Improving the treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders: new directions for research and practice
Anxiety disorders are among the most common conditions affecting children and adolescents, and they are linked to numerous poor outcomes over time. Although both CBT and SSRI medication have proven efficacious, a significant proportion of youth fail to respond and relapse is common over the long term. Thus, there remains a need to better understand strategies for optimizing outcomes in the treatment of pediatric anxiety. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tara S. Peris, John T. Walkup Tags: Symposium 2 Source Type: research

2.1 utility of assessing development and incorporating novel technologies in the treatment of young adults with anxiety disorders
Anxiety disorders in college-age young adults (YAs) are highly disabling and associated with increased risk for comorbidity and long-term dependencies. Accurate diagnosis is hampered by underreporting of symptoms when observational data are absent and developmental functioning is not assessed. The Launching Emerging Adults Program (LEAP) aims to improve prescriptive cognitive-behavioral treatment by targeting specific symptoms and impairments through contextually based methods. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Anne Marie Albano Source Type: research

2.2 novel technology-based intervention for pediatric ocd and anxiety
By some estimates, less than 20 percent of youth with clinical anxiety or OCD receive effective treatment for their disorder because of their inability to access quality care. The accelerating proliferation of technology-based child mental health applications has the potential to not only increase access to treatment for clinical care, especially in underserved areas, but also enhance the quality of care. At the same time, only a small fraction of existing applications uses approaches rooted in the evidence base or are formally tested for efficacy. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John Piacentini Source Type: research

2.3 pharmacotherapy for anxiety disorders: beyond ssris
The goal of this session is to compare and summarize the efficacy and tolerability of SSRI medications in children and adolescents with generalized, separation, and social anxiety disorders. Although SSRIs are effective in many anxious youth, nearly 40 percent of pediatric patients with generalized, separation, and/or social anxiety disorders fail to experience remission with SSRI treatment. However, the evidence for “next step” interventions and alternative pharmacotherapy is unclear. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jeffrey Robert Strawn Source Type: research

2.4 maximizing the success of exposure therapy: strategies for improving practice
Exposure tasks are viewed widely as the central active ingredient of CBT for child and adolescent anxiety. However, relatively limited research has considered which aspects of exposure are most important for predicting outcomes. Such information is vital for guiding its application in therapy and aiding in dissemination efforts. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tara S. Peris Source Type: research

Novel approaches to inform treatment decisions in child psychiatry: steps toward personalized medicine
Although the DSM-5 provides diagnostic categories that can be reliably assessed, these categories are far from being homogeneous. Heterogeneity in clinical course, comorbidities, genotype, and brain circuitry greatly affects prognosis and may have important treatment implications. In these talks, we take a transdiagnostic approach to describe efforts to examine this heterogeneity and how this may eventually lead to more personalized treatment decisions. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Danella Hafeman, Argyris Stringaris Tags: Symposium 3 Source Type: research

3.1 traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors are associated with brain function and structure in adolescents with bipolar disorder: potential treatment targets and/or subgroup classifiers?
Obesity is associated with brain structure in youth with bipolar disorder (BD), but functional correlates are unknown. There is endothelial dysfunction, a progenitor of atherosclerosis, in adults with mood disorders. However, endothelial function (EF) has not been examined in relation to brain structure in BD. We sought to extend the knowledge base linking these cardiovascular risk factors with adolescent BD. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Benjamin I. Goldstein Source Type: research

3.2 do baseline neural connectivity and individual variability during executive function task performance predict treatment response to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rtms) for executive function deficits in youth and young adults with asd?
Executive function (EF) deficits in individuals with ASD are ubiquitous and understudied. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), the central hub of the fronto-parietal network supporting EF, is a promising treatment target for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to improve EF. Here, we examine individual variability in functional connectivity (FC) in ASD at baseline, in the context of an RCT examining the effect of rTMS on EF deficits in ASD. Given the clinical and neural heterogeneity of ASD, our aim was to identify neural markers predictive of treatment response to personalize treatment approaches fo...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stephanie H. Ameis Source Type: research

