Longitudinal Associations of Childhood Internalizing Psychopathology With Substance Misuse: A Register-Based Twin and Sibling Study
The pathways from internalizing psychopathology to substance misuse remain largely unclear. We estimated associations between childhood internalizing problems and subsequent substance misuse in two family-based samples. We also investigated sex differences and the role of externalizing comorbidity. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - July 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suvi Virtanen, Ralf Kuja-Halkola, Sebastian Lundstr öm, Brian M. D'Onofrio, Henrik Larsson, Jaana Suvisaari, David Mataix-Cols, Paul Lichtenstein, Antti Latvala Tags: New Research Source Type: research

The Economic Cost of Child and Adolescent Bullying in Australia
This study conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis and estimated the economic costs attributable to child and adolescent bullying victimization in Australia. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Amarzaya Jadambaa, David Brain, Rosana Pacella, Hannah J. Thomas, Molly McCarthy, James G. Scott, Nicholas Graves Tags: New Research Source Type: research

Our Vision: An Anti-Racist Journal
Ahmaud Arbery. Rayshard Brooks. Michael Brown. Eric Garner. George Floyd. Freddie Gray. Laquan McDonald. Tamir Rice. Walter Scott. Breonna Taylor. We could fill these pages with the names of the Black people murdered by police officers, a devastating toll of racism in this country. Our anger joins with the millions who have raised their voices in outrage and have cried for change across the globe. With them we fight for not only changes in policing, but deep and enduring changes in human society to bring true and lasting liberty, equality, solidarity, and community for all people. (Source: Journal of the American Academy o...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Douglas K. Novins, Robert R. Althoff, Samuele Cortese, Stacy S. Drury, Jean A. Frazier, Schuyler W. Henderson, Elizabeth McCauley, Tonya J.H. White Tags: Editor's Note Source Type: research

Internet-Related Behaviors and Psychological Distress Among Schoolchildren During COVID-19 School Suspension
The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection has rapidly grown worldwide,1 and many governments have implemented policies to control the infection rate. For example, school suspension, self-quarantine, requirement of citizens to stay at home,2 travel and border controls, and discouragement of outdoor activities3 have been used. Although these actions emphasize the importance of “spatial distancing” are based on the perspective of public health, they may result in health problems other than COVID-19 infection, such as psychological distress and fear. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child a...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: I-Hua Chen, Chao-Ying Chen, Amir H. Pakpour, Mark D. Griffiths, Chung-Ying Lin Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Titrating Social Media Use During Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization
Approximately 89% of adolescents have access to a smartphone, with 70% checking social media (eg, Snapchat, Instagram) multiple times per day.1 Psychiatric hospitalizations for adolescents commonly involve suicidal crises with underlying interpersonal stressors, often inextricably embedded in the digital milieu. Upon psychiatric hospitalization, adolescents typically leave their smartphones with caregivers or in a locked area of the unit and enter into a social media “deprivation” period (inclusive of all digital social communication, such as texting). (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Taylor A. Burke, Jacqueline Nesi, Sarah E. Domoff, Magdalena Romanowicz, Paul E. Croarkin Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Grasping Gaming: Parent Management Training for Excessive Videogame Use in Children
Elijah is an 11-year-old boy referred to a child psychiatrist for worsening aggression and tantrums. He spends all his time playing video games. Elijah does not join his family for dinner, forsaking meals to play more games. He refuses to do chores and has urinated on himself several times rather than get up to use the bathroom. Frustrated, Elijah ’s mother unplugs the game and Elijah becomes violent—throwing things, kicking, screaming, and hitting. His mother has also found new charges on her credit card that could only have been made by her son. When asked what game he plays so fervently, both mother and Elij...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Hughes, Deborah Brooks Tags: Clinical perspectives Source Type: research

