Planning for Future Pandemics Including Smallpox Outbreaks: Interview with Dr. Phil Gomez, CEO, SIGA Technologies
The COVID-19 pandemic has had significant global consequences, with healthcare systems stretched to their limits, a growing death toll, and economic devastation as economies came grinding to a halt. The pandemic and its aftereffects will be with us for some time to come, but this isn’t the first pandemic humanity has weathered, and it won’t be the last. Given accelerating advances in medical technology, there is plenty to discuss in terms of how we can be better prepared for the next infectious disease event. While COVID-19 is widely thought to have arisen naturally through transmission between an animal ...
Source: Medgadget - May 27, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

COVID-19: Physicians in Shackles
By ANISH KOKA, MD A number of politically tinged narratives have divided physicians during the pandemic. It would be unfortunate if politics obscured the major problem brought into stark relief by the pandemic: a system that marginalizes physicians and strips them of agency. In practices big and small, hospital-employed or private practice, nursing homes or hospitals, there are serious issues raising their heads for doctors and their patients. No masks for you When I walked into my office Thursday, March 12th, I assembled the office staff for the first time to talk about COVID.  The prior weekend had been...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Medical Practice Physicians Anish Koka medical autonomy Pandemic Source Type: blogs

Research Provides No Basis for Pandemic Travel Bans
CONCLUSIONThe pre ‐​COVID‐​19 research is unanimous that governments cannot expect to rely on travel restrictions to prevent the spread of pandemics similar to influenza. Travel restrictions do not prevent the spread of disease and may only delay it for a few days or weeks if implemented prior to the interna tional transmission of the disease. The Trump administration’s travel restrictions waited until after the virus had already entered the United States, and they exempted many travelers from China, not to mention the rest of the world.[30]The research shows that the Trump administration should have kno...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 15, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: David J. Bier Source Type: blogs

Ebola, forgotten but not gone
The recent WHO decision to declare the novel coronavirus outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC), while both appropriate and hardly surprising, offers the opportunity to reflect on the previous PHEIC which was declared, namely the Ebola epidemic in Kivu region, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). And you should really say the ongoing Ebola epidemic, as during the time since the declaration in July 2019 through to the present day (March 2020), a total of 3,453 cases have been reported [1]. The nCoV-2019 outbreak is still ballooning; as of today, over 400,000 confirmed cases worldwide with no ...
Source: GIDEON blog - March 25, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Outbreaks Source Type: blogs

Skilled Immigrants Searching for Coronavirus Cures at U.S. Companies
David BierThe government has so far kept to minimal and rational restrictions on travel in response to the coronavirus. My colleague Alex Nowrastehhas written about alternatives to outright immigration bans that could slow down the transmission of the deadly disease. But only scientific advancements will save thousands of lives, and it is here that many immigrants are working for treatments and vaccines that will stop the spread and treat the viral infection.The major U.S. companies seeking a coronavirus vaccine or treatment have together received approvals from the Department of Labor to hire foreign workers with eit...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 12, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Reasons to chill and reasons not to chill
Okay, I'm not an epidemiologist or a virologist. But I do know something about those subjects, I'm a public health professor, and I am an expert in clinical communication and risk communication. So I'm going to offer some observations that I hope will help people keep this public health scare in proper perspective and maybe be of practical use.There are two important parameters we need to understand the risk caused by any communicable disease. I'm going to broadly say transmissibility, and the probability that exposure will lead to serious disease.We often see transmissibility represented as a single number, called R0 or &...
Source: Stayin' Alive - February 26, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Improved PCR Flu Diagnostic for Pandemic Response: Interview with Chris Hole of TTP
TTP, a technology company based in Melbourn, UK, is developing a handheld PCR (polymerase chain reaction) diagnostic device that can rapidly detect influenza viruses, and one day other viruses, in samples of nasal mucus. The company claims that the system, which uses a high speed version of traditional RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction), incorporates several breakthroughs that translate to improved speed, cost, and size when compared with existing molecular diagnostics systems. Such technology could be crucial in providing diagnostic and surveillance capability for infectious disease outbreaks such as...
Source: Medgadget - February 20, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Exclusive Public Health Source Type: blogs

