Medical imaging could benefit from new X-ray detector
Boost in sensitivity could reduce radiation exposure during CT scans (Source: PhysicsWeb News)
Source: PhysicsWeb News - March 23, 2016 Category: Physics Source Type: news

High-Risk Lung Cancer Patients May Not Need Annual Screenings
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Monday, March 21, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. – Most high-risk lung cancer patients might not need annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screenings if they are cleared of disease in their initial test, according to a study led by a Duke Cancer Institute researcher. The researchers found that even former heavy smokers appear to have a reduced incidence of lung cancer if their initial LDCT screening is negative, suggesting that less frequent screening might be warranted.  “This has significant ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 23, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

High-risk lung cancer patients may not need annual screenings
Most high-risk lung cancer patients might not need annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screenings if they are cleared of disease in their initial test, according to a study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

High-risk lung cancer patients may not need annual screenings
(Duke University Medical Center) Most high-risk lung cancer patients might not need annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screenings if they are cleared of disease in their initial test, according to a study led by a Duke Cancer Institute researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 21, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Annual CT Lung Screening Might Not Be Needed for All High-Risk Adults, Analysis Suggests (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH High-risk adults who have a negative computed tomography screen for lung cancer might not require subsequent annual screening, according to a retrospective analysis of data from the National Lung Screening Trial published … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - March 20, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Pars injuries in athletes - Oren J, Gallina J.
Pars injuries are common causes of low back pain in adolescent athletes. Workup traditionally has included lumbar radiographs with oblique views and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, recent literature has demonstrated the accurac... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Bringing MRI Where It's Needed Most
By Algis V. Urbaitis, Engineer If you haven't had an MRI before, chances are you know someone who has. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is widely used to create pictures of soft tissues in the body -- allowing doctors to identify anything from a torn knee ligament to a concussion. MRIs provide critical early diagnosis of potentially life-threatening injuries, yet their size and cost make them difficult to deploy to hard-to-reach places. That's changing. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, we've developed a portable MRI, also called Battlefield MRI (bMRI), that uses ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging to create images...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

High coronary calcium score may signal increased risk of cancer, kidney and lung disease
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) A 10-year follow-up study of more than 6,000 people who underwent heart CT scans suggests that a high coronary artery calcium score puts people at greater risk not only for heart and vascular disease but also for cancer, chronic kidney disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 16, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Meet T. Rex's Fierce, Fleet-Footed Relative
Scientists have discovered a nimble, meat-eating dinosaur with blade-like teeth that fills an important gap in Tyrannosaurus rex's family tree. The newly named creature, Timurlengia euotica, sheds light on how a family of dinosaurs called tyrannosaurs advanced from being small predators to clever giants at the top of the food chain -- within the span of about 70 million years. The long-legged, 600-pound T. euotica lived some 90 million years ago. It was around this time that tyrannosaurs developed impressive cognitive abilities and sharp senses, such as the ability to detect low-frequency sounds, a...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hitachi, Redlen ink development deal for next-gen CT component
Hitachi (NYSE:HIT) and Redlen Technologies said they inked a deal to co-develop a component used in photon-counting computed tomography devices. The Japanese conglomerate’s Hitachi Medical subsidiary and Redlen are slated to develop a direct-conversion semiconductor X-ray detector module, a necessary component for PCCT systems, the companies said. Saanichton, British Columbia-based Redlen makes high-resolution cadmium zinc telluride semiconductor radiation detectors. The pact calls for the duo to jointly develop the data acquisition technology to process data from the sensors, which is an ord...
Source: Mass Device - March 14, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Imaging Hitachi Hitachi Medical Redlen Technologies Source Type: news

Orthofix puts $1.3m into Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation deal
Orthofix (NSDQ:OFIX) said last week it is investing $1.3 million into the Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation through a collaborative agreement to support the procurement and installation of equipment and tech at MTF’s Edison, N.J. facilities. Lewisville, Texas-based Orthofix has maintained a collaborative agreement with MTF since 2008 to support the commercialization of its Trinity Evolution and Trinity Elite allograft matrices. Orthofix maintains the marketing rights to the product, while MTF sources, processes, packages and supplies them in allograft tissue form. The new agreement will expand tissue process...
Source: Mass Device - March 14, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Orthopedics Regenerative Medicine Orthofix International Source Type: news

