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Coronary calcium CT scans predict mortality
A simple coronary calcium CT scan can be used to predict death in asymptomatic (more) (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 7, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Brain Scan Reveals Old World Monkey's Surprisingly Complex Brain
The brain scan of a fossilized monkey skull has given evolutionary anthropologists new clues into the branching of humanity's ancient origins and is rewriting the current understanding of primate brain development. A team from Duke University scanned this ancient monkey fossil, first discovered in Kenya in 1997, and has revealed that its tiny brain was wrinkled and well defined, containing aspects that are actually more complex than its modern descendants. The ancient monkey, famously known as Victoriapithecus, is from the Old World primate family- an evolutionary branch that contains animals such as macaques and baboons....
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 7, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Calcium Scan Can Predict Premature Death Risk
Noninvasive look at arteries may benefit people without obvious heart symptoms Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: CT Scans, Heart Diseases, Heart Diseases--Prevention (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - July 6, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gene therapy breakthrough for cystic fibrosis
ConclusionThis RCT showed that a new non-viral-based gene therapy for cystic fibrosis was able to produce “modest” benefits in lung function compared to a placebo. The treatments were given once a month for a year. The study had many strengths, including its double-blind randomised design, recruiting adequate numbers to demonstrate real differences between groups, and using pre-specified outcomes and sub-analysis. This means we can be confident in the reliability of the findings presented. Although the findings of this study are encouraging, there are always limitations. These include: This study was relativel...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Radiation from X-rays and CT scans DOESN'T cause cancer
Oncologist Dr James Welsh from Loyola University in Chicago and his colleague Dr Jeffry Siegel said there is little evidence to suggest X-rays and CT scans are linked to cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Low-dose radiation from X-rays, CT scans does not cause cancer
Human body has the ability to repair damage caused by exposure to low-dose radiation from X-rays, CT scans and other medical imaging, scientists say. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - July 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UCLA doctors use 3-D printed model to guide tricky heart valve replacement
​​Last summer, after a long career as a successful entrepreneur and a brief retirement, Richard Whitaker was helping to start another new company. Unfortunately, a serious health concern caused a couple of interruptions in his work on the new venture. One of Whitaker’s heart valves wasn’t working properly, which caused congestive heart failure and led to two hospitalizations within several months.  Whitaker, now 66, needed surgery to replace the valve, which regulates the blood being pumped from the heart to the lungs. But previous surgeries and the unique anatomy of his heart would have made conventio...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 1, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Does radiation from X-rays and CT scans really cause cancer?
In recent years, there has been widespread media coverage of studies purporting to show that radiation from X-rays, CT scans and other medical imaging causes cancer. But such studies have serious flaws, including their reliance on an unproven statistical model, according to a recent article. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 1, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Does radiation from X-rays and CT scans really cause cancer?
(Loyola University Health System) In recent years, there has been widespread media coverage of studies purporting to show that radiation from X-rays, CT scans and other medical imaging causes cancer.But such studies have serious flaws, including their reliance on an unproven statistical model, according to a recent article in the journal Technology in Cancer Research & Treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 30, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Hidden cancer rarely causes out-of-the-blue clots in the bloodstream
Blood clots can be lifesavers when they form outside the bloodstream to stop bleeding from an injury. But they can wreak havoc when they form inside the bloodstream. A blood clot in a coronary artery can cause a heart attack. One in the brain can cause a stroke. Blood clots that form in a leg vein cause a problem known as venous thromboembolism, or VTE. If the clot stays in the leg, it can cause swelling or pain. If it breaks away and travels to the lungs, it can cause a potentially deadly pulmonary embolism. In about half of people who develop a VTE, doctors can identify what caused it. Common causes include an injury; su...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - June 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Howard LeWine, M.D. Tags: Cancer blood clot venous thromboembolism VTE Source Type: news

