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Animation Shows How A Woman's Pelvis Morphs During Her Lifetime
Scientists have long known that the female pelvis widens and shrinks throughout a woman's lifetime -- and now, an animated model details exactly how. The model, created as part of a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, shows that the pelvis widens as a woman becomes more fertile and narrows as she ages. These changes are most likely mediated by estrogen, and they reveal that the female pelvis is not "written in bone," as Dr. Marcia Ponce de León, senior researcher at the University of Zurich in Switzerland and a co-author of the study, told The Huffingt...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Animation Shows How A Woman's Pelvis Morphs During Her Lifetime
Scientists have long known that the female pelvis widens and shrinks throughout a woman's lifetime -- and now, an animated model details exactly how. The model, created as part of a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, shows that the pelvis widens as a woman becomes more fertile and narrows as she ages. These changes are most likely mediated by estrogen, and they reveal that the female pelvis is not "written in bone," as Dr. Marcia Ponce de León, senior researcher at the University of Zurich in Switzerland and a co-author of the study, told The Huffingt...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 26, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hidden Costs of Cancer From CT Scans Add UpHidden Costs of Cancer From CT Scans Add Up
CT imaging induces a small rate of cancers with a 'large and hidden financial cost,' researchers say. But not everyone is convinced about the rigor of their study. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Radiology News Source Type: news

Clear Guide closes $3m Series A to support Scenergy image guidance system
Clear Guide Medical said today it closed a $3 million Series A round of financing to support its Scenergy CT-Ultrasound fusion and image guidance system designed to aid in minimally invasive biopsies and other diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The system operates through an intelligently integrated display of fused ultrasound and CT images, and will be sold as an accessory to ultrasound machines, the Baltimore, Md.-based company said. The round was led by Alpharetta, Ga.-based investment adviser Wildermuth Advisory, the company said in a press release. The company won FDA 510(k) clearance for the imaging gui...
Source: Mass Device - April 22, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Imaging Ultrasound Clear Guide Medical Source Type: news

Three-dimensional imaging of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
(Journal of Clinical Investigation) In this issue of JCI Insight, Mark Jones and colleagues at the University of Southampton in Southampton, UK, used a micro-computed tomography method to create three-dimensional images of fibroblastic foci from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 21, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

3D-printed skull saves patient's life
Surgeons in South Korea used data from CT scans to create a 3D-printed skull...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: The power and promise of 3D printing: Part 2 The power and promise of 3D printing: Part 1 CT helps 3D printing get wounded warriors back in action (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 20, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Echoes Of Trump, Sanders At 'Right Care' Meeting
If Lown wants to change the “culture” that prompts those [unnecessary CT] scan orders….I suggest finding some moms willing to publicly agree that not treating their child's “intracranial bleeds and skull fractures” (as the research phrased it) was perfectly fine. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 20, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Michael Millenson Source Type: news

Make the Diagnosis: Colonic Conundrum
(MedPage Today) -- Case Findings: A 31-year-old male presents with umbilical pain consistent with a small bowel obstruction. He had a 2-day history of constipation. There were no signs of a hernia, and a CT scan failed to show the cause of the obstruction. What is your diagnosis? (Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology)
Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology - April 19, 2016 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

FDA Update About Interference Between CT and Electronic Medical Devices
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) CT and Electronic Medical Devices website has been updated with new information for patients and health care providers about the three electronic medical devices that might be affected: insulin pumps, cardiac implantable electronic devices and neurostimulators. It notes that adverse events are rare and preventable and advises that the CT scans are a valuable diagnostic tool. (Source: American College of Radiology)
Source: American College of Radiology - April 15, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

New imaging technique reveals vulnerability of coral reefs
Researchers have created a novel method using micro-computed tomography scans to expose how bioerosion and secondary accretion of corals -- critical processes for reef sustainability -- respond to varying environmental conditions, including changing ocean acidity. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 13, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Analysis of death in major trauma: value of prompt post mortem computed tomography (pmCT) in comparison to office hour autopsy - Schmitt-Sody M, Kurz S, Reiser M, Kanz KG, Kirchhoff C, Peschel O, Kirchhoff S.
BACKGROUND: To analyze diagnostic accuracy of prompt post mortem Computed Tomography (pmCT) in determining causes of death in patients who died during trauma room management and to compare the results to gold standard autopsy during office hours. M... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

CT reveals findings in Zika-related microcephaly
Researchers in Brazil reported the appearance on CT scans of brain anomalies...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Ultrasound misses signs of early Zika infection French researchers describe Zika on MRI scans (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 11, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

