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Can We Treat Obesity with Regulated Hunger Signaling?
Recent research suggests that obesity can be controlled by regulating the satiety cascade, including influencing the nerves carrying hunger signals. Global obesity levels have almost doubled in the last 30 years. This is a worrying fact, especially when considering that obesity represents one of the major risk factors for many chronic diseases, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in particular. Thus, it is not surprising that conditions like insulin resistance, pre-diabetes, and diabetes are becoming increasingly common worldwide. Although it is clear that obesity develops when caloric energy intake exceeds energy expen...
Source: World of Psychology - May 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain Blogger Health-related Publishers Research gut-brain axis hunger signaling Obesity Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

AI Detects and Measures Small Vessel Disease in Brain CT Scans
Clinicial researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Edinburgh have developed an artificial intelligence software for identifying and quantifying small vessel disease, a frequent cause of dementia and stroke in older people, from CT scans. The investigators have already tested the software at Imperial’s Charing Cross Hospital, demonstrating that the technology rivals that of MRI scans coupled with specialized clinicians in spotting and measuring small vessel disease. Because CT scans are used, which are considerably faster to perform than MRI scans, and that the assessment may not need any human in...
Source: Medgadget - May 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Informatics Neurology Neurosurgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

The Ethics of Keeping Alfie Alive
By SAURABH JHA Of my time arguing with doctors, 30 % is spent convincing British doctors that their American counterparts aren’t idiots, 30 % convincing American doctors that British doctors aren’t idiots, and 40 % convincing both that I’m not an idiot. A British doctor once earnestly asked whether American physicians carry credit card reading machines inside their white coats. Myths about the NHS can be equally comical. British doctors don’t prostate every morning in deference to the NHS, like the citizens of Oceania sang to Big Brother in Orwell’s dystopia. Nor, in their daily rounds, do the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: OP-ED Uncategorized AlfieEvans Source Type: blogs

How mindfulness helped this physician ’s primary care journey
“Paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment and nonjudgmentally.” That’s how Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD, describes mindfulness. In the book Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind, another thought leader in mindfulness, Shunryu Suzuki, says that, “In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s there are few.” In my experience, I’ve found that cultivating a beginner’s mind opens doors and improves clinical diagnosis. Medical training has phases, and clinicians in different phases think differently. In medical school, students learn...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 20, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/heather-finlay-morreale" rel="tag" > Heather Finlay-Morreale, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Parasternal long axis (PLAX) view – echocardiogram – split screen images
Parasternal long axis (PLAX) view – echocardiogram – split screen images Split screen display with side by side display of 2-D (2 dimensional) and Colour Doppler imaging in echocardiography from parasternal long axis view. Left panel shows the 2-D image with mitral valve open. Structure nearest to the transducer in the PLAX view is the right ventricular free wall (RVFW). There may be a thin echo free space anterior to it due to pericardial pad of fat. Beneath that the outflow region of the right ventricle is partially seen, but not the pulmonary valve or sub pulmonary region. Next comes the interventricular se...
Source: Cardiophile MD - May 16, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Echocardiogram Library Echocardiography Source Type: blogs

A surgeon channels his mentor
“A teacher affects eternity; he can never tell where his influence stops.” – Henry Adams Mrs. Jones (identifying information changed) is a vibrant woman in her eighties who has been admitted to the hospital with swallowing problems and a fever. The CT scans show some swelling next to one of the major blood vessels and our team has been asked to see her and decide if she would benefit from surgery. She winces as I touch her swollen, tender neck. “The scan shows that there is an infection deep in the tissues,” I tell her. “It will clear up more quickly if we take you to the operating room,...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/bruce-campbell" rel="tag" > Bruce Campbell, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Surgery Source Type: blogs

Insurance denials: the law of the land
It all started out with Malaysian methimazole, and didn’t end until two highly trained medical professionals sat on opposite ends of a telephone call, scratching their heads and wondering how two digits being transposed could lead to so many problems. Those two transposed digits caused a thyroid uptake scan to become a bone marrow scan (whatever that is). But look at all it took to get there. Mystery illness, mystery medicine It started when a new patient came to see one of my colleagues with a mystery illness, and a medication in a pill bottle with a label in another language. After figuring out what this medicine w...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/fred-n-pelzman" rel="tag" > Fred N. Pelzman, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Imaging Innovations Predict Fractures Among Aging Patients
Bone fractures are  increasingly commonamong aging populations. Not only is rehabilitation and healing a strenuous and long process, but pain management can result in its own complications and stress. Fortunately, a new study from the University of Wisconsin suggests routine CT scans might be able to determine if a patient is at risk for an osteopathic fracture. This discovery could prompt aging patients to take conscientious measures for preventing falls.  " CT scans are commonly performed in older adults for a wide variety of reasons. The rich bone data embedded in these scans is often ignored, but can and...
Source: radRounds - May 5, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