Little Doubt That CBT Works for Pediatric OCD
We write with great concern in response to the recent systematic review and meta-analysis of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) by Uhre et  al.1 Although the authors’ results consistently support the clinical efficacy of CBT for pediatric OCD, we expect that, much like ourselves, readers will be confused by the discordant and inappropriate conclusions that they put forward. These conclusions stem from the authors’ application and interpretation of their particular qualitative methods, which could lead important stakeholders (eg, parents, patients, clinicians...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Eric A. Storch, Tara S. Peris, Alessandro De Nadai, John Piacentini, Michael Bloch, Matti Cervin, Joseph McGuire, Lara J. Farrell, James T. McCracken, Dean McKay, Bradley C. Riemann, Aureen Pinto Wagner, Martin Franklin, Sophie C. Schneider, John T. Walku Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Dr. Uhre et  al. Reply:
In a recent letter to the editor, a group of clinician-researchers posit that the conclusions in our published systematic review1 on cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are based on inappropriate methodology. In this reply, we address the concerns expressed by Storch et  al.2 (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Valdemar Funch Uhre, Camilla Funch Uhre, Nicole Nadine L ønfeldt, Linea Pretzmann, Signe Vangkilde, Kerstin Jessica Plessen, Christian Gluud, Janus Christian Jakobsen, Anne Katrine Pagsberg Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Existential Returns
No longer were there individual destinies; only a collective destiny, made of plague and emotions shared by all. —Albert Camus1 (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Craigan Usher Tags: Book forum Source Type: research

When Science Challenges Our Long-Held Assumptions About the Robustness of Evidence for Standard of Care
In this issue of the Journal, we publish two letters pertaining to the article “Systematic Review and Meta-analysis: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Children and Adolescents” by Uhre et al.1 Their protocol employed the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions to evaluate risk of bias (selection, performance, detection, at trition, and reporting biases) in the included 25 trials, contacting trial authors to obtain missing data where possible. They controlled for random errors owing to sparse data or multiple testing using Trial Sequential Analysis and evalu...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Daniel A. Geller, Daniel Hosker Tags: Editors' note Source Type: research

---
That the film Joker (2019) generated controversy should come as little surprise. Even the three men who created the Clown Prince of Crime in 1940 —Bob Kane, Bill Finger, and Jerry Robinson—could not agree who deserved the credit.1 The violent villain, formerly known as “Red Hood,” was inspired by the character “Gwynplaine” from a Victor Hugo novel and the 1928 film, The Man Who Laughs. The Joker is a jesting lawbreaker whose origi n story has taken many forms. Casual fans of the Batverse are probably most familiar with a somewhat shallow version wherein Jack Napier, a hoodlum of question...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fred Coler Tags: Book forum Source Type: research

---
Jojo Rabbit is the latest film by director Taika Waititi (What We Do in the Shadows, Hunt for the Wilderpeople) and the story of a young boy and his imaginary friend. The twist is that the imaginary friend isn ’t a figurative monster. He is the world’s greatest monster: Adolf Hitler. Although this is a juxtaposition played for laughs, the movie is a poignant story of growing up, one about the fall of personal fantasies that mirrors the fall of the Third Reich. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Ian Pearson Tags: Book forum Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Council Page
(Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Don ’t Miss the Boat: Towards a Developmental Nosology for Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder in Early Childhood
The DSM ’s disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD), characterized by severe, chronic irritability, currently excludes children (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jillian Lee Wiggins, Margaret J. Briggs-Gowan, Melissa A. Brotman, Ellen Leibenluft, Lauren S. Wakschlag Tags: New Research Source Type: research

