Update to Interference between CT and Electronic Medical Devices
This website provides information about a rare and preventable type of interference between Computed Tomography (CT) and electronic medical devices. This information updates and replaces our 2008 preliminary public health notification. CT is a valuable... (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

For the first time scientists can observe the nano structure of food in 3-D
Scientists have, for the first time, created a 3-D image of food on the nanometer scale. The method the scientists used is called Ptychographic X-ray computed tomography. It has promising prospects as a more detailed knowledge of the structure of complex food systems could potentially save the food industry large sums of money and reduce food waste that occurs because of faulty production. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Getting under a fossil's skin: how CT scans have changed palaeontology
Scanning is leading to huge breakthroughs. For example, we’ve now found the world’s oldest chameleons and know why giant wombats were air-heads Palaeontologists seem to be CT-scanning everything these days. A paper published in March by an international team led by Juan D. Daza, used scans to get a better look at fossil lizards encased in 99 million year old amber. These tropical lizards from Myanmar can be seen in their orange, glass-like tombs with the naked eye, but not in great detail. Using CT-scanning meant scientists were able to examine not only the scaled skin of these fossils, but the internal bones a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 30, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Elsa Panciroli Tags: Science Fossils Technology Biology Source Type: news

For the first time scientists can observe the nano structure of food in 3-D
(Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen) Scientists from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, have, for the first time, created a 3-D image of food on the nanometer scale. The method the scientists used is called Ptychographic X-ray computed tomography. It has promising prospects as a more detailed knowledge of the structure of complex food systems could potentially save the food industry large sums of money and reduce food waste that occurs because of faulty production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 30, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Can concussion be tested for with a 'simple' blood test?
Conclusion This study is a prospective cohort study that aimed to investigate the use of two proteins in the blood – GFAP and UCH-L1 – as markers for detecting mild to moderate traumatic brain injury. The study found both proteins could be present in the blood after a head injury, with higher levels of UCH-L1 in the early stages after injury, while GFAP seemed to be a good marker for up to a week after injury. But both biomarkers were not found in all cases. One in five people with a brain injury did not have detectable levels of GFAP, and 1 in 10 did not have UCH-L1. This substantially reduces their ability ...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Neurology Source Type: news

ECRI, LSE partner for medical device pricing study
The ECRI Institute said earlier this month it inked a partnership deal with the London School of Economics and Political Science’s LSE Health and Social Care group. The Plymouth Meeting, Penn.-based institute said both groups will collaborate on a project that seeks to examine medical device pricing across different countries. “Reducing costs in the healthcare system is critically important for hospitals and health systems worldwide. We anticipate that our partnership with LSE will yield the kind of research results that are needed to make device pricing more transparent,” ECRI European operations veep Da...
Source: Mass Device - March 28, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Research & Development ECRI Institute Source Type: news