When a physician gets yelled at
It was not so much the words as the overall tone of the interaction. The doctor-patient relationship had been generally affable. There was the usual exchange of pleasantries over the years. Questions about family, children, and grandchildren. It was a good relationship — until Harvey got sick, that is. Originally, there was weight loss and fatigue. The initial physical exam and slew of testing showed nothing but a frail, cachectic, middle-aged man. A few CT scans later, and he was in the oncologist’s office discussing chemotherapy. A regimen was decided on, and therapy began the next day. Therapy was hard. Naus...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 4, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jordan-grumet" rel="tag" > Jordan Grumet, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Radiology and Errors
Conclusion should use diagnostic terms /  reflect  one opinion about disease and not  an echogenic  …. Etc . one can take the help of , could rep …. in view of …… etcComparison with old  images should follow , expressing various components  including the effect of therapy/ progression of the disease  findings etcAlways proof read your report with the help of your data entry operators( who would even confirm that you have reported the correct patient , i.e. images and report belong to the same individual/ investigation done is  what the clini...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - April 24, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Bedside ultrasound is not yet the standard of care. But it will be.
I just read a Clinical Problem Solving case from the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). It was entitled “Stream of Consciousness“and it told the story of a 65-year-old man who was a patient at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital of Harvard Medical School, arguably one of the finest medical institutions in the world. These cases are presented in single paragraphs to a clinical expert physician who then comments about his or her thought processes and discusses how he or she would have handled the situation. In this narrative, the patient presented to a different hospital in New England with kidney failure...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 21, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/janice-boughton" rel="tag" > Janice Boughton, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Hospital-Based Medicine Neurology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 16th 2018
This study demonstrates that small peptide domains derived from native protein amelogenin can be utilized to construct a mineral layer on damaged human enamel in vitro. Six groups were prepared to carry out remineralization on artificially created lesions on enamel: (1) no treatment, (2) Ca2+ and PO43- only, (3) 1100 ppm fluoride (F), (4) 20 000 ppm F, (5) 1100 ppm F and peptide, and (6) peptide alone. While the 1100 ppm F sample (indicative of common F content of toothpaste for homecare) did not deliver F to the thinly deposited mineral layer, high F test sample (indicative of clinical varnish treatment) formed mainly C...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 15, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

O ’NA HealthCare: A new healthcare insurance option?
I was recently invited to speak at David Wolfe’s Longevity NOW conference in Anaheim, California, where I gave a talk entitled “Germs, Muscle, and Pac-Man: New Strategies for Turning the Clock Back 10 or 20 Years” detailing some new strategies for maintaining youthfulness and vigor. (It was a longevity conference, after all. I shall be posting a similar talk on our Undoctored Inner Circle website in the next few days.) Of the 40-some vendor booths that were part of the conference, there was one that caught my eye: O’NA HealthCare. They claim to provide coverage for functional medicine care, integrat...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 11, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle health insurance healthcare low-cost Source Type: blogs

Correlating Hair Graying and Cardiovascular Disease
This study recruited 545 adult male patients who underwent a CTCA for suspicion of CAD. Extent of grayness was assessed with two observers using hair whitening score (HWS), defined according to percentage of gray/white hairs. Patients were divided into different subgroups according to the percentage of gray/white hairs and to the absence or presence of CAD. We found that patients who had atherosclerotic CAD were older in age and among all cardiovascular risk factors, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were more prevalent, and that high HWS was associated with increased risk of CAD independent of chronological ...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 11, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The follies of health insurance preauthorization
A few weeks ago, I saw a patient some gastro issues. So far, nothing newsworthy here since I am a gastroenterologist. I ordered a CT scan colonography, a special CT scan that is designed to view the colon in detail. It’s the CT scan version of a colonoscopy. Why didn’t I simply perform a colonoscopy, which, unlike a CT scan, would contribute to my retirement fund? That’s an easy one. Care to take a guess? The patient refused to undergo a colonoscopy. The patient had no insurance, and I don’t work for free. The CT scan was a better tool than colonoscopy to explain her symptoms. I expect that my dis...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/michael-kirsch" rel="tag" > Michael Kirsch, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Gastroenterology Source Type: blogs