Annabel’s journey: The story behind the movie “Miracles from Heaven”
Eight-year-old Annabel Beam was on a quest to find the perfect gift. During a 2010 trip from her Texas home to Boston Children’s Hospital, she asked her Mom to stop at the airport gift shop before boarding the plane. Annabel perused the aisles, examining each item in the hope of finding a token of appreciation for her gastroenterologist, Dr. Samuel Nurko, director of the Motility and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Center. Annabel spotted a cuddly teddy bear wearing blue doctors’ scrubs. She reached for the bear, squeezed its arm, and a musical rendition of “Doctor, Doctor, give me the news&hel...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - March 14, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Anna Beam Jennifer Garner Miracles from Heaven Motility and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Center pseudo-obstruction Samuel Nurko Source Type: news

Kids and Radiation Safety
By Stacy SimonWhen your child is sick or hurt, you want them to get medical care right away. Often, this means getting an image through x-ray, fluoroscopy, CT scan, or other medical test that uses radiation. These tests can often help children, and sometimes even save their lives. But it’s important to use these tests only when necessary.That’s because these types of exams expose children to ionizing radiation, which can be a risk factor for cancer. Exposure is especially concerning in children. For one thing, children are more sensitive to radiation than adults. Using regular equipment meant for adults exposes...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - March 14, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cancer Risks/Causes Source Type: news

Serum potassium concentration predicts brain hypoxia on computed tomography after avalanche-induced cardiac arrest - Cohen JG, Boué Y, Boussat B, Reymond E, Grand S, Blancher M, Ferretti GR, Bouzat P.
BACKGROUND: Brain anoxia after complete avalanche burial and cardiac arrest (CA) may occur despite adequate on-site triage. PURPOSE: To investigate clinical and biological parameters associated with brain hypoxia in a cohort of avalanche victims wi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

High coronary calcium score may signal increased risk of cancer, kidney and lung disease
A high coronary artery calcium score puts people at greater risk not only for heart and vascular disease but also for cancer, chronic kidney disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a 10-year follow-up study of more than 6,000 people who underwent heart CT scans suggests. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 9, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Quitting smoking plus low-dose helical CT reduces lung cancer death risk
Smoking abstinence for 7 years results in a 20% reduction in death from lung cancer – a benefit that is comparable to three rounds of annual screening with low-dose helical computed tomography (LDCT)... (Source: Family Practice News)
Source: Family Practice News - March 9, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Report: Alberta hospitals see spike in CT wait times
Patients may be waiting longer for CT scans in the Canadian province of Alberta...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Canadian proposal would ban private MRI, CT scans Alberta orders imaging test review Radiation therapy wait times meet guidelines in Canada (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 8, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Lung cancer screening: New Canadian guideline
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) Adults aged 55-74 years who are at high risk of lung cancer -- current or former smokers (i.e., have quit within the past 15 years) with at least a 30 pack-year history or more -- should be screened annually up to three times using low-dose computed tomography (CT), according to a new guideline from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care published in Canadian Medical Association Journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 7, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How to Understand Radiology Reports Used to...
Various imaging technologies such as ultrasound, CAT, and CT scans can be used to diagnose, stage or monitor treatment for ovarian cancer. (Source: About.com Ovarian Cancer)
Source: About.com Ovarian Cancer - March 7, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: health Source Type: news

New initiative helps Emergency Department reduce number of CT scans
(Source: St. Michael's Hospital News and Media)
Source: St. Michael's Hospital News and Media - March 4, 2016 Category: Hospital Management Tags: Hospital News Source Type: news

Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale and brain computed tomography-scan findings in head trauma patients - Nayebaghayee H, Afsharian T.
BACKGROUND: The study aimed to assess the relationship between computed tomography (CT) scan findings and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score with the purpose of introducing GCS scoring system as an acceptable alternative for CT scan to clinically management of... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Ultralow-dose CT successfully detects fractures
Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center found that ultralow-dose CT can detect...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: CT scans do double duty as osteoporosis test CAD can automatically detect vertebral fractures on CT (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 3, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

CMS Clarifies Coding Instructions for Lung Cancer Screening of Current Smokers
In response to comments by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and others, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has modified its coding policies for low-dose CT lung cancer screenings of current smokers. CMS set a July 5, 2016, implementation date for the addition of ICD-10 F17.2 (nicotine dependence) codes to the Medicare National Coverage Determination (NCD) 210.14 list of approved codes for low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening.  In addition, the CMS Coverage and Analysis Group provided a specific clarification after learning from the ACR that some claims f...
Source: American College of Radiology - March 2, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Ultra-low dose CT scans successfully detect fractures
(NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine) Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center are reporting they successfully performed CT scans for joint fractures with one-fourteenth the amount of normal radiation without compromising image quality or a surgeon's ability to effectively diagnose an injury. Study could have significant implications from a public health and safety standpoint for patients with orthopaedic trauma who require CT scans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 2, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

3-month PET/CT helps track oropharyngeal cancer
A three-month follow-up PET/CT scan is very helpful for detecting the recurrence...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Interrupted radiation therapy risks cancer recurrence PET/CT details hint at survival of head and neck cancer patients Oral HPV infection increasing in young men PET/CT prevents dissections for head and neck cancer patients (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 1, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Visceral Fat Triggers Heart Disease
I tell my patients to avoid drinking soda not just because they make you fat. Each sip of soda affects your health. Soda puts you at risk for health problems like metabolic syndrome. This is a collection of symptoms that can lead to diabetes, heart disease and other chronic diseases, like cancer. Soft drinks are the beverage of choice for millions of Americans. The latest research now reveals that sodas are a major cause of visceral fat — the deadliest kind of fat you can have, inflaming your tissues, rotting your blood vessels and upsetting your body chemistry. In a minute I’m going to tell you about a great ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - February 29, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Heart Health heart disease metabolic syndrome Visceral Fat Source Type: news

Signs and Symptoms of Colon Cancer
By Stacy Simon Many of the symptoms of colon cancer can also be caused by something that isn’t cancer, such as infection, hemorrhoids, irritable bowel syndrome, or inflammatory bowel disease. In most cases, people who have these symptoms do not have cancer. Still, if you have any of these problems, it is a sign that you should go to the doctor so the cause can be found and treated, if needed:A change in bowel habits, such as diarrhea, constipation, or narrowing of the stool, that lasts for more than a few daysA feeling that you need to have a bowel movement that is not relieved by doing soRectal bleedingDark stools, ...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - February 29, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Colon/Rectum Cancer Prevention/Early Detection Source Type: news

3-D micro X-ray images help answer questions about fried foods' internal structure
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) U of I researchers recently conducted a study using X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to gain 3-D images of the microstructure of fried potato disks after they had been fried for various lengths of time in order to better understand oil uptake and distribution in fried foods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 25, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

MRI assessment of pulmonary vein stenosis predicts outcomes
A retrospective analysis of children who underwent pulmonary vein stenosis repair with preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging from 1990 to 2012 showed that smaller upstream... (Source: Pediatric News)
Source: Pediatric News - February 22, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Triple rule-out CT shows value over CCTA
It's worth the extra trouble to perform a triple rule-out CT scan in chest...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: CCTA a good choice for patients with stable angina Societies issue imaging guidelines for chest pain Imaging for coronary artery disease on the decline Residents do fine reading CT triple rule-out exams Tube current modulation cuts triple rule-out CTA dose (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 22, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