3-D heart printed using multiple imaging techniques
Congenital heart experts have successfully integrated two common imaging techniques to produce a three-dimensional anatomic model of a patient's heart. This is the first time the integration of computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (3DTEE) has been used in this way. A proof-of-concept study also opens the way for these techniques to be used in combination with a third tool -- magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 26, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Redefining overuse to include costs: a decision analysis for computed tomography in minor head injury - Melnick ER, Keegan J, Taylor RA.
BACKGROUND: A study was conducted to (1) determine the testing threshold for head computed tomography (CT) in minor head injury in the emergency department using decision analysis with and without costs included in the analysis, (2) to determine which vari... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - June 26, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

What Life Is Like With A Disfigured Face
(Photo: © Anthony Gerace) In a world obsessed with beauty, living with a facial disfigurement can be hard. Neil Steinberg explores the past and present to find out what it’s like to look different.“Take your ear off for me, please,” Rosie Seelaus says to Randy James, who is sitting on a black exam chair in a special room designed for viewing colors in the Craniofacial Center on the Near West Side of Chicago.He reaches up and detaches his right ear, which she created for him out of silicone seven years before. The ear is shabby, stained from skin oil and mottled by daily use. Viewed under various lig...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 26, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Helen DeVos Children's hospital prints first 3D heart using multiple imaging techniques
(Spectrum Health) Congenital heart experts from Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital have successfully integrated two common imaging techniques to produce a three-dimensional anatomic model of a patient's heart. This is the first time the integration of computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (3DTEE) has been used in this way. A proof-of-concept study also opens the way for these techniques to be used in combination with a third tool -- magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 25, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lung Scans May Help Track Suspicious Masses
Annual screening could catch changes that signal beginnings of cancer Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: CT Scans, Lung Cancer (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - June 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CT allows nonsurgical management of some lung nodules
(Radiological Society of North America) People who have nonsolid lung nodules can be safely monitored with annual low-dose computed tomography screening, according to a new study. Researchers said the findings could help spare patients from unnecessary surgery and additional imaging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 23, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study could reduce unnecessary cancer screening
Contrary to expectations, a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis does not improve cancer detection in people with unexplained blood clots in their legs and lungs, a new study has found. The results are expected to improve patient care and reduce screening costs around the world. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 22, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study could reduce unnecessary cancer screening
(Ottawa Hospital Research Institute) A large clinical trial led by researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa has found that contrary to expectations, a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis does not improve cancer detection in people with unexplained blood clots in their legs and lungs. The results, published in the June 22nd edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, are expected to improve patient care and reduce screening costs around the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 22, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CT Does Not Improve Detection of Occult Cancer in Patients with Unprovoked Venous Thromboembolism (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and André Sofair, MD, MPH In patients with a first unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE), adding computed tomography to a limited screening strategy does not improve the detection of occult cancer, according to a New England Journal of Medicine study.Some 850 … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - June 22, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Application of MSCT in the identification and analysis of traffic accidents: 2 fatal cases - Han SQ, Wan L, Qin ZQ, Deng KF, Zhang JH, Liu NG, Zou DH, Li ZD, Shao Y, Chen M, Huang P, Chen YJ.
OBJECTIVE: To explore the application value of multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) in traffic accidents through observing and analyzing the injury features of the accidents. METHODS: Two fatal cases caused by traffic accidents were fully ... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - June 13, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

SNMMI: FDG-PET/CT predicts ovarian cancer survival
BALTIMORE - FDG-PET/CT scans can help predict disease progression and overall (more) (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 10, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Hospital staffers race to keep up as ‘victims’ of mass casualty pour in
Monday was anything but a slow start to the work week for 150 UCLA staffers from 28 different departments at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. At 8:55 a.m., the first patient injured in a plane crash at Los Angeles International Airport was wheeled into the Emergency Department. The 25-year-old man was moaning in pain and bleeding profusely from several open fractures. His blood pressure was dangerously low. Reed Hutchinson/UCLA In the hospital’s command center, Dr. Rick Harrison, UCLA chief medical officer, calls for updates from departments as he takes charge as incident commander. By 9 a.m., more plane crash vi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 9, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

