Television-related head injuries in children: a secondary analysis of a large cohort study of head-injured children in the pediatric emergency care applied research network - Lichenstein R, Monroe D, Quayle KS, Miskin M, Cooper A, Gerardi MJ, Callahan JM, Dayan PS, Holmes JF, Kuppermann N.
The objective of the study was to describe the epidemiology, cranial computed tomography (CT) findings, and clinical outcomes of children with blunt head trauma after television tip-over injuries. METHODS: We performed a secondary analys... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - November 15, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

An Open Letter to Medical School Students
Medicine has changed dramatically over the past 50 years. We've waxed extreme from a strongly relationship-driven practice to a technologically-advanced and financially-driven system. The time has come for us to bring these extremes together. Only when these two models of practicing medicine are integrated will we truly deliver great healthcare. When I was a child in Romania, our family doctor made house calls. I remember to this day, 60 years later, that he was a wonderful old man, with grey hair and big warm hands and kind eyes, and I actually looked forward to his visits. Even at five, I understood at some subliminal ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Blood Test May Detect Concussion in Kids
Could help reduce the number of CT scans, and the radiation exposure they bring, experts say (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - November 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study Finds Blood Test May Detect Concussion in Kids
Could help reduce the number of CT scans, and the radiation exposure they bring, experts say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: CT Scans, Children's Health, Concussion (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - November 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Early CT Screening Is Critical to Reducing Lung Cancer Deaths
Thoracic surgeon and robotics innovator Dr. Farid Gharagozloo believes regular early screenings and better follow-up care will significantly reduce the annual number of Americans dying of lung cancer by almost two-thirds. Gharagozloo, director of cardiothoracic surgery at Florida Hospital Celebration Health, says the medical establishment in the U.S. and patients themselves share the blame for the unreasonably high number of lung cancer deaths today. Patients need to be more assertive. Doctors need to be more aggressive. Together, they can make a big difference. "We can turn this thing around — change the who...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 10, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Who Should Be Screened for Lung Cancer?
This study included more than 50,000 people aged 55 to 74 who were current or former smokers with at least a 30 pack-year history of smoking (equal to smoking a pack a day for 30 years, or 2 packs a day for 15 years) and who had not quit more than 15 years ago. The NLST found that people who got low-dose CT had a 16% lower chance of dying from lung cancer than those who got chest x-rays. However, some other trials have not found a benefit from screening. The screening in the NLST was done at large teaching hospitals with access to a lot of medical specialists and comprehensive follow-up care. Most were National Cancer Inst...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - November 9, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Prevention/Early Detection Lung Cancer - Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer - Small Cell Source Type: news

Fire eater's pneumonia: the role of computed tomography - Marchiori E, Soares-Souza A, Zanetti G.
[Abstract unavailable] Language: es... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - November 8, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Occupational Issues Source Type: news

Can postmortem MRI be used to assess trajectories in gunshot victims? - Luijten M, Haest II, van Kan RA, van Lohuizen W, Kroll J, Schnerr RS, Hermsen R, Hofman PA.
PURPOSE: Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has proven to be of value for the reconstruction of trajectories of projectiles and the assessment of the injuries in deceased gunshot victim. For the depiction of soft tissue injury, MRI is superior to MD... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - November 8, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Violence and Weapons Issues Source Type: news

Is whole-body computed tomography the standard work-up for severely-injured children? Results of a survey among german trauma centers - Bayer J, Reising K, Kuminack K, Sudkamp NP, Strohm PC.
PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Whole-body computed tomography is accepted as the standard procedure in the primary diagnostic of polytraumatised adults in the emergency room. Up to now there is still controversial discussion about the same algorithm in the primary d... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - November 8, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Boy Lives With Bobby Pin Embedded In Kidney For Three Months
By: Agata Blaszczak Boxe Published: 11/06/2015 09:39 AM EST on LiveScience Kids will put anything in their mouths, and usually this doesn’t cause serious harm. But for one 4-year-old boy in Saudi Arabia, swallowing a bobby pin led to a perforated intestine, a pierced kidney and surgery to fix it all, according to a new report of his case. After a medical team operated to remove the pin, the boy recovered without further complications, according to the doctors who treated the boy and wrote the report of his case. "Children actually start exploring the world using their mouth as soon as they are able to pick up ob...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 6, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Boy Lives With Bobby Pin Embedded In Kidney For Three Months
By: Agata Blaszczak Boxe Published: 11/06/2015 09:39 AM EST on LiveScience Kids will put anything in their mouths, and usually this doesn’t cause serious harm. But for one 4-year-old boy in Saudi Arabia, swallowing a bobby pin led to a perforated intestine, a pierced kidney and surgery to fix it all, according to a new report of his case. After a medical team operated to remove the pin, the boy recovered without further complications, according to the doctors who treated the boy and wrote the report of his case. "Children actually start exploring the world using their mouth as soon as they are able to pick up ob...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 6, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