BU researchers examine how spinal structure affects fracture rate
A Boston University mechanical engineering professor is attempting to improve spinal fractures predictions using an unusual set of tools – the same used for analyzing stress and strain on bridges and buildings. Spine fractures affect approximately 20% of men over 50 and 40% of women over 80, according to a report from Boston University. Despite the high rate of occurrence, spine fractures are difficult to predict and get less attention than hip fractures, despite being far more common. Currently, spine fracture risk is assessed through bone density scans which measure how much bone a patient has and how dense it...
Source: Mass Device - February 19, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Research & Development Spinal Boston University Source Type: news

Micro computed tomography features of laryngeal fractures in a case of fatal manual strangulation - Fais P, Giraudo C, Viero A, Miotto D, Bortolotti F, Tagliaro F, Montisci M, Cecchetto G.
Cases of subtle fatal neck compression are often complicated by the lack of specificity of the post-mortem signs of asphyxia and by the lack of clear signs of neck compression. Herein we present a forensic case of a 45-year-old schizophrenic patient found ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Drowning, Suffocation Source Type: news

The importance of post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT) in confrontation with conventional forensic autopsy of victims of motorcycle accidents - Moskała A, Woźniak K, Kluza P, Romaszko K, Lopatin O.
Since traffic accidents are an important problem in forensic medicine, there is a constant search for new solutions to help with an investigation process in such cases. In recent years there was a rapid development of post-mortem imaging techniques, especi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Usefulness and limitations of postmortem computed tomography in forensic analysis of gunshot injuries: three case reports - Usui A, Kawasumi Y, Hosokai Y, Kozakai M, Saito H, Funayama M.
Gunshot injury has always been an important field of investigation in postmortem forensic radiology. The localization and retrieval of the bullet and of potentially important fragments are vital to these cases. Using postmortem multidetector-row computed t... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Study: Invasive Angiography No Better Than CT Scans (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Noninvasive tool similarly effective, even preferable in some cases (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - February 19, 2016 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

The Joint Commission Publishes New Requirements for CT Technologists
The Joint Commission has recently approved new requirements for accredited hospitals, critical access hospitals and ambulatory care organizations that provide diagnostic imaging services. (See The Joint Commission – New Requirements for Diagnostic Imaging Services) The new requirements include minimum qualifications for technologists who perform diagnostic computed tomography (CT) exams. Although the changes will become publicly available online and in print in July 2016; they will not go into effect until Sept. 1, 2016.  (Source: American College of Radiology)
Source: American College of Radiology - February 19, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Autoantibodies may help detect lung cancer earlier
Preliminary research has identified autoantibodies, immune proteins found in the blood specific for one's own proteins, that can potentially detect lung cancer early by distinguishing between smokers with or without lung cancer and also discriminate between lung cancer and low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) detected non-cancerous lung lesions. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Autoantibodies may help detect lung cancer earlier
(International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) Preliminary research has identified autoantibodies, immune proteins found in the blood specific for one's own proteins, that can potentially detect lung cancer early by distinguishing between smokers with or without lung cancer and also discriminate between lung cancer and low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) detected non-cancerous lung lesions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Clear Guide Medical wins 510(k) for Scenergy image guidance
Clear Guide Medical said today it won FDA 510(k) clearance for its Scenergy CT-Ultrasound fusion and image guidance system designed to aid in minimally invasive biopsies and other diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The system operates through an intelligently integrated display of fused ultrasound and CT images, and will be sold as an accessory to ultrasound machines, the Baltimore, Md.-based company said. “Scenergy is a real advance for image-guided interventions. Because Scenergy is installed onto existing equipment, it can quickly be adopted in many different locations, benefitting patients sooner. We believe ...
Source: Mass Device - February 16, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Imaging Clear Guide Medical Source Type: news

'Bioprinter' creates bespoke lab-grown body parts for transplant
A new 3D printer which uses biodegradable materials to form a tissue shape and living cells as ‘ink’ could be used to print tissues and organs A bioprinter – a three dimensional printer that uses living cells in suspension as its ink, and injection nozzles that can follow a CT scan blueprint – brings the dream of transplant surgery a step nearer: a bespoke body part grown in a laboratory and installed by a robot surgeon.Scientists and clinicians began exploring tissue culture for transplant surgery more than 20 years ago. But researchers in the US report in Nature Biotechnology that they have harnes...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Tim Radford Tags: Biology Science Medical research Tissue engineering 3D printing Technology Source Type: news