A semi-automatic method of generating subject-specific pediatric head finite element models for impact dynamic responses to head injury - Li Z, Han X, Ge H, Ma C.
To account for the effects of head realistic morphological feature variation on the impact dynamic responses to head injury, it is necessary to develop multiple subject-specific pediatric head finite element (FE) models based on computed tomography (CT) or... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

CT Scans of Infant Brains Affected by Zika Show Severe Abnormalities (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by André Sofair, MD, MPH, and William E. Chavey, MD, MS Another study has found severe brain malformations in infants with Zika-related microcephaly.Researchers performed computed tomography (CT) scans of the brains of 23 … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - April 7, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Liberia: Jackson F. Doe Hospital Faces Shutdown
[New Dawn] The Chief Medical Doctor for the Jackson FiahDoe Memorial Regional and Referral Hospital in Tappital, Lower Nimba County has disclosed that most of the hospital's equipment has broken down. Dr.Lawrence Sherman told The NewDawnthe equipment, including CT scan was donated to the hospital by the Government of the People's Republic of China and has been in use since 2010. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 6, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

FDA warns on CT risks to electronic medical devices
Getting a CT scan could result in adverse consequences for patients with insulin pumps, cardiac implantable electronic devices and neurostimulators, according to a new report form the FDA. The federal watchdog said it received a small number of reports of adverse events related to CT imaging in patients with implantable and wearable electronic devices. The FDA said that when a CT scanner directly irradiates the circuitry of certain implantable or wearable electronic medical devices, it can cause enough electronic interference to affect the function of the devices. The agency said that while this can lead to malfunctions, t...
Source: Mass Device - April 4, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Imaging Source Type: news

What Genetics are Associated with Multiple Sclerosis?
Discussion Multiple sclerosis (MS) is “a chronic degenerative, often episodic disease of the central nervous system marked by patchy destruction of the myelin that surrounds and insulates nerve fibers, usually appearing in young adulthood and manifested by one or more mild to severe neural and muscular impairments, as spastic weakness in one or more limbs, local sensory losses, bladder dysfunction, or visual disturbances.” It is a chronic disease and therefore symptoms must occur more than once. The first episode is called an acute demyelinating attack. Fifteen to forty-five percent of children with their first...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

FDA: Presence of Electronic Medical Devices Should Not Preclude CT Scans (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH The presence of insulin pumps, pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators, and neurostimulators should not prevent use of medically indicated computed tomographic scans, the FDA has advised. While … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - April 3, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

CT Scan May Interfere With Electronic Medical DevicesCT Scan May Interfere With Electronic Medical Devices
New FDA safety notice updates current understanding of potential risk of electronic medical device malfunction during CT scan. News Alerts (Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines)
Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines - April 2, 2016 Category: Endocrinology Tags: Radiology News Alert Source Type: news

FDA: CT scans safe for patients with electronic medical devices
There’s no need to let fear of electronic interference between computed tomography and electronic medical devices preclude the ordering of such scans for patients with insulin pumps, cardiac... (Source: Clinical Endocrinology News)
Source: Clinical Endocrinology News - April 1, 2016 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

FDA: CT scans safe for patients with electronic medical devices
There’s no need to let fear of electronic interference between computed tomography and electronic medical devices preclude the ordering of such scans for patients with insulin pumps, cardiac... (Source: Clinical Neurology News)
Source: Clinical Neurology News - April 1, 2016 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

FDA: CT scans safe for patients with electronic medical devices
There’s no need to let fear of electronic interference between computed tomography and electronic medical devices preclude the ordering of such scans for patients with insulin pumps, cardiac... (Source: Family Practice News)
Source: Family Practice News - April 1, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Can HRT in early menopause cut heart disease risk?
ConclusionThis double-blind RCT found that women taking HRT less than six years after the menopause had slower artery wall thickening than those taking a placebo. This represented the main measure of atherosclerosis progression tested; other measures showed no difference, so the results were not as conclusive as they could have been. Women taking HRT 10 or more years after menopause also showed no difference in atherosclerosis progression compared with a placebo, further complicating the picture.An important limitation of this study is the lack of a patient relevant endpoint, such as cardiovascular events or mortality. Pre...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news

Computed tomography revolutionizing paleontological research
(Source: Physics Today News Picks)
Source: Physics Today News Picks - March 31, 2016 Category: Physics Authors: Physics Today Source Type: news