My hysterectomy for cancer – Carol’s story
The post My hysterectomy for cancer – Carol’s story appeared first on Hysterectomy Association. In March 2013 I went for my routine annual smear, I have been on yearly smears since the birth of my last daughter in 1997. Two weeks later I received a letter with an appointment to attend the colposcopy clinic which was scheduled for two weeks later (end of April). I attended this and was told I had cin3 pre-cancer cells on my cervix. They tried to do the leep whilst I was there but were unable to do it as the pain was horrendous. So I was advised it needed to be done under a general. The end of May I had my l...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - June 9, 2015 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Tags: Your Stories cancer cervical cancer Source Type: news

SNMMI: PET/CT with Ga-68 DOTATOC targets neuroendocrine tumors
PET/CT scans with the investigational radiopharmaceutical gallium-68 (Ga-68) (more) (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 8, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Adding contrast to CT doubles DNA damage from radiation
Patients who received contrast with their CT scans had more than twice as many (more) (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 5, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Adding contrast to CT doubles DNA damage
Patients who received contrast with their CT scans had more than twice as many (more) (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 5, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +3 | The top 3 medtech stories for June 4, 2015
Say hello to MassDevice +3, a bite-sized view of the top three medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 3 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry.   3. TAVI: St. Jude Medical can resume Portico trial St. Jude Medical, which paused implantations of its Portico replacement heart valve last fall out of an abundance of caution, won the FDA’s approval to resume U.S. implants of the device in a clinical trial, the company said. Back in Septe...
Source: Mass Device - June 4, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 3 Source Type: news

TAVI: St. Jude Medical can resume Portico trial
St. Jude Medical (NYSE:STJ), which paused implantations of its Portico replacement heart valve last fall out of an abundance of caution, won the FDA’s approval to resume U.S. implants of the device in a clinical trial, the company said yesterday. Back in September 2014, St. Jude said CT scans turned up a potential problem with the Portico valves in […] The post TAVI: St. Jude Medical can resume Portico trial appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - June 4, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Replacement Heart Valves Source Type: news

What is the Epidemiology of SMA Syndrome?
Discussion Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is caused by the compression of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) against the 3rd part of the duodenum creating a proximal intestinal obstruction. It is relatively rare and can be hard to distinguish from other causes of intestinal obstruction. Normally the SMA arises from the anterior aorta around the L1 vertebra. It extends anteriorly and caudally into the mesentery of the small bowel. The angle between the SMA and aorta is called the aortomesenteric angle and is usually 38-65°. The distance between the SMA and aorta is usually 10-20 mm. Within the aortomesent...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 1, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography in Newborns With Congenital Heart Disease
This article also provides images and videotapes to better highlight our understanding of various complex congenital heart lesions. (Source: NeoReviews recent issues)
Source: NeoReviews recent issues - June 1, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Gupta, D., Chandran, A. Tags: Pediatric Drug Labeling Update Articles Source Type: news

Dr Aoife Ryan wins 2015 Julie Wallace Award
We are delighted to announce that Dr Aoife Ryan from University College Cork is the 2015 winner of our Julie Wallace Award.   Dr Ryan will be presented with her award on 18 June at our Nutrition at Key Life Stages conference in Cork, Ireland.  Attendees will have the chance to listen to her deliver the Julie Wallace Award Lecture, titled ‘Cancer-associated malnutrition, cachexia and sarcopenia: The skeleton in the hospital closet 40 years later’.  We interviewed Dr Ryan about her career and research interests ahead of the conference. Q: You began your career as a dietitian.&nb...
Source: The Nutrition Society - May 29, 2015 Category: Nutrition Authors: DG Source Type: news

Radiological Case: Emphysematous PyelonephritisRadiological Case: Emphysematous Pyelonephritis
This patient presented with severe abdominal pain, fever, hypotension, tachycardia and leukocytosis. What did CT scan reveal? Applied Radiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Radiology Journal Article Source Type: news