The real cost, and longer term implications, of the Wuhan coronavirus
It's too soon to know for sure how the tale of the novel coronavirus will play out,but at this point we have a pretty good idea. A stipulation in both of the scenarios at the linked essay is that yeah, it gets loose into the wild and eventually can show up anywhere in the world. I think that's pretty much definitely going to happen if it hasn't already.Scenario number 1, and most likely, in my view, it will just be one more virus that causes what amounts to a common cold and in a few people who are otherwise debilitated goes on to be complicated by pneumonia. In that case, for a year or two it will circulate as a novel vir...
Source: Stayin' Alive - February 5, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

How Digital Health Technology Can Help Manage The Coronavirus Outbreak
“Chinese health authorities say an outbreak of a pneumonia-like illness has sickened 305 people and killed five”…  No, this is not an excerpt from a recent news report about the Wuhan virus, but it is actually one from a CNN piece from 2003 when the SARS outbreak was raging. There are many similarities between the current outbreak to the SARS one from its geolocation to its spread to the viruses themselves.  However, much has changed within the 17 year gap between those two pandemics. For one, technology in the healthcare sector has known an exponential boom. New technologies that were nonex...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 28, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Artificial Intelligence Future of Medicine digital health digital technology epidemics global health coronavirus Source Type: blogs

On the RISE: Joshua and Caleb Marceau Use NIGMS Grant to Jump-Start Their Research Careers
A college degree was far from the minds of Joshua and Caleb Marceau growing up on a small farm on the Flathead Indian Reservation in rural northwestern Montana. Their world centered on powwows, tending cattle and chicken, fishing in streams, and working the 20-acre ranch their parents own. Despite their innate love of learning and science, the idea of applying to and paying for college seemed out of reach. Then, opportunities provided through NIGMS, mentors, and scholarships led them from a local tribal college to advanced degrees in biomedical science. Today, both Joshua and Caleb are Ph.D.-level scientists working to imp...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - October 23, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Being a Scientist Infectious Diseases Scientific Process Training Source Type: blogs

New Drugs for Treating Ebola Virus Infection
by Gertrud U. Rey The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is currently experiencing its worst outbreak of Ebola virus disease in history. More than 3,000 people have been infected with the virus, and nearly 1,900 have died since the outbreak began in 2018. The causative virus is “Ebola virus”, the strain previously known as […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - September 5, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information antiviral antibodies ebola virus mAb-114 monoclonal antibody neutralizing antibodies non-neutralizing antibodies passive vaccine REGN-EB3 viruses Source Type: blogs

TWiV 559: Nectin connection what ’ s your infection?
The complete TWiV team give a report on the Ebola virus outbreak in DRC, and reveal that cell surface nectin proteins cause the transfer of cytoplasmic cargo, including measles virus, between cells. Click arrow to play Download TWiV 559 (65 MB .mp3, 108 min) Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - August 4, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology Democratic Republic of the Congo Ebolavirus outbreak measles virus nect nectin nectin-elicited cytoplasmic transfer SSPE transcytosis vaccine viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Digital Health And The Ebola Epidemic: How Not To Let It Go Viral
More than 1,500 deaths and 2,500 people sickened – that’s the recent account of the ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) raging in the country since last August, and recently declared a public health emergency of international concern. Experts say efforts to contain the virus are hindered by biological, public health, political, and cultural issues, but we looked around what digital health technologies could do to mitigate the spread and the devastation of the infectious disease. The Spaghetti-like virus… The lethal Ebola virus first appeared in 1976 around a river in Congo &nda...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 1, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Africa AI artificial intelligence Congo digital digital health digital maps disease disease outbreak ebola epidemic Innovation technology Source Type: blogs

TWiV 557: Congress in Rotterdam
From the European Congress of Virology in Rotterdam, Vincent and local co-host Ben Berkhout speak with Ron Fouchier, Rosina Girones, and Marie-Paule Kieny about their careers and their work on influenza virus, environmental virology, and developing an Ebola virus vaccine during an epidemic. Click arrow to play Download TWiV 557 (41 MB .mp3, 67 min) Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - July 22, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology antigenic drift ebola virus environmental virology epidemic global health H2N2 influenza virus pandemic vaccine viral viruses viruses in water Source Type: blogs

