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What counts as 'nature'? It all depends
(University of Washington) University of Washington psychology professor Peter Kahn describes 'environmental generational amnesia' as the idea that each generation perceives the environment into which it's born, no matter how developed, urbanized or polluted, as the norm. And so what each generation comes to think of as 'nature' is relative, based on what it's exposed to. Kahn argues that more frequent and meaningful interactions with nature can enhance our connection to -- and definition of -- the natural world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is it an Emergency? Insurer Asks Patients to Question ED Visits
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Alison Wrenne was making waffles for her two young children one morning when abdominal pain forced her to the floor. A neighbor who is a physician assistant urged her to go to the emergency room. Wrong decision, according to her health insurer. Wrenne was diagnosed with a ruptured ovarian cyst, but Anthem said that wasn't an emergency and stuck her with a $4,110 bill. "How are you supposed to know that?" said the 34-year-old from Lexington, Kentucky. "I'm not a doctor ... that's what the emergency room is for." In an effort to curb unnecessary and costly ER visits, the Blue Cro...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - November 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tom Murphy, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Is it an Emergency? Insurer Asks Patients to Question ED Visits
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Alison Wrenne was making waffles for her two young children one morning when abdominal pain forced her to the floor. A neighbor who is a physician assistant urged her to go to the emergency room. Wrong decision, according to her health insurer. Wrenne was diagnosed with a ruptured ovarian cyst, but Anthem said that wasn't an emergency and stuck her with a $4,110 bill. "How are you supposed to know that?" said the 34-year-old from Lexington, Kentucky. "I'm not a doctor ... that's what the emergency room is for." In an effort to curb unnecessary and costly ER visits, the Blue Cro...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - November 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tom Murphy, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Is it an Emergency? Insurer Asks Patients to Question ED Visits
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Alison Wrenne was making waffles for her two young children one morning when abdominal pain forced her to the floor. A neighbor who is a physician assistant urged her to go to the emergency room. Wrong decision, according to her health insurer. Wrenne was diagnosed with a ruptured ovarian cyst, but Anthem said that wasn't an emergency and stuck her with a $4,110 bill. "How are you supposed to know that?" said the 34-year-old from Lexington, Kentucky. "I'm not a doctor ... that's what the emergency room is for." In an effort to curb unnecessary and costly ER visits, the Blue Cro...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tom Murphy, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

How cells detect, mend DNA damage may improve chemotherapy
(Washington University School of Medicine) Human cells have a way of detecting and mending DNA damage caused by some common chemotherapy drugs, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings could have important implications for treating cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 8, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Washington University receives $10 million gift for personalized medicine research
The Washington University School of Medicine has received a $10 million gift from George and Debra Couch to support personalized medicine research. The gift will establish an endowed fund dedicated to personalized medicine efforts and will also provide support to the university's Genome Engineering and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Center. Washington University named its newly built research building at 4515 McKinley Ave. as the Debra and Ge orge W. Couch III Biomedical Research Building in honor… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - November 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Angela Mueller Source Type: news

Study: PCI procedures ineffective at treating chest pain
Cardiovascular stents intended to relieve chest may not be effective at all for a good number of patients they’re implanted in, according to a new study reported yesterday by the New York Times. The study, published in the Lancet, examined the use of stents to open blocked arteries to treat chest pain, often experienced during exercise, according to the report. Results from the study stood in stark contrast to existing medical evidence and call into question the use of stents for treating chest pain, the Times reports. In the blinded, randomized, study, researchers compared percutaneous coronary interventions against...
Source: Mass Device - November 3, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Stents Source Type: news

How toxic air clouds mental health
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have found a link between air pollution and psychological distress. The higher the level of particulates in the air, the UW-led study showed, the greater the impact on mental health.The study is believed to be the first to use a nationally representative survey pool, cross-referenced with pollution data at the census block level, to evaluate the connection between toxic air and mental health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penny-wise, pound-foolish decisions explained by neurons' firing
(Washington University School of Medicine) People sometimes spend as much time deciding whether to spend a few cents more on groceries as they do deciding whether to spend a few thousand dollars extra when buying a car. A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that these spending habits may reflect how our brains tally differences in value among objects that vary greatly in worth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 2, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

In autism, too many brain connections may be at root of condition
(Washington University School of Medicine) Mutations in a gene linked to autism in people causes neurons to form too many connections in rodents, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings suggest that malfunctions in communication between brain cells could be at the root of autism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New NIH grant to help researchers follow children with autism transition to adulthood
(George Washington University) A George Washington University-led national collaborative network aimed at improving outcomes for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder will receive more than $11.7 million from the National Institutes of Health over the next five years to help propel innovative research in the field. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Red wine could HELP you get pregnant
Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine in the US examined the effect of alcohol on fertility because previous findings were ‘conflicting’. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Large declines seen in teen substance abuse, delinquency
(Washington University School of Medicine) Survey data indicate that in recent years, teens have become far less likely to abuse alcohol, nicotine and illicit drugs, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Teens also are less likely to engage in behaviors like fighting and stealing, and the researchers believe the declines in substance use and delinquency are connected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cells' mechanical memory could hold clues to cancer metastasis
(Washington University in St. Louis) In the body, cells move around to form organs during development; to heal wounds; and when they metastasize from cancerous tumors. A mechanical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis found that cells remember the properties they had in their first environment for several days after they move to another in a process called mechanical memory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Older Neandertal survived with a little help from his friends
(Washington University in St. Louis) An older Neandertal from about 50,000 years ago, who had suffered multiple injuries and other degenerations, became deaf and must have relied on the help of others to avoid prey and survive well into his 40s, indicates a new analysis published Oct. 20 in the online journal PLoS ONE. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Washington University gets $3.7 million to study neurological disorders
Washington University has received $3.7 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health to study neurological disorders linked to manganese, an element found in smoke from steel production and coal fires. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 16, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Angela Mueller Source Type: news

