clue to the mystery of 'hemorrhagic fever' syndromes. The team showed that Interferon Type I immune proteins are key drivers of a viral syndrome in mice that closely mimics human hemorrhagic fevers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 4, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

SLU virologists harness adenovirus to kill breast cancer cells
(Saint Louis University) Saint Louis University researcher Maurice Green, Ph.D., hopes to tame the adenovirus's ability to kill cancer cells in order to use it as a therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Antiviral Vaginal Rings for Preventing HIV in WomenAntiviral Vaginal Rings for Preventing HIV in Women
Could this device be the solution to HIV prevention in women? Future Virology (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - May 21, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: HIV/AIDS Journal Article Source Type: news

Nigeria: Lassa Fever - Ebonyi NMA Sends SoS to FG
[Independent]Abakaliki -The Nigeria Medical Association (NMA), Ebonyi State branch, rose from meeting at the Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki (FETHA2), on Saturday with a call to the Federal Government to, as a matter of emergency, establish a virology diagnosis centre in the South East geo-political zone to save the inhabitants of the area from Lassa fever. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 19, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Being Creative with Sickle Cell Disease
When Cindy Hahn was a young girl, her father, a virologist, used to let her sit at his microscope and look at immune cells fighting a pig virus. Watching that pig virus sparked a passion for science she is now pursuing as an MD-PhD student. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - May 10, 2014 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Kate Villars Tags: Education News blood disease Christopher Lowrey Cindy Hahn sickle cell students Source Type: news

Keep Or Kill Last Lab Stocks Of Smallpox? Time To Decide, Says WHO
"If smallpox is outlawed, only outlaws will have smallpox," says one NIH virologist. Others say keeping vials of deadly virus just invites a horrific accident or theft. WHO is about to vote — again.» E-Mail This (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 9, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'3D' Combination Effective for Hep C Even Without Ribavirin'3D' Combination Effective for Hep C Even Without Ribavirin
The interferon-free regimen led to high rates of sustained virologic response both with and without the addition of ribavirin. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines - May 9, 2014 Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS): Threats Posed by the Virus (WSJ video)
An Indiana patient with the first case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) reported in the U.S. is stable. But the MERS virus has proved deadly elsewhere. What kind of threat does the virus present? Columbia University's Dr. W. Ian Lipkin discusses with the WSJ:MERS was first identified in June 2012. Arabian camels were recently identified as the source of the respiratory virus. To date, there have been 401 confirmed cases of MERS in 12 countries, but all the cases originated in 6 countries in the Arabian Peninsula. More than 100 people have died. New research has confirmed that camels can transmit the deadly MERS v...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - May 8, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Infectious Diseases WSJ Source Type: news

MERS Can Be Transmitted From Camel to Human, Study Confirms
Vienna virologists report finding coronavirus almost identical in both from same region (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - May 6, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MERS Can Be Transmitted from Camel to Human, Study Confirms
Vienna virologists report finding coronavirus almost identical in both from same region Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Coronavirus Infections, International Health (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - May 6, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MERS: A Virologist's View From Saudi Arabia
Surge in cases caused by increase in testing and lack of hospital hygiene, says Christian Drosten (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 6, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Oral HCV Regimen Continues Strong Showing (CME/CE)
CHICAGO (MedPage Today) -- An all-oral antiviral combination led to sustained virologic response in more than 90% of patients with the most common type of hepatitis C virus in North America. (Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology)
Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology - May 5, 2014 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

The Anti-Vaxxers Simply Won’t Quit
It’s never easy to say oops. You know it if you’ve ever said something nasty during an argument and found it hard to apologize later. You know it if you’ve ever caused a fender bender on the road and been unable to say “my bad.” And you know it if you’ve ever failed to inoculate your baby against a range of disabling and deadly diseases that can be easily and harmlessly prevented with vaccines, in effect failing to perform the most basic job of parenthood, which is to keep your children safe. MoreMeasles Outbreaks Have Hit 13 States This Year, CDC Says‘Are Your Children Vaccinated?...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - May 5, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized anti-vaccinators extremists measles mumps Parents polio vaccines WHO whooping cough Source Type: news