2019 Health Law Professors Conference
Conclusion (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 27, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Beyond Vaccination: New Measures Needed to Protect Hospitals and the Public Against the Flu
By MARC M. BEUTTLER, MD Every year at this time, you hear warnings that flu season has arrived. New data from the CDC indicates the season is far from over. So, you are urged by health authorities to get a flu shot. What you may not realize is how the flu can affect the hospitals you and your loved ones rely on for care.   In January, the large urban hospital where I am an intern faced the worst flu outbreak it has ever seen. Nearly 100 staff members tested positive for the flu. Residents assigned to back-up coverage were called to work daily to supplement the dwindling ranks of the sick. Every hospital vis...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Hospitals Medical Practice Marc Beuttler Vaccination Source Type: blogs

TWiV 528: Our annual recapsidation
In the first episode for 2019, the TWiV team reviews the amazing virology stories of the past year. <span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; ...
Source: virology blog - January 6, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology alzheimer's disease Dengue Ebola herpesvirus horsepox influenza virus insect rna virus vaccine viral viruses wolbachia Source Type: blogs

TWiV 515: When virus is in retrograde
The TWiV team notes the passing of Tom Steitz, an outbreak of acute flaccid myelitis in the US, a continuing Ebola virus outbreak in DRC, respiratory vaccinia due to inhalation of ground up rabbit skin, and how a human papillomavirus capsid protein directs virus-containing endosomes towards the nucleus. 
Source: virology blog - October 14, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology capsid protein L2 cell penetrating peptide DRC ebola virus HPV human papillomavirus outbreak rabbit skin respiratory vaccinia retrograde transport retromer Tom Steitz trans-Golgi network vaccine vaccinia Source Type: blogs

A Libertarian ’ s Case Against Free Markets in Healthcare
By ROMAN ZAMISHKA In the final act of Shakespeare’s Richard III the eponymous villain king arrives on the battlefield to fight against Richmond, who will soon become Henry VII. During the battle Richard is dismounted as his horse is killed and in a mad frenzy wades through the battlefield screaming “A horse, a horse! My kingdom for a horse!” Richard shows us how market value can change drastically depending on the circumstances, or your mental state, and even the most absurd exchange rate can become reasonable in a moment of crisis. This presumably arbitrary nature of prices should be the first thi...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: Economics Source Type: blogs

A Libertarian ’ s Case Against Free Markets in Health Care
By ROMAN ZAMISHKA In the final act of Shakespeare’s Richard III, the eponymous villain king arrives on the battlefield to fight against Richmond, who will soon become Henry VII. During the battle, Richard is dismounted as his horse is killed and in a mad frenzy wades through the battlefield screaming “A horse, a horse! My kingdom for a horse!” Richard shows us how market value can change drastically depending on the circumstances, or your mental state, and even the most absurd exchange rate can become reasonable in a moment of crisis. This presumably arbitrary nature of prices should be the first t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: Economics Free Market health economics Libertarian Source Type: blogs

Ebola Vaccine – Have We Considered Sustainability?
Ebola is a devastating disease, and not a way anyone would want to die. As a nurse who worked in a 120-bed Ebola treatment unit in Liberia in 2014, I have seen the horror of this completely ravaging disease on individuals, families, and whole communities. To contract the disease is terrifying and certainly made worse The post Ebola Vaccine – Have We Considered Sustainability? appeared first on Johns Hopkins Nursing Magazine. (Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University)
Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University - June 20, 2018 Category: Nursing Authors: Online Editor Tags: On the Pulse Community health DRC Ebola Ebola response Global health vaccination Vaccine Source Type: blogs

TWiV 494: Ebola Makona is the opposite of hakuna matata
Vincent, Kathy, and Alan review the ongoing outbreak of Ebola virus in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the finding that mutations identified in the 2015 West African epidemic do not alter pathogenesis in animals. <span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 20, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology Democratic Republic of the Congo ebolavirus Makona Mayingo pathogenesis transmission vaccine viral virology Ebola virus virulence viruses Source Type: blogs