FINALLY: Science Figured Out Where The Holes In Swiss Cheese Have All Gone
New research is poking holes in old thinking about Swiss cheese. Namely: Where do cheese holes come from, and where have they all gone? Those questions have plagued Swiss cheese producers who, in the last 15 years, have seen the signature holes in their product decrease for no apparent reason. Thanks to Agroscope, a government-funded Swiss agriculture institute, we now know it all comes down to hay. In a report released Thursday, Agroscope and the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology revealed microscopic hay particles are believed to be responsible for the creation of holes in cheeses such as E...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 28, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Reducing iodine levels in coronary angiography
Latest data from multicentre trials support the thesis that using lower iodine concentration achieves adequate results in terms of image quality in coronary computed tomography investigations (Source: Pharmacy Europe)
Source: Pharmacy Europe - May 28, 2015 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: ebercott Tags: Cardiovascular medicine Featured Articles Source Type: news

Bamboo in the brain-an unusual mode of injury - Ramdasi R, Mahore A.
A 22-year-old male presented with a history of penetration of bamboo over the head which had fallen from the height of 40 ft. The position of the object was confirmed by computed tomography and patient underwent surgery immediately with removal of the obj... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - May 23, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Risk Factor Prevalence, Injury Occurrence Source Type: news

Blood test to detect traumatic brain injury could reduce unnecessary CT scans
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) New study results show that a simple blood test to measure brain-specific proteins released after a person suffers a traumatic brain injury (TBI) can reliably predict both evidence of TBI on radiographic imaging and injury severity. The potential benefit of adding detection of glial fibrillary acidic protein breakdown products (GFAP-BDP) to clinical screening with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is described in an article published in Journal of Neurotrauma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Sea Turtle Gets New Lease On Life With Awesome 3-D Printed Beak
We had the technology, and we rebuilt him. This sea turtle was found clinging to life by Turkish animal rescue volunteers, its beak torn to shreds by a boat propeller. But thanks to a 3d-printing company called BTech Innovation, the sea turtle will soon be let back into its natural habitat with a big upgrade: a new beak forged out of medical-grade titanium, according to the website 3D Printing Industry. The turtle was found and then nursed back to health by volunteers at the Dalyan Iztuzu Pamukkale University Sea Turtle Research, Rescue and Rehabilitation Center. But the poor guy never would have made it in the wild beca...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 17, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Injury severity score inflation resulting from pan-computed tomography in patients with blunt trauma - Gupta M, Gertz M, Schriger DL.
STUDY OBJECTIVE: All articles that demonstrate a mortality benefit from liberal pan-computed tomography (CT) use in patients with blunt trauma have relied on Injury Severity Score (ISS) to control for morbidity. This mortality benefit may be artifact, the ... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - May 16, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Landscaper Survives After Nail Impaled In His Eye
BOSTON (CBS/AP) – A landscaper survived a horrific accident after a nearly 3-inch nail was impaled in his eye when he accidentally hit it with a weed-whacker. The incident happened about two years ago, but was just reported this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. Landscaper escapes with "barely a scratch" after getting 3-inch nail in eye http://t.co/ESrDI735gv pic.twitter.com/uFSoj73Qhv — CBS News (@CBSNews) May 14, 2015 The unidentified 27-year-old landscaper was cutting weeds using a power string trimmer when it hit a nail and it became lodged in his right eye. ‘EXCRUCIATING&rsquo...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 14, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: miketoole Tags: Health Local News CT Scan Dr. Rajiv Gupta Dr. Wael Asaad Landscaper Massachusetts General Hospital MGH Nail In Eye New England Journal Of Medicine X-Ray Source Type: news

A SMARTer approach to stroke care
Time is critical when it comes to stroke: early treatment is associated with better outcomes. According to the Screening with MRI for Accurate and Rapid stroke Treatment (SMART) study, small changes in quality improvement procedures enabled clinicians to use MRI scans to diagnose stroke patients before giving acute treatment, within 60 minutes of hospital arrival. MRI scans provide detailed images but take longer to complete than CT scans, which are commonly used in most centers. (Source: NINDS Press Releases and News: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke)
Source: NINDS Press Releases and News: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke - May 13, 2015 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