Simple blood test detects concussion up to a WEEK after head injury
Scientists from Orlando Health, in Florida, discovered that a biomarker released during head injuries remains in the bloodstream for seven days - and testing for it can cut out need for CT scans. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Simple blood test detects concussion up to a WEEK after head injury - helping 'prevent headaches, memory loss and depression'
Scientists from Orlando Health, in Florida, discovered that a biomarker released during head injuries remains in the bloodstream for seven days - and testing for it can cut out need for CT scans. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Digital Mammograms Could Also Reveal Heart Disease Risk
This study demonstrates that accurate cardiovascular risk can be determined by evaluating the extent of calcification in blood vessels seen on digital mammograms, without the use of any additional radiation or risk. These exciting findings will allow women to be screened for the two most frequent life-threatening diseases at once - breast cancer and cardiovascular disease - (and allow) for determination of cardiovascular risk in a large population of women who might otherwise not get this potentially life-saving information.”   SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1MESUa8 JACC: Imaging, released March 24, 2016. -- This feed an...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 25, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Digital Mammograms Could Also Reveal Heart Disease Risk
This study demonstrates that accurate cardiovascular risk can be determined by evaluating the extent of calcification in blood vessels seen on digital mammograms, without the use of any additional radiation or risk. These exciting findings will allow women to be screened for the two most frequent life-threatening diseases at once - breast cancer and cardiovascular disease - (and allow) for determination of cardiovascular risk in a large population of women who might otherwise not get this potentially life-saving information.”   SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1MESUa8 JACC: Imaging, released March 24, 2016. -- This feed an...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Digital Mammograms Could Also Reveal Heart Disease Risk
This study demonstrates that accurate cardiovascular risk can be determined by evaluating the extent of calcification in blood vessels seen on digital mammograms, without the use of any additional radiation or risk. These exciting findings will allow women to be screened for the two most frequent life-threatening diseases at once - breast cancer and cardiovascular disease - (and allow) for determination of cardiovascular risk in a large population of women who might otherwise not get this potentially life-saving information.”   SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1MESUa8 JACC: Imaging, released March 24, 2016. -- This feed an...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDG-PET/CT Accurately Detects Recurrence in Breast CancerFDG-PET/CT Accurately Detects Recurrence in Breast Cancer
18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is accurate in diagnosing recurrence in women with suspected recurrent breast cancer, according to results of a study in Denmark. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Loss of consciousness is related to white matter injury in mild traumatic brain injury - Levin H, Wilde EA, Li X, Hunter JV, Narayana PA, Hasan KM, Biekman B, Sw. PR, Robertson CS, Miller ER, McCauley SR, Chu Z, Faber J, McCarthy JJ.
To study the relation of loss of consciousness (LOC) to white matter integrity after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), we acquired diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at 3 tesla in 79 participants with mTBI and normal computed tomography(age 18 to 50 years) w... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 25, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Mammograms May Also Help Spot Heart Disease, Study Suggests
The breast screening test compared well to heart CT scans, researchers say (Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Breast Cancer - March 25, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mammograms May Also Help Spot Heart Disease, Study Suggests
The breast screening test compared well to heart CT scans, researchers say (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - March 24, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Cardiology, Gynecology, Oncology, Radiology, Preventive Medicine, News, Source Type: news

Mammograms May Also Help Spot Heart Disease, Study Suggests
The breast screening test compared well to heart CT scans, researchers say (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - March 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mammograms May Also Help Spot Heart Disease, Study Suggests
The breast screening test compared well to heart CT scans, researchers say (Source: U.S. News - Health)
Source: U.S. News - Health - March 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mammograms May Also Help Spot Heart Disease, Study Suggests
The breast screening test compared well to heart CT scans, researchers say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Coronary Artery Disease, Heart Disease in Women, Mammography (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

PET/CT after therapy avoids surgery for head, neck cancer
Using PET/CT scans to assess response to therapy can help patients with head...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 3-month PET/CT helps track oropharyngeal cancer Interrupted radiation therapy risks cancer recurrence PET/CT details hint at survival of head and neck cancer patients Oral HPV infection increasing in young men PET/CT prevents dissections for head and neck cancer patients (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 24, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Build Lung Cancer Screening Programs That Grow, Evolve
Discussions What We Can Learn From Our Customers: Perspectives From Three Non-Radiologists (and One Radiologist) ACR’s annual all-member meeting will be held May 15–19 in Washington, DC. The keynote address is being given by Ezekiel J. (Zeke) Emanuel, MD, PhD, an architect of the Affordable Care Act and a leading practitioner shaping the future of health care. Special events include Capitol Hill Day, with exclusive meetings scheduled for members to bring the “Voice of Radiology” to elected officials; the Body MRI Boot Camp and the Economics Forum. Sessions are organized into nine Program Pathways...
Source: American College of Radiology - March 23, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Medical imaging could benefit from new X-ray detector
Boost in sensitivity could reduce radiation exposure during CT scans (Source: PhysicsWeb News)
Source: PhysicsWeb News - March 23, 2016 Category: Physics Source Type: news

