Medical News Today: 'No evidence that CT scans, X-rays cause cancer'
Researchers say there is no proof low-dose radiation from medical imaging causes cancer and urge we throw out the old, unproven theoretical model that makes people think otherwise. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

No proof that radiation from X rays and CT scans causes cancer
(Loyola University Health System) The widespread belief that radiation from X rays, CT scans and other medical imaging can cause cancer is based on an unproven, decades-old theoretical model, according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 3, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

JACR Provides Keys to Successful Radiology Business Planning
Reston, VA — February’s Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR) provides clinical practice management insights — including the keys to successful business planning and ways to foster leadership development. This month’s journal also features a reprint supplement on computed tomography (CT) lung cancer screening. Select articles not previously released online are listed below. An Organizational Perspective and a Team Approach: Keys to Successful Business Planning: A business plan communicates to you and your organization why and how you would like to direct key resources of money, time,...
Source: American College of Radiology - February 1, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

No, You Are Not an Hysterical Female, and This Is Not Just Anxiety
"He's working with a med student shadowing him today. Do you mind being seen by her first?" In the spirit of education, I said, "No, of course not." She had long strawberry blond hair and big glasses. We talked. "What brought you here today?" she asked. "Well, I was seen in the ER three weeks ago for a blood clot in my leg and they told me I needed to follow up." I watched her write down "Deep Vein Thrombosis." "It wasn't a deep vein thrombosis, but they did find a blood clot, and told me to follow up with you." She marked out "Deep Vein Thrombosis" and ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Taking Concussions Head-On: Part I
Recognizing the Breadth of the Problem and the Search for Answers The release of the movie Concussion brings an even greater focus to an issue that has been debated more and more heatedly in recent years. Head injuries are devastating and their prevention is a goal not just in professional sports, but for athletes at all levels. Year after year, the NFL has reported pre-season and regular season concussions (Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, or MTBI) totaling over 200 players. This is a high profile situation that has placed a spotlight on the problem. More importantly, each year approximately 250,000 student-athletes aged 19 o...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New PET tracer aids in metastatic prostate cancer
PET/CT scans with a radiotracer that targets prostate-specific membrane antigen...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: PET can detect fast-growing prostate cancer New PET tracer homes in on metastatic prostate cancer (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 28, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Image Wisely Initiates New Annual Pledge Process
Reston, VA — Image Wisely® participants must now make yearly commitments, as opposed to a one-time pledge, confirming their ongoing dedication to safety in medical imaging. “Requiring an annual Image Wisely pledge reinforces the solid commitment to eliminate unnecessary imaging exams and to only use the amount of radiation necessary to produce the image quality needed for the diagnostic imaging task,” said Richard L. Morin, PhD, FACR, FAAPM, co-chair of the Image Wisely Executive Committee and American College of Radiology (ACR) representative. All individual pledges and associations/education...
Source: American College of Radiology - January 27, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Single no more: First females of a Madagascan chameleon described with modern technologies
(Pensoft Publishers) The first females of a scarcely known chameleon species from Northeast Madagascar have been described. Because of lack of genetic data, X-ray micro-computed tomography scans of the chameleon's head were used for species assignment. Regrettably, the habitats of this and many other chameleon species are highly threatened by the ongoing deforestation in Madagascar. The study is published in the open-access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 27, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A better way to image metastatic prostate cancer
(Society of Nuclear Medicine) A recent study, reported in the January issue of "The Journal of Nuclear Medicine," shows in a prospective, systematic manner that a PET/CT scan, using the radiotracer F-18-DCFBC to target prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), is significantly more effective at detecting metastatic prostate cancer than conventional imaging methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 27, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CT scans increase your risk of cancer by 35 percent
(NaturalNews) Medical imaging technology has provided physicians with a nonsurgical method for discovering, diagnosing and monitoring injuries and diseases. Rather than a hospital stay and invasive procedure, patients can undergo a CT scan with little discomfort or down time.But... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Characteristics of rib fractures in child abuse-the role of low-dose chest computed tomography - Sanchez TR, Grasparil AD, Chaudhari R, Coulter KP, Wootton-Gorges SL.
OBJECTIVES: Our aim is to describe the radiologic characteristics of rib fractures in clinically diagnosed cases of child abuse and suggest a complementary imaging for radiographically occult injuries in highly suspicious cases of child abuse. METH... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 23, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Amy Tan to be honoured by naming of new species - of leech
Chtonobdella tanae named after the Joy Luck Club author because of her longstanding support for the American Museum of Natural History, joining a host of wildlife, asteroids and dinosaurs named after authorsAmy Tan is happy. Not because of booming sales or critical acclaim, but because the author of books including The Bonesetter’s Daughter and The Joy Luck Club has just had a species of leech named after her.Chtonobdella tanae is a tiny Australian leech, and is, said the researchers announcing its name, “the first new species of invertebrate without chitinous or calcified tissues (like a shell or exoskeleton) ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 22, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Alison Flood Tags: Fiction Books Culture Biology Science Wildlife Queensland Source Type: news