A SMARTer approach to stroke care
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) Time is critical when it comes to stroke, and early treatment is associated with better outcomes. According to the Screening with MRI for Accurate and Rapid stroke Treatment (SMART) study, small changes in quality improvement procedures enabled clinicians to use MRI scans to diagnose stroke patients before giving acute treatment, within 60 minutes of hospital arrival. MRI scans provide detailed images but take longer to complete than CT scans, which are commonly used in most centers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Government to provide free diagnostic tests for all
Centre is set to announce a scheme for providing free diagnostic tests, including several blood tests, x-rays and advanced CT scans, for those visiting public health facilities. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - May 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

It Was You: A Thank You Letter to a Nurse
It was you. It was you who held my hand when I said "I don't know if I'm ready for this." It was you who told me to push before the epidural ran out, and boy did I push. It was you who stayed long after your shift had ended because you were just as excited as I was to find out whether we were welcoming a boy or a girl. It was you who took the camera and captured our first moments without us even having to ask. It was you who made my child laugh while the doctor checked to see if he needed stitches after a bad run in with a coffee table. It was you who cried with me after the doctor told us that our son had ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clinical decision tools in electronic medical records can reduce childhood radiation exposure
Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases lifetime malignancy risk, but a team of researchers has found that with just a little bit of education, the risk can be significantly reduced. Currently, up to 40% of computed tomography, or CT, scans are ordered (for everyone) unnecessarily. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Low-dose CT in body-packers: delineation of body packs and radiation dose in a porcine model - Scherr MK, Peschel O, Grimm JM, Ziegeler E, Uhl M, Geyer LL, Reiser MF, Wirth S.
PURPOSE: To compare low-dose computed tomography (CT) with standard CT and conventional radiography (CR) regarding delineation of body packs and radiation dose. METHODS: Nine samples of illicit drugs including cocaine, heroin, and hashish were posi... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - May 7, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Compact Light Source Improves CT Scans
A new study shows that the recently developed Compact Light Source (CLS) – a commercial X-ray source with roots in research and development efforts at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory – enables computer tomography scans that reveal more detail than routine scans performed at hospitals today. (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - May 7, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Compact light source improves CT scans
The recently developed Compact Light Source (CLS) -- a commercial X-ray source -- enables computer tomography scans that reveal more detail than routine scans performed at hospitals today. The new technology could soon be used in preclinical studies and help researchers better understand cancer and other diseases. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 5, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Epileptic Effect: The Aftermath of a Seizure isn’t Always What it Seems
Discussion Upon arrival at the receiving facility, the patient's cranial CT scan rules out any kind of stroke. She's diagnosed with epilepsy and Todd's Paralysis--a rare condition you and your partner have never heard of. Todd's Paralysis was found by clinician Robert Bentley Todd in the mid-1800s.1 It's also known as epileptic hemiplegia and is a condition that affects epileptics. It follows an epileptic seizure in which the patient experiences total or partial paralysis of one side of the body. (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 4, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matthew J. Cline, MA, NREMT P Tags: Patient Assessment Case of the Month Special Topics Patient Care Source Type: news

Epileptic Effect: The Aftermath of a Seizure isn’t Always What it Seems
Discussion Upon arrival at the receiving facility, the patient's cranial CT scan rules out any kind of stroke. She's diagnosed with epilepsy and Todd's Paralysis--a rare condition you and your partner have never heard of. Todd's Paralysis was found by clinician Robert Bentley Todd in the mid-1800s.1 It's also known as epileptic hemiplegia and is a condition that affects epileptics. It follows an epileptic seizure in which the patient experiences total or partial paralysis of one side of the body. (Source: JEMS Special Topics)
Source: JEMS Special Topics - May 4, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matthew J. Cline, MA, NREMT P Tags: Patient Assessment Case of the Month Special Topics Patient Care Source Type: news