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Epileptic Effect: The Aftermath of a Seizure isn’t Always What it Seems
Discussion Upon arrival at the receiving facility, the patient's cranial CT scan rules out any kind of stroke. She's diagnosed with epilepsy and Todd's Paralysis--a rare condition you and your partner have never heard of. Todd's Paralysis was found by clinician Robert Bentley Todd in the mid-1800s.1 It's also known as epileptic hemiplegia and is a condition that affects epileptics. It follows an epileptic seizure in which the patient experiences total or partial paralysis of one side of the body. (Source: JEMS Special Topics)
Source: JEMS Special Topics - May 4, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matthew J. Cline, MA, NREMT P Tags: Patient Assessment Case of the Month Special Topics Patient Care Source Type: news

Epileptic Effect: The Aftermath of a Seizure isn ’t Always What it Seems
Discussion Upon arrival at the receiving facility, the patient's cranial CT scan rules out any kind of stroke. She's diagnosed with epilepsy and Todd's Paralysis--a rare condition you and your partner have never heard of. Todd's Paralysis was found by clinician Robert Bentley Todd in the mid-1800s.1 It's also known as epileptic hemiplegia and is a condition that affects epileptics. It follows an epileptic seizure in which the patient experiences total or partial paralysis of one side of the body. (Source: JEMS Special Topics)
Source: JEMS Special Topics - May 4, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matthew J. Cline, MA, NREMT P Tags: Patient Care Special Topics Source Type: news

A sister’s words: The athlete who couldn’t be tamed by a brain hemorrhage
When my 14-year-old sister Carly woke up on February 1, 2015, she thought about what snacks she wanted while she watched the Patriots play in the Super Bowl that night. She thought about whether there would be pancakes for breakfast. She thought about whether to go for her daily run or whether she should ride the stationary bike. Just the week before, she’d shattered her personal best time in winter track: a 5:32 mile. After pedaling on the bike for a few minutes, there was a sharp pain on the right side of her head. Within minutes, Carly became lethargic, unresponsive and in serious pain. Sensing something wasn&rsqu...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 4, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Caitlyn Coughlin Tags: Our patients’ stories Source Type: news

Mars Mission Could Cause Brain Damage Due To Exposure To Cosmic Rays
Thousands of people have volunteered for a potential mission to Mars, but if any of them end up making the trip, they might lose a few brain cells along the way. New research finds that exposure to cosmic rays during the long journey, expected to take about six to eight months, can damage the brain and lead to dementia-like impairment. "This is not positive news for astronauts deployed on a two- to three-year round trip to Mars," Charles Limoli, professor of radiation oncology at the UC Irvine School of Medicine, said in a news release. "Performance decrements, memory deficits and loss of awareness and f...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Baseline CT scans predict lung fibrosis in SSc
Patients with newly diagnosed systemic sclerosis should have a high-resolution lung CT and pulmonary function tests, because when assessed together, their findings identify patients at high risk of interstitial lung disease, researchers say. In a study of 305 patients with systemic sclerosis... (Source: Skin and Allergy News)
Source: Skin and Allergy News - May 2, 2015 Category: Dermatology Tags: CME-candidate IMN News RHEUM News RHEUM Lupus/Connective Tissue Diseases CHEST Pulmonary Medicine CHEST Clinical News CHEST News FPN News Source Type: news