Medtech approvals: FDA releases November 2015 PMAs
The FDA today released its list of the pre-market approvals it granted for medical devices in November 2015: Summary of PMA Originals & Supplements Approved Originals: 3 Supplements: 69 Summary of PMA Originals Under Review Total Under Review: 57 Total Active: 30 Total On Hold: 27 Summary of PMA Supplements Under Review Total Under Review: 583 Total Active: 433 Total On Hold: 150 Summary of All PMA Submissions Originals: 4 Supplements: 75 Summary of PMA Supplement PMA Approval/Denial Decision Times Number of Approvals: 69 Number of Denials: 0 Average Days Fr Receipt to Decision (Total Time): 193.4 FDA Tim...
Source: Mass Device - January 22, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Source Type: news

New bone biopsy method highlights link between diabetes and osteoporosis
This study highlights an important link between diabetes and osteoporosis, and identifies a selective deficit in skeletal development, which leads to excess fracture risk in this increasingly frequent disorder."It also demonstrates that environmental influences during critical periods of early development might lead to several common non-communicable disorders in Western populations."Dr Katherine Free, research liaison and communications manager for Arthritis Research UK, said: "Osteoporosis, as with all forms of arthritis, can be a debilitating condition and the risk of getting it increases with age. Women ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - January 21, 2016 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Radiological Case: Abernethy MalformationRadiological Case: Abernethy Malformation
What did a CT scan reveal concerning the etiology of this patient's elevated liver function tests? Applied Radiology (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - January 20, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: Radiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Study finds CT use has doubled for minor injuries
The use of CT for minor injuries has doubled in the past decade, according...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Study finds emergency CT use leads to diagnosis changes Appendix CT scans predict resource utilization Feedback helps docs adhere to CT imaging guidelines Emergency departments continue to drive CT use Algorithm cuts CT use for appendicitis in children (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 19, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Virtual bone biopsy helps identify why people with diabetes are at risk of bone fractures
A study using high resolution imaging to create a "virtual bone biopsy" has shed new light on why people with type 2 diabetes are at risk of bone fractures. Researchers used high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) to assess bone structure and strength at a microstructural level in living patients. The images showed that individuals with type 2 diabetes have structural defects within their bones, which could weaken them and go some way to explaining the greater rates of fracture found in older men and women with the disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 19, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study shows surge in use of CTs in patients with minor injuries
(University of California - San Francisco) Twice as many patients with non-serious injuries, such as fractures or neck strain, are undergoing CT scans in emergency departments at California hospitals, according to a UCSF-led study, which tracked the use of the imaging from 2005 to 2013. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 19, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

EMS Systems Should Lower the Threshold for Stroke Alert Activation
THE RESEARCH Oostema JA, Konen J, Chassee T, et al. Clinical predictors of accurate prehospital stroke recognition. Stroke. 2015;46(6):1513–1517. THE SCIENCE Recognizing that prehospital stroke recognition and stroke code activation result in better outcomes for patients, the authors of the study examined all EMS records of suspected stroke transported over a 12-month period. They compared this to the patient’s final diagnosis. They also examined all patients diagnosed with stroke in the ED who weren’t recognized by EMS to be having a stroke. There were 441 eligible cases. Of those, 371 (84.1%) were &ldqu...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 18, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP Tags: Research Neurology Columns Source Type: news

