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UCLA researchers develop more accurate tool to predict whether liver cancer will recur in transplant patients
UCLA transplant researchers have developed a novel method to more accurately calculate the risk of disease recurring in people with liver cancer who have undergone a liver transplant. The approach gives physicians a new tool to help make treatment and surveillance decisions. The study, led by Dr. Ronald Busuttil, the William P. Longmire, Jr. Chair in Surgery and director of the Pfleger Liver Institute and Dumont–UCLA Transplant and Liver Cancer Centers, was published by the peer-reviewed Journal of the American College of Surgeons. The research team developed a predictive calculator called a nomogram after analy...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 12, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

CT scanning shows why tilting trees produce better biofuel
Medical imaging techniques have been used to explore why making willow trees grow at an angle can vastly improve their biofuel yields. Using micro-CT scans, the team showed that the trees respond to being tilted by producing a sugar-rich, gelatinous fibre, which helps them stay upright. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 11, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

CT scanning shows why tilting trees produce better biofuel
(Imperial College London) Imperial researchers have used medical imaging techniques to explore why making willow trees grow at an angle can vastly improve their biofuel yields. Using micro-CT scans, the team showed that the trees respond to being tilted by producing a sugar-rich, gelatinous fiber, which helps them stay upright. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 11, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

US Military Hopes To Learn From Victim Of Chimp Attack
http://media.boston.cbslocal.com/CBSBOS_1003201517440000000AA.mp4 BOSTON (AP) — Charla Nash never served in the military. She was horribly disfigured, not in combat, but in a 2009 attack by a rampaging chimpanzee. The Pentagon, though, is watching her recovery closely. The U.S. military paid for Nash’s full face transplant in 2011, as well as face transplants for a small group of other civilians. The agency is also underwriting Nash’s follow-up treatment at a combined cost estimated in the hundreds of thousands of dollars in the hope that some of the things it learns can help young, seriously di...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: deanreddington Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Watch Listen Brigham and Women's Hospital Charla Nash Chimpanzee Attack Paula Ebben Pentagon Source Type: news

ILROG issues treatment guidelines for pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma
(American Society for Radiation Oncology) The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has issued a guideline that outlines the use of 3-D computed tomography (CT)-based radiation therapy planning and volumetric image guidance to more effectively treat pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma and to reduce the radiation dose to normal tissue, thus decreasing the risk of late side effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 4, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

3 To 5 Cups Of Coffee A Day May Lower Heart Attack Risk
By: Tanya Lewis Published: 03/02/2015 07:09 PM EST on LiveScience Good news for people who drink coffee every day: Consuming a moderate amount of coffee could lower the risk of clogged arteries that can lead to a heart attack, a new study finds. The study of healthy young adults in Korea found that, compared with people who didn't drink coffee, those who drank three to five cups of java per day had a lower risk of having calcium deposits in their coronary arteries, which is an indicator of heart disease. (The coronary arteries are the vessels that bring oxygenated blood to the heart muscle itself.) The study participant...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coffee can 'cut risks of heart attack' claims
Conclusion This large cross-sectional study found that people who reported drinking between three to five cups of coffee per day in the previous year were less likely to have calcium deposits in the coronary arteries than people who did not drink coffee. There was no statistically significant difference for people consuming any other level of coffee compared to those who don’t drink coffee. This type of study cannot prove that drinking this level of coffee stopped calcium being deposited in the arteries, an early sign of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries). It shows there is an association, but does not expla...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Food/diet Source Type: news

Rigaku Introduces the Ultra-high-speed, High-resolution 3D X-ray Micro...
New CT Lab GX Incorporates the “Sample-Stationary Method” and achieves CT scan in 8 seconds at top speed and minimum resolution of 4.5 μm(PRWeb March 02, 2015)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/03/prweb12551606.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - March 2, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

CT Scans Expose Patients to Most Radiation, Cost
Source: Lippincott’s Bone and Joint Newsletter - March 1, 2015 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Trends and Innovations Source Type: news

The use of computed tomography in determining development, anomalies, and trauma of the hyoid bone - Naimo P, O'Donnell C, Bassed R, Briggs C.
PURPOSE: Recognition of injury to the hyoid bone is intrinsic to post-mortem examination. Given its superficial location in the neck hyoid fractures are generally associated with some form of compressive neck force although they are well recognized in the ... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - February 28, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Drowning, Suffocation Source Type: news

Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) Names Norm Linsky New Executive Director
The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) Board of Trustees today announced that Norm Linsky, MPA, MA has been selected as the Society's new Executive Director. Linsky comes to SCCT from the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), where as Executive Director for 14 years he partnered with physician volunteers to dramatically increase SCAI's membership, educational programs, advocacy efforts, guidelines and international partnerships. (Source: News from Angioplasty.Org)
Source: News from Angioplasty.Org - February 28, 2015 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

