Aspirin found to greatly decrease covid hospitalizations
(Natural News) New research out of George Washington University (GWU) has found that over-the-counter aspirin could help to protect the lungs of patients who test “positive” for the Wuhan coronavirus (Covid-19). An investigative team looked at more than 400 Chinese Virus patients from hospitals across the United States who take aspirin for some other unrelated... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Too much or not enough sleep can lead to greater cognitive decline
Seven and a half hours is the 'sweet spot' to preserve the brain and offset Alzheimer's disease, a study by Washington University's Sleep Medicine Centre has found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Paula J. Clayton Dies at 86; Helped Destigmatize Depression and Suicide
A clinical psychiatrist, she showed that suicide was often a result of mental illness, and that it could be avoided with the right treatment and public education. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Clay Risen Tags: Clayton, Paula J (1934-2021) Deaths (Obituaries) Depression (Mental) Mental Health and Disorders Suicides and Suicide Attempts Psychiatry and Psychiatrists Grief (Emotion) Bipolar Disorder Washington University Source Type: news

COVID-19 survivors who weren't hospitalized have a 40% increased chance of heart failure
Researchers from Washington University St Louis found that even people that do not require hospitalization due to Covid are at an increased risk of complications over the next year. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

D.C. strikes partnership with George Washington University to staff new St. E ’s hospital
The agreement isn ’t a total surprise, but it solidifies the Northwest D.C. hospital's role. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 1, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

Mars Was Always Destined to Die
Mars is the solar system’s near-miss world. Earth may have gotten everything right when it came to sustaining life—atmosphere, water, proximity to the sun. Mercury, Venus and the outer planets, with their extreme temperatures and inhospitable chemistry, may have gotten everything wrong. Mars, on the other hand, came so close, yet fell short. Thanks to data from rovers and other spacecraft, we know that the Red Planet once fairly sloshed with water—with dry deltas, riverbeds, and sea basins stamped into its surface. But 4 billion years ago, the Martian core cooled, shutting down the dynamo that sustained i...
Source: TIME: Science - September 21, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Space Source Type: news

Washington University student puts nearly 3,000 U.S. flags from 9/11 display into trash bags
Fadel Alkilani, a vice president of finance for the Student Union, acknowledged that he removed the flags on Saturday and put them in... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rheumatoid arthritis treated with implanted cells that release drug
With a goal of developing rheumatoid arthritis therapies with minimal side effects, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have genetically engineered cells that, when implanted in mice, will deliver a biologic drug in response to inflammation. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - September 1, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Study: Even people with mild COVID-19 may develop lifelong natural immunity to the coronavirus
(Natural News) A recent study published in the journal Nature suggests that people who recovered from a mild case of COVID-19 may have developed lifelong immunity to the Wuhan coronavirus. Researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine arrived at this finding after tracking people who have had mild COVID-19. They found that these individuals still had immune cells that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Most Influential Business Women 2021: Erica Barnell, Geneoscopy
Erica Barnell, a current medical degree candidate at Washington University School of Medicine, is also the co-founder and chief science officer of St. Louis health care startup Geneoscopy. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - August 12, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Ali Gold Source Type: news

CDC Urges Pregnant Women to Get a COVID-19 Vaccination, Emphasizing the Shots ’ Safety and the Threat of the Delta Variant
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urged all pregnant women Wednesday to get the COVID-19 vaccine as hospitals in hot spots around the U.S. see disturbing numbers of unvaccinated mothers-to-be seriously ill with the virus. Expectant women run a higher risk of severe illness and pregnancy complications from the coronavirus, including perhaps miscarriages and stillbirths. But their vaccination rates are low, with only about 23% having received at least one dose, according to CDC data. “The vaccines are safe and effective, and it has never been more urgent to increase vaccinations as we face the highly trans...
Source: TIME: Health - August 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: AP / Lindsey Tanner and Mike Stobbe Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Nancy Staudt Named Dean of Pardee RAND Graduate School
Nancy Staudt, dean of the School of Law at Washington University, will join the RAND Corporation as the Frank and Marcia Carlucci Dean of the Pardee RAND Graduate School and Vice President of Innovation at RAND. (Source: RAND)
Source: RAND - August 11, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: RAND Corporation Source Type: news