3.3 predicting bipolar trajectories: a risk calculator for recurrence and neural underpinnings
The trajectory of bipolar disorder (BD) in youth is heterogeneous; although some youth experience frequent mood episodes, others may never have a recurrence. Quantifying risk for recurrence for the individual patient has important ramifications for prognosis and potentially treatment. Risk calculators (RC) have been used in other areas of medicine to quantify risk, and we describe a RC here for BD recurrence, as well as neural correlates of risk score. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Danella Hafeman, John Merranko, Tina R. Goldstein, Benjamin I. Goldstein, Dara J. Sakolsky, Rasim Somer Diler, David Axelson, Mary L. Phillips, Boris Birmaher, COBY Group Source Type: research

3.4 utility of pharmacogenomic testing for depression in adolescents: results from a prospective, double blind trial
The goal of this session is to evaluate the clinical impact of pharmacogenomic testing in clinical practice on treatment response/remission rates for depressed adolescent patients seeking pharmacologic treatment. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jennifer L. Vande Voort Source Type: research

Screening tools in the emergency department
The number of patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with behavioral health complaints have been increasing, as have pediatric suicide rates and substance use issues. The ED is a crucial site for identifying these issues and helping patients connect with the level of care they need. Use of standardized instruments can help identify those at risk and link them to ongoing care. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Vera Feuer, David B. Goldston Tags: Symposium 4 Source Type: research

4.1 a computerized adaptive screen for suicidal youth (cassy): development in the ed stars national sample
The rate of suicide among adolescents is rising in the United States, yet many adolescents at risk go unrecognized and receive no mental health services. Improved risk detection through effective screening has the potential to facilitate treatment linkage, reduce morbidity, and prevent mortality. Our study aims were: 1) to develop a Computerized Adaptive Screen for Suicidal Youth (CASSY) presenting to emergency departments (EDs) with at least 80-percent sensitivity and 80-percent specificity for the prediction of a suicide attempt within 3 months; and 2) to determine whether this screen outperforms the widely recognized sc...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Cheryl King Source Type: research

4.2 utilizing a trauma-informed therapeutic intervention in the emergency department for risk assessment
Suicide is the second leading cause of death among adolescents in the United States and the first leading cause of death in Utah. Emergency department (ED) visits for youth at risk for suicide have increased significantly over the last decade. The ED is a challenging site for the delivery of mental health interventions, although it provides a valuable opportunity to intervene with this high-risk population. This presentation will describe an ED evidenced-based behavioral assessment and intervention protocol. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Lisa Lloyd Giles Source Type: research

4.3 addressing substance use as part of usual care in pediatric emergency medicine
Before the age of 18 years, 9 of 10 people start using substances. Despite efforts to provide comprehensive health care, screening for substance use is not a standard element of care in pediatric emergency departments (EDs). As part of the efforts for early detection and intervention, we expanded universal alcohol and substance use screening beyond adults to include patients aged 12 to 18 years at the largest Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center in New York. This ED sees 60,000 patients a year, of whom 25 percent are adolescents in the age range for substance use screening. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and ...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Sandeep Kapoor Source Type: research

4.4 the heads-ed: a psychosocial screening tool for the emergency department and beyond
Given the increasing numbers of pediatric mental health visits to emergency departments (EDs) across North America, ED clinicians require a quick and reliable way to facilitate their assessment and to transition patients from the ED to services in the community that meet their needs. This presentation will describe the development and psychometric properties of an innovative psychosocial screening tool. The Home, Education, Activities and peers, Drugs and alcohol, Suicidality, Emotions, thoughts, and behaviors, and Discharge resources (HEADS-ED) was originally developed for use in pediatric EDs and expanded to hospital-bas...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Clare Gray Source Type: research