Imaging in suspected child abuse: necessity or radiation hazard? - Bajaj M, Offiah AC.
Imaging has many uses, but in cases of suspected child abuse, radiographs and CT scans are vital in identifying fractures and head injury that may not be clinically obvious. There are growing concerns about the small but potential adverse effects of radiat... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - April 28, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Trans-orbital orbitocranial penetrating injury by pointed iron rod - Tewari VK, Dubey RS, Dubey GC.
Trans-orbital orbitocranial penetrating injury (TOPI) by a foreign body is an extremely rare compound head injury having a potential to cause major morbidity and mortality. Preoperative radiological imaging by CT scan is very important for operative guidan... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - April 24, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Lawnmower Shoots 3.5-Inch Metal Wire Into Louisiana Man's Skull
When Bill Parker cut his grass last Sunday, he was the one who got sliced and diced. Parker, 34, was mowing in front of his home in Gulfport, Mississippi, when the lawnmower shot a 3.5-inch piece of metal straight into his left nostril. "At first I thought a rock had flew out and hit me and struck me in the face," Parker, 34, told SunHerald.com. "It threw me back a little bit and it hurt real bad. I felt my face but I didn't feel any disfiguring or anything. I saw blood, so I knew I got a bloody nose." At first, Parker thought he had a broken cheekbone, but decided to have it checked out at a local h...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 24, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Lawnmower Shoots 3.5-Inch Metal Wire Into Mississippi Man's Skull
When Bill Parker cut his grass last Sunday, he was the one who got sliced and diced. Parker, 34, was mowing in front of his home in Gulfport, Mississippi, when the lawnmower shot a 3.5-inch piece of metal straight into his left nostril. "At first I thought a rock had flew out and hit me and struck me in the face," Parker, 34, told SunHerald.com. "It threw me back a little bit and it hurt real bad. I felt my face but I didn't feel any disfiguring or anything. I saw blood, so I knew I got a bloody nose." At first, Parker thought he had a broken cheekbone, but decided to have it checked out at a local h...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 24, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cholecystitis on CT, Check Ultrasound Before TreatingCholecystitis on CT, Check Ultrasound Before Treating
CT scans are not accurate enough on their own to direct treatment decisions for patients with acute cholecystitis, researchers warn. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines - April 22, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Radiology News Source Type: news

Unexpected perforated bowel complication – Lauraine’s story
Years of bowel disease and endometriosis had left me with a very sticky, complex pelvis. I reached the age of 50 and an MRI indicated I had ovarian cancer. This proved to be incorrect but my consultant was becoming increasingly concerned at the state of my insides and how the suspect masses presented on ultrasound and MRI’s. So much so he recommended a complete hysterectomy as otherwise I would live with this uncertainty for ever. This was four years ago – I was warned the surgery would be complex owing to numerous operations for bowel disease and endometriosis but on the basis the scans was no longer reliable,...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - April 22, 2015 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Tags: Your Stories endometriosis perforated bowel Source Type: news

Comparative analysis of clinical and computed tomography features of basal skull fractures in head injury in southwestern Nigeria - Olabinri EO, Ogbole GI, Adeleye AO, Dairo DM, Malomo AO, Ogunseyinde AO.
BACKGROUND: Basal skull fractures (BSF) in head injury may be missed clinically. Early detection ensures prompt treatment and prevention of complications We compared the clinical and Computed Tomography (CT) features of basal skull fractures in head injure... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - April 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Immunotherapy drug shows success in treating advanced lung cancer
UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center Dr. Edward Garon In what is thought to be the largest study to date using immunotherapy to treat lung cancer, UCLA researchers have found that the drug pembrolizumab (Keytruda), recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat some melanoma patients, is safe and effective in arresting tumor growth in people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Approximately 25 percent of patients’ tumors had high levels of the protein PD-L1, and the study found that they were the people most likely to have the best outcomes. The research was the first validation of PD-...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 21, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Why You Should Always Inspect Your Asthma Inhaler Before Using It
By: Laura Geggel Published: April 17, 2015 06:16am ET on LiveScience. A woman in Australia had an unexpected medical emergency on New Year's Eve after she accidentally inhaled one of her earrings, according to a new case report. The 41-year-old woman was at a New Year's Eve party when she felt like she was starting to wheeze. She had asthma, and reached into her purse for her inhaler, according to the report published April 9 in the journal BMJ Case Reports. The inhaler rattled when she picked it up, but the woman dismissed it as a loose connection within the device. [8 Strange Signs You're Having an Allergic Reacti...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eye-Catching Clothing Line Uses Biology-Themed Designs To Attract Girls To Science
An aspiring doctor is using a clothing line to inspire young girls to get interested in science. Lizzie Cochran, a 24-year-old student at Columbia University, came up with the idea of Epidemia Designs -- a clothing line which turns biology-themed images into designs for workout apparel and fashion accessories, late last year. The brand's first prototypes came out in January, and last month, the student created a Kickstarter to help launch Epidemia's first line of activewear leggings. Through eye-catching designs, Cochran and her team hope that they can attract girls to pursue the sciences. The Epidemia Designs team, w...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 20, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Article Advises on Reducing Radiation Exposure When Inspecting Lead GarmentsArticle Advises on Reducing Radiation Exposure When Inspecting Lead Garments
Radiofrequency identification (RFID) tags and computed tomography (CT) scans could improve the inspections of lead garments and other coverings that protect against radiation exposure during imaging scans, according to newly published test results. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - April 18, 2015 Category: Radiology Tags: Radiology News Source Type: news