Four Civilian Astronauts. Three Days in Orbit. One Giant Leap. Meet the Inspiration4 Crew
Jared Isaacman is not likely to forget the day he almost died at 10,000 ft., back in 2011. He was flying closely alongside three others, all in F-14 Tomcats, tearing along at 460 m.p.h. over the desert southwest of Las Vegas. The group, part of Isaacman’s Black Diamonds aerobatic team, was rehearsing for an air show and trying to come up with a flashy new finish. What they decided on called for flying in a square formation and then suddenly veering toward one another, before pulling back at the last second. It would be a nifty thing to watch go right—and a terrible thing to watch go wrong. [time-brightcove not-...
Source: TIME: Science - August 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Magazine Space Special Project Source Type: news

Four Civilian Astronauts. Three Days in Orbit. One Giant Leap. Meet the Inspiration4 Crew
TIME Studios is producing the Netflix documentary series Countdown: Inspiration 4 Mission to Space, starting Sept. 6. Jared Isaacman is not likely to forget the day he almost died at 10,000 ft., back in 2011. He was flying closely alongside three others, all in L-39 fighter jets, tearing along at 460 m.p.h. over the desert southwest of Las Vegas. The group, part of Isaacman’s Black Diamonds aerobatic team, was rehearsing for an air show and trying to come up with a flashy new finish. What they decided on called for flying in a square formation and then suddenly veering toward one another, before pulling back at the l...
Source: TIME: Science - August 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Magazine Space Special Project Source Type: news

How the Inspiration4 Mission Fits Into the Long History of Civilian Space Travel
It’s been 52 years since the artist Jeff Gates made a reservation to go to the Moon. Like many who gathered around their TV sets to watch the first lunar landing on July 20, 1969, Gates—then a 20-year-old college student home for summer vacation—walked outside immediately afterward and looked skyward. “I kept saying, ‘there are human beings on that Moon!,’ says Gates, now 72. “It was unbelievable, and I wasn’t quite sure what to do with that feeling. But I wanted to be a part of that shared moment of exhilaration and amazement … It’s just human nature to want to...
Source: TIME: Science - August 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized Space Special Project Source Type: news

Clinics Won ’t Provide It. Insurers Won’t Cover It. So Will the First Alzheimer’s Drug Make a Difference?
In theory, the approval of the first drug to treat Alzheimer’s disease would be cause for universal celebration. But from the moment the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved aducanumab on June 7, the drug has been beset by controversy about whether the drug is actually effective—and if the agency bent to pressure from maker Biogen. The conflict came to a head Wednesday when the agency watchdog, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Inspector General, announced that it would look into the drug’s accelerated approval, including allegations that the FDA had an “inappropriately cl...
Source: TIME: Health - August 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park and Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

What Public Health Officials Can Learn from a New Long COVID Survey
Fifty percent of vaccine-hesitant Americans believe the message that “Getting the COVID-19 vaccine is the best way to prevent COVID-19 and its potential long-term complications”. Credit: UNICEF/Nahom Tesfaye By Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Jul 30 2021 (IPS) A new survey on public awareness of long COVID by ‘Resolve to Save Lives” showed that among the 40% of Americans who were not vaccinated, seeing testimonials of those who suffer from long COVID inspired nearly two-thirds to consider the vaccine. A representative sample of nearly 2,000 Americans 18 and older took the survey between May 21 and Ju...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 30, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Global Headlines Health Source Type: news

Dementia cases 'set to almost triple worldwide to more than 150 million by 2050'
A three-fold increase in dementia cases worldwide will be driven by population growth and ageing, as well as factors like smoking and being overweight, Washington University researchers have found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists model 'true prevalence' of COVID-19 throughout pandemic
(University of Washington) University of Washington scientists have developed a statistical framework that incorporates key COVID-19 data -- such as case counts and deaths due to COVID-19 -- to model the true prevalence of this disease in the United States and individual states. Their approach projects that in the U.S. as many as 60% of COVID-19 cases went undetected as of March 7, 2021, the last date for which the dataset they employed is available. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 26, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

'Good cholesterol' may protect liver
(Washington University School of Medicine) The body's so-called good cholesterol may be even better than we realize. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that one type of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) has a previously unknown role in protecting the liver from injury. This HDL protects the liver by blocking inflammatory signals produced by common gut bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vaccines Delayed are Vaccines Denied
A global system in which poor countries are unable to develop and produce their own vaccines to match their demand is not sustainable; particularly when faced by potential future pandemics. Credit: PAHO/Karen González.By Jonatan Konafino and Shubha NageshJul 20 2021 (IPS) “Vaccine equity is the challenge of our time,” Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), told the gathering in opening remarks.  “And we are failing”at a special ministerial meeting of the Economic and Social Council. Earlier, G7 leaders wrote a letter of support declaring that...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 20, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jonatan Konafino and Shubha Nagesh Tags: Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