SCCT names Linsky as executive director
The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography's (SCCT) board of trustees (more) (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 27, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Decline in smoking rates may increase lung cancer mortality due to inadequate screening guidelines
A decline in smoking rates may mean that many people who could have benefited from early detection of lung cancer are dying because they don’t qualify for low-dose CT scans, according to a group of researchers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 24, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Decline in Smoking Rates May Increase Lung Cancer Mortality Due to Inadequate Screening Guidelines
ROCHESTER, Minn. — A decline in smoking rates may mean that many people who could have benefited from early detection of lung cancer are dying because they don’t qualify for low-dose CT scans, according to a group of Mayo Clinic researchers. Their research appears in the Feb. 24 issue of JAMA, the journal of the [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - February 24, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Scan Reveals Mummy Hidden Inside Buddha Statue
Researchers examining a nearly 1,000-year-old statue of Buddha on display in Holland discovered something very unusual hidden inside: the mummy of a meditating monk. Calling the mummy its "oldest patient ever," the Meander Medical Center in the Dutch city of Amersfoort used a CT scanner to take images of the body inside the statue and an endoscope to examine the thoracic and abdominal cavities. (Story continues below). Buddha mummy statue (left) and CT scan image showing mummy inside (right). The mummy is believed to be that of Liuquan, a Buddhist monk who died in China around 1,100 A.D. During their examin...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 23, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Multiple FDG-PET/CT scans can influence lung cancer treatment
By showing how four or more follow-up FDG-PET/CT scans for lung cancer can (more) (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 20, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Research shows value of additional PET/CT scans in follow-up of lung cancer patients
New research reveals a high value of scans which could lead to future change of reimbursement policies for follow-up positron emission tomography/computed tomography studies in lung cancer. The study establishes the value of fourth and subsequent follow-up PET/CT scans in clinical assessment and management change in patients with the disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 18, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Research shows value of additional PET/CT scans in follow-up of lung cancer patients
(Society of Nuclear Medicine) New research from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine reveals a high value of scans which could lead to future change of reimbursement policies for follow-up positron emission tomography/computed tomography studies in lung cancer. The study, featured in the February 2015 issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, establishes the value of fourth and subsequent follow-up PET/CT scans in clinical assessment and management change in patients with the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 18, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Medicare To Cover Low-Dose CT Scans For Those At High Risk For Lung Cancer
Lung cancer is recognized as the most deadly cancer in men and women in the US, leading to more deaths than breast, colon and pancreatic cancers combined. Nearly 160,000 Americans were projected to die from lung cancer in 2014, based on data from the American Lung Association (ALA). And the cause of these lung cancers in over 90 percent of patients is related to cigarette smoking. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 17, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robert Glatter, MD Source Type: news

Post-mortem evaluation of drowning with whole body CT - Plaetsen SV, De Letter E, Piette M, Van Parys G, Casselman JW, Verstraete K.
PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to investigate the value of whole body computed tomography (WB-CT) in bodies recovered from water by analysis of the imaging findings after drowning. METHODS: The bodies of 41 drowning victims and 9 persons who die... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - February 15, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Drowning, Suffocation Source Type: news

King Richard III's Fatal Death Blow Revealed In New Video
A team of British scientists believe they may have identified the killer blow that killed King Richard III more than 500 years ago--and they were lucky enough to catch their "eureka moment" on camera. A new video from the University of Leicester in England (see above) shows forensic pathologist Professor Guy Rutty examining the crooked king's skull, and discovering a small lesion inside the cranium directly opposite a large wound at the base of the skull. Rutty and his colleagues say these wounds suggest that a sword or a staff weapon was shoved into the king's neck, and then through his brain, before nicking ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 13, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Medicare to Cover Lung Cancer CT Screening, CMS Announces
CMS recently announced that as of Feb. 5, Medicare beneficiaries who meet certain criteria will be covered for lung cancer screening using low-dose CT scans. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - February 10, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