Prior Authorizations: A Necessary Evil?
Along with general practice burdens, child and adolescent psychiatrists (CAP) are commonly tasked with completing prior authorizations (PAs) for medications prescribed in clinical practice. CAP frown in resignation to their PA requirements to allow patients to be initiated onto, or continue with, their medications. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Timothy E. Wilens, Kai Wilens, K. Yvonne Woodworth, Victoria Chippari, Elizabeth S. Firmin Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Editorial: The Ups and Downs of Mind-Wandering in Adolescents
The human brain is always active; it wanders freely during rest, and also when we lose focus during tasks. Mind-wandering encompasses spontaneous thinking such as processing recent experiences, problem-solving, and achieving insights. Understanding this unconstrained brain activity may lead to clues about the neural mechanisms of mental health problems. Brain networks implicated in mind-wandering include the default mode network (DMN), the salience network (SN), and task-positive networks, including the frontoparietal control network and dorsal attention network (DAN). (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and ...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Michelle Thai, Bonnie Klimes-Dougan, Kathryn Cullen Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Editorial: A Special Tree in the Forest: From Oak to Acorn to Oak
In this issue Sucksdorff and colleagues1 present additional evidence of maternal health and nutrition during pregnancy affecting offspring mental health. In the Finnish National Registry, they identified 1,067 cases of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and 1,067 matched controls. They found a highly significant negative association between maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels the first half of pregnancy and later offspring diagnoses of ADHD. The lower the mother ’s vitamin D, the greater the risk of offspring ADHD, even after adjusting for maternal age and socioeconomic status (P=0.002). (Sourc...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: L. Eugene Arnold Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Mind-Wandering in Adolescents Predicts Worse Affect and Is Linked to Aberrant Default Mode Network –Salience Network Connectivity
This study used ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to investigate the affective correlates and consequences of mind-wandering in adolescents with anhedonia (AH) and typically developing (TD) controls. In addition, we examined the association between mind-wandering and resting state functional connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a core hub of the Default Mode Network (DMN) linked to internally-oriented mentation, and networks linked to attentional control (Dorsal Attention Network; DAN) and affect/salience detection (Salience Network; SN). (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Christian A. Webb, Elana S. Israel, Emily Belleau, Lindsay Appleman, Erika E. Forbes, Diego A. Pizzagalli Tags: New Research Source Type: research

Editorial: Taking the Next Step Towards Validating Social Processes From the Research Domain Criteria
Navigating social interactions and relationships is a complex endeavor. The successful management of these activities calls upon a variety of underlying biological and behavioral mechanisms that are contextualized by environmental demands. Social challenges can arise for many different reasons, but autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is the prototypical disorder of social behavior. That being stated, clinically significant interference with social functioning is shared across a variety of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Gregory L. Wallace, Benjamin E. Yerys Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Effect of Parent Training on Health-Related Quality of Life in Preschool Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Secondary Analysis of Data From a Randomized Controlled Trial
This study compared HRQoL in preschool children with ADHD with age-matched children from the general population, examined whether PT improves HRQoL, and tested if treatment-related changes in HRQoL are mediated by improvements in ADHD, parent efficacy (PE) and family stress (FS). (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Liva Bundgaard Larsen, David Daley, Anne-Mette Lange, Edmund Sonuga-Barke, Per Hove Thomsen, Charlotte Ulrikka Rask Tags: New Research Source Type: research

Rapid Systematic Review: The Impact of Social Isolation and Loneliness on the Mental Health of Children and Adolescents in the Context of COVID-19
Disease containment of COVID-19 has necessitated widespread social isolation. We aimed to establish what is known about how loneliness and disease containment measures impact on the mental health in children and adolescents. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Maria Elizabeth Loades, Eleanor Chatburn, Nina Higson-Sweeney, Shirley Reynolds, Roz Shafran, Amberly Brigden, Catherine Linney, Megan Niamh McManus, Catherine Borwick, Esther Crawley Tags: Review Source Type: research