Interview with Tal Golesworthy, Inventor of the ExoVasc Aortic Root Support
Tal Golesworthy is the inventor of the ExoVasc, a bespoke implant that supports the aortic root when it has becomes weak and dilated. Tal’s invention was born out of his personal need for the device to support his aorta that was expanding dangerously due to Marfan syndrome. In 2004, Tal was the first patient to be implanted with the device that he invented, and many more patients have benefited from the ExoVasc Aortic Root Support since. Medgadget editor Tom Peach spoke with Tal Golesworthy to hear about the inspiring journey that gave birth to the ExoVasc and to learn more about Exstent, the company that was formed ...
Source: Medgadget - April 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tom Peach Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Making Electronic Health Records Great Again
By ROBERT WACHTER and JEFF GOLDSMITH After a blizzard of hype surrounding the electronic health record (EHR), health professionals are now in full backlash mode against this complex new tool. They are rightly seen as a major cause of professional burnout among physicians and nurses: Clinicians are spending almost half their professional time typing, clicking, and checking boxes on electronic records. They can and must be made into useful, easy-to-use tools that liberate, rather than oppress, clinicians. Performing several tasks, badly. The EHR is a lot more than merely an electronic version of the patient&rs...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Fix the EHR!
By ROBERT WACHTER and JEFF GOLDSMITH After a blizzard of hype surrounding the electronic health record (EHR), health professionals are now in full backlash mode against this complex new tool. They are rightly seen as a major cause of professional burnout among physicians and nurses: Clinicians are spending almost half their professional time typing, clicking, and checking boxes on electronic records. They can and must be made into useful, easy-to-use tools that liberate, rather than oppress, clinicians. Performing several tasks, badly. The EHR is a lot more than merely an electronic version of the patient&rs...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

A middle aged man with unwitnessed cardiac arrest
Written by Pendell Meyers, with edits by Steve SmithThanks to my attending Nic Thompson who superbly led this resuscitationWe received a call that a middle aged male in cardiac arrest was 5 minutes out. He was estimated to be in his 50s, with no known PMHx. He arrived with chest compressions ongoing, intubated, and being bagged. EMS report was that the patient had unknown down time with unwitnessed arrest, found initially in VFib arrest, defibrillated x1 followed by PEA arrest alternating with asystolic arrest during transport.He arrived in PEA arrest with a slow and wide cardiac waveform during initial rhythm check, with ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - April 6, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

Splitting hairs with hypertension
By SAURABH JHA, MD   Intrigued by many things in my first few days in the U.S., what perplexed me the most was that there seemed to be a DaVita Dialysis wherever I went; in malls, in the mainstreet of West Philadelphia, near high rises and near lower rises. I felt that I was being ominously followed by nephrologists. How on earth could providers of renal replacement therapy have a similar spatial distribution as McDonalds? After reading Friedrich Hayek’s essay, Use of Knowledge in Society, I realized why. In stead of building a multiplex for dialysis, which has shops selling pulmonary edema-inducing fried chicke...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: OP-ED Patients Value-Based Care Source Type: blogs

First FDA Clearance for Software to 3D Print Patient Specific Anatomical Models
Materialise, a company specializing in 3D printing based in Belgium but with offices around the world, won FDA clearance for its Mimics inPrint software to be used for 3D printing of anatomical models for diagnostic applications. The software allows hospitals to print one-to-one reproductions of individual patient anatomy, thereby helping surgeons to understand the unique nature of difficult cases. This is the first such clearance issued by the FDA. The regulatory clearance is a consequence of FDA’s classification of software used for patient-specific 3D printing of anatomical models as a class II medical device, wh...
Source: Medgadget - April 2, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