High-Risk Lung Cancer Patients May Not Need Annual Screenings
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Monday, March 21, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. – Most high-risk lung cancer patients might not need annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screenings if they are cleared of disease in their initial test, according to a study led by a Duke Cancer Institute researcher. The researchers found that even former heavy smokers appear to have a reduced incidence of lung cancer if their initial LDCT screening is negative, suggesting that less frequent screening might be warranted.  “This has significant ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 23, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

High-risk lung cancer patients may not need annual screenings
Most high-risk lung cancer patients might not need annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screenings if they are cleared of disease in their initial test, according to a study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

High-risk lung cancer patients may not need annual screenings
(Duke University Medical Center) Most high-risk lung cancer patients might not need annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screenings if they are cleared of disease in their initial test, according to a study led by a Duke Cancer Institute researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 21, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Annual CT Lung Screening Might Not Be Needed for All High-Risk Adults, Analysis Suggests (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH High-risk adults who have a negative computed tomography screen for lung cancer might not require subsequent annual screening, according to a retrospective analysis of data from the National Lung Screening Trial published … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - March 20, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Pars injuries in athletes - Oren J, Gallina J.
Pars injuries are common causes of low back pain in adolescent athletes. Workup traditionally has included lumbar radiographs with oblique views and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, recent literature has demonstrated the accurac... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Bringing MRI Where It's Needed Most
By Algis V. Urbaitis, Engineer If you haven't had an MRI before, chances are you know someone who has. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is widely used to create pictures of soft tissues in the body -- allowing doctors to identify anything from a torn knee ligament to a concussion. MRIs provide critical early diagnosis of potentially life-threatening injuries, yet their size and cost make them difficult to deploy to hard-to-reach places. That's changing. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, we've developed a portable MRI, also called Battlefield MRI (bMRI), that uses ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging to create images...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

High coronary calcium score may signal increased risk of cancer, kidney and lung disease
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) A 10-year follow-up study of more than 6,000 people who underwent heart CT scans suggests that a high coronary artery calcium score puts people at greater risk not only for heart and vascular disease but also for cancer, chronic kidney disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 16, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Meet T. Rex's Fierce, Fleet-Footed Relative
Scientists have discovered a nimble, meat-eating dinosaur with blade-like teeth that fills an important gap in Tyrannosaurus rex's family tree. The newly named creature, Timurlengia euotica, sheds light on how a family of dinosaurs called tyrannosaurs advanced from being small predators to clever giants at the top of the food chain -- within the span of about 70 million years. The long-legged, 600-pound T. euotica lived some 90 million years ago. It was around this time that tyrannosaurs developed impressive cognitive abilities and sharp senses, such as the ability to detect low-frequency sounds, a...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hitachi, Redlen ink development deal for next-gen CT component
Hitachi (NYSE:HIT) and Redlen Technologies said they inked a deal to co-develop a component used in photon-counting computed tomography devices. The Japanese conglomerate’s Hitachi Medical subsidiary and Redlen are slated to develop a direct-conversion semiconductor X-ray detector module, a necessary component for PCCT systems, the companies said. Saanichton, British Columbia-based Redlen makes high-resolution cadmium zinc telluride semiconductor radiation detectors. The pact calls for the duo to jointly develop the data acquisition technology to process data from the sensors, which is an ord...
Source: Mass Device - March 14, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Imaging Hitachi Hitachi Medical Redlen Technologies Source Type: news

Orthofix puts $1.3m into Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation deal
Orthofix (NSDQ:OFIX) said last week it is investing $1.3 million into the Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation through a collaborative agreement to support the procurement and installation of equipment and tech at MTF’s Edison, N.J. facilities. Lewisville, Texas-based Orthofix has maintained a collaborative agreement with MTF since 2008 to support the commercialization of its Trinity Evolution and Trinity Elite allograft matrices. Orthofix maintains the marketing rights to the product, while MTF sources, processes, packages and supplies them in allograft tissue form. The new agreement will expand tissue process...
Source: Mass Device - March 14, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Orthopedics Regenerative Medicine Orthofix International Source Type: news