Robotics, A.I. and Blockchain Redesign The Pharma Supply Chain
Exoskeletons will aid pharma factory workers. 3D printing will allow pharmacies to produce drugs on the spot. Blockchain technologies will help fight counterfeit drugs. These are just bits and pieces, but the entire process of the pharmaceutical supply chain will be affected by disruptive technologies. Let me show you a comprehensive overview how innovations will make it more efficient, faster and cheaper than ever before. Exoskeletons will aid pharma factory workers. 3D printing will allow pharmacies to produce drugs on the spot. Blockchain technologies will help fight counterfeit drugs. These are just bits and pieces, b...
Source: The Medical Futurist - March 13, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: 3D Printing in Medicine Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Pharma Security & Privacy AI blockchain digital Innovation Personalized medicine pharmaceutics pharmacies robotics robots supply chain Source Type: blogs

The Luxury to Choose
By TRAVIS BIAS, MD The 80 year-old woman lay on her mat, her legs powerless, looking up at the small group that had come to visit her. There were no more treatment options left. The oral liquid morphine we had brought in the small plastic bottle had blunted her pain. But, she would be dead in the coming days. The cervical cancer that was slowly taking her life is a notoriously horrible disease if left undetected and untreated and that is exactly what had happened in this case. We had traveled hours by van along dirt roads to this village with a team of health workers from Hospice Africa Uganda, the country’s authori...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Gardasil Hospice Africa Uganda vaccines Source Type: blogs

Digital Maps Help Fight Epidemics
Have you ever thought that it would be possible to monitor drug overdoses, Zika cases or the spread of the flu in real time? Have you ever imagined that satellites wouldbe able to tell how and where a malaria epidemic will happen months before the actual outbreak? It is mind-blowing how, in the last years, digital maps developed to a level where they serve as effective tools for evaluating, monitoring and even predicting health events. That’s why I decided to give a comprehensive overview of digital maps in healthcare. John Snow, cholera and the revolution of maps in healthcare Before Game of Thrones monopolized Joh...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 12, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Mobile Health digital health digital technology epidemics epidemiology gc4 Innovation interactive maps Source Type: blogs

Why Doctors should read books by Nassim Taleb
By SAURABH JHA, MD     “There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness is the true method” Herman Melville, Moby Dick Asymmetry of Error During the Ebola epidemic calls to ban flights from Africa from some quarters were met by accusations of racism from other quarters. Experts claimed that Americans were at greater risk of dying from cancer than Ebola, and if they must fret they should fret more about cancer than Ebola. One expert, with a straight Gaussian face, went as far as saying that even hospitals were more dangerous than Ebola. Pop science reached an unprecedented fizz. Trader an...
Source: The Health Care Blog - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: Economics The Business of Health Care Source Type: blogs

Why Doctors (And Everybody Else) Should Read Books by Nassim Taleb
By SAURABH JHA, MD “There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness is the true method” – Herman Melville, Moby Dick Asymmetry of Error During the Ebola epidemic calls to ban flights from Africa from some quarters were met by accusations of racism from other quarters. Experts claimed that Americans were at greater risk of dying from cancer than Ebola, and if they must fret they should fret more about cancer than Ebola. One expert, with a straight Gaussian face, went as far as saying that even hospitals were more dangerous than Ebola. Pop science reached an unprecedented fizz. Trader and math...
Source: The Health Care Blog - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: Economics The Business of Health Care Source Type: blogs

Public Health Funding And OMB Director Mulvaney ’s “Taxpayer First” Test
The first formal budget of the Trump era—billed as a “Taxpayer First” budget—contains some very bad news when it comes to the health of the American public. It proposes dramatic cuts in federal investments that keep us healthy and protected from harm, including a $1.2 billion cut from the budget for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This is on top of the catastrophic cuts that will occur with the loss of the Prevention and Public Health Fund if the Affordable Care Act is repealed. It is the opposite of both what American taxpayers have asked for and what is owed to them. Office o...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - June 8, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Edward L. Hunter Tags: Costs and Spending Featured GrantWatch Public Health Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Chronic Care Consumers Effectiveness Health Philanthropy Health Promotion and Disease PreventionGW vaccines Source Type: blogs

Ebola vaccines for Guinea and the world: photos
Dr Margaret Chan, Director-General of WHO, visited some of the communities who participated in the vaccine trial in the city of Conakry. (Source: WHO Features on the Ebola Outbreak)
Source: WHO Features on the Ebola Outbreak - May 5, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: ebola [subject], ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola virus, ebola fever, ebola virus disease, ebola [subject], ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola virus, ebola fever, ebola virus disease, African Region [region], Guinea [country], Photo gallery [doctype] Source Type: blogs