Doctors Discuss Future of Medicine on eMedicoz: India's First Medical Education Centric Mobile app
Note by Dr Sumer Sethi Recently we launched our unique medical education centric app for young Doctors calledeMedicoz. On this in addition to routine discussions Doctors also discuss various aspects of the profession. In a recent discussion series young Doctors brainstormed and tried crystal balling the future of the medicine and technology. It is wonderful to hear their thoughts on future. It is for certain future looks really happening for medical profession, computers and machine learning will re- invent the way we practice medicine. Targeted therapy is another important area, 3D printing , understanding the value ...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - April 2, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Monarch Robotic Endoscopy for Spotting Small, Deep-Seated Lung Nodules Cleared by FDA
Auris Health, based in Redwood City, California, is showing off its brand new Monarch Platform for robotic, accurate endoscopic navigation through the lungs. The Monarch helps physicians to reach more places within the lungs and find smaller lesions, potentially providing a more accurate diagnosis of the presence of lung cancer. The potential for the technology includes delivery of therapy as well as aiding with diagnosis. The flexible, motor powered endoscope is controlled by a joystick that anyone with experience playing console video games should be immediately comfortable with. Imagery from previously gathered CT scan...
Source: Medgadget - March 29, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Radiology Thoracic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Are Hospitals Becoming Obsolete; Consequences for Pathology and the Labs
I have blogged in the past about how the mission and nature of hospitals in the U.S. is changing rapidly (see, for example:The Design of Bedless Hospitals Continue to Evolve Based on Cost and Technology; Some Additional Ideas About the Bedless Hospitals of the Future; The Case of the"Disappearing Hospital Beds"; Implications for Pathologists). This same idea was covered in a somewhat controversial recent article by Ezekiel Emanuel with the provocative headline that asked whether hospitals were becoming obsolete (see:Are Hospitals Becoming Obsolete?). Below is an excerpt from it:What year saw the ma...
Source: Lab Soft News - March 28, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Cost of Healthcare Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Innovations Hospital Financial Reference Laboratories Source Type: blogs

Coping with Other's Cancer
When you are diagnosed with cancer, you are faced with the World of Oncology. Inside that world lies the answers to your questions and how to keep you alive. As you go through diagnosis and treatment, you get to educate yourself on your illness and what's involved in getting through it.Oncologists have to go to medical school to learn all this crap. Us patients get the express pass and learn it much faster and more intimately. Doctor's say'may cause nausea and hair loss'. We know it means we will watch our hair fall out as we shop for a wig and try to keep something in our stomachs. We learn what the truth really is and ho...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer diagnosis cancer information cancer treatment coping Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 62-year-old woman with a left adrenal mass
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 62-year-old woman is evaluated for an incidentally discovered left adrenal mass. Two weeks ago, the patient was evaluated in the emergency department for diffuse abdominal pain and vomiting. A CT scan was obtained that was normal except for the adrenal mass. Three hours after presentation to the emergency department, the pain resolved spontaneously. Her medical history is significant for diet-controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosed 1 year ago and osteoporosis diagnosed 4 years ago. Her only medic...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 24, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Endocrinology Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Can a Blood Test Replace the CT Scan?
Soon, patients with mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) may not need an expensive CT scan to understand the severity of their injury.The FDA recently approved the first blood test to measure mTBIs in adults: the Banyan Brain Trauma Indicator.As Swedish American headache specialist Jeffrey Royce, MD,explains, “What this test allows us to do is say who may or may not need a cat scan.” The new blood test determines levels of specific proteins, UCH-L1 and GFAP, two biomarkers of a mTBI that can be measured “within 12 hours of head injury.” These levels indicate whether or not a patient would demonst r...
Source: radRounds - March 22, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

First Blood Test for Traumatic Brain Injuries Receives FDA Approval
I have posted a number of previous notes about traumatic brain injury (TBI) with some attention to the need for a biomarker to rapidly diagnose the lesion (see, for example:NFL Physician Says Diagnosis of"Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy" Lacks Validity;Biomarker Proposed to Detect Traumatic Brain Injury; Possible Future Scenarios). Some of my comments have commented on professional football where such a test could change the nature of the game by removing injured players from a game. The first blood test to diagnose traumatic brain injuries has just been approved by the FDA (see:First blood test to help dia...
Source: Lab Soft News - March 22, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Food and Drug Administration Healthcare Innovations Lab Industry Trends Medical Research Source Type: blogs