Editorial: Why JAACAP Published an “Inconclusive” Trial: Optimize, Optimize, Optimize Psychostimulant Treatment
In this issue of the Journal, Blader et al.1 report the results of a double-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) aimed at assessing the comparative efficacy and tolerability of adjunctive risperidone (RISP), valproex sodium (DVPX) or placebo for aggressive behaviors in children (aged 6-12) with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comorbid oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), or conduct disorder (CD), as well as a prior history of psychostimulant treatment. Participants with aggressive symptoms persisting after an open-label optimization of psychostimulant medication entered the 8-week randomized phase. (...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - June 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Samuele Cortese, Douglas K. Novins Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Disclosure in Undocumented Families and School Mental Health Clinics
The following describes the case of Miguel and a missed diagnosis in an undocumented minor.Miguel Estrada (all names changed to protect identity) was a 10-year-old boy of Central American origin initially seen at age 8 years in our university outpatient child psychiatry clinic. During the initial evaluation with a native Spanish-speaking provider, his mother, Mrs. Estrada, reported behavioral problems beginning at age 5 with diagnoses of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and intellectual disability; a trauma history was denied. Over the subsequent 2 years, Miguel continued treatment in our outpatient service and lat...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Shirley Alleyne Tags: Clinical perspectives Source Type: research

Regulatory Barriers to the Use of Time Out in Child Inpatient Units: Interference With Effective Treatment?
I read with interest the article “Behavior Modification Is Associated With Reduced Psychotropic Medication Use in Children With Aggression in Inpatient Treatment: A Retrospective Cohort Study” by Carlson et al.,1 and I believe it raises important developmental questions regarding the application of adult criteria for seclusion and restraint (S/R) management to time out (T/O) procedures on child psychiatric inpatient units and the reliance on verbal de-escalation options to address behavioral crises with this patient population. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kim J. Masters Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

Dr. Carlson et  al. Reply:
We appreciate the thoughtful and supportive comments from Dr. Masters1 and agree that coercive parent –child relationships were often what was addressed and modified during hospitalization. Lowering seclusion and restraint rates by prohibiting them, without lowering rates of aggression, is not the desired outcome. As we noted in our paper, evidence-based treatments are sorely needed for young chil dren whose severe and destructive outbursts get them psychiatrically hospitalized. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Gabrielle A. Carlson, Jaclyn Chua, Katherine Pan, Tahsin Hasan, Adam Bied, Andr és Martin, Daniel N. Klein Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

The “F” Word
A beautiful word. Probably one of the simplest concepts a mind can hold, but equally controversial and conflictual in its application. An action often assumed to be altruistic but potentially more enriching than any conceivable indulgence. At times so difficult to enact and sometimes even harder to receive. Perhaps most arduous to extend to ourselves. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Julie A. Chilton Tags: Book forum Source Type: research

Correction
In the April 2020 issue of the Journal, (J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 59:566 –567), in the Book Forum review of LSD: My Problem Child and Insights/Outlooks, reviewer Ely Fish was incorrectly listed as Dr. Fish and with Tel Aviv University. Mr. Fish is an MD candidate and student at Tel Aviv University. The author regrets this error. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Correction Source Type: research

---
Edith Eger ’s National Jewish Book Award–winning memoir is a paean to the power of hope. In the memoir, the nonagenarian author recounts her remarkable life before, during, and after internment in Nazi concentration camps. During the time I read Eger’s terrifying and inspirational account, I was mindful that anti-Semitic hate crimes still disfigured the American landscape. Before I could finish her narrative, Jews were murdered at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh. An already compelling book then took on a much more somber note. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Maureen Sayres Van Niel Tags: Book forum Source Type: research

---
If you cannot get rid of the family skeleton,you may as well make it dance. —George Bernard Shaw1 (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Andr és Martin Tags: Book forum Source Type: research