Leaders gather in Guinea to celebrate Ebola vaccine successes
“The world is far better prepared for another Ebola outbreak,” said Dr Margaret Chan, Director-General of the World Health Organization, today at a celebratory event to recognize the Governments and people of the three most-affected countries for their contribution to the control of the Ebola ou tbreak in 2014-15. (Source: WHO Features on the Ebola Outbreak)
Source: WHO Features on the Ebola Outbreak - May 4, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: ebola [subject], ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola virus, ebola fever, ebola virus disease, ebola [subject], ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola virus, ebola fever, ebola virus disease, African Region [region], Guinea [country] Source Type: blogs

Why President Trump Should Use Foreign Aid For Health To Make America Great
The Trump administration recently proposed to make major cuts to US foreign assistance, including the $10.3 billion a year that the federal government spends to advance global health through the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the US Agency for International Development (USAID), and the United Nations. As practitioners with more than 60 years of combined experience, we believe that the Trump administration is making a terrible mistake. Investing in global health is essential to the safety, security, and future prosperity of the United States, in addition to being a highl...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 17, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Robert Hecht and Sten Vermund Tags: Costs and Spending Featured Global Health Policy Population Health Public Health epidemics foreign aid humanitarian aid infectious diseases PEPFAR US foreign assistance Source Type: blogs

Scott Gottlieb ’s FDA Commissioner Confirmation Hearing: Remarkably Unremarkable
On Wednesday morning, the United States Senate Committee on Health, Energy, Labor, and Pensions conducted the confirmation hearing for Dr. Scott Gottlieb, President Trump’s nominee to be the next Commissioner of the Food & Drug Administration (FDA). In a presidential administration whose confirmation hearings have sparked more than a few contentious moments, Dr. Gottlieb’s hearing was remarkable for how unremarkable it was. Senators from both parties asked questions on the full range of the FDA’s jurisdiction, and Dr. Gottlieb’s experience combined with his clear preparation for the hearing resu...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 7, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Rachel Sachs Tags: Drugs and Medical Innovation Featured FDA generic drugs opioid epidemic Source Type: blogs

The Law of Diminishing Returns of Ethicism
SAURABH JHA MD Many allege that the FIRST trial, which randomized surgical residencies to strict versus flexible adherence to duty hour restrictions, was unethical because patients weren’t consented for the trial and, as this was an experiment, in the true sense of the word, consent was mandatory. The objection is best summarized by an epizeuxis in a Tweet from Alice Dreger, a writer, medical historian, and a courageous and tireless defender of intellectual freedom. @RogueRad @LVSelbs @ethanjweiss @Skepticscalpel Consent to experimentation. Consent. Consent. Am I not being clear? — Alice Dreger (@AliceDre...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Online Virus Tracking Tool Nextstrain Wins Inaugural Open Science Prize
Credit: Trevor Bedford and Richard Neher, nextstrain.org. Over the past decade, scientists and clinicians have eagerly deposited their burgeoning biomedical data into publicly accessible databases. However, a lack of computational tools for sharing and synthesizing the data has prevented this wealth of information from being fully utilized. In an attempt to unleash the power of open-access data, the National Institutes of Health, in collaboration with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Britain’s Wellcome Trust, launched the Open Science Prize . Last week, after a multi-stage public voting process, the inaugural...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - March 10, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Chris Palmer Tags: Computers in Biology Bioinformatics Ebola Genomics Infectious Disease Spread Infectious Diseases Modeling Viruses Zika Source Type: blogs

ACA Repeal Would Mean Massive Cuts To Public Health, Leaving Cities And States At Risk
When the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed a little over six years ago, it brought with it the promise of health insurance for all Americans. It also sought to begin to shift the paradigm for health care in this country, emphasizing value over volume, and recognizing the importance of prevention coupled with appropriate access to care. By now, it is well known that repealing the ACA could leave nearly 20 million Americans uninsured and simultaneously result in millions of job losses across the country. An associated cost that has been less discussed, but no less relevant, is what repeal could mean for the nation’s...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 7, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Chrissie Juliano Tags: Costs and Spending Following the ACA Public Health Big Cities Health Coalition Community Health Prevention and Public Health Fund. Source Type: blogs