Uncontrollable itching – the denouement
The emergency department ordered a CT scan that showed a dilated common bile duct, no pancreatic masses, a mass in the duct – stone versus other. Twelve hours after admission, he developed a temperature of 101 and a repeat CBC showed an elevated WBC with left shift. Therefore, GI did an ERCP the next day – revealing a large gallstone – not easily removable.  The placed a stent and drained pus. So this man had painless jaundice from a common duct stone. As an intern in 1976 I had a patient with ascending cholangitis.  His internist told me that he had pancreatic cancer, but had declined surgery.&...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - March 21, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Eric Schmidt Discusses the Potential Value of Predictive Analytics in the ER
For me, one of the major future changes in diagnostic medicine will be the use of predictive analytics based on deep learning and big data (see:Integrated Clinical Research Databases: A New Way to"Monetize" Clinical Data;What Are the Consequences of Big Tech Entering the Healthcare Market?). This new science will enable the prediction of future"outcomes" for patients. This trend was emphasized by former Google CEO Eric Schmidt in a lecture at HIMSS 2018 (see:HIMSS 2018: ‘Run to the Cloud,’ says Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt). He referred to the trend as leveraging the power of predicti...
Source: Lab Soft News - March 13, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Testing Cost of Healthcare Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Information Technology Healthcare Innovations Lab Processes and Procedures Medical Research Medicolegal Issues Quality of Care Source Type: blogs

A crashing patient with an abnormal ECG that you must recognize
In conclusion, the presence of negative T waves in both leads III and V1 allows PE to be differentiated simply but accurately from ACS in patients with negative T waves in the precordial leads. "Witting et al. looked at consecutive patients with PE, ACS, or neither. They found that only 11% of PE had 1 mm T-wave inversions in both lead III and lead V1, vs. 4.6% of controls.  This does not contradict the conclusions of Kosuge et al. that when T-wave inversions in the right precordial leads and in lead III are indeed present, then PE may indeed by more common. ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - March 12, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

A Four Step Plan For the Value-Based Transformation of the Health Care System
By ALEX AZAR HHS Secretary Alex Azar spoke earlier this week at the American Federation of Hospitals, giving a widely reported speech that offered new details on the Trump administration’s plans for Accountable Care Organizations, the CMS quality measurement program, and a new drive for patient access to medical records. The full text of his remarks follows. – The Editors. It’s a pleasure to be here with all of you today. I want to thank Chip [Kahn] and all of the Federation’s members for inviting me to share our vision for HHS and America’s healthcare system, and how we hope to work with all ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Alex Azar Source Type: blogs

5 things that can help you take a pass on kidney stones
If you’ve ever passed a kidney stone, you probably would not wish it on your worst enemy, and you’ll do anything to avoid it again. “Kidney stones are more common in men than in women, and in about half of people who have had one, kidney stones strike again within 10 to 15 years without preventive measures,” says Dr. Brian Eisner, co-director of the Kidney Stone Program at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. Where do kidney stones come from? Kidney stones form develop when certain substances, such as calcium, oxalate, and uric acid, become concentrated enough to form crystals in your ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Solan Tags: Health Kidney and urinary tract Source Type: blogs

Patient Aortas Printed in 3D to Test How Replacement Valves Will Work
Implanting prosthetic heart valves is a challenge requiring careful matching of the implanted device to the patient anatomy, as well as placing the implant so that there are no leaks, hemodynamic occlusions, nor a configuration that promotes clot formation. While this is relatively manageable when performing open heart valve replacements, using transcatheter valves is a lot harder because the anatomy being worked on is difficult to examine. Typically, only CT scans are available that provide a reasonable look at the morphology. But, CT scans are not nearly as intuitive to analyze as real objects hence clinicians have do to...
Source: Medgadget - March 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Source Type: blogs

How a Radiologist Reacts to Mass Shootings
Heather Sher, MD, has seen CT scans that most radiologists never have. The radiologist was on call during the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, and examined first-hand the gruesome damage that AR-15 bullets do to the body. In an essay forThe Atlantic, Dr. Sher reflects on how the shock of seeing the brutal affliction of the AR-15 rifle in comparison to the lacerations made by handguns. “With an AR-15, the shooter does not have to be particularly accurate… The bullets fired by an AR-15 are different: They travel at a higher velocity and are far more lethal than routine bullets fired from a ...
Source: radRounds - March 2, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Nano-CT Scanner and Staining Technique Allow for High-Resolution 3D Histology
Researchers at the Technical University of Munich have developed a nano-CT scanning technique. When coupled with a new staining technique, their nano-CT scanner can take extremely high-resolution scans of intact tissue samples, such as tumors. The new method allows clinicians to examine soft tissue samples without the need for sectioning or toxic stains. At present, examining soft tissue samples frequently involves sectioning them and mounting them on slides. This is time-consuming and laborious and makes it difficult to envisage the intact structure of the tissue. Imaging intact pieces of tissue to generate a 3D reconstru...
Source: Medgadget - February 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Nanomedicine Pathology Radiology Source Type: blogs

