Gene-editing tool CRISPR/Cas9 shown to limit impact of certain parasitic diseases
(George Washington University) For the first time, researchers at the George Washington University have successfully used the gene-editing tool CRISPR/Cas9 to limit the impact of parasitic worms responsible for schistosomiasis and for liver fluke infection, which can cause a diverse spectrum of human disease including bile duct cancer.   (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Vegan diets for athletes: Cutting out meat 'boosts heart health, endurance and recovery'
The high intake of vitamins and minerals keeps inflammation low, experts led by George Washington University School of Medicine said in a review of current evidence. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mice sleeping fitfully provide clues to insomnia
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis -- working with mice with sleep problems similar to those experienced by people with the genetic disease neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) -- believe the animals will help shed light on insomnia linked to NF1 or other factors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New strategy may curtail spread of antibiotic resistance
(Washington University School of Medicine) In studying a bacterium that causes disease in hospitalized people, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have figured out a key step in the transmission of antibiotic resistance from one bacterium to another. Their insight suggests a new strategy for stopping the spread of antibiotic resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 9, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

With Wash U as a client, Israeli startup gains more traction in the U.S.
After making its first U.S. deal with Washington University, an Israeli startup continues to expand and may ultimately showcase St. Louis as a good starting off point for innovative companies. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 8, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Brian Robbins Source Type: news

Racial Differences ID'd in Some Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease
TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 -- Certain molecular biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease differ with race, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in JAMA Neurology. John C. Morris, M.D., from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 8, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Wash U: African-Americans may be twice as likely as Caucasians to develop Alzheimer ’s
Washington University School of Medicine released the results of the study Monday that revealed African-American patients may be twice as likely as caucasians to develop Alzheimer ’s disease. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 8, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Brian Robbins Source Type: news

Closed-loop device uses light to control overactive bladder
Researchers developed this small device implanted around the bladder of a rat to provide closed-loop bladder control. It uses light signals from tiny LEDs to activate nerve cells in the bladder. (Image courtesy of Gereau Lab, Washington University) A team of neuroscientists and engineers has developed a tiny, implantable, closed-loop device that may replace medication or electronic stimulators for bladder disorders. The team from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago created a soft, imp...
Source: Mass Device - January 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation News Well Research & Development Urology feinbergschoolofmedicineatnorthwesternuniversity University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Washington University School of Medicine Source Type: news

Human brain allocates attention based on known size of objects
(George Washington University) Researchers at the George Washington University gained important insights into how the human brain processes information and allocates attention. Their study, " Attention Scales According to Inferred Real-World Object Size, " shows people pay attention to objects based on their real-world size, rather than how they are perceived by the eye. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

I Spent My Fertile Years Training to Be a Surgeon. Now, It Might Be Too Late For Me to Have a Baby
“How do you envision your family looking?” My face crumpled and tears fell from my eyes as soon as the young doctor asked me this question. I reflexively reached for a tissue to cover my face and erase the signs of weakness. “I don’t know,” I said. “I just want to be able to have a family someday.” I was in a fertility clinic for an initial consultation about egg freezing. Of the people in the waiting room, I was the odd one out: a single woman among couples struggling to have children. As a surgeon, I can’t honestly say I have spent a lot of time looking for a partner. I&rsq...
Source: TIME: Health - January 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Arghavan Salles Tags: Uncategorized Sex/Relationships Source Type: news

Sex differences identified in deadly brain tumors
(Washington University School of Medicine) More males get, and die of, the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma than females. A team of researchers led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified distinct molecular signatures of glioblastoma in men and women that help explain disparities in patients' response to treatment and survival. The research suggests that tailoring treatments to men and women with glioblastoma based on the molecular subtypes of their tumors may improve survival for all patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 2, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A daily glass of wine is NOT harmful to pensioners with heart disease, study finds  
Dr David Brown at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis said patients often ask if they have to stop drinking. His new research confirms they do not have to - and perhaps shouldn't. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Moderate drinking not harmful for older patients with heart failure
(Washington University School of Medicine) A new study suggests that people over age 65 who are newly diagnosed with heart failure can continue to drink moderate amounts of alcohol without worsening their condition. However, the findings do not suggest that nondrinkers should start imbibing after a heart failure diagnosis, the researchers emphasized. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stressed? Depressed? Put down your phone and speak to people
Social media allows us to connect at any time. But psychologist Kostadin Kushlev of George Washington University warns it is not a substitute for real connections - quite the opposite. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Americans Are Getting Shorter And Heavier
By Naomi Thomas, CNN (CNN) — America is struggling with an obesity epidemic, and a new government report says that the population is only getting heavier. “Mean (or average) weight, waist circumference, and BMI in adults 20 years and older increased between 1999-2000 and 2015-2016,” Cynthia Ogden, one of the report’s authors and an epidemiologist at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics, wrote in an email. The report looked at the height, weight, body-mass index and waist circumference of American adults; it updated a 2004...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Obesity Source Type: news