EMS Systems Should Lower the Threshold for Stroke Alert Activation
THE RESEARCH Oostema JA, Konen J, Chassee T, et al. Clinical predictors of accurate prehospital stroke recognition. Stroke. 2015;46(6):1513–1517. THE SCIENCE Recognizing that prehospital stroke recognition and stroke code activation result in better outcomes for patients, the authors of the study examined all EMS records of suspected stroke transported over a 12-month period. They compared this to the patient’s final diagnosis. They also examined all patients diagnosed with stroke in the ED who weren’t recognized by EMS to be having a stroke. There were 441 eligible cases. Of those, 371 (84.1%) were &ldqu...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 18, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP Tags: Research Neurology Columns Source Type: news

The Biggest Medical Stories You May Have Missed In 2015
SPECIAL FROM Next Avenue By Craig Bowron As we head into the New Year, let’s take a look back and see what lessons we should have learned from medical science in 2015. The New England Journal of Medicine’s publication Journal Watch provides physicians and other health care providers with expert analysis of the most recent medical research. Below is a brief synopsis of what the Journal Watch editors felt were the most important stories in general medicine for the year 2015. While you likely heard about a couple, others probably escaped your radar. Getting Aggressive with Strokes We’re familiar with the id...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Higher deductibles mean less imaging use
Patients who have high-deductible health insurance plans undergo fewer imaging...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Ind. radiology group institutes flat-rate pricing Rads are doing fewer double CT scans -- but nonrads aren't Knee MRI prices can vary almost 8-fold across the U.S. Public reporting does not reduce MRI scans for low back pain Almost one-third of radiologists' ED services uncompensated (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 15, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Use of metamaterials could speed MRI scanning times by more than 50%
Placing a layer of metamaterials boosts scanner sensitivity, international research group foundRelated items from OnMedicaLow-dose CT scan might overdiagnose lung cancerNew imaging method uses sugar to show-up tumorsNew imaging creates cancer-identification breakthroughDelays in GP referrals linked to lower cancer survival in UKRise in medical radiation incidents (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - January 15, 2016 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

ACR 2016 Moreton Lecture: How Radiology and Patient Care Intersect
Washington, DC — In today’s value-based health care delivery system, radiology professionals must learn to merge evidence-based medical practice with ideal patient experience. Influential patient advocate Andy DeLaO will offer ways to add value to a patient’s medical experience in his May 17 Moreton Lecture at ACR 2016 — The Crossroads of Radiology®. DeLaO, better known as @CancerGeek in social media circles, has an extensive background in health care, cancer services, business development, marketing and health care experience design. “During the Moreton Lecture, ACR 2016 attendees will g...
Source: American College of Radiology - January 12, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Sugary drinks linked to increased fat levels around vital organs
Conclusion This US cohort study found drinking sugar-sweetened beverages on a daily basis is associated with the highest increase in fat accumulation around the abdominal organs, compared with people who do not consume them. But there was an average increase in the amount of this fat in all people who took part in the study, although this was lowest in people who never consumed sugar-sweetened beverages. The study was prospective, which limits some sources of bias, but it has some limitations. For example, the food frequency questionnaire was only conducted once, at baseline. The results are therefore reliant ...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Diabetes Heart/lungs Obesity Source Type: news

Supreme Court declines to review Medtronic win in InFuse lawsuit
The U.S. Supreme Court yesterday declined to review a Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) win in a lawsuit alleging off-label promotion of its controversial InFuse bone-growth protein. Patricia Caplinger asked the high court last year to review an April decision by the U.S Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit that her state-law tort claims are preempted by federal law. Caplinger had argued that her claims survived preemption because the device was used in a manner not approved by the FDA. In a Sept. 11 petition for certiorari, Caplinger asked the Supremes to decide “whether state-l...
Source: Mass Device - January 12, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Legal News Medtronic Source Type: news

Early Trial Shows Injectable Agent Illuminates Cancer During Surgery
Contact: Samiha KhannaPhone: 919-419-5069Email: samiha.khanna@duke.eduhttps://www.dukemedicine.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 2 p.m. (ET) Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Doctors at Duke Medicine have tested a new injectable agent that causes cancer cells in a tumor to fluoresce, potentially increasing a surgeon’s ability to locate and remove all of a cancerous tumor on the first attempt. The imaging technology was developed through collaboration with scientists at Duke, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Lumicell Inc. According to findings published January 6 in Science Translational Medicin...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - January 6, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Children’s Hospital Uses 3D Printer To Get New Look Inside Heart
BOSTON (CBS) – Many kids born with heart defects need surgery to save their lives but it can be difficult for doctors to visualize the abnormalities before going to the operating room. As Dr. Mallika Marshall reports, doctors at Boston Children’s Hospital are using 3D printer technology to give surgeons a whole new look into and feel of the human heart. “Whenever we make these models everyone wants to grab them and pick them up and rotate them around and play with them in their hand,” says Dr. Andy Powell, a pediatric cardiologist at Boston Children’s Hospital. 3D heart used by doctors at Bos...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: deanreddington Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen 3D printer technology Boston Children's Hospital Dr. Mallika Marshall Heart Links Source Type: news