FDA authorizes marketing of first blood test to aid in the evaluation of concussion in adults
Advances in technology are leading to a host of innovations around reducing and detecting concussions.Today, the FDA authorized the marketing of the first blood test to evaluate mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), commonly referred to as concussion, in adults.The FDA reviewed and authorized for marketing the Banyan Brain Trauma Indicator in fewer than 6 months as part of its Breakthrough Devices Program.The Brain Trauma Indicator works by measuring levels of proteins, known as UCH-L1 and GFAP, that are released from the brain into blood and measured within 12 hours of head injury. Levels of these blood proteins after mTBI/...
Source: Medicine and Technology by Dr. Joseph Kim - February 14, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

New and Improved Planmed Verity CBCT Scanner Unveiled
Planmed, based in Helsinki, Finland, is releasing an upgraded new version of its popular Planmed Verity CBCT (Cone Beam Computed Tomography) extremity scanner. The system is intended for ortho, as well as head and neck imaging, and even advanced dental applications. It is CE marked in Europe and is now available wherever the mark applies. While the new device looks much like its previous version, the major changes are on the inside, such as a new and improved detector, a new operating system, and a number of new features and applications. For instance, there’s now a greater ability to capture maxillofacial and ENT im...
Source: Medgadget - February 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Dentistry Medicine Orthopedic Surgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

2018 AHA/ASA stroke guidelines & Radiology
The following are key points to remember from the American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association (ASA) 2018 Guidelines for the Early Management of Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke:These 2018 guidelines are an update to the 2013 guidelines, which were published prior to the six positive “early window” mechanical thrombectomy trials that emerged in 2015 and 2016 showed a clear benefit of“extended window” mechanical thrombectomy for certain patients with large vessel occlusion who could be treated out to 16-24 hours IV tPA should be administered to all eligible acute stroke patien...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - February 4, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 75-year-old man with very severe COPD
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 75-year-old man is seen for routine follow-up for very severe COPD. He has constant dyspnea and air hunger and spends most of the day in a chair. He has had no change in baseline cough and sputum production. He has had multiple COPD exacerbations that required ICU admission and intubation. He has not benefited from pulmonary rehabilitation in the past. He quit smoking 3 years ago. His medical history is also notable for hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and a myocardial infarction 3 years ago. Hi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Palliative Care Pulmonology Source Type: blogs

HoloLens Augmented Reality Headset Helps Surgeons to Reconnect Blood Vessels
After a traumatic injury, surgeons may need to repair damage using flaps of tissue taken from elsewhere in the body. One of the challenges with this approach is that the blood vessels of the “new” tissue must be connected with those at the injury site. At the moment, surgeons use a handheld ultrasound scanner that can detect blood pulsing under the skin, to approximate where blood vessels are. Researchers at Imperial College London have now developed an augmented reality system, based on the Micosoft HoloLens, that allows surgeons to see the positions of key blood vessels and bones in a CT image overlay on a pa...
Source: Medgadget - January 31, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Radiology Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

The Ongoing Challenges of Schizophrenia
They are silent because the division walls are broken down in the brain, and hours when they might be understood at all begin and leave again. —Rainer Maria Rilke, “The Insane” Schizophrenia is an elusive disease, which makes it a difficult one to relate to among the general population. It is easy to sympathize with someone who is suffering from an evident physical malady, such as a broken leg, or even an invisible illness, like cancer, which generally attacks the body in ways that are not cognitive in nature. One is readily able to put oneself in that person’s place and empathize with their plight....
Source: World of Psychology - January 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Casey Clabough Tags: Communication Personal Psychology Schizophrenia Stigma Suicide Violence and Aggression Delusions Depression Empathy Hallucinations Miscommunication Mystery Nonverbal communication Paranoia Psychosis Schizoaffective Disorder Source Type: blogs