ITC grants Varian bid for Elekta investigation
The U.S. International Trade Commission said last week that it will begin an investigation into alleged Tariff Act violations by Elekta (STO:EKTA B), based on a complaint by arch-rival Varian Medical (NYSE:VAR). Varian makes the TruBeam and VitalBeam radiotherapy systems, which compete with Elekta’s Versa HD and Infinity devices. The ITC said Oct. 26 that it would open the probe based on a Sept. 25 complaint by Palo Alto, Calif.-based Varian against Elekta and several subsidiaries in Sweden, the U.K., Germany, China and the U.S., including Impac Medical Systems of Sunnyvale, Calif. Varia...
Source: Mass Device - November 2, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Legal News Radiosurgery Elekta AB Varian Medical Systems Source Type: news

Associations of computed tomography-based trunk muscle size and density with balance and falls in older adults - Anderson DE, Quinn E, Parker E, Allaire BT, Muir JW, Rubin CT, Magaziner J, Hannan MT, Bouxsein ML, Kiel DP.
BACKGROUND: Deficits in balance and muscle function are important risk factors for falls in older adults. Aging is associated with significant declines in muscle size and density, but associations of trunk muscle size and density with balance and falls in ... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - October 30, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Radiological Case: Multifocal OsteomyelitisRadiological Case: Multifocal Osteomyelitis
What did CT scan reveal regarding the cause of leg, knee and hip pain in this 57-year-old man? Applied Radiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Radiology Journal Article Source Type: news

PET/CT predicts stem cell transplant success in lymphoma
The presence of lesions on FDG-PET/CT scans prior to stem cell transplantation...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: SNMMI: PET/CT aids non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients FDG-PET/CT tops biopsy in lymphoma patients FDG-PET/CT, MRI can help assess stem cell transplant response (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - October 29, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

When Stroke Happens... at Age 27
Ever wonder what it's like to experience a stroke? Avid runner Emily Welbourn blogs about the day she had a stroke while running a race. At the sound of the starting gun, I charge forward with the other runners selected from around the world. In spite of being at peak physical health, I slowly realize my pace isn't sustainable. The one-mile marker is now ahead, I've got this. Just keep moving. Suddenly I am stabbed above the eyebrow...but no one is within arm's reach. Blindsided, I squeeze my eyes shut for a moment to tamper the pain, and the invisible knife is dragged across the top of my head down to my neck. Never i...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Association of a guardian's report of a child acting abnormally with traumatic brain injury after minor blunt head trauma - Nishijima DK, Holmes JF, Dayan PS, Kuppermann N.
IMPORTANCE: Increased use of computed tomography (CT) in children is concerning owing to the cancer risk from ionizing radiation, particularly in children younger than 2 years. A guardian report that a child is acting abnormally is a risk factor for clinic... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - October 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