Portable 3-D scanner assesses patients with elephantiasis
(Washington University in St. Louis) An estimated 120 million people worldwide are infected with lymphatic filariasis, a parasitic, mosquito-borne disease that can cause major swelling and deformity of the legs, a condition known as elephantiasis. Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that a portable scanning device can measure limb enlargement and disfigurement faster and more easily in patients with elephantiasis. The research tool makes it easy to obtain accurate measurements and determine whether treatments to reduce swelling are effective. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NIH awards almost $10 million to UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment
The National Institutes of Health, recognizing UCLA ’s leadership in understanding and developing interventions for autism spectrum disorder, has renewed its support of the UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment with a five-year, $9.7 million grant.The Autism Center of Excellence grant is directed by Susan Bookheimer, director of the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center at UCLA. It supports research projects led by autism experts Mirella Dapretto, Dr. Shafali Jeste, Connie Kasari, Elizabeth Laugeson, Dr. Daniel Geschwind and Dr. Jim McCracken.“This renewed support will allow UCLA t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers create map of the gut's microbial landscape
(Forsyth Institute) A collaborative effort by a team of researchers from three institutions including the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, the Forsyth Institute in Cambridge and Washington University in St. Louis provided an early glimpse of how microbial communities in the gut -- known collectively as the gut microbiome -- are spatially organized, uncovering a surprising degree of mixing among different bacterial members. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study casts doubt on warming implications of brown carbon aerosol from wildfires
(Washington University in St. Louis) As devastating wildfires rage in California wine country, a team of environmental engineers at Washington University in St. Louis have made a new discovery about wildfire smoke, and its effect on the atmosphere. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

US ’ George Washington University to conduct Zika virus trial in Brazil
The George Washington University (GW) School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) in the US is set to conduct the clinical trial of an investigational vaccine for prevention of the Zika infection in Brazil. (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - October 10, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Alzheimer's gene poses both risk -- and benefits
(Washington University School of Medicine) Scientists studying the molecular roots of Alzheimer's disease have encountered a good news/bad news scenario. The bad news is that in the early stages of the disease, high-risk TREM2 variants can hobble the immune system's ability to protect the brain from amyloid beta. The good news, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is that later in the disease, the absence of TREM2 protein seems to protect the brain from damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GW research team brings Zika virus vaccine clinical trial to Brazil site
(George Washington University) A research team at GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences awarded over $2 million to participate in Zika vaccine trial in Brazil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 9, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

GW researcher receives more than $2.3 million to study cocaine's influence on HIV
(George Washington University) Following studies showing that cocaine influences the transcription and replication of HIV, Mudit Tyagi, PhD, at GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, will lead a team researching the underlying mechanisms of that influence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Specific gut microbes found to prevent influenza by "digesting" flavonoids found in superfoods
(Natural News) Scientists behind the latest nutritional review on gut microbiomes and flavonoids call their results “intriguing” after observing an unusual connection between the two. The description was made after observing that a specific gut microbe directly influenced how naturally-occurring compounds called flavonoids impacted our immune system. Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Text messaging program may help pregnant women kick the smoking habit
(George Washington University) An intensive text messaging program provides some pregnant women help in fighting the urge to light up a smoke (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GW-led consortium and FDA release new specifications to advance genomic data analysis
(George Washington University) GW and the FDA have published a BioCompute Object Specification Document for research and clinical trial use, which details a new framework for communication of High-throughput Sequencing computations and data analysis, known as BioCompute Objects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 29, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

16 Ways to Get People to Like You Immediately, According to Psychology
This article originally appeared on BusinessInsider.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shana Lebowitz / Business Insider Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology Source Type: news

Antibiotics warranted for kids with minor staph infections
(Washington University in St. Louis) The overuse of antibiotics has left some doctors questioning whether to give such drugs to children diagnosed with uncomplicated Staphylococcus aureus (staph) infections. Now, research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that prescribing antibiotics -- in addition to lancing and draining staph-infected areas -- reduces the risk of recurrent infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 26, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Antibody protects against Zika and dengue, mouse study shows
(Washington University School of Medicine) The same countries hard hit by Zika virus -- which can cause brain damage in babies infected before birth -- are also home to dengue virus. Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis researchers report that they have found an antibody that protects against both viruses. These findings, in mice, could be a step towards an antibody-based preventative drug to protect fetuses from brain damage, while also protecting their mothers from both Zika and dengue disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 25, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Health center services at risk if Congress fails to renew funding
(George Washington University) Community health centers all over the country could suffer catastrophic losses, resulting in site closures, job and economic losses, and a disruption in health care access for 9 million people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Breathing dirty air may harm kidneys
(Washington University in St. Louis) Outdoor air pollution may increase the risk of chronic kidney disease and contribute to kidney failure, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Veterans Affairs (VA) St. Louis Health Care System. Scientists used VA data to evaluate the effects of air pollution and kidney disease on nearly 2.5 million people and compared it to air-quality levels collected by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 21, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Alzheimer's gene found by scientists decrease symptoms
Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis studied ApoE4. This mutant gene has been linked to Alzheimer's disease. It helps cause brain damage by knotting proteins within neurons. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists find way to convert bad body fat into good fat
There's good fat and bad fat in our bodies. The good fat helps burn calories, while the bad fat hoards calories, contributing to weight gain and obesity. Now, new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified a way to convert bad, white fat into good, brown fat, at least in mice. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - September 20, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Bernie Sanders: I Did Everything I Could to Get Hillary Clinton Elected
Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders pushed back against Hillary Clinton’s criticism that he did not do enough on her behalf in the general election — claiming he