A middle-aged man with severe syncope, diffuse weakness
p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 11.0px Helvetica; background-color: #fefefe}A middle-aged male diabetic who is otherwise healthy was found unconscious by his wife, with incontinence.  He quickly awoke but was too weak to stand.  Initial vitals by EMS were BP 100/50 with pulse of 80 and normal glucose.  He remained weak and somnolent, and without focal neurologic abnormality.  He recovered full consciousness, but still felt weak and " not normal. "  There was a prehospital ECG:What do you think?He arrived in the ED and had this ECG recorded:This one was sent to me for my ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - January 20, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Aortic Dissection Detection Risk Score
Acute aortic dissection may be present in only about one in ten thousand patients presenting to the emergency department. But missing an aortic dissection can be catastrophic. At the same time submitting all patients with suspected dissection to imaging studies may not be feasible in view of the cost and potential risks. Hence a good clinical bedside risk score may be useful, in addition to diligent clinical evaluation. Aortic Dissection Detection Risk Score (ADD Risk Score) was formulated by IRAD investigators using the International Registry of Acute aortic Dissection. Three groups of high risk features have b...
Source: Cardiophile MD - January 19, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: General Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 192
This article defines the concept of ‘translational simulation’ and is the perfect succinct, academic overview of this exciting area. Recommended by: Chris Nickson The Best of the Rest Emergency Medicine Crowell EL, et al. Accuracy of Computed Tomography Imaging Criteria in the Diagnosis of Adult Open Globe Injuries by Neuroradiology and Ophthalmology. Acad Emerg Med. 2017. PMID: 28662312  Some people rely on CT scan of the orbits to rule in or rule out an open globe. This retrospective chart review, in which CT scans were reviewed independently by a blinded neuroradiologist and ophthalmologist (x2...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 17, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Justin Morgenstern Tags: Education Emergency Medicine ENT and Maxillofacial Intensive Care Ophthalmology R&R in the FASTLANE Trauma EBM recommendations research and reviews Resuscitation Source Type: blogs

An Example of the Need for Research and Development Investment in Cryonics
Cryonics is a field that requires commercial success of some form for further expansion, such as in the reversible vitrification of organs, not least because either that or wealthier patrons than presently exist will be needed as a source of significant funding to improve current methodologies of preservation. The recent report from Alcor noted here illustrates the well-understood need for this sort of technical improvement. Alcor presents comparatively unfiltered reports on cryopreservations, where patients agree to it, and the staff and patients should be commended for this. Such reports are important to the quality of a...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 17, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Healthcare for the Uninsured Is Wasteful (For a Surprising Reason)
Shutterstock American physicians dole out lots of unnecessary medical care to their patients. They prescribe things like antibiotics for people with viral infections, order expensive CT scans for patients with transitory back pain, and obtain screening EKGs for people with … Continue reading → The post Healthcare for the Uninsured Is Wasteful (For a Surprising Reason) appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 10, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care health insurance health policy Medicare Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

High ST Elevation in a Patient with Acute Chest Pain
ConclusionThe ECG findings could be due to either dynamic early repolarization (normal variant ST elevation), or to pericarditis, or to acombination of the 2 entities.Yes, normal variant ST elevation can be dynamic:Increasing ST elevation. STEMI vs. dynamic early repolarization vs. pericarditis.ST elevation of early repolarization may vary with the rateChest pain, Dynamic ST Elevation and T-waves, and High VoltageAlternatively, the ECG could represent pericarditis superimposed on early repol.  There certainly was pericarditis, but that does not mean the ECG findings were due to pericarditis.This paradox is extremely w...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - January 8, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Cancer Cure?
No there is not a cancer cure. We need to keep remembering that. We are told by our doctors that there is no evidence of disease or some thing along those lines - which just boils down to " we are not capable of finding it yet " . If your doctor tells you that you are cured, please find a new one asap.In this day and ageshould there be a new definition of cured of cancer? I'm not sure. I have friends who tell me they are cured. I try to figure out what they are talking about. Seriously, where did this cured business come from? I want to question their position on this but in some ways do not want to know." U...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being a patient cancer bonds cancer cure cancer treatment lies Source Type: blogs

An apology from a telemedicine physician
In the emergency room, the stress is palpable. The hairs on your neck rise up as you enter the resuscitation bay where the next unconscious patient has just arrived. You can almost feel death as it circulates through the air, like a vulture in the sky. The air tastes sterile, and you hear the crash cart and ultrasound being rolled over to the patient’s bed. The patient was fine 20 minutes ago, a healthy middle-aged woman who collapsed at home while preparing dinner with her husband. He now stands in the corner, face flushed and dampened by tears. You avoid making eye contact with him at first, until that empty feelin...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/james-e-siegler" rel="tag" > James E. Siegler, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Mobile health Neurology Source Type: blogs