Soy sauce molecule may unlock drug therapy for HIV patients
For HIV patients being treated with anti-AIDS medications, resistance to drug therapy regimens is commonplace. Often, patients develop resistance to first-line drug therapies, such as Tenofovir, and are forced to adopt more potent medications. Virologists now are testing the next generation of medications that stop HIV from spreading, and are using a molecule related to flavor enhancers found in soy sauce, to develop compounds that are more potent than Tenofovir. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 5, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Soy sauce molecule may unlock drug therapy for HIV patients
(University of Missouri-Columbia) For HIV patients being treated with anti-AIDS medications, resistance to drug therapy regimens is commonplace. Often, patients develop resistance to first-line drug therapies, such as Tenofovir, and are forced to adopt more potent medications. Virologists at the University of Missouri now are testing the next generation of medications that stop HIV from spreading, and are using a molecule related to flavor enhancers found in soy sauce, to develop compounds that are more potent than Tenofovir. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 5, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Oral HCV Regimen Continues Strong Showing
CHICAGO (MedPage Today) -- An all-oral antiviral combination led to sustained virologic response in more than 90% of patients with the most common type of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in North America. (Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology)
Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology - May 4, 2014 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Fears Rise Over MERS Outbreak While Saudis Fumble
The sudden spike in cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, in Saudi Arabia came soon after camel racing events at the Jenadriyah Festival in Riyadh. That suggested the surge in the incurable coronavirus, which resembles pneumonia but is fatal to one in three who contract it, confirmed what scientists already knew of the disease: that camels seem to be reservoirs for the virus, and transmit it to humans more easily than humans do to one another. MoreSaudi Arabia Confirms 20 New Cases of Deadly MERS VirusMERS Death Toll Climbs as Man Killed By Virus in Saudi ArabiaMen Charged With Toppling Ancient Rock Formation...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - April 22, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Karl Vick Tags: Uncategorized bird glue coronavirus H1N1 MERS middle east respiratory syndrome SARS Saudi Arabia Source Type: news

Researchers identify a new variant of Ebola virus in Guinea
In a new article, researchers have published their initial findings on the characteristics of the Ebola virus discovered in Guinea. Initial virological investigations enabled them to identify Zaire ebolavirus as the pathogen responsible for this epidemic. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 22, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Inserm and the Institut Pasteur identify a new variant of Ebola virus in Guinea
(INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale)) In an article which appeared in The New England journal of Medicine on 16 April, researchers from Inserm and the Institut Pasteur have published their initial findings on the characteristics of the Ebola virus discovered in Guinea. Initial virological investigations enabled them to identify Zaire ebolavirus as the pathogen responsible for this epidemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 22, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Community-based HIV prevention can boost testing, help reduce new infections
Communities in Africa and Thailand that worked together on HIV-prevention efforts saw not only a rise in HIV screening but a drop in new infections, according to a new study in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet Global Health.   The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health's Project Accept — a trial conducted by the HIV Prevention Trials Network to test a combination of social, behavioral and structural HIV-prevention interventions — demonstrated that a series of community efforts boosted the number of people tested for HIV and resulted in a 14 percent reduction in new HIV infections, compared ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 18, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Community-based HIV prevention can boost testing, help reduce new infections
Communities in Africa and Thailand that worked together on HIV-prevention efforts saw not only a rise in HIV screening but a drop in new infections, according to a new study in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet Global Health.   The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health's Project Accept — a trial conducted by the HIV Prevention Trials Network to test a combination of social, behavioral and structural HIV-prevention interventions — demonstrated that a series of community efforts boosted the number of people tested for HIV and resulted in a 14 percent reduction in new HIV infections, compared with contr...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 14, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news