Update to Interference between CT and Electronic Medical Devices
This website provides information about a rare and preventable type of interference between Computed Tomography (CT) and electronic medical devices. This information updates and replaces our 2008 preliminary public health notification. CT is a valuable... (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

For the first time scientists can observe the nano structure of food in 3-D
Scientists have, for the first time, created a 3-D image of food on the nanometer scale. The method the scientists used is called Ptychographic X-ray computed tomography. It has promising prospects as a more detailed knowledge of the structure of complex food systems could potentially save the food industry large sums of money and reduce food waste that occurs because of faulty production. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Getting under a fossil's skin: how CT scans have changed palaeontology
Scanning is leading to huge breakthroughs. For example, we’ve now found the world’s oldest chameleons and know why giant wombats were air-heads Palaeontologists seem to be CT-scanning everything these days. A paper published in March by an international team led by Juan D. Daza, used scans to get a better look at fossil lizards encased in 99 million year old amber. These tropical lizards from Myanmar can be seen in their orange, glass-like tombs with the naked eye, but not in great detail. Using CT-scanning meant scientists were able to examine not only the scaled skin of these fossils, but the internal bones a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 30, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Elsa Panciroli Tags: Science Fossils Technology Biology Source Type: news

For the first time scientists can observe the nano structure of food in 3-D
(Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen) Scientists from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, have, for the first time, created a 3-D image of food on the nanometer scale. The method the scientists used is called Ptychographic X-ray computed tomography. It has promising prospects as a more detailed knowledge of the structure of complex food systems could potentially save the food industry large sums of money and reduce food waste that occurs because of faulty production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 30, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Can concussion be tested for with a 'simple' blood test?
Conclusion This study is a prospective cohort study that aimed to investigate the use of two proteins in the blood – GFAP and UCH-L1 – as markers for detecting mild to moderate traumatic brain injury. The study found both proteins could be present in the blood after a head injury, with higher levels of UCH-L1 in the early stages after injury, while GFAP seemed to be a good marker for up to a week after injury. But both biomarkers were not found in all cases. One in five people with a brain injury did not have detectable levels of GFAP, and 1 in 10 did not have UCH-L1. This substantially reduces their ability ...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Neurology Source Type: news

ECRI, LSE partner for medical device pricing study
The ECRI Institute said earlier this month it inked a partnership deal with the London School of Economics and Political Science’s LSE Health and Social Care group. The Plymouth Meeting, Penn.-based institute said both groups will collaborate on a project that seeks to examine medical device pricing across different countries. “Reducing costs in the healthcare system is critically important for hospitals and health systems worldwide. We anticipate that our partnership with LSE will yield the kind of research results that are needed to make device pricing more transparent,” ECRI European operations veep Da...
Source: Mass Device - March 28, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Research & Development ECRI Institute Source Type: news

Simple blood test detects concussion up to a WEEK after head injury
Scientists from Orlando Health, in Florida, discovered that a biomarker released during head injuries remains in the bloodstream for seven days - and testing for it can cut out need for CT scans. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Simple blood test detects concussion up to a WEEK after head injury - helping 'prevent headaches, memory loss and depression'
Scientists from Orlando Health, in Florida, discovered that a biomarker released during head injuries remains in the bloodstream for seven days - and testing for it can cut out need for CT scans. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Digital Mammograms Could Also Reveal Heart Disease Risk
This study demonstrates that accurate cardiovascular risk can be determined by evaluating the extent of calcification in blood vessels seen on digital mammograms, without the use of any additional radiation or risk. These exciting findings will allow women to be screened for the two most frequent life-threatening diseases at once - breast cancer and cardiovascular disease - (and allow) for determination of cardiovascular risk in a large population of women who might otherwise not get this potentially life-saving information.”   SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1MESUa8 JACC: Imaging, released March 24, 2016. -- This feed an...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 25, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Digital Mammograms Could Also Reveal Heart Disease Risk
This study demonstrates that accurate cardiovascular risk can be determined by evaluating the extent of calcification in blood vessels seen on digital mammograms, without the use of any additional radiation or risk. These exciting findings will allow women to be screened for the two most frequent life-threatening diseases at once - breast cancer and cardiovascular disease - (and allow) for determination of cardiovascular risk in a large population of women who might otherwise not get this potentially life-saving information.”   SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1MESUa8 JACC: Imaging, released March 24, 2016. -- This feed an...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Digital Mammograms Could Also Reveal Heart Disease Risk
This study demonstrates that accurate cardiovascular risk can be determined by evaluating the extent of calcification in blood vessels seen on digital mammograms, without the use of any additional radiation or risk. These exciting findings will allow women to be screened for the two most frequent life-threatening diseases at once - breast cancer and cardiovascular disease - (and allow) for determination of cardiovascular risk in a large population of women who might otherwise not get this potentially life-saving information.”   SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1MESUa8 JACC: Imaging, released March 24, 2016. -- This feed an...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDG-PET/CT Accurately Detects Recurrence in Breast CancerFDG-PET/CT Accurately Detects Recurrence in Breast Cancer
18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is accurate in diagnosing recurrence in women with suspected recurrent breast cancer, according to results of a study in Denmark. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Loss of consciousness is related to white matter injury in mild traumatic brain injury - Levin H, Wilde EA, Li X, Hunter JV, Narayana PA, Hasan KM, Biekman B, Sw. PR, Robertson CS, Miller ER, McCauley SR, Chu Z, Faber J, McCarthy JJ.
To study the relation of loss of consciousness (LOC) to white matter integrity after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), we acquired diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at 3 tesla in 79 participants with mTBI and normal computed tomography(age 18 to 50 years) w... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 25, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Mammograms May Also Help Spot Heart Disease, Study Suggests
The breast screening test compared well to heart CT scans, researchers say (Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer - March 25, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mammograms May Also Help Spot Heart Disease, Study Suggests
The breast screening test compared well to heart CT scans, researchers say (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - March 24, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Cardiology, Gynecology, Oncology, Radiology, Preventive Medicine, News, Source Type: news

Mammograms May Also Help Spot Heart Disease, Study Suggests
The breast screening test compared well to heart CT scans, researchers say (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - March 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mammograms May Also Help Spot Heart Disease, Study Suggests
The breast screening test compared well to heart CT scans, researchers say (Source: U.S. News - Health)
Source: U.S. News - Health - March 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mammograms May Also Help Spot Heart Disease, Study Suggests
The breast screening test compared well to heart CT scans, researchers say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Coronary Artery Disease, Heart Disease in Women, Mammography (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

PET/CT after therapy avoids surgery for head, neck cancer
Using PET/CT scans to assess response to therapy can help patients with head...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 3-month PET/CT helps track oropharyngeal cancer Interrupted radiation therapy risks cancer recurrence PET/CT details hint at survival of head and neck cancer patients Oral HPV infection increasing in young men PET/CT prevents dissections for head and neck cancer patients (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 24, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Build Lung Cancer Screening Programs That Grow, Evolve
Discussions What We Can Learn From Our Customers: Perspectives From Three Non-Radiologists (and One Radiologist) ACR’s annual all-member meeting will be held May 15–19 in Washington, DC. The keynote address is being given by Ezekiel J. (Zeke) Emanuel, MD, PhD, an architect of the Affordable Care Act and a leading practitioner shaping the future of health care. Special events include Capitol Hill Day, with exclusive meetings scheduled for members to bring the “Voice of Radiology” to elected officials; the Body MRI Boot Camp and the Economics Forum. Sessions are organized into nine Program Pathways...
Source: American College of Radiology - March 23, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Medical imaging could benefit from new X-ray detector
Boost in sensitivity could reduce radiation exposure during CT scans (Source: PhysicsWeb News)
Source: PhysicsWeb News - March 23, 2016 Category: Physics Source Type: news

High-Risk Lung Cancer Patients May Not Need Annual Screenings
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Monday, March 21, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. – Most high-risk lung cancer patients might not need annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screenings if they are cleared of disease in their initial test, according to a study led by a Duke Cancer Institute researcher. The researchers found that even former heavy smokers appear to have a reduced incidence of lung cancer if their initial LDCT screening is negative, suggesting that less frequent screening might be warranted.  “This has significant ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 23, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

High-risk lung cancer patients may not need annual screenings
Most high-risk lung cancer patients might not need annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screenings if they are cleared of disease in their initial test, according to a study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

High-risk lung cancer patients may not need annual screenings
(Duke University Medical Center) Most high-risk lung cancer patients might not need annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screenings if they are cleared of disease in their initial test, according to a study led by a Duke Cancer Institute researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 21, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Annual CT Lung Screening Might Not Be Needed for All High-Risk Adults, Analysis Suggests (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH High-risk adults who have a negative computed tomography screen for lung cancer might not require subsequent annual screening, according to a retrospective analysis of data from the National Lung Screening Trial published … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - March 20, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news