---
The book ’s title is the best starting place; forgiveness is really strange. It is an unexpected reaction to hurt. And besides being unexpected, it is a difficult response that takes extraordinary effort. In our post-Puritan society, our entire political spectrum is focused on questions of justice, whether in the form of criminal sentencing or as racial reparations. Justice is often the only solution offered for hurt. Demands for reckoning can lead to cycles of “eye for eye” retribution or can leave victimized groups angry and unsatisfied without viable avenues for satisfaction. (Source: Journal of the Am...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Michael Holman Tags: Book forum Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Council Page
(Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Epigenetic Intergenerational Transmission: Mothers ’ Adverse Childhood Experiences and DNA Methylation
Introduction Summary: Individual differences in risk for mental disorders over the lifespan are shaped by forces acting before the individual is born — in utero, but likely even earlier, during the mother’s own childhood. The environmental epigenetics hypothesis proposes that sustained effects of environmental conditions on gene expression are mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Recent human studies have shown that adversities in the early env ironment are correlated with DNA methylation in childhood. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 19, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Pamela Scorza, Cristiane S. Duarte, Seonjoo Lee, Haotian Wu, Jonathan E. Posner, Andrea Baccarelli, Catherine Monk Tags: Study Preregistration Source Type: research

Editorial: Promoting Quality Psychotherapy: It Is Not the Process but the Outcome That Matters!
The article published in this issue of the Journal by Bear et  al.1 is the first to use meta-analytic procedures to try to understand the value of psychotherapy for pediatric anxiety and depression as usually delivered in the community. The authors scoured the literature for psychotherapy clinical trials that used treatment as usual as a control group or obse rvational studies of treatment in mental health settings, then applied meta-analytic approaches to get a better idea of what treatment as usual outcomes were and by extension what to expect from psychotherapy as usually delivered. The study findings suggest that ...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John T. Walkup, John Parkhurst, John Lavigne Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Editorial: Promoting Quality Psychotherapy: It Is Not the Process, but the Outcome That Matters!
The article published in this issue of the Journal by Bear et  al.1 is the first to use meta-analytic procedures to try to understand the value of psychotherapy for pediatric anxiety and depression as usually delivered in the community. The authors scoured the literature for psychotherapy clinical trials that used treatment as usual as a control group or obse rvational studies of treatment in mental health settings, then applied meta-analytic approaches to get a better idea of what treatment as usual outcomes were and by extension what to expect from psychotherapy as usually delivered. The study findings suggest that ...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John T. Walkup, John Parkhurst, John Lavigne Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Promoting Quality Psychotherapy: It Is Not the Process, but the Outcome That Matters!
The paper published in this issue of JAACAP by Bear et al.1 is the first to use meta-analytic procedures to try to understand the value of psychotherapy for pediatric anxiety and depression as usually delivered in the community. The authors scoured the literature for psychotherapy clinical trials that used treatment as usual (TAU) as a control group or observational studies of treatment in mental health settings, then applied meta-analytic approaches to get a better idea of what TAU outcomes were and by extension what to expect from psychotherapy as usually delivered. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and A...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John T. Walkup, John Parkhurst, John Lavigne Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Clinical Practice Guideline for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Anxiety Disorders
Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. As reviewed in this guideline, both cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medication have considerable empirical support as safe and effective short-term treatments for anxiety in children and adolescents. Serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) medication has some empirical support as an additional treatment option. In the context of a protracted severe shortage of child and adolescent-trained behavioral health specialists, research demonstrating convenient, efficient, co...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Heather J. Walter, Oscar G. Bukstein, A. Reese Abright, Helene Keable, Ujjwal Ramtekkar, Jane Ripperger-Suhler, Carol Rockhill Tags: Clinical Practice Guideline Source Type: research

JAACAP ’s Role in Advancing the Science of Pediatric Mental Health and Promoting the Care of Youth and Families During the COVID-19 Pandemic
As we pen these words, the COVID-19 pandemic is having profound impacts on human society. Based on decades of research, we know that the accompanying illness,1 death2 and social isolation,3,4 and malnutrition5 will have deep and lasting impacts on our children and adolescents, their families, and the communities in which they develop. The pandemic is exposing, with terrible clarity, the disparities in human society – racism,6 and poverty,7,8 domestic violence,9,10 and child maltreatment and neglect11 – and tragically will likely amplify the negative impacts each has on child development and mental health. (Sour...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 7, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Douglas K. Novins, Schuyler W. Henderson, Robert R. Althoff, Mary K. Billingsley, Samuele Cortese, Stacy S. Drury, Jean A. Frazier, Elizabeth McCauley, Tonya J.H. White Tags: Editor's Note Source Type: research