Seeing the unseen: PET/CT scans reveal worms' hidden life
What are lugworms and other small animals doing in the seabed? Until now scientists have not been able to study these animals without disturbing them, but thanks to modern PET/CT scans, now we can study their hidden life. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 14, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hyland launches OnBase VNA
The newly-launched OnBase VNA technology from Hyland stores both DICOM and non-DICOM clinical content – X-rays, MRIs , CT scans, digital photos, documents and reports – and then makes it available, in context, from the electronic medical record. Enterprise Content Management read more (Source: Healthcare IT News)
Source: Healthcare IT News - April 13, 2015 Category: Information Technology Authors: Mike Miliard Tags: Online Only Clinical Electronic Health Records Enterprise Content Management Imaging Source Type: news

Identifying patients most at risk of developing pancreatic cancer
When people learn they have a lesion in their pancreas that could become pancreatic cancer, they often request frequent CT scans and biopsies, or surgery. Often the lesion is nothing to worry about. A team of international physicians has developed a profile of the patient most at risk of developing lesions that are most likely to develop into cancer. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 13, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Tumor DNA in Blood Reveals Lymphoma Progression
Using an advanced genetic test, researchers detected diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in blood before it could be seen on CT scans. The technique could improve disease monitoring. (Source: NIH Research Matters)
Source: NIH Research Matters - April 13, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Mayo profile identifies patients most at risk of developing pancreatic cancer
(Mayo Clinic) When people learn they have a lesion in their pancreas that could become pancreatic cancer, they often request frequent CT scans and biopsies, or surgery. Often the lesion is nothing to worry about. A team of international physicians, led by researchers at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida, has developed a profile of the patient most at risk of developing lesions that are most likely to develop into cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 13, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Creating Profile to Identify Patients Most at Risk of Developing Pancreatic Cancer
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — When people find out — usually from a diagnostic scan looking at something else — that they have a lesion in their pancreas that could morph into pancreatic cancer, they can panic. They insist on having frequent CT scans and biopsies to monitor the lesion, or they ask for surgery. Physicians also [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 13, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

New Species Of 'Terror Bird' Discovered In Argentina
An army of huge carnivorous "terror birds" -- some as big as 10 feet tall -- ruled South America for tens of millions of years before going extinct some 2.5 million years ago. Now, with the discovery of a new species of terror bird called Llallawavis scagliai, paleontologists are gaining fresh insight into this fearsome family of top predators. More than 90 percent of the bird's fossilized skeleton was unearthed in northeastern Argentina in 2010, making it the most complete terror bird specimen ever found. “It’s rare to find such a complete fossil of anything, let alone a bird,” Dr. Lawrence...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 10, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scapular Fractures: Diagnosis and Treatment PlanScapular Fractures: Diagnosis and Treatment Plan
3D computed tomography can play a pivotal role in the diagnosis and treatment planning of scapula fractures. Current Orthopaedic Practice (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics Journal Article Source Type: news

Study finds wild price variations for head CT scans
The price of a noncontrast head CT scan can vary more than fivefold in academic (more) (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 9, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

FDA Approves New Use for Immunotherapy Drug in Mesothelioma Treatment
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted orphan drug designation last week to the immunotherapy vaccine CRS-207, moving it one step closer to changing the way malignant pleural mesothelioma is treated. CRS-207 is derived from Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterium that causes the serious infection listeriosis. For the vaccine, the bacteria are weakened and genetically modified to produce an anti-tumor response without causing disease. Early results are impressive. The vaccine produced a 94 percent rate of disease control, either partial response or stable disease, according to a presentation made at the latest Inte...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 7, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Orbital Pseudotumor With Cavernous Sinus, Sellar ExtensionOrbital Pseudotumor With Cavernous Sinus, Sellar Extension
What did CT scan reveal regarding the cause of this patient's vision loss in the right eye, associated with swelling of the right eyelid and forehead? Applied Radiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Radiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Circulating tumor DNA in blood can predict recurrence of the most common type of lymphoma
Measurement of ctDNA enabled detection of disease before it could be seen on CT scans. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 2, 2015 Category: American Health Source Type: news