A child case of blunt liver injury ( iii b) caused by bicycle handlebars that underwent transcatheter arterial embolization and damage control surgery - Minagawa Y, Yoshida S, Takahashi M, Tohsya T, Shimooki O, Kaneko Y, Abe T.
The case was a 9-year-old boy. He fell while cycling and was transported to a nearby hospital. In this previous hospital, liver damage III b (Japan Trauma Society liver damage classification) was found by abdominal enhanced computed tomography (CT). His sy... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 23, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +3 | The top 3 medtech stories for December 22, 2015
Say hello to MassDevice +3, a bite-sized view of the top three medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 3 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry.   3. Medibio shares rise on Medtronic deal Medibio shares rose today on the Australian stock exchange after the company said it inked a deal with Medtronic. “The non-binding MOU provides a framework under which Medibio and Medtronic will enter discussions around a proposed strategic agreement...
Source: Mass Device - December 22, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 3 Source Type: news

FDA denies Materialise’s 510(k) bid for knee guide
Belgium-based additive manufacturer and 3D printing company Materialise (NSDQ:MTLS) said the FDA sent it a “not substantially equivalent” letter for its X-ray knee guide system, dooming its bid for 510(k) clearance from the federal safety watchdog. The Materialise system is designed to help align total knee replacement components without MRI or CT scans, the company said. “We are disappointed that the FDA concluded that, based on the information submitted, our X-ray knee guide system cannot be considered as substantially equivalent to our solutions based on CT or MRI images. While this decision will ...
Source: Mass Device - December 22, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Orthopedics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Knees Materialise Source Type: news

12 Amazing Things We Learned About The Human Body In 2015
The human body is a source of mystery. But every year, scientists get just a little better at understanding its secrets.  Of course, 2015 has been no different. In the past year, researchers have created better access to proven therapies, developed futuristic new technologies that may change the way we approach disease and even enacted more complete disease screening processes to keep us healthy.  Read on to learn more. Here’s to more scientific discoveries in 2016!   @media (max-width: 969px) { #desktop { display: none; } } @media (min-width: 970px) { #mobile { display: none; } } #g-body-de...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 22, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Reduction of contrast medium volume and radiation dose in CTA scans
Researchers have shown that a CTA scan (a scan of the arteries) can be performed with a contrast medium volume reduction of up to 75% and up to 50% reduction in radiation dose. CT scans using contrast medium are the third most common cause of acute renal failure and renal insufficiency as a result of hospital treatments. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

The transformation of cancer imaging: From shades of gray to living color
(University of Notre Dame) A new technology called spectral (color) computed tomography, or spectral CT, is not only on the horizon, but it is also on the University of Notre Dame's campus, where researchers are giving the phrase 'in living color' a new meaning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffolds Safe, Effective in STEMIBioresorbable Vascular Scaffolds Safe, Effective in STEMI
Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS) for stent implantation appear to be safe and have shown excellent one-year clinical and computed tomography (CT) angiographic outcomes in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - December 16, 2015 Category: Surgery Tags: General Surgery News Source Type: news

Attitudes and Beliefs of Primary Care Providers in New Mexico About Lung Cancer Screening Using Low-Dose Computed Tomography
Reports on a study to determine the awareness and attitudes of rural and urban primary healthcare providers in New Mexico (8 practicing in FQHCs) who use low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) when screening high risk underserved minority populations for lung cancer. (Source: Rural publications via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: Rural publications via the Rural Assistance Center - December 15, 2015 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

EOS Imaging touts sterEOS workstation study data
EOS Imaging said today that a clinical study examining the association of sagittal balance measurements and risk of falling in elderly patients reported a correlation between the falling risk and postural balance measured using its sterEOS workstation. The study results are slated to be presented at the French Rheumatology Congress in Paris this week, EOS Imaging said. “The analysis of sagittal balance and overall posture are emerging as key elements in the management of diseases related to aging. The results of this preliminary study show how EOS systems can be used for the 1st time in prevention and screening....
Source: Mass Device - December 14, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Imaging Eos Imaging Source Type: news