Researchers study epigenetic reprogramming in HIV-associated heart disease
(George Washington University) Researchers from the George Washington University received more than $3.1 million from the National Institutes of Health to investigate the causes of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 20, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

D.C. Council approves St. E's hospital bill after changes; GWU Hospital mum
The agreement with George Washington University Hospital to operate a new hospital in Southeast D.C. might not be dead. The D.C. Council voted 10-2 Tuesday to waive the certificate of need process to build both the new facility and a new patient tower in Foggy Bottom planned by GWU Hospital as part of the deal. The bill now moves to Mayor Muriel Bowser, clearing the way for the mayor to negotiate the final operatio nal agreement with GWU Hospital. The original bill passed in November was designed… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 19, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

Edging closer to personalized medicine for patients with irregular heartbeat
(Washington University in St. Louis) Biomedical engineer Jon Silva led an international team that determined which patients would benefit the most from a commonly used drug treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

D.C. Council approves St. E's hospital bill after changes; GWU Hospital mum
The agreement with George Washington University Hospital to operate a new hospital in Southeast D.C. might not be dead. The D.C. Council voted 10-2 Tuesday to waive the certificate of need process to build both the new facility and a new patient tower in Foggy Bottom planned by GWU Hospital as part of the deal. The bill now moves to Mayor Muriel Bowser, clearing the way for the mayor to negotiate the final operatio nal agreement with GWU Hospital. The original bill passed in November was designed… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

Clinical Trial Tests CAR T-Cell Therapy on Peritoneal Mesothelioma
The National Cancer Institute in Rockville, Maryland, has opened an innovative clinical trial for patients with peritoneal mesothelioma that will explore the safety and effectiveness of a novel CAR T-cell therapy. The phase I trial also is being conducted at Washington University in St. Louis. It is aimed at patients whose disease has relapsed after initial chemotherapy treatment. It involves a laboratory modification of a patient’s T cells — a type of white blood cell — that can help the immune system kill the cancer. CAR T-cell therapy is a form of gene therapy that has been highly successful with blood...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 18, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

A versatile vaccine that can protect mice from emerging tick-borne viruses
(Cell Press) A group of researchers led by Michael Diamond of Washington University in St. Louis have developed a vaccine that is effective in mice against Powassan virus, an emerging tick-borne virus that can cause life-threatening encephalitis in humans. They also show that the vaccine produces antibodies that can protect the mice against other, related tick-transmitted flaviviruses. Their findings appear Dec. 18 in the journal Cell Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