Annabel’s journey: The story behind the movie “Miracles from Heaven”
Eight-year-old Annabel Beam was on a quest to find the perfect gift. During a 2010 trip from her Texas home to Boston Children’s Hospital, she asked her Mom to stop at the airport gift shop before boarding the plane. Annabel perused the aisles, examining each item in the hope of finding a token of appreciation for her gastroenterologist, Dr. Samuel Nurko, director of the Motility and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Center. Annabel spotted a cuddly teddy bear wearing blue doctors’ scrubs. She reached for the bear, squeezed its arm, and a musical rendition of “Doctor, Doctor, give me the news&hel...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - March 14, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Anna Beam Jennifer Garner Miracles from Heaven Motility and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Center pseudo-obstruction Samuel Nurko Source Type: news

Kids and Radiation Safety
By Stacy SimonWhen your child is sick or hurt, you want them to get medical care right away. Often, this means getting an image through x-ray, fluoroscopy, CT scan, or other medical test that uses radiation. These tests can often help children, and sometimes even save their lives. But it’s important to use these tests only when necessary.That’s because these types of exams expose children to ionizing radiation, which can be a risk factor for cancer. Exposure is especially concerning in children. For one thing, children are more sensitive to radiation than adults. Using regular equipment meant for adults exposes...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - March 14, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cancer Risks/Causes Source Type: news

Serum potassium concentration predicts brain hypoxia on computed tomography after avalanche-induced cardiac arrest - Cohen JG, Boué Y, Boussat B, Reymond E, Grand S, Blancher M, Ferretti GR, Bouzat P.
BACKGROUND: Brain anoxia after complete avalanche burial and cardiac arrest (CA) may occur despite adequate on-site triage. PURPOSE: To investigate clinical and biological parameters associated with brain hypoxia in a cohort of avalanche victims wi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

High coronary calcium score may signal increased risk of cancer, kidney and lung disease
A high coronary artery calcium score puts people at greater risk not only for heart and vascular disease but also for cancer, chronic kidney disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a 10-year follow-up study of more than 6,000 people who underwent heart CT scans suggests. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 9, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Quitting smoking plus low-dose helical CT reduces lung cancer death risk
Smoking abstinence for 7 years results in a 20% reduction in death from lung cancer – a benefit that is comparable to three rounds of annual screening with low-dose helical computed tomography (LDCT)... (Source: Family Practice News)
Source: Family Practice News - March 9, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Report: Alberta hospitals see spike in CT wait times
Patients may be waiting longer for CT scans in the Canadian province of Alberta...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Canadian proposal would ban private MRI, CT scans Alberta orders imaging test review Radiation therapy wait times meet guidelines in Canada (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 8, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Lung cancer screening: New Canadian guideline
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) Adults aged 55-74 years who are at high risk of lung cancer -- current or former smokers (i.e., have quit within the past 15 years) with at least a 30 pack-year history or more -- should be screened annually up to three times using low-dose computed tomography (CT), according to a new guideline from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care published in Canadian Medical Association Journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 7, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How to Understand Radiology Reports Used to...
Various imaging technologies such as ultrasound, CAT, and CT scans can be used to diagnose, stage or monitor treatment for ovarian cancer. (Source: About.com Ovarian Cancer)
Source: About.com Ovarian Cancer - March 7, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: health Source Type: news

New initiative helps Emergency Department reduce number of CT scans
(Source: St. Michael's Hospital News and Media)
Source: St. Michael's Hospital News and Media - March 4, 2016 Category: Hospital Management Tags: Hospital News Source Type: news

Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale and brain computed tomography-scan findings in head trauma patients - Nayebaghayee H, Afsharian T.
BACKGROUND: The study aimed to assess the relationship between computed tomography (CT) scan findings and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score with the purpose of introducing GCS scoring system as an acceptable alternative for CT scan to clinically management of... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Ultralow-dose CT successfully detects fractures
Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center found that ultralow-dose CT can detect...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: CT scans do double duty as osteoporosis test CAD can automatically detect vertebral fractures on CT (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 3, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

CMS Clarifies Coding Instructions for Lung Cancer Screening of Current Smokers
In response to comments by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and others, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has modified its coding policies for low-dose CT lung cancer screenings of current smokers. CMS set a July 5, 2016, implementation date for the addition of ICD-10 F17.2 (nicotine dependence) codes to the Medicare National Coverage Determination (NCD) 210.14 list of approved codes for low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening.  In addition, the CMS Coverage and Analysis Group provided a specific clarification after learning from the ACR that some claims f...
Source: American College of Radiology - March 2, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Ultra-low dose CT scans successfully detect fractures
(NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine) Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center are reporting they successfully performed CT scans for joint fractures with one-fourteenth the amount of normal radiation without compromising image quality or a surgeon's ability to effectively diagnose an injury. Study could have significant implications from a public health and safety standpoint for patients with orthopaedic trauma who require CT scans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 2, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

3-month PET/CT helps track oropharyngeal cancer
A three-month follow-up PET/CT scan is very helpful for detecting the recurrence...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Interrupted radiation therapy risks cancer recurrence PET/CT details hint at survival of head and neck cancer patients Oral HPV infection increasing in young men PET/CT prevents dissections for head and neck cancer patients (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 1, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Visceral Fat Triggers Heart Disease
I tell my patients to avoid drinking soda not just because they make you fat. Each sip of soda affects your health. Soda puts you at risk for health problems like metabolic syndrome. This is a collection of symptoms that can lead to diabetes, heart disease and other chronic diseases, like cancer. Soft drinks are the beverage of choice for millions of Americans. The latest research now reveals that sodas are a major cause of visceral fat — the deadliest kind of fat you can have, inflaming your tissues, rotting your blood vessels and upsetting your body chemistry. In a minute I’m going to tell you about a great ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - February 29, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Heart Health heart disease metabolic syndrome Visceral Fat Source Type: news

Signs and Symptoms of Colon Cancer
By Stacy Simon Many of the symptoms of colon cancer can also be caused by something that isn’t cancer, such as infection, hemorrhoids, irritable bowel syndrome, or inflammatory bowel disease. In most cases, people who have these symptoms do not have cancer. Still, if you have any of these problems, it is a sign that you should go to the doctor so the cause can be found and treated, if needed:A change in bowel habits, such as diarrhea, constipation, or narrowing of the stool, that lasts for more than a few daysA feeling that you need to have a bowel movement that is not relieved by doing soRectal bleedingDark stools, ...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - February 29, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Colon/Rectum Cancer Prevention/Early Detection Source Type: news

3-D micro X-ray images help answer questions about fried foods' internal structure
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) U of I researchers recently conducted a study using X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to gain 3-D images of the microstructure of fried potato disks after they had been fried for various lengths of time in order to better understand oil uptake and distribution in fried foods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 25, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

MRI assessment of pulmonary vein stenosis predicts outcomes
A retrospective analysis of children who underwent pulmonary vein stenosis repair with preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging from 1990 to 2012 showed that smaller upstream... (Source: Pediatric News)
Source: Pediatric News - February 22, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Triple rule-out CT shows value over CCTA
It's worth the extra trouble to perform a triple rule-out CT scan in chest...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: CCTA a good choice for patients with stable angina Societies issue imaging guidelines for chest pain Imaging for coronary artery disease on the decline Residents do fine reading CT triple rule-out exams Tube current modulation cuts triple rule-out CTA dose (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 22, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news