Systematic review of polypharmacy studies in child and adolescent psychiatry
Polypharmacy, or the simultaneous use of multiple medications, is common practice in child and adolescent psychiatry. The purpose of this research is to provide a systematic review of published literature that exams the effectiveness of drug combinations for treating mental health disorders in children and adolescents. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Megan Baker, Timothy Wilens Tags: Symposium 5 Source Type: research

5.1 polypharmacy in bipolar disorder
The goal of this session is to compare a single medication that is used to treat bipolar disorder (BD) with 2 drugs that are used to treat BD with a comorbid condition to determine whether polypharmacy enhanced or worsened the symptoms being addressed. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Robert J. Hilt, Gabrielle A. Carlson Source Type: research

5.2 systematic review of polypharmacy studies in child and adolescent psychiatry: the asd studies
The objective of the literature review was to identify research supporting the use of 2 or more psychotropic medications in the treatment of mental health disorders in children and adolescents. A subset of the articles (n = 13) focused on adding medications to risperidone in the treatment of ASD in children and adolescents. Previous research has shown that risperidone is well-tolerated and efficacious in treating the behavioral symptoms associated with ASD in children and adolescents, but there is little evidence that it positively affects social/cognitive functioning. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and ...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jonathan C. Huefner Source Type: research

5.3 systematic review of polypharmacy studies in child and adolescent psychiatry: focus on adhd
The goals of this session are to conduct a systematic review of psychiatric medication combination studies for youth with ADHD and to examine the evidence that supports the use of more than one concurrent psychotropic medication. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Megan Baker, Robert J. Hilt Source Type: research

5.4 systematic review of polypharmacy studies in child and adolescent psychiatry: the nos group
The research team was interested in documenting the extent of the research to date, looking at combination trials or one plus one medication studies. We were particularly interested in whether the evidence base supported current clinical practice in which children and adolescents are frequently prescribed more than one psychotropic medication concurrently. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Christopher Bellonci Source Type: research

Understanding and predicting psychopathology in young people exposed to trauma
Traumas present substantial challenges in clinical practice and public health, such as the assessment and treatment of psychopathology in trauma-exposed individuals and planning of service provision. To improve assessment and treatment in trauma-exposed young people, it is important to provide a clear understanding of the epidemiology and structure of psychopathology in this population and to improve individualized risk prediction. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Andrea Danese, Judith A. Cohen Tags: Symposium 6 Source Type: research

6.1 trauma and ptsd in a representative cohort of british young people
We described the prevalence and clinical features of trauma exposure and PTSD in a representative cohort of British young people to inform clinical assessment, treatment, and service planning. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stephanie J. Lewis Source Type: research

6.2 symptom network architecture in youth with and without interpersonal violence exposure
There is growing evidence to suggest that interpersonal violence (IPV) exposure in youth instantiates a unique ecophenotype characterized by a more severe and comorbid constellation of psychopathology symptoms. The current work uses a network methodology to determine whether IPV exposure biases typical manifestation of mental illness symptoms in youth. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Ryan Herringa Source Type: research

6.3 identification of traumatic stress and suicidality among abused youth
Children who disclose abuse are often evaluated at Children ’s Advocacy Centers (CACs), with more than 300,000 evaluations every year. CAC evaluations consist of a forensic interview and/or medical evaluation. Recently, the National Children’s Alliance recommended that CACs detect and refer for traumatic stress. However, little guidance exists about effe ctive strategies to detect, assess, and refer children evaluated at CACs. We developed and piloted a standard trauma screening to evaluate risk and enhance referral for traumatic stress in CACs. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Brooks Keeshin Source Type: research

6.4 predicting ptsd in trauma-exposed young people
Previous research has identified risk factors for PTSD and found that groups of trauma-exposed young people with a risk factor are, on average, more likely to develop PTSD than groups of trauma-exposed young people without such risk factors. However, single risk factors cannot be used to accurately predict PTSD because of heterogeneity within groups. In addition, previous multivariate prediction models have not been validated in external samples, with the risk of overfitting and limited practical use. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Andrea Danese Source Type: research