GW professor elected to National Academy of Inventors
(George Washington University) Igor Efimov, the Alisann and Terry Collins Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the George Washington University, will be inducted into the National Academy of Inventors next spring, a prestigious distinction for leaders in academic innovation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New genetic clues to early-onset form of dementia
(Washington University School of Medicine) In an effort to better understand frontotemporal dementia, an international team of researchers, led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has found that a lone mutation in a single gene that causes an inherited form of the disorder makes it harder for neurons in the brain to communicate with one another, leading to neurodegeneration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Collagen nanofibrils in mammalian tissues get stronger with exercise
(University of Illinois College of Engineering) A recent experimental study conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Washington University in St. Louis, and Columbia University on nanoscale collagen fibrils reported on, previously unforeseen, reasons why collagen is such a resilient material. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study investigates treatments for prurigo nodularis
(George Washington University) A team from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences found emerging treatments, such as neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists, were the most promising against prurigo nodularis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Meth Playing Bigger Role in US Drug Overdose Crisis
NEW YORK (AP) — A bigger share of U.S. drug overdose deaths are being caused by methamphetamine, government health officials reported. The number of fatal overdoses involving meth more than tripled between 2011 and 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Wednesday. The percentage of overdose deaths involving meth grew from less than 5 percent to nearly 11 percent. Meth is not the main killer among illicit drugs. Fentanyl was involved in the highest percentage of fatal overdoses in 2016, followed by heroin and cocaine. Meth was fourth. But it was only eighth as recently as 2012. It's not clear wh...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 12, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Stobbe, Associated Press Medical Writer Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Meth Playing Bigger Role in US Drug Overdose Crisis
NEW YORK (AP) — A bigger share of U.S. drug overdose deaths are being caused by methamphetamine, government health officials reported. The number of fatal overdoses involving meth more than tripled between 2011 and 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Wednesday. The percentage of overdose deaths involving meth grew from less than 5 percent to nearly 11 percent. Meth is not the main killer among illicit drugs. Fentanyl was involved in the highest percentage of fatal overdoses in 2016, followed by heroin and cocaine. Meth was fourth. But it was only eighth as recently as 2012. It's not clear wh...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 12, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Stobbe, Associated Press Medical Writer Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Women and men with heart attack symptoms get different treatment from EMS
(George Washington University) Researchers from the George Washington University (GW) have examined the care that women and men with heart attack symptoms receive from emergency medical services (EMS) after a 911 call and found that women were less likely to receive aspirin, be resuscitated, or be transported to the hospital in ambulances using lights and sirens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Providers show interest in prescribing therapeutic cannabinoids
(George Washington University) A team from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences found many dermatologists are interested in learning more about and recommending therapeutic cannabinoids to their patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GW expert calls for strong, sustainable action to make world roadways safer
(George Washington University) According to the latest World Health Organization (WHO) report on road safety, more than 1.3 million people die on the world's roadways each year -- and millions more are injured or disabled. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GWU Hospital: New bill makes Southeast hospital deal 'potentially impossible'
George Washington University Hospital said that it “cannot and will not be involved” in a deal with D.C. to operate a planned new Southeast D.C. hospital unless D.C. Council removes two amendments from proposed legislation that would essentially require the Foggy Bottom hospital to embrace an employee union and affiliation with Howard University Hospital at the new facility, dubbed the East End Hospital. GWU Hospital CEO Kimberly Russo sent a letter Wednesday to City Administrator Rashad Young… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 6, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

GWU Hospital: New bill makes Southeast hospital deal 'potentially impossible'
George Washington University Hospital said that it “cannot and will not be involved” in a deal with D.C. to operate a planned new Southeast D.C. hospital unless D.C. Council removes two amendments from proposed legislation that would essentially require the Foggy Bottom hospital to embrace an employee union and affiliation with Howard University Hospital at the new facility, dubbed the East End Hospital. GWU Hospital CEO Kimberly Russo sent a letter Wednesday to City Administrator Rashad Young… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 6, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

GWU Hospital deal to oversee UMC's replacement may be imploding
George Washington University Hospital is expected to pull out of a tentative deal to run a new Southeast D.C. hospital because of new provisions backed Tuesday night by many D.C. Council members, according to a source familiar with the situation. News of the about-face comes less than a day after the council added two amendments to a bill originally intended to speed up the delivery of both the Southeast hospital and a patient tower that GWU Hospital wants to build in Foggy Bottom to help financially… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 6, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

D.C. Council postpones vote on GWU Hospital expansion bill
The D.C. Council opted Tuesday night to postpone for two more weeks its final vote on a bill designed to accelerate the construction of a new Southeast D.C. hospital that George Washington University Hospital is slated to run. The legislation would waive the Certificate of Need requirement to both build that new Southeast hospital and for GWU Hospital to build a new patient tower in Foggy Bottom. Its aim is to bring a much-needed hospital to the St. Elizabeths campus by the end of 2021, rather than… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - December 5, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

D.C. Council postpones vote on GWU Hospital expansion bill
The D.C. Council opted Tuesday night to postpone for two more weeks its final vote on a bill designed to accelerate the construction of a new Southeast D.C. hospital that George Washington University Hospital is slated to run. The legislation would waive the Certificate of Need requirement to both build that new Southeast hospital and for GWU Hospital to build a new patient tower in Foggy Bottom. Its aim is to bring a much-needed hospital to the St. Elizabeths campus by the end of 2021, rather than… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 5, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

Medtronic studies use of both heat and cold for cardiac ablation
Medtronic today said that a St. Louis heart team has treated the first patient in the company’s Terminate AF trial, which is studying the simultaneous use of heat and cold to produce cardiac ablation for atrial fibrillation treatment. The goal is to determine the safety and efficacy of treating persistent atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing other surgical heart procedures including bypass surgery, heart valve repair or replacement, according to the Medtronic. During a recent open-heart surgical procedure, a team led by Dr. Ralph Damiano at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis used bot...
Source: Mass Device - December 3, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Featured News Well Research & Development Surgical Medtronic Source Type: news