COVID-19 shutdowns reveal racial disparities in exposure to air pollution
(George Washington University) A new study of COVID-19 shutdowns in the United States reveals pronounced disparities in air pollution -- with disenfranchised, minority neighborhoods still experiencing more exposure to a harmful air pollutant compared to wealthier, white communities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Microbially produced fibers: Stronger than steel, tougher than Kevlar
(Washington University in St. Louis) A new fiber, made by genetically engineered bacteria in the lab of Fuzhong Zhang, is stronger than steel and tougher than Kevlar. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Muddied waters: Sinking organics alter seafloor records
(Washington University in St. Louis) The remains of microscopic plankton blooms in near-shore ocean environments slowly sink to the seafloor, setting off processes that forever alter an important record of Earth's history, according to research from geoscientists, including David Fike at Washington University in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Health: Switching to a soy-rich vegan diet causes an 84 per cent drop in menopausal hot flushes
Of the women who followed the soy-rich diet in their study, 59 per cent saw moderate-to-severe hot flushes gone within 12 weeks, researchers from the George Washington University reported. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Magnetic field from MRI affects focused-ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier
(Washington University in St. Louis) Washington University in St. Louis researchers have found for the first time that the magnetic field of the MRI scanner decreased the BBB opening volume by 3.3-fold to 11.7-fold, depending on the strength of the magnetic field, in a mouse model. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Male dragonflies lose their 'bling' in hotter climates
(Washington University in St. Louis) A study in PNAS led by Washington University in St. Louis finds that dragonfly males have consistently evolved less breeding coloration in regions with hotter climates. The research reveals that mating-related traits can be just as important to how organisms adapt to their climates as survival-related traits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 5, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study Suggests Long-lasting Protection from COVID-19 Vaccine Study Suggests Long-lasting Protection from COVID-19 Vaccine
WebMD's Chief Medical Officer, John Whyte, MD, speaks with Rachel M. Presti, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Infectious Disease, Washington University in St. Louis, about the positive results of a new study on the Pfizer mRNA vaccine.WebMD (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - July 2, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases Expert Interview Source Type: news

Covid first wave led to increase in antibiotic misuse in India: Study
The researchers at Washington University in the US estimated that Covid-19 likely contributed to 216.4 million excess doses of antibiotics and 38 million more doses of azithromycin in adults from June 2020 through September 2020, a period of peak Covid-19 activity in India. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - July 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

COVID-19 aggravates antibiotic misuse in India
(Washington University in St. Louis) Antibiotic sales soared during India's first surge of COVID-19, suggesting that the drugs were inappropriately used to treat mild and moderate COVID-19 infections, according to research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The excessive usage is especially concerning because antibiotic overuse increases the risk for drug-resistant infections -- not just in India, but worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 1, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study: Recovering from a coronavirus infection gives you lifelong antibody protection... but authorities refuse to recognize natural immunity
(Natural News) People who recover from mild cases of COVID-19 develop antibodies that may protect them from the Wuhan coronavirus, say researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis (WUSTL). In their report, which was published in Nature, the team noted that these immune cells can persist for a lifetime as they continue to produce... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 30, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pfizer, Moderna vaccines likely to provide lasting immunity, Washington University study finds
The Moderna and Pfizer vaccines will likely provide lasting immunity to Covid-19, according to findings from a new study by the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Both vaccines were authorized for emergency use and employed mRNA technology, which has never been used before in FDA-approved vaccines. Both vaccines performed well in clinical trials, and both have been widely credited with reducing disease, but there have been concerns over how long immunity in duced by the new vaccine… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 29, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Kelsi Anderson, KSDK Source Type: news

Cell-based immunotherapy shows promise against melanoma
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown in preclinical studies conducted in mice and human cells that a type of immunotherapy based on natural killer cells could be effective against solid tumors, starting with melanoma, a type of skin cancer that can be deadly if not caught early. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 29, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 vaccine generates immune structures critical for lasting immunity
(Washington University School of Medicine) A new study from researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, published June 28 in the journal Nature, has found evidence that the immune response to Pfizer's mRNA vaccine against COVID-19 is both strong and potentially long-lasting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 28, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Virus that causes COVID-19 can find alternate route to infect cells
(Washington University School of Medicine) The virus that causes COVID-19 normally gets inside cells by attaching to a protein called ACE2. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that a single mutation confers the ability to enter cells through another route, which may threaten the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics designed to block the standard route of entry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 24, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