From constructs to circuits: how can the research domain criteria (rdoc) framework inform our clinical practice?
This Symposium will explore how the research domain criteria (RDoC) framework informs our understanding of child psychopathology. RDOC integrates many levels of information (from genomics and circuits to behavior and self-reports) to explore basic dimensions of functioning that span the full range of human behavior from normal to abnormal. Progress is being made in understanding the levels of information that are accessible from this line of inquiry. However, clinicians continue to rely on categorical diagnostic systems to evaluate and develop treatment plans for children and adolescents with mental health disorders. (Sour...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: David Cochran, Antonio Hardan, Uma Vaidyanathan Tags: Symposium 7 Source Type: research

7.1 linking research domain criteria (rdoc) to developmental psychopathology: self-regulation as an intervention target in early childhood
Despite almost decade-long efforts since the initiation of the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) project, integrating RDoC into developmental psychopathology, especially the application of RDoC to early childhood, has been understudied. Identifying RDoC constructs in early childhood is essential for understanding etiological pathways of psychopathology. Our central goals were to identify and establish RDoC constructs in early childhood across different functional domains and to examine how they relate to typical versus atypical symptom trajectories between ages 3 and 10 years. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Chil...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Ka Ip, Sheryl Olson Source Type: research

7.2 the circuit-level analysis of social cognition processes using structural and functional neuroimaging in asd
One of the primary units of analysis of the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) framework is the circuit-level description of the various domains of function. Our goal was to demonstrate the use of resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in ASD to better understand the neurocircuitry involved in the social cognition domain. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: David Cochran, Steven Hodge, Jean A. Frazier, David Kennedy Source Type: research

7.3 cognitive control development in asd: can research domain criteria (rdoc) help us to better understand behavioral phenotypes and pathophysiology?
The objective of this presentation is to initiate a Research Domain Criteria (RDoC)-oriented examination of cognitive control (CC) in ASD by: 1) determining the proportion of those with ASD who are impaired in CC compared with those with typical development (TYP); and 2) investigating the neural correlates of CC in ASD compared with those with TYP with better and poorer task performance. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Marjorie Solomon, Marie K. Krug, Cory Coleman, Matthew V. Elliott, Jeremy Hogeveen, Rachel Wulff, Tara Niendam, J. Daniel Ragland Source Type: research

7.4 mapping the research domain criteria (rdoc) social communication sub-constructs to the social responsiveness scale
The objective of this presentation is to derive estimations of the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) social constructs from the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and to explore their utility in capturing individual patterns of strengths and weaknesses across the identified factors in a large, clinically diverse sample group. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Antonio Hardan, Mirko Uljarevic, Thomas William Frazier, Jennifer M. Phillips, Booil Jo, Sandy Littlefield Source Type: research

Meditative interventions in child and adolescent psychiatry
The value of meditation as a clinical tool is now well-established. However, many clinicians are unaware of the extensive evidence base supporting the use of meditative interventions across a broad range of mental health disorders. The purpose of this Symposium is to report on the results of several recent clinical trials evaluating meditative interventions in child and adolescent psychiatry. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: David C. Saunders, James J. Hudziak Tags: Symposium 8 Source Type: research

8.1 three randomized experiments on the  longitudinal effects of the transcendental meditation technique on cognition
There are 3 categories of meditation: focused attention, open monitoring, and automatic self-transcending (AST) —which differ in their effects on the brain. Transcendental meditation (TM) technique is AST and increases alpha1 (8–10 Hz) EEG power, and coherence and default mode activity correlated with improved cognitive performance. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: David Orme-Johnson Source Type: research