High Tech Medicine Can Be Bad for Your Health
You reach a certain age and all your friends are getting sick, going to lots of doctors, having lots of tests, and taking lots of medicine. No surprise there. The surprise is how many of your friends tell you that their doctors have made glaring errors and that the tests and treatments have caused them more harm than good. And surprising also that often it is the best doctors at the most high tech places who seem to make the most egregious errors. The problem is that too many doctors have gotten into the habit of treating lab tests, not patients. And doctors have become super-specialized, each one focusing only on one spe...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 28, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why eating fruit and vegetables in youth protects your heart in middle age 
The Minneapolis Heart Institute in Minnesota found those who ate fruit and veg when they were in their 20s had less calcified coronary artery plaque two decades later, when measured in CT scans. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Loading Up on Fruit, Veggies in Early Adulthood Pays Off Later
CT scans after 20 years show healthier arteries, study says Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Heart Diseases--Prevention, Nutrition (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - October 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart CT scans outperform stress tests in spotting clogged arteries
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Results of a head-to-head comparison study led by Johns Hopkins researchers show that noninvasive CT scans of the heart's vessels are far better at spotting clogged arteries that can trigger a heart attack than the commonly prescribed exercise stress that most patients with chest pain undergo. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 26, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Underneath My Skin
No one but me and a handful of doctors know what's going on underneath my skin. On the surface I look like everyone else I pass on the streets on Manhattan. I hustle through Penn Station after getting off NJ Transit and whip out my MetroCard so I can take the number 1 train up to the Lincoln Center stop. Then, I weave my way through crowds of tourists and other people who work at ABC over to the coffee cart. I'm such a regular my plain hot Lipton tea and buttered roll are prepared for me while I wait on line; that way when I get to the window I put down my two dollars and 75 cents and walk away. There are very few noticea...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Accuracy of Canadian CT head rule in predicting positive findings on CT of the head of patients after mild head injury in a large trauma centre in Saudi Arabia - Arab AF, Ahmed ME, Ahmed AE, Hussein MA, Khankan AA, Alokail RN.
BACKGROUND: Investigation of unjustified computed tomography (CT) scan in patients with minor head injury is lacking in Saudi Arabia. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the compliance and effectiveness of the Canadian computed tomography head rule (C... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - October 23, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

FDA finalizes Class II status for HeartFlow’s FFRct software
HeartFlow‘s non-invasive CT-guided fractional flow reserve software has been reclassified as a class II medical device by the FDA, according to a posting from the agency published today. The FDA classifies medical devices dependent upon based on their “risks and the regulatory controls necessary to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness.” HeartFlow’s FFRCT test uses data from a standard CT scan to create a 3D map of the changes in blood flow as it passes across a coronary lesion. The Redwood City, Calif.-based company submitted a request for reclassification of the soft...
Source: Mass Device - October 22, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Software / IT HeartFlow Source Type: news

How Optos’ retinal scanner saved a physician’s life
A Hattiesburg, Miss.-based doctor says Optos‘ (LON:OPTS) Optomap retinal imaging camera helped him identify a particularly deadly blood vessel blockage before it could trigger a heart attack, according to the Hattiesburg American. During a demonstration of the system, Dr. David Richardson of Hattiesburg Eye Clinic was scanned by the mapping system which captures a panorama of the retina on the back wall of his eye. The image showed an abnormality, according to the paper, that indicated a possible vessel blockage. “Viewing a patient’s retina primarily helps us diagnose vision problems, but it can also...
Source: Mass Device - October 21, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Imaging Optos Inc. Source Type: news

Patients undergoing lung cancer screening experience elevated levels of distress
(American College of Chest Physicians) Low-dose computed tomography lung cancer screening is recommended to screen patients with an increased risk of developing lung cancer, but little research regarding the emotional toll of screening has been conducted. Researchers from Stony Brook Cancer Center in Stony Brook, New York found 43 percent of patients undergoing LDCT experienced elevated distress before screening, and one-third of patients experienced continued distress even after being told there was no sign of cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Nanodiamonds might prevent tooth loss after root canals
People undergoing root canals may have gained a powerful, if tiny, new ally. Researchers from the UCLA School of Dentistry have found that using nanodiamonds to fortify a material used in the procedure could significantly improve outcomes for patients.   A paper on their research is published in the current issue of the peer-reviewed journal ACS Nano. Nanodiamonds are tiny particles formed as byproducts of diamond refining and mining. Thousands of times smaller than the width of a human hair, they have been widely explored for use in dentistry, cancer therapy, imaging and regenerative medicine, among other applic...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 17, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Why Are Most Cancer Drugs so Expensive and so Ineffective?
Monopoly is defined as: "a situation in which a single company or group owns all or nearly all of the market for a given type of product or service. By definition, monopoly is characterized by an absence of competition, which often results in high prices and inferior products." The pharmaceutical industry is the most powerful monopoly in the United States. Not surprisingly, it delivers mostly second-rate products at ridiculously inflated prices. The results are unprecedented profits and bad patient care. Pharma's monopoly power is exerted in a variety of interacting domains. Political Monoply: Big Pharma is a ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 15, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

