Naomi Osaka ’s Bravery can be a Teachable Moment about Mental Health

There is no health without mental health. Credit: Unsplash /Melanie Wasser. By Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Jun 2 2021 (IPS) Recently, Naomi Osaka, the number 2 ranked women’s tennis player in the world, said she would not participate in the press conference at the French Open (Rolland-Garros) because she wanted to protect her mental health. The organizers of the tournament were incensed, imposed a fine on her and threatened to disqualify her.  Would the organizers have reacted differently if Naomi Osaka said she could not participate in the tournament’s press briefing because of a physical illness, such as abdominal pain? Your guess is as good as mine, but I believe the organizers would have been more empathetic and would have provided her with the best medical treatment. The same should happen for mental health. Osaka was stigmatized because people do not understand mental health and feel she should “man up” and attend a press conference. Further, athletes like her are all too often viewed as superhuman and incapable of showing weakness It is wrong for the organizers to impose a fine of $15,000 on Osaka and threaten to suspend her for missing the press conference. Such reactions contribute to why mental health is still so widely misunderstood, shrouded in mystery and stigmatized. There is no other way to put this. Osaka was stigmatized because people do not understand mental health and feel she should “man up” and a...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Related Links:

Are you sad? Just be happy! Does this irritate you? In today’s show, Gabe and Lisa ponder whether happiness really is a choice — especially for people who struggle with mental illness. How do we measure happiness? And what is happiness inflation? Join us for an in-depth conversation on whether or not people can actually choose happiness. (Transcript Available Below) Please Subscribe to Our Show: And We Love Written Reviews!  About The Not Crazy podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular book, Mental Illness is an A...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
Conclusions and relevanceCOVID-19 pandemic had an overall negative impact on patients with migraine. Several risk factors for poor outcome were identified. Long-term strategies should be validated and implemented to deliver quality care for patients with migraine, with emphasis on psychosocial well-being.
Source: The Journal of Headache and Pain - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Now that we’re in the middle of a pandemic, more people than ever are experiencing anxiety, especially those who struggled with mental health issues before COVID-19. And to make things even worse, many of our coping mechanisms, like going to the gym or hanging out with friends, have been taken away. In today’s show, our host, Gabe Howard, talks with Dr. Jasleen Chhatwal, who helps explain why so many people are having anxiety symptoms and what we can do about it. We want to hear from you — Please fill out our listener survey by clicking the graphic below! SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW   Guest informatio...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic Disorders Mental Health and Wellness The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
BOSTON (CBS) – This back to school season is particularly stressful for many children. In addition to the normal jitters kids get, they have so many other things to think about this year with the coronavirus pandemic and all the changes it brings. Children might be worried they will get sick or make their family members sick. They may be afraid to leave home and their parents. They may worry about failing to follow the new school rules like wearing masks and keeping a safe distance from others. Their schedules could change at a moment’s notice depending on the newest guidelines. They may worry they won’t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Syndicated Local Anxiety Back To School Coronavirus Source Type: news
Mikayla Mace A University of Arizona pharmacologist discusses how the conditions created by the pandemic and the response could be exacerbating drug use and overdose. Monday University Communicationssad-505857_1920.jpgHealthCOVID-19Researcher contact: Todd W. Vanderah Comprehensive Pain and Addiction Center 520-626-7801vanderah@email.arizona.eduMedia contact: Mikayla Mace University Communications 520-621-1878mikaylamace@arizona.edu For the latest on the University of Arizona response to the novel coronavirus, visit the university'sCOVID-19 webpage.For UANews coverage of COVID-19, visithttps://uanews.arizona.edu/...
Source: The University of Arizona: Health - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: research
Pandemics can be indiscriminate, with viruses making no distinctions among the victims they attack and those they spare. If you’re human, you’ll do. COVID-19 has been different, particularly when it comes to age. The disease has shown a special animus for older people, with those 65-plus considered at especially high risk for hospitalization and death, and those 18 and below catching a semblance of an epidemiological break. Though a small share of adolescents have suffered severe cases, most who contract the disease in that age cohort are likelier to experience milder symptoms or none at all. But if COVID-19 is...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
Abstract COVID-19 has brought the world into uncharted waters. Many countries are under lockdown, the economy has ground to a halt, and almost everyone is afraid of dire consequences. The unprecedented changes that came on so quickly due to the pandemic and stay-at-home confinement to accomplish social distancing and mitigate risk for infection pose many challenges. These include compromised health, well-being, and sleep as a consequence of disruption of the daily life routine, anxiety, worry, isolation, greater family and work stress, and excessive screen time. Our study of 203 corporate sector professionals perf...
Source: Chronobiology International - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Chronobiol Int Source Type: research
  Lockdown is a “prison like” experience, for Londoner Annabelle Ume, who suffers from myalgic encephalomyelitis. “It’s very similar to being trapped in a bunker with no access outside,” says Ume.   Many other fellow sufferers are enduring pandemic enforced isolation without much hope. “They are staying in limbo until help is available and adapting to the worsening of their health conditions,” says Ume. “You just try to make mental peace with it because the physical can’t be addressed at this time.” COPD sufferer John Linnell from Wisconsin i...
Source: EyeForPharma - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
Since the outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, most attention has focused on containing transmission of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and addressing the surge of critically ill patients in acute care settings. Indeed, as of 29 April 2020, over 3 million confirmed cases have been accounted for globally [1]. In the coming weeks and months, emphasis will gradually involve also post-acute care of COVID-19 survivors. It is anticipated that COVID-19 may have a major impact on physical, cognitive, mental and social health status, also in patients with mild disease presen...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Articles: Correspondence Source Type: research
Jeffrey A. SingerWhite House “drug czar” Jim Carroll toldPolitico earlier this week that an Office of National Drug Control Policy analysis finds an 11.4 percent year ‐​over‐​year increase in opioid‐​related overdose deaths during the first four months of 2020. Kentucky has seen a 25 percent increase in overdose deaths during the first four months of this year, and West Virginia saw a 50 percent increase in deaths since the beginning of the year. The data are incomplete at this point, and not all states have reported in.Mr. Carroll attributed much of the increase in the overdose rate ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
More News: Academies | African Health | Anxiety | Child Abuse | Conferences | Depression | Eating Disorders & Weight Management | France Health | Graduation | International Medicine & Public Health | Legislation | Men | Nigeria Health | Pain | Pandemics | Science | Skin | Sports Medicine | Students | Tropical Medicine | United Nations | Universities & Medical Training | Washington University | Women