The NELSON lung cancer screening trial results are inferable for the general high-risk
(International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) Results of the NELSON lung cancer screening trial using low dose computed tomography can be used to predict the effect of population-based screening on the Dutch population even though there were slight differences in baseline characteristics of participants in the control arm versus eligible non-participants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 10, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Lung-RADS Criteria Could Result in Fewer False-Positives in Lung Cancer Screening (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD New criteria for classifying lung nodules detected during low-dose computed tomography screening are associated with fewer false-positives than existing criteria, an Annals … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - February 10, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Consumer Information on: Koning Breast CT - P130025
The Koning Breast CT (KBCT) system is a dedicated breast imaging system that acquires computed tomography (CT) images without compressing the breast. The KBCT produces 3D images to aid in the diagnosis of breast cancer. (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - February 9, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Medicare to Cover Annual Lung Cancer Screening (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by André Sofair, MD, MPH Medicare will cover annual lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography in high-risk patients, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - February 9, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Giant Prehistoric Rodent Had Titanic Teeth, And They Weren't Just For Biting
When scientists discovered the fossilized skull of a huge prehistoric rodent six years ago in Uruguay, they could tell right away that the extinct buffalo-sized creature had freakishly large incisors. But a new analysis of the specimen of Josephoartigasia monesi -- believed to be the "the largest rodent ever to have lived" -- reveals that this ancient relative of the guinea pig used its gigantic teeth for more than delivering a powerful bite. “We concluded that Josephoartigasia must have used its incisors for activities other than biting, such as digging in the ground for food, or defending itself from p...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 5, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

A second chance for a baby with a life-threatening brain cyst
Photo courtesy of Jennifer Hammond Other than being born a little early—at 37 weeks—everything started out fine for Liam Hammond. “He was a healthy baby, it was a healthy birth, and he was progressing and meeting his milestones,” says his mother Jennifer. But at his 4-month-old check-up, “Something about his head looked different to me.” Liam’s head circumference was normal, though, and he was in the same head-growth percentile as at his last visit. The pediatrician suggested Jennifer keep watching it. Two weeks later, the family left for a seaside Memorial Day weekend vacation. &l...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 5, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nancy Fliesler Tags: Our patients’ stories Hydrocephalus Source Type: news

Koning wins FDA nod for 3D breast CT device
Koning Corp. says the FDA granted pre-market approval for its 3D computed tomography device for breast imaging. New York's Koning Corp. said it nailed down pre-market approval from the FDA for a new 3D breast imaging system and related equipment. Food & Drug Administration (FDA), Koning Corp.News Well, Breast Cancer, Imaging, Pre-Market Approval (PMA), Regulatory/Complianceread more (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - February 5, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Mark Hollmer Source Type: news

The use of 3D computed tomography reconstruction in medico-legal testimony regarding injuries in living victims - risks and benefits - Borowska-Solonynko A, Solonynko B.
Forensic pathologists are often called upon to determine the mechanism and severity of injuries in living individuals. Such expert testimony is often based solely on hand-written clinical notes. The victims' injuries may also be visualized via three-dimens... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - February 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Paramedics may be best first line of defense in treating stroke patients
This study involved an unprecedented cooperative effort of paramedics in the field and emergency physicians serving as investigators,” said Dr. Sidney Starkman, co-principal investigator and co-director of the UCLA Stroke Center. “Through this study we were able to instill permanently in everyone’s mind the idea that ‘time is brain.’ We believe this represents a paradigm shift in the treatment of stroke and potentially numerous other neurological conditions,” said Starkman, who also is professor of emergency medicine and neurology at the Geffen School. “We demonstrated that paramed...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 5, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

CT scans: Are they safe?
(Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist)
Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist - February 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Two Vatican Mummies Declared Fake
They're fake! That's what archaeologists are saying about two mummies that have long been part of Vatican's collection of antiquities. The small mummies, each about two feet long, had been thought to contain the bodies of children or small animals that dated back to ancient Egypt. But when Vatican researchers analyzed the mummies using 3D CT scans, X-rays, DNA tests, and infrared and ultraviolet light, they found that the mummies actually contained a hodgepodge of adult human bones from the Middle Ages, along with a single nail dating back to the 19th Century, Catholic News Service reported. Archaeologists and experts...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 2, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Head CT Scans May Be Overused in Emergency Departments Head CT Scans May Be Overused in Emergency Departments
Unless a patient presenting with syncope or dizziness is older, has a focal neurologic deficit, or has recent head trauma, a head CT is unlikely to be useful, researchers have found. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Radiology News Source Type: news