Donald Trump's " Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior "
Asany pedantic patriot can tell you,  there’s really no such thing as “Presidents’ Day”–the official name for the federal holiday we celebrated on Monday is “Washington’s Birthday.” And it wasn’t the first president’s actual birthday, which is today, February 22.Washingtonhad his faults, but, especially when compared to most of those who followed him, he provided an admirable model of probity and restraint. The teenage Washington copied in his own hand 110 precepts on etiquette:“The Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation,&rdqu...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 22, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Gene Healy Source Type: blogs

The Public Health Enemy at the Gate
By ARTHUR CAPLAN President Donald Trump  keeps getting kicked around in court when challenges are brought against his ban on travel from seven predominantly Muslim nations. Trump says he wants to halt the flow of people who might be planning attacks. What we cannot forget is that the kind of attack he has in mind is not confined to bombs and shootings. Trump is terrified that immigrants bring diseases with them. If racism fails, public health will likely afford Trump the rationale he seeks for making it difficult for those he does not like to enter our country. The president is a self-described germaphobe. He has doub...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Art Caplan Ebola Pandemic Zika Source Type: blogs

What Three Decades Of Pandemic Threats Can Teach Us About The Future
Editor’s Note: This post reflects on a speech on pandemic preparedness Dr. Fauci gave on January 10, 2017 in Washington, DC, hosted by  The Center for Global Health Science and Security at Georgetown University Medical Center, the Harvard Global Health Institute, and Health Affairs. One of the most important challenges facing the new Administration is preparedness for the pandemic outbreak of an infectious disease. Infectious diseases will continue to pose a significant threat to public health and the economies of countries worldwide. The U.S. government will need to continue its investment to combat these ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - February 9, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Anthony S. Fauci Tags: Featured Global Health Policy Ebola HIV/AIDS NIH pandemic preparedness Zika Source Type: blogs

The Framework Convention On Global Health: A Call For Leadership From The Global Health Trio
In the current issue of Health Affairs, we explore a pivotal moment of opportunity and peril in global health, while identifying the leadership challenges of “the global health trio” — the World Health Organization, the United Nations, and the World Bank. Each of the challenges we pose share a common thread: poor and other marginalized populations are most vulnerable to current and emerging health risks. Maternal and child mortality, infectious diseases, non-communicable diseases, health harms from climate change, and mass migration — all disproportionately affect those who are poor and less educate...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - January 12, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Eric A. Friedman and Lawrence O. Gostin Tags: Featured Global Health Policy Public Health antimicrobial resistance Ebola Source Type: blogs

Introducing New Deliberative Scenario and Facilitator Guide from the Bioethics Commission: “MMR Vaccination in a Local Immigrant Community”
The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has released two new educational materials, Deliberative Scenario: MMR Vaccination in a Local Immigrant Community and Facilitator Guide for Deliberative Scenario: MMR Vaccination in a Local Immigrant Community. This new deliberative scenario and facilitator guide build on the work of two of the Bioethics Commission’s reports, Ethics and Ebola: Public Health Planning and Response (Ethics and Ebola) and Bioethics for Every Generation: Deliberation and Education in Health, Science, and Technology. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 2, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ijeoma Egekeze Tags: Health Care Deliberation and Education syndicated Source Type: blogs

Slow progress on Zika vaccine development – and at the expense of Ebola funding?
The Zika Virus – Image by David Goodwill (RCSB Molecule of the Month 197, June 2016) [CC BY 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons A recent PBS Newshour story highlights just some of the challenges in getting a vaccine for Zika tested and out on the market. The article confirms that about 30 vaccines are being developed […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 13, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Nancy Walton Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Let’s Stop Making Excuses For Egregious Medical Errors
To save the life of a child, a zoo sacrifices a prized, endangered gorilla. In exchange for one nearsighted Israeli soldier captured in Gaza, Israel released 1,000 Palestinian prisoners. (This example from the Middle East may not be surprising. In Judaism, it is commanded that “to save a life is as if one saved the world.”) And there are other examples of extreme bravery to save one life. That’s how much societies value the life of each human being. So how, then, do we explain our national acceptance of approximately 251,000 preventable deaths each year from medical error (according to a recent BMJ study)...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - June 22, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Karen Wolk Feinstein Tags: Featured GrantWatch Health Professionals Hospitals Organization and Delivery Payment Policy Quality Consumers Health Care Delivery Health Philanthropy Health Professions insurers Medical Errrors MRSA Nurses outcomes data Pa Source Type: blogs