2016 CPT radiology code changes: More bundling expected
Code bundling has become a commonly used tool for revising reimbursement levels...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Tips for correct use of the -X{EPSU} modifiers CMS turns attention to billing for off-campus services How to avoid Medicare CT scan payment denials CMS: Radiologists are buying into PQRS program Bundling of radiology codes into surgical codes continues (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - October 15, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +3 | The top 3 medtech stories for October 14, 2015
Say hello to MassDevice +3, a bite-sized view of the top three medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 3 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry.   3. HeartFlow’s CT-based FFR lowers costs, improves quality of life A non-invasive test of cardiac function made by HeartFlow lowered the cost of care and delivered improved quality of life scores compared to standard care, according to a study presented at the annual Transcatheter Cardiovas...
Source: Mass Device - October 14, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 3 Source Type: news

TCT 2015: HeartFlow’s CT-based FFR lowers costs, improves quality of life
A non-invasive test of cardiac function made by HeartFlow lowered the cost of care and delivered improved quality of life scores compared to standard care, according to a study presented yesterday at the annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics conference. HeartFlow’s FFRCT test uses data from a standard CT scan to create a 3D map of the changes in blood flow as it passes across a coronary lesion. Results from the 584-patient Platform trial showed that the costs associated with planned angiography and the FFRCT procedure were 32% lower than the cost of angiography alone ...
Source: Mass Device - October 14, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Imaging HeartFlow TCT 2015 Source Type: news

Sheffield referee with brain tumour is diagnosed after being hit on head by ball
Melvyn Scarborough, 55, from Sheffield, had been suffering from chronic tiredness and balance issues. After being knocked unconscious by the ball, he was given a CT scan, which revealed the tumour. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How does D.C.'s health care affordability compare with major U.S. cities?
Compared with other major U.S. cities, Washington, D.C., looks downright affordable when it comes to certain medical costs, such as getting a CT scan or an MRI. But the true costs of medical care in the District actually vary widely, according to a new report from Castlight Health Inc. (NYSE: CSLT). The report compares widely variable health costs between the District and more than 40 other major U.S. cities as part the San Francisco-based health care information company's second U.S. Costliest… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 12, 2015 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

Lumbar bone mineral density phantomless computed tomography measurements and correlation with age and fracture incidence - Weaver AA, Beavers KM, Hightower RC, Lynch SK, Miller AN, Stitzel JD.
OBJECTIVE: Low bone quality is a contributing factor to motor vehicle crash (MVC) injury. Quantification of occupant bone mineral density (BMD) is important from an injury causation standpoint. The first aim of this study was to validate a technique for me... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - October 11, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

A snapshot of circulation failure following acute traumatic injury: the expansion of computed tomography beyond injury diagnosis - Anand T, VanSonnenberg E, Gadani K, Skinner R.
OBJECTIVE: CT scans with a flat Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) suggest hypovolemia, and the presence of shock bowel implies hypoperfusion. The purpose of this study is to correlate injury severity, resuscitation needs, and clinical outcomes with CT indices of hy... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - October 11, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Comparison of predictability of Marshall and Rotterdam CT scan scoring system in determining early mortality after traumatic brain injury - Deepika A, Prabhuraj AR, Saikia A, Shukla D.
BACKGROUND: Marshall computed tomographic (CT) classification is widely used as a predictor of outcome. However, this grading system lacks the following variables, which are found to be useful predictors: subarachnoid/intraventricular hemorrhage, extradura... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - October 11, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Trends in advanced computed tomography use for injured patients in United States emergency departments: 2007-2010 - Hussein W, Mullins PM, Alghamdi K, Sarani B, Pines JM.
OBJECTIVES: Studies have documented increased advanced radiography use in U.S. emergency departments (EDs) for injured patients over the past decade. The authors explored trends in recent years (2007 through 2010) in advanced radiography use, specifically ... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - October 11, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Patients spared artery probe by 3D heart scan that uses complex calculations
The new technology, known as fractional flow reserve computed tomography (FFRCT), creates a computer model of the heart from a CT scan image, which is similar to an X-ray. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