CT scans link arterial calcium to kidney stones
People who develop recurrent kidney stones have more calcium in their arteries (more) (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 2, 2015 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Freshwater drowning in a child: a case study demonstrating the role of post-mortem computed tomography - Filograna L, Tartaglione T, Vetrugno G, Guerra C, Fileni A, Bonomo L.
In recent years, modern imaging techniques have gained ground in forensics. A crucial question is whether virtual autopsy is capable of replacing traditional autopsy. Forensic diagnosis of freshwater drowning (FWD) is based on the evidence of findings from... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - February 1, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Handheld CT Scanner-Like Device Could Provide Alternatives For Eye Exams
Diagnosing eye conditions in pediatric patients may have become slightly easier thanks to recent research from the Baylor Visual Function Testing Center. Their new, non-invasive technology tests for optical diseases by operating like a handheld computed tomography (CT) scanner for the eye. The device accurately performs retinal diagnoses without getting too close to the young patient, who may have difficulty sitting still. (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - January 29, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Report: Many medical imaging tests performed in U.S. are unnecessary
A new report finds doctors are using CT scans and x-rays tests too frequently, exposing patients to high levels of radiation when safer options could be used (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Risks of cancer-causing radiation from X-rays, CT scans
A new investigation from Consumer Reports found the number of CT scans grew from 3 million a year in 1980 to 80 million today, and up to one-third of them could be unnecessary. Consumer Reports deputy content editor Trisha Calvo joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the story. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Majority of primary care physicians find that medical imaging improves patient care
Large majorities of primary care physicians believe that advanced medical imaging, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), provides considerable value to patient care. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 26, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Retrospective computation of the ISS in multiple trauma patients : potential pitfalls and limitations of findings in full body CT scans - Bogner V, Brumann M, Kusmenkov T, Kanz KG, Wierer M, Berger F, Mutschler W.
INTRODUCTION: The Injury Severity Score (ISS) is a well-established anatomical scoring system for polytraumatized patients. However, any inaccuracy in the Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS) directly increases the ISS impreciseness. Using the full body computed... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - January 24, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

One nanoparticle, 6 types of medical imaging
(University at Buffalo) Using two biocompatible parts, University at Buffalo researchers and their colleagues have designed a nanoparticle that can be detected by six medical imaging techniques: computed tomography scanning; positron emission tomography scanning; photoacoustic imaging; fluorescence imaging; upconversion imaging; and Cerenkov luminescence imaging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 20, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Diagnosis of drowning using post-mortem computed tomography - state of the art - Raux C, Saval F, Rouge D, Telmon N, Dedouit F.
AIM OF THE STUDY: Recent studies using post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT) have suggested this imaging modality is of value in the positive diagnosis of drowning. We summarize the data from the literature regarding the diagnostic value of CT in cases of... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - January 19, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Drowning, Suffocation Source Type: news

Head Computed Tomography in the Emergency DepartmentHead Computed Tomography in the Emergency Department
Find out about the diagnoses that can be easily overlooked on head CT, and how to efficiently interpret these images to avoid error. The Journal of Emergency Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Emergency Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

Right ventricle collapse secondary to hepatothorax caused by diaphragm rupture due to blunt trauma - Topuz M, Ozek MC.
Traumatic diaphragm ruptures occur frequently after motor vehicle accidents through penetrating traumas. In 90% of the patients, traumatic diaphragm rupture commonly coexists with other organ injuries. Posteroanterior chest x-ray, computed tomography, magn... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - January 10, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Community-dwelling female fallers have lower muscle density in their lower legs than non-fallers: evidence from the Saskatoon Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos) cohort - Frank AW, Farthing JP, Chilibeck PD, Arnold CM, Olszynski WP, Kontulainen SA.
OBJECTIVES: Our objectives were to determine whether peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT)-derived lower leg muscle density and area, and basic functional mobility differ between community-dwelling older women who do and do not report recent f... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - January 10, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

What Does it Mean to Have a Shadow on the Lung?
What does it mean if I have a shadow on my chest x-ray or CT scan, what are some possible causes, and what tests are often done for diagnosis? (Source: About.com Lung Cancer)
Source: About.com Lung Cancer - January 8, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: lungcancer.guide at about.com Tags: health Source Type: news

Imaging abusive head trauma: why use both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging? - Vázquez E, Delgado I, Sánchez-Montañez A, Fábrega A, Cano P, Martín N.
Abusive head trauma is the leading cause of death in child abuse cases. The majority of victims are infants younger than 1 year old, with the average age between 3 and 8 months, although these injuries can be seen in children up to 5 years old. Many vic... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - December 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Differences between postmortem computed tomography and conventional autopsy in a stabbing murder case - Zerbini T, Silva LF, Ferro AC, Kay FU, Amaro Junior E, Pasqualucci CA, Saldiva PH.
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present work is to analyze the differences and similarities between the elements of a conventional autopsy and images obtained from postmortem computed tomography in a case of a homicide stab wound. METHOD: Comparison betw... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - December 20, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Detects GI Cancer Without RadiationDiffusion-Weighted Imaging Detects GI Cancer Without Radiation
Whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (WB-DWI) is a reliable alternative to positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for detecting gastrointestinal cancers without the ionizing radiation, according to new research from China. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news