8.2 effect of transcendental meditation on arrests and school attendance in adolescent high school students: a randomized controlled trial
Growing evidence suggests that constant exposure to environmental stressors, such as an abusive household or a dangerous neighborhood, can contribute to what is known as “toxic” or “chronic” stress. For adolescents with developing brains, these stressors can cause lasting psychological and physiological impairments, particularly in areas of the brain that influence learning, behavior, and mental health. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Chris Busch Source Type: research

8.3 mindfulness-based adhd treatment for children: a pilot feasibility study
ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with a myriad of adverse outcomes. Medication is known to be effective but is limited by side effects. Mindfulness improves attention in healthy adults, as well as adults with ADHD, and 2 small studies in teenagers with ADHD have shown preliminary evidence of efficacy. To our knowledge, however, there are no standardized mindfulness interventions for children with ADHD, nor has it been studied in a rigorous research setting in children. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: David C. Saunders Source Type: research

New findings from the multimodal treatment of adhd (mta) study follow-up
This Symposium presents new findings from the Multimodal Treatment Study of ADHD (MTA) 16-year prospective follow-up study. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Lily Hechtman, Steven R. Pliszka Tags: Symposium 9 Source Type: research

9.1 maternal personality traits moderate adhd treatment response in the multimodal treatment study of adhd (mta)
The goal of this session is to evaluate the moderating effect of maternal personality traits (neuroticism, conscientiousness) on treatment response in the Multimodal Treatment Study of ADHD (MTA). (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Guillermo Perez Algorta Source Type: research

9.2 patterns and predictors of stimulant medication use from childhood to adulthood in the prospective long-term follow-up of the multimodal treatment study of adhd (mta)
Most children diagnosed with ADHD are treated with stimulant medication. The AACAP Practice Parameter for the assessment and treatment of ADHD (recommendation number 12) advises treatment for as long as symptoms persist, but information on duration of medication use (treatment as usual in clinical practices) is limited. The main objective is to use the data from long-term follow-up of the MTA to address this important gap in the literature. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: James M. Swanson Source Type: research

9.3 adolescent predictors of adult outcome in adhd: results from the multimodal treatment study of adhd (mta)
The goal of this session is to explore the importance of adolescent functioning in predicting adult functioning in participants with and without ADHD. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Lily Hechtman Source Type: research

Pediatric trichotillomania: an update on screening, genetics, and treatment
This Symposium will cover recent research on trichotillomania (also known as hair-pulling disorder), highlighting new developments relevant to the clinical practice of child and adolescent psychiatry. Presentations will review data on clinical screening tools, genetic studies, behavioral therapies, and pharmacological treatments. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Michael H. Bloch, Emily Olfson, S. Evelyn Stewart Tags: Symposium 10 Source Type: research

10.1 genetic findings in trichotillomania
Trichotillomania, or hair-pulling disorder, is a difficult-to-treat impairing condition with onset typically in early adolescence. The goal of this presentation is to provide an overview of previous research on the genetics of trichotillomania and to discuss new results from a whole-exome sequencing study. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Emily Olfson Source Type: research

10.2 habit reversal training for hair pulling disorder
Hair-pulling behaviors are relatively common among youth with mental health disorders and can result in significant distress and impairment. Habit reversal training (HRT) has demonstrated efficacy for reducing hair-pulling behaviors across several randomized, controlled trials. This has led experts to recommend HRT as a first-line treatment for youth with hair-pulling disorder (formerly called trichotillomania). This presentation describes the empirical support of HRT and delves into the implementation of its clinical components. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Joseph McGuire Source Type: research

10.3 pharmacological treatment of trichotillomania
Trichotillomania, or hair-pulling disorder, is a functionally impairing, often overlooked disorder, with no US FDA-approved medications for its treatment. Several pharmacological studies, however, have offered promise for those with trichotillomania, but the ability of clinical trials to detect beneficial effects of active treatment in trichotillomania has been hampered by a lack of understanding of the possible subtypes of trichotillomania and the unusually high placebo response rate. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jon E. Grant Source Type: research