Imaging tests: Using them wisely
Follow me at @ashishkjha Half a century ago, physicians had few options for diagnostic tests to obtain images of the body. Worried about a brain tumor? A physician might order a pneumo-encephalogram (PEG), which entailed injecting air into the spinal cord and taking x-rays of the head, hoping to spot an abnormality. Tests like these were painful and ineffective, leading physicians to shy away from excessive imaging. The last five decades have seen dramatic progress in technology and innovation, but not without consequences. The upside — and downside — of innovation in imaging In the 1970s, CT scans became ...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - December 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ashish K. Jha, MD, MPH Tags: Health Health care Radiation Tests and procedures image testing Source Type: news

Combined imaging modalities may change cancer management
PET/CT and whole-body MRI detect extraskeletal disease that may change the management of high-risk breast and prostate cancer patients, according to a recent study. In addition, the combined administration of F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF) and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in a single PET/CT scan showed significantly higher sensitivity and accuracy than alternative methods for the detection of skeletal lesions. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 10, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Combined imaging modalities may change cancer management
(Society of Nuclear Medicine) PET/CT and whole-body MRI detect extraskeletal disease that may change the management of high-risk breast and prostate cancer patients, according to a recent study reported in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. In addition, the combined administration of F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF) and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in a single PET/CT scan showed significantly higher sensitivity and accuracy than alternative methods for the detection of skeletal lesions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 10, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CMS shuffles the deck in 2016 hospital OPPS rules
New Medicare payment rules for 2016 are chock full of changes for medical billing...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 2016 CPT radiology code changes: More bundling expected Tips for correct use of the -X{EPSU} modifiers CMS turns attention to billing for off-campus services How to avoid Medicare CT scan payment denials Panacea on new coding changes: Medically unlikely edits (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 9, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Tanzania: Villagers' Long Trek for Scans
[Citizen] Dar es Salaam -You do not want to get involved in an accident today in Misenyi District, Kagera Region. Not when your doctor will recommend a CT scan. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 9, 2015 Category: African Health Source Type: news

CT Scans for Statin Eligibility: A Pandora's Box to AvoidCT Scans for Statin Eligibility: A Pandora's Box to Avoid
Drs Steve Nissen and Peter Libby discuss the 'incidentaloma' effect and other concerns about using calcium scoring to assess whether a patient should take a statin. theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - December 7, 2015 Category: Radiology Tags: Cardiology Commentary Source Type: news

Are mammals 30 million years older than previously thought?
Palaeontologists re-examine a 200-million-year-old fossil from Greenland, reigniting debate about the origins of mammalsHow old are you? What if, when someone asked you this question, you answered with the age of all humans? 2.3 million years, you would say. What about all primates? Around 80 million years old. If you wanted to answer for the whole of mammal-kind, you’d find the answer depends who you ask.In November a new paper came out that stirred an ongoing debate among palaeontologists working on the first mammals and their close relatives. Early-mammal expert Professor Zhe-Xi Luo, from the University of Chicago...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 7, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Elsa Panciroli Tags: Evolution Fossils Science Biology Source Type: news

Automated CAC fares well in CT lung screening scans
CHICAGO - Automated coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring is robust and accurate...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Coronary CTA yields prognostic boost over CAC DECT differentiates lung lesions with material decomposition Study on CT calcium testing redefines who needs statins Coronary calcium CT scans predict mortality Coronary calcium found on CT packs extra peril for smokers (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 7, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Radiologist found guilty of poor professional performance
Dr Dawar Siddiqi made serious errors in relation to CT scan reports, inquiry hears (Source: The Irish Times - Health)
Source: The Irish Times - Health - December 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Clears Siemens CT Scanners For Low-Dose Lung Cancer Screening
The FDAhas cleared Siemens Healthcare’s SOMATOM computed tomography (CT) systems for low-dose lung cancer screening. Siemens now offers the industry’s most comprehensive approach to low-dose lung cancer screening -- both on all of Siemens’ new CT scanners sold as well as on the company’s installed base of non-end-of-support systems – using standard low-dose lung protocols that are already delivered on Siemens CT scanners. (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - December 1, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news