6 Amazing 3D-Printed Body Parts That Changed Patients' Lives
There's been a lot of hype around 3D printing, but its applications in medicine are real. Advances in "additive manufacturing" -- the industrial version of 3D printing -- are being applied toward federally approved medical devices, and have enabled surgeons from Scotland to Chicago to inexpensively visualize medical procedures before performing them. But that's far from all: Doctors are also crafting personalized bones and joints for their patients.  The devices and materials used today in a medical context often go well beyond the plastic and resin prototypes commonly...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 9, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Medtronic issues new software for SuperDimension lung device
Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) said today it launched the next generation version of its SuperDimension lung navigation system software. The SuperDimension navigation system uses a patients CT scan to generate a 3D virtual bronchial tree which allows operating physicians to map pathways to pulmonary targets during electromagnetic bronchoscopy procedures, the Fridley, Minn.-based company said. “This minimally invasive device helps physicians prepare for the most appropriate therapy depending on the stage of the cancer. Improving chances to more easily identify patients at an early stage may bring a dramatic change in ...
Source: Mass Device - October 8, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Respiratory Software / IT Medtronic Source Type: news

TAVI: Study prompts FDA notice on blood clot risk
A small study published yesterday in the New England Journal of Medicine, finding reduced leaflet mobility in some replacement heart valves, prompted the FDA to caution doctors about the risk of blood clots on the devices. The finding is notable because it involves both transcatheter aortic heart implants and surgical aortic valve implants, which have been in use for roughly 30 years. The researchers looked at data from St. Jude Medical‘s (NYSE:STJ) investigational device exemption trial for its Portico TAVI device and a pair of registry studies following patients treated with TAVI and SAVI devices. Ex...
Source: Mass Device - October 6, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Replacement Heart Valves Edwards Lifesciences St. Jude Medical Source Type: news

Study on CT calcium testing redefines who needs statins
CT calcium testing could significantly refine conventional wisdom regarding...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Coronary calcium CT scans predict mortality USPSTF ponders addition of new heart risk factors NIH study ties soft plaque on CT to cardiac risk factors SCCT: Dual-energy CTA may offer more accurate look at plaque (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - October 6, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Heart Scan Can Fine-Tune Risk Estimate for Patients Considering Statins
A study found that a CT scan could ascertain the heart health of people over 40 to better help them make a decision on taking cholesterol-lowering statins. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Heart Cholesterol Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT Scans) Krumholz, Harlan M Journal of the American College of Cardiology Statins (Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs) Source Type: news

This Test Might Tell You If You Don't Need A Statin
Medical tests usually tell you and your doctor if you need to consider taking a medication or having a procedure. It is unusual to think about a test as a way to avoid taking a medication. But I was senior author on a study that showed just that for the decision about whether to take a statin drug, the type of cholesterol-lowering medicine taken by millions of patients. The test is a heart CT scan looking for calcium in the coronary arteries, the major blood vessels that supply the heart. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - October 5, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Harlan Krumholz Source Type: news

Expert alert: Are CT scans safe?
ROCHESTER, Minn. — With questions lingering about the safety of medical imaging and the radiation that is used in some of those tests, Mayo Clinic radiation safety expert Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., wrote a paper that provides clear answers that she hopes will allay patients’ fears. Dr. McCollough wrote “Answers to Common Questions About the Use [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 5, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Penetrating stab injury to the lumbar spinal cord in a child - Scheiderer B, Mild K, Gebhard F, Scola A.
This article reports the case of an 8-year-old boy with a knife stab injury to the lumbar spine without neurological deficits. The computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a longitudinal penetration of the conus medullaris at the level of the first lumbar ve... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - October 4, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

After UCLA-led tests, immunotherapy drug approved by FDA to treat lung cancer
Pembrolizumab, a drug that has already been proven to extend the lives of people with advanced melanoma, has now been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The study, the largest published research to date using immunotherapy to treat lung cancer, was conducted at UCLA and 29 other sites in the U.S., Europe and Australia. “The approval of this drug and a test to identify patients most likely to benefit has the potential to transform the way that lung cancer is treated,” said Dr. Edward Garon, the study’s principal investigator and a researcher at U...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 2, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

CT Scans for Lung Cancer Turn Up Few False-Positives: Study
Worries that wider adoption of the screen might lead to unnecessary surgeries are unfounded, experts say (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - October 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CT Scans for Lung Cancer Turn Up Few False-Positives: Study
Worries that wider adoption of the screen might lead to unnecessary surgeries are unfounded, experts say (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - October 1, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Family Medicine, Oncology, Radiology, Surgery, Preventive Medicine, News, Source Type: news

CT Scans for Lung Cancer Turn Up Few False-Positives
Worries that wider adoption of the screen might lead to unnecessary surgeries are unfounded, experts say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: CT Scans, Health Screening, Lung Cancer (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - October 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news