10.4 evaluation and assessment of trichotillomania across the lifespan
Trichotillomania (TTM, also known as hair pulling disorder) is a mental health disorder in which patients pull their own hair, leading to noticeable hair loss. It is a relatively common mental health disorder, as studies suggest that between 0.6 percent and 1 percent of the general population meet criteria for TTM, with females being more likely to be affected. Although trichotillomania has an onset in childhood (typically ages 11 –13 years of age), it is most commonly studied in adulthood. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Michael H. Bloch, Luis C. Farhat Source Type: research

Research symposium: advances in the genetics of neurodevelopmental disorders: translating findings to the clinic
The goal of the 2019 Research Symposium is to highlight advances in the genetics of ASDs and to provide a roadmap for translation of this information into clinical practice. The presenters will highlight the potential for improved treatments for neurodevelopmental disorders based on current advances in genetics. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Ellen J. Hoffman, David Cochran Tags: Symposium 11 Source Type: research

11.1 the revolution has begun: asd, genomics, and the advancing science of neurodevelopmental disorders
The past decade has witnessed the emergence of reliable and systematic gene discovery in ASDs. Over the past 5 years, dramatic progress has been made in identifying rare, large-effect mutations that contribute to approximately 20 percent of cases in the clinic. More recently, the first common alleles for ASD risk have also been identified, contributing very small individual effects but across a greater percentage of the population. These molecular clues offer a foothold into the pathophysiology of ASD and, consequently, offer a number of potential paths from the gene to therapeutics. (Source: Journal of the American Academ...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Matthew State Source Type: research

11.2 harnessing an asd genomic revolution in the here and now: personalized medicine, risk-based counseling, and what to do about polygenic risk
A large share of the population-attributable risk of ASD is traceable to complex polygenic inheritance. The ability to clinically distinguish inherited from noninherited forms of ASD has significant public health implications and underscores the opportunity to complement the discovery of gene-based therapeutic targets with that of: 1) early phenotypic targets that index polygenic liability; and 2) common “comorbidities” that exacerbate the severity of impairment in ASD. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John N. Constantino Source Type: research

Complementary and integrative treatments for asd and adhd: selected recent research
The goals of this presentation are to review recent RCTs and their follow-ups (FU) of complementary/alternative treatments for ADHD and ASD and to evaluate their scientific basis. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: L. Eugene Arnold, James T. McCracken Tags: Symposium 12 Source Type: research

12.1 essential oils for improving quality of life and anxiety in asd
The goals of this session are to evaluate the feasibility of a larger multisite trial of essential oils for improving the quality of life (QOL) and anxiety in children with ASD and to collect preliminary data on the benefits and tolerability of essential oils. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jill A. Hollway, L. Eugene Arnold, Xueliang Pan, Taylor Wong, Cheryl Li, Craig E. Williams, Robert R. Rice Source Type: research

12.2 folinic acid improves verbal ability in children with asd, language impairment, and folate receptor blocking antibodies
The goal of this presentation is to determine whether folinic acid can improve verbal ability in ASD. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Deborah R. Simkin Source Type: research

12.3 one-year follow-up of double-blind rct of neurofeedback for adhd
The goal of this session is to determine whether neurofeedback (NF) has a delayed specific benefit for ADHD beyond a nonspecific benefit, such as placebo response and a benefit of 30+ sessions, with coaching and encouragement to focus on a screen. Unblinded RCTs have shown encouraging results, but small blinded, flawed RCTs have not. Some of those have shown delayed benefit in follow-up (FU) reports. Despite wide variation in its quality, NF has the potential to be an alternative or adjunct to medication with a more enduring effect. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: L. Eugene Arnold, Roger DeBeus, Cynthia Kerson, Vincent J. Monastra, Robert R. Rice, Justin A. Barterian, Xueliang Pan, Neurofeedback Collaborative Group Source Type: research