High-Cost Imaging Falls Short for DLBCL Monitoring (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Routine CT or PET-CT scans offer minimal survival benefit at substantial economic costs. (Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology)
Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology - April 1, 2015 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Evaluation and Treatment of Fetal Exposure to Toxoplasmosis
Symptomatic congenital toxoplasmosis is a rare disease in the United States. However, prenatal screening is becoming increasingly available, resulting in identification of infants at risk of developing the disease. Infants who are born asymptomatic may still develop significant neurodevelopmental sequelae months or even years after birth if untreated. Congenital toxoplasmosis is a difficult infection to diagnose. Using one case as an example, this review attempts to highlight the importance of identifying at-risk infants and summarize the most current recommendations with regard to workup and treatment of affected infants....
Source: NeoReviews recent issues - April 1, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Wild, B. M., Obringer, E., Farrell, E. Tags: Pediatric Drug Labeling Update Articles Source Type: news

How My Husband Transformed My Son's MRI Scans Into Incredible Adventures
My son was 2 years old when he had his first MRI scan. After a long, painful night in the emergency room, a CT scan confirmed what we feared: Andrew had a tumor behind his left eye. An MRI was needed to get a clearer and more detailed picture of the horror we were facing. On that first occasion, the MRI tech took him out of my arms and I listened to my son shriek my name over and over again with his arms flailing as he was carried down a very long, very white hallway. "Maaaama!! Maaaama!!! Mamaaaa!!!" Hearing his screams left me heartbroken and incredulous. It seemed like unnecessary trauma for a child who had ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 31, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MRI based on a sugar molecule can tell cancerous from noncancerous cells
Imaging tests like mammograms or CT scans can detect tumors, but figuring out whether a growth is or isn't cancer usually requires a biopsy to study cells directly. Now results of a study suggest that MRI could one day make biopsies more effective or even replace them altogether by noninvasively detecting telltale sugar molecules shed by the outer membranes of cancerous cells. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 27, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

MRI Based On A Sugar Molecule Can Tell Cancerous From Noncancerous Cells - 3/27/15
Imaging tests like mammograms or CT scans can detect tumors, but figuring out whether a growth is or isn't cancer usually requires a biopsy to study cells directly. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - March 27, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

MRI based on a sugar molecule can tell cancerous from noncancerous cells
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Imaging tests like mammograms or CT scans can detect tumors, but figuring out whether a growth is or isn't cancer usually requires a biopsy to study cells directly. Now results of a Johns Hopkins study suggest that MRI could one day make biopsies more effective or even replace them altogether by noninvasively detecting telltale sugar molecules shed by the outer membranes of cancerous cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 27, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Doctor's Diary: A CT scan is not always necessary for minor head injuriies
The five clinical criteria to decide if children need a CT scan, the ongoing saga at Whipps Cross Hospital and horse chestnut extract for arthritic joints (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - March 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Care Quality Commission arthritis horse chestnut extract prostate brain injury CT scan Whipps Cross Hospital Doctor's Diary James Le Fanu Source Type: news

Doctor's Diary: A CT scan is not always necessary for minor head injuriies
The five clinical criteria to decide if children need a CT scan, the ongoing saga at Whipps Cross Hospital and horse chestnut extract for arthritic joints (Source: The Telegraph : Health Advice)
Source: The Telegraph : Health Advice - March 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Care Quality Commission arthritis horse chestnut extract prostate brain injury CT scan Whipps Cross Hospital Doctor's Diary James Le Fanu Source Type: news

Early scans for back pain add cost but offer little benefit for seniors
Older adults with new back pain usually end up getting a CT scan or MRI. That’s often a waste of time and money and has little or no effect on the outcome, according to a new study from the University of Washington. The results contradict current guidelines from the American College of Radiology. The guidelines say that it’s “appropriate” for doctors to order early MRIs for people ages 70 and older with new-onset back pain, and many doctors do just that. The study followed more than 5,200 men and women over the age of 65 who saw a primary care physician for a new bout of back pain. More than 1,500 o...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - March 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Howard LeWine, M.D. Tags: Back Pain Source Type: news