Meta-analysis: Pharmacologic Treatment of Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders
To examine the efficacy of pharmacological treatments for restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs) in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - May 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Melissa S. Zhou, Madeeha Nasir, Luis C. Farhat, Minjee Kook, Bekir B. Artukoglu, Michael H. Bloch Tags: Review Source Type: research

Promoting Treatment Access Following Pediatric Primary Care Depression Screening: Randomized Trial of Web-Based, Single-Session Interventions for Parents and Youths
Major depression in youth is a serious psychiatric illness with extensive acute and chronic morbidity and mortality.1 In 2018, the American Academy of Pediatrics released updated practice guidelines promoting screening of youth depression in primary care (PC) clinics across the country, representing a critical step towards increasing early depression detection.2 However, the challenge of bridging screening with service access remains. Even when diagnosed by PC providers, (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - April 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jessica L. Schleider, Mallory Dobias, Julia Fassler, Akash Shroff, Susmita Pati Tags: Study Registration Source Type: research

A Case of Clinical Scholarship
A 32-year-old child and adolescent psychiatry resident with a history of presenting an abstract at a local psychiatric conference during residency and fourth authorship on an immunotherapy paper from a summer internship during medical school presents with a new-onset desire to write a case report. She has just come off her consultation liaison rotation, during which she consulted on a 12-year-old boy with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, disruptive mood dysregulation disorder, and low depressive state hospitalized for pseudoseizures, a new-onset inability to walk, and aggressive outb...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - April 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Schuyler W. Henderson Tags: Commentary Source Type: research

Our House Is on Fire: Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists in the Era of the Climate Crisis
The global climate crisis has arrived and is impacting pediatric mental health in the form of children facing more frequent and severe weather-related trauma, experiencing climate-related deprivation and displacement, and experiencing anxiety and grief related to inevitable losses to come. Child and adolescent psychiatrists must respond: we are care providers to individuals and families in distress; we are contributors to the crisis through our own emissions; and we are potential mediators of the crisis, somewhat uniquely, as we work to instill agency and hope. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - April 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Elizabeth Pinsky, Anthony P.S. Guerrero, Richard Livingston Tags: Translations Source Type: research

Dr. Liu et  al. Reply:
While there is growing acceptance within the field that measurement-based care (MBC) is a valuable and effective care quality improvement strategy, broad and sustained implementation continues to be elusive for most organizations.1 This is partly attributable to the lack of proven implementation strategies for MBC. Although implementation science has made significant progress in recent years,1 more work is needed to identify the most effective and efficient strategies for MBC implementation across a range of service delivery contexts. (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - April 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Freda F. Liu, Rick A. Cruz, Carol M. Rockhill, Aaron R. Lyon Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

A Different Way to Mind the Gap: Mandated Versus Voluntary Collection of Measures
Measurement-based care (MBC) has been called the bridge for the gap between outcomes achieved in randomized clinical trials and routine clinical care.1 Trials of MBC have improved outcomes, helped identify patients with residual symptoms, prompted clinicians to know when to intensify treatment, created more informed patients, and improved the patient –provider relationship.1 These previous studies were grant-funded projects, however, which were implemented on project deadlines with research staff committed to the success of the project. In a recent Letter to the Editor in the Journal, Liu et al.2 reported on the...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - April 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Michael S. Scheeringa Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research

In Praise of Going There
“Sometimes these letters do the opposite of what they’re intended to do.”—Evan Hansen1 (Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - April 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Craigan Usher Tags: Book forum Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - April 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Council Page
(Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry)
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - April 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research