COVID-19 dual-antibody therapies effective against variants in animal study
(Washington University School of Medicine) A study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that many, but not all, COVID-19 therapies made from combinations of two antibodies are effective against a wide range of virus variants. Further, combination therapies appear to prevent the emergence of drug resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blood cancer patients with COVID-19 fare better with convalescent plasma
(Washington University in St. Louis) A large, retrospective, multicenter study involving Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that convalescent plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients can dramatically improve likelihood of survival among blood cancer patients hospitalized with the virus. The therapy involves transfusing plasma -- the pale yellow liquid in blood that is rich in antibodies -- from people who have recovered from COVID-19 into patients who have leukemia, lymphoma or other blood cancers and are hospitalized with the viral infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 17, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

BJC HealthCare, Washington University to require Covid-19 vaccination for all employees
Two of the St. Louis region's largest employers announced Tuesday that they will require their employees to be vaccinated against Covid-19 by fall. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - June 16, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Diana Barr Source Type: news

BJC HealthCare, Washington University to require Covid-19 vaccination for all employees
Two of the St. Louis region's largest employers announced Tuesday that they will require their employees to be vaccinated against Covid-19 by fall. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 16, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Diana Barr Source Type: news

More than one MILLION deaths were linked to fossil fuel combustion in 2017
In 2017, 1.05 million deaths would have been avoidable during the year by eliminating fossil-fuel combustion, according to a research team led by Washington University in St. Louis. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Malicious content exploits pathways between platforms to thrive online, subvert moderation
(George Washington University) Malicious COVID-19 online content -- including racist content, disinformation and misinformation -- thrives and spreads online by bypassing the moderation efforts of individual social media platforms, according to a new study by researchers at the George Washington University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 15, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

What makes us sneeze?
(Washington University School of Medicine) What exactly triggers a sneeze? A team led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified, in mice, specific cells and proteins that control the sneeze reflex. Better understanding of what causes us to sneeze -- specifically how neurons behave in response to allergens and viruses -- may point to treatments capable of slowing the spread of infectious respiratory diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 15, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Keeping the peace
(Washington University in St. Louis) New research sheds light on how - and in what context - peacekeepers can contain the spread of violence in fragile post-conflict areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research finds 1M deaths in 2017 attributable to fossil fuel combustion
(Washington University in St. Louis) An international team of researchers, including faculty in the McKelvey School of Engineering, has determined what sources contribute to pollution and the health effects they have on global, regional and smaller scales. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Shrinking to survive: Bacteria adapt to a lifestyle in flux
(Washington University in St. Louis) E. coli adapt to survive sudden starvation. Biologists from Washington University in St. Louis and Stanford showed that when E. coli cells lack nutrients, the cytoplasm becomes more dense as its volume decreases, probably because of water loss. At the same time, the periplasm increases in volume as the inner membrane pulls away from the outer membrane. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Controversy Over the FDA ’s Approval of The First Alzheimer’s Treatment Keeps Growing
“The whole thing is befuddling, and a series of inexplicable surprises,” says Dr. Caleb Alexander, professor of epidemiology and medicine at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Alexander is a member of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s advisory committee that provided recommendations to the agency on whether or not to approve the Alzheimer’s drug aducanumab. On June 7, the FDA did approve the drug (under the brand name Aduhelm), in a highly controversial decision that continues to divide the Alzheimer’s community. Patients and advocacy groups, including the Alzheimer&rsq...
Source: TIME: Health - June 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Study finds brain areas involved in seeking information about bad possibilities
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified the brain regions involved in choosing whether to find out if a bad event is about to happen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Demographic Disparities in Proximity to Stroke Care Identified
THURSDAY, June 10, 2021 -- Demographic disparities in proximity to stroke care are greater in nonurban than in urban areas, according to a study published online June 10 in Stroke. Cathy Y. Yu, from the Washington University School of Medicine in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 10, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Study sheds light on treatment options for devastating childhood brain cancer
(Washington University School of Medicine) Research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that children with average risk medulloblastoma can receive radiation to a smaller volume of the brain at the end of a six-week course of treatment and still maintain the same disease control as those receiving radiation to a larger area. But the dose of preventive radiation treatments given to the whole brain and spine over the six-week regimen cannot be reduced without reducing survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 10, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
(American College of Physicians) Experts suggest limited and careful use of corticosteroids as one of several strategies to curtail the syndemic of mucormycosis, or 'black fungus,' a fungal infection characterized by blackening or discoloration over the face, breathing difficulties, and other serious symptoms, that has recently emerged in India. A commentary from Washington University School of Medicine and the University of Massachusetts Medical School is published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 7, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news