Early recall rates decline after second round of lung cancer screening
(International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) The German Lung Cancer Screening Intervention Trial shows that the early repeat scan rate for suspicious findings decreased by more than 80 percent with the second and subsequent low-dose computed tomography screens, but emphasizes the need to have an organized screening program with the baseline scan available for comparison. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 18, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Early diagnosis worked – Annette’s story
Sourced from The Hysterectomy Association: Hysterectomy Association - Hysterectomy Association - hysterectomy, menopause and hormone replacement therapy (hrt) information and support for women. I was referred by my GP to the local Gynae clinic after another hospital picked up something after having a CT scan for an unrelated condition. I had a biopsy on Xmas Eve, diagnosis on 9/1/15 and into hospital on 2/2/15/ for a total hysterectomy. I spent 5 days in hospital and was shocked on seeing the wound once the dressing was off. I felt i had been butchered. The local community nurse came in ten days post op to remove the clips...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - March 17, 2015 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Parkinson-Hardman Tags: Your Stories Source Type: news

ACC 2015 Roundup: CTA no benefit, Abbott's MitraClip, Philips' IntelliSpace
Screening coronary artery disease patients using computed-tomography angiography is no better than functional testing in improving outcomes, according to a large clinical study by the National Heart, Lung & Blood Institute, plus more from the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology. A large clinical trial comparing computed-tomography angiography with functional testing found no benefit to clinical outcomes with CTA, which also exposes patients to large doses of radiation. American College of Cardiology, Biotronik, Edwards Lifesciences, Keystone Heart, Royal Philips, Abbott LaboratoriesNews Wel...
Source: Mass Device - March 16, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Source Type: news

CT scans appear to dramatically improve diagnosis of heart disease
Use of computed tomography coronary angiography, which provides 3-D images of the heart, coupled with standard care allows doctors to more accurately diagnose coronary artery disease in patients presenting with chest pain, therefore, leading to more appropriate follow-up testing and treatments, according to new research. Data also showed a trend toward a lower incidence of heart attacks among the group receiving the tests, known as CT scans, compared to usual care. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 16, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Heart CT scans show slight benefits over functional tests for heart disease
Patients with symptoms of heart disease have similar outcomes in terms of death and major cardiac conditions regardless of whether they undergo a functional stress test or a computed tomographic scan, but the scan may be better at ruling out the need for subsequent tests and procedures in patients who are free of heart disease, according to new research. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 16, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

£2m study to check if chest scans can cut heart attack risk.
A trial funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Programme will examine whether giving cardiac CT scans to patients when they arrive at hospital with chest pain is a cost effective way to improve treatment, save lives and cut unnecessary hospital admissions.In the UK, around 700,000 patients attend hospital emergency departments each year with... (Source: NIHR Evaluation, Trials and Studies News)
Source: NIHR Evaluation, Trials and Studies News - March 16, 2015 Category: American Health Source Type: news

CT Scans Might Spot Heart Risks More Clearly in Patients With Chest Pain
Title: CT Scans Might Spot Heart Risks More Clearly in Patients With Chest PainCategory: Health NewsCreated: 3/15/2015 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 3/16/2015 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - March 16, 2015 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

CT Scans Might Spot Heart Risks More Clearly in Patients with Chest Pain
Study found they changed treatments, lowered chances of later heart attack than standard care Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Angina, CT Scans, Heart Diseases (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: CT scans no better than other tests for predicting a heart attack
Thor BensonSAN DIEGO, March 14 (UPI) -- A new study finds CT scans are not better than other common tests done to evaluate heart health. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - March 14, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Traumatic injury of the proximal aortic arch after blunt chest trauma: report of a case - Kato M, Sugimura Y.
We report a rare case of an proximal aortic arch injury caused by blunt chest trauma. A 48-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital because of traffic accident. Computed tomography(CT) showed a small ulcer-like projection( ULP) at the proximal part o... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - March 13, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news