A new approach to studying the flu
(Washington University in St. Louis) A clever repurposing of a biological tool gives researchers new clues as to how the flu remains so successful. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 3, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Washington University gets $20 million gift
The Washington University School of Medicine this week received a $20 million gift from Scottrade Financial Services' founder Rodger Riney and his wife, Paula. Scottrade was acquired last year by TD Ameritrade in a $4 billion deal. Scottrade's longtime CEO, Rodger Riney and his family had owned Scottrade through family trusts. The gift establishes the Paula C. and Rodger O. Riney Blood Cancer Research Initiative Fund. The money will be used to research to improve treatment options and life expectancy… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - November 30, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Veneta Rizvic Source Type: news

Washington University gets $20 million gift
The Washington University School of Medicine this week received a $20 million gift from Scottrade Financial Services' founder Rodger Riney and his wife, Paula. Scottrade was acquired last year by TD Ameritrade in a $4 billion deal. Scottrade's longtime CEO, Rodger Riney and his family had owned Scottrade through family trusts. The gift establishes the Paula C. and Rodger O. Riney Blood Cancer Research Initiative Fund. The money will be used to research to improve treatment options and life expectancy… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 30, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Veneta Rizvic Source Type: news

Rates of chronic kidney disease, deaths outpace other diseases
(Washington University in St. Louis) An abundance of high-sugar, high-salt foods in many American diets and obesity-related health problems such as diabetes are likely driving an increase in kidney disease cases, including in young adults, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Alcohol dependence, psychiatric disorders share genetic links
(Washington University School of Medicine) An international team of researchers has identified a gene that regulates how quickly the body metabolizes alcohol as a key risk factor for alcohol dependence. The researchers, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and several other institutions, also linked genetic factors associated with alcohol dependence to other psychiatric disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Project ECHO launched in D.C. and Maryland to combat diabetes
(George Washington University) The GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences and La Clinica del Pueblo have partnered to launch Project ECHO in Washington, D.C., to increase workforce capacity to provide best practice specialty care and reduce health disparities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Keeping cholesterol low could reduce Alzheimer's risks, study suggests
Scientists at Washington University, St Louis, and UC San Francisco found that nine gene variants raise he risks of high cholesterol and Alzheimer's. Controlling fat may help avoid dementia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here ’s Why People Are Obsessed With Popping Pimples
You know it’s a bad idea to pop your pimples. Dermatologists say so. “If the inflamed or infected material”—i.e., the pimple pus—“is not easily extruded with a little pressure, you could force it deep and spread the extent of the inflammation, and even cause permanent scarring and pitting of the skin,” says Dr. Michael Olding, a dermatologist and chief of plastic surgery at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. But despite these warnings, many find it hard to resist evicting the unsightly little squatters that set up shop in their skin. One dermat...
Source: TIME: Health - November 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

GWU Hospital could get expedited new tower in Foggy Bottom from its deal to operate Ward 8 hospital
George Washington University Hospital could get a waiver to build a new hospital tower in Foggy Bottom as part of its deal to take control of the United Medical Center replacement facility in Southeast. The D.C. Council recently signed off on first reading of a partnership agreement that waives the lengthy Certificate of Need process for the hospital on the St. Elizabeths East campus. The aim of the waiver is to expedite the facility's opening in an area of the District that has long lacked suffi cient… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - November 21, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Drew Hansen Source Type: news

GWU Hospital could get expedited new tower in Foggy Bottom from its deal to operate Ward 8 hospital
George Washington University Hospital could get a waiver to build a new hospital tower in Foggy Bottom as part of its deal to take control of the United Medical Center replacement facility in Southeast. The D.C. Council recently signed off on first reading of a partnership agreement that waives the lengthy Certificate of Need process for the hospital on the St. Elizabeths East campus. The aim of the waiver is to expedite the facility's opening in an area of the District that has long lacked suffi cient… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 21, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Drew Hansen Source Type: news

Probiotics no help to young kids with stomach virus
(Washington University in St. Louis) A major US study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that a commonly used probiotic is not effective in improving symptoms of diarrhea and vomiting in young children with gastroenteritis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 21, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New MRI brain scan technique could predict up to 95% of Alzheimer's cases
The small study of 61 patients at Washington University suggests a technique that, if successful, would be a better alternative to the current questionnaire screening method. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MRI scans shows promise in predicting dementia
(Washington University School of Medicine) Doctors may one day be able to gauge a patient's risk of dementia with an MRI scan, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Using a new technique for analyzing MRI data, researchers were able to predict who would experience cognitive decline with 89 percent accuracy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news