Zika May Place Burden On Medicaid
Congress is currently debating the level of federal funding that should be made available to fight to reduce the spread of Zika. Administration officials working with local public health agencies on the ground have recently expressed fear that the funding levels are insufficient to prevent the disease from spreading. What is one overlooked concern? State budgets. Medicaid is jointly funded by states and the federal government and serves as a key financer of health care services if Zika spreads across the country this summer. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released a bulletin to state Medicaid...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - June 8, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Emma Sandoe Tags: Equity and Disparities Medicaid and CHIP Public Health family planning States Zika Source Type: blogs

On Zika Preparedness And Response, The US Gets A Failing Grade
There are worrying signs that the United States is unprepared to contain a likely Zika virus outbreak this summer. The critical problems are: insufficient resources for mosquito control, surveillance, and health care; highly variable capabilities and quality of service among public health and mosquito abatement authorities; and weak legal powers to implement critical interventions. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) reports that 35 countries and territories in the Americas have confirmed local, vector-borne transmission of Zika since 2015. In the US, local mosquito-borne transmission has been reported in Puerto Ri...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 28, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Alexandra Phelan and Lawrence O. Gostin Tags: Costs and Spending Equity and Disparities Featured Public Health CDC Congress outbreaks PAHO Prevention WHO Zika Zika virus Source Type: blogs

Looking, hopefully, towards an Ebola-free future
Experts from WHO and other partner organizations comment on the future of the VSV-EBOV vaccine. (Source: WHO Features on the Ebola Outbreak)
Source: WHO Features on the Ebola Outbreak - April 15, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: ebola [subject], ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola virus, ebola fever, ebola virus disease, ebola [subject], ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola virus, ebola fever, ebola virus disease, ebola [subject], ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola virus, ebola fever, ebola Source Type: blogs

WHO coordinating vaccination of contacts to contain Ebola flare-up in Guinea
Hundreds of people who may have been in contact with 8 individuals infected with Ebola virus in Guinea have been vaccinated with the experimental Ebola vaccine. (Source: WHO Features on the Ebola Outbreak)
Source: WHO Features on the Ebola Outbreak - March 31, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: ebola [subject], ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola virus, ebola fever, ebola virus disease, ebola [subject], ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola virus, ebola fever, ebola virus disease, ebola [subject], ebola haemhorragic fever, ebola virus, ebola fever, ebola Source Type: blogs

The End of Civilization and the Real Donald Trump
By ART CAPLAN The pandemic started quietly.  In the spring of 2017 A few hundred dead chickens appeared in markets in Hong Kong and a few other cities in China.   Public health officials in China were slow to respond.  They did not want to panic the public about an avian flu outbreak.  Nor were they eager to take the steps necessary to contain such an outbreak—the killing hundreds of thousands of chickens and poultry with devastating economic consequences.  While the delay went on a few cases began to occur on Canadian and American poultry farms.  Department of Agriculture experts trace...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: 2016 Election Uncategorized CDC Donald Trump Pandemic of 2017 Source Type: blogs

US Vaccine Officials Weigh In At The Midpoint Of The Decade Of Vaccines
We’re at the midpoint of the Decade of Vaccines — an intense period marked by efforts to ramp up and extend the benefits of immunization to all people, everywhere. Unfortunately, despite much progress, the world has fallen short. But there is still time to re-think our strategy. It was with this goal in mind that PATH recently joined Health Affairs at the launch of its February issue on Vaccines, which includes a series of articles on global immunization. I moderated a thought-provoking panel of experts from various US agencies to discuss how the US government—as a leader in global immunization—can ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 7, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: David Fleming Tags: Featured Population Health Quality Decade of Vaccines Global Vaccine Action Program Source Type: blogs