Early Brain CT After Headache Onset Can Rule Out Aneurysmal HemorrhageEarly Brain CT After Headache Onset Can Rule Out Aneurysmal Hemorrhage
In patients with thunderclap headache and normal neurological exam, a normal brain computed tomography (CT) scan can rule out aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), according to new research. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - February 12, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Automated outcome classification of computed tomography imaging reports for pediatric traumatic brain injury - Yadav K, Sarioglu E, Choi HA, Cartwright WB, Hinds PS, Chamberlain JM.
BACKGROUND: The authors have previously demonstrated highly reliable automated classification of free-text computed tomography (CT) imaging reports using a hybrid system that pairs linguistic (natural language processing) and statistical (machine learning)... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 12, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Solving the 5,000-Year-Old Murder of Otzi the Iceman
In 1991, the mummified body of a 5,000-year-old murder victim was discovered in melting ice at a rock-gully crime scene high in the Italian Otzal Alps. Nicknamed "Otzi", the estimated 45-year-old man and his possessions were incredibly well preserved. His skin, hair, bones, and organs were cryopreserved in time, allowing archeological researchers a phenomenal insight into human life in the Copper Age. The frozen corpse also gave modern science the opportunity to forensically investigate and positively determine how Otzi the Iceman was killed. The story began on a sunny September day, when two hikers were traversi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Mass. jury says Marlboro smokers don't need screening
Cigarette manufacturer Philip Morris USA is not obligated to pay for annual...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Philip Morris may have to pay for smokers' CT scans (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 11, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Computational tools could change the way sleep apnea is treated
Imagine that before performing surgery, doctors could consult software that would determine the actual effectiveness of the procedure before even lifting a scalpel. With the use of a computational model of the human airway being developed by Jeff Eldredge, a professor at the Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at UCLA, people who suffer from sleep apnea may one day benefit from such a scenario. Previously, Eldredge, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, had been working on creating models that simulated the interactions between blood and vessel walls with Shao-Ching Huang, an expert in h...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 10, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Dementia sufferer Sandra Wood died after Tunbridge Wells doctors refused her a scan
Sandra Wood was ordered to A&E by her GP who feared she had a bowel blockage. But staff at Tunbridge Wells Hospital were loathe to call a consultant to sanction the ‘out of hours’ CT scan. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How one ED uses telemedicine in the ambulance
When you think of telemedicine, what comes to mind? Often the answer is a split screen—physician and patient in separate locations on their computers or tablets. But one health system has shown the true breadth of telemedicine’s reach by using the technology to treat patients during the critical early moments of a stroke. Find out how. The risk of damage and disability in patients who are experiencing a stroke increases with any delay in care delivery. Two emergency physicians at the University of Virginia (UVA) Health System understood the need for speed when it comes to caring for patients in the midst of a...
Source: AMA Wire - February 5, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Troy Parks Source Type: news

Medical News Today: 'No evidence that CT scans, X-rays cause cancer'
Researchers say there is no proof low-dose radiation from medical imaging causes cancer and urge we throw out the old, unproven theoretical model that makes people think otherwise. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

No proof that radiation from X rays and CT scans causes cancer
(Loyola University Health System) The widespread belief that radiation from X rays, CT scans and other medical imaging can cause cancer is based on an unproven, decades-old theoretical model, according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 3, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

JACR Provides Keys to Successful Radiology Business Planning
Reston, VA — February’s Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR) provides clinical practice management insights — including the keys to successful business planning and ways to foster leadership development. This month’s journal also features a reprint supplement on computed tomography (CT) lung cancer screening. Select articles not previously released online are listed below. An Organizational Perspective and a Team Approach: Keys to Successful Business Planning: A business plan communicates to you and your organization why and how you would like to direct key resources of money, time,...
Source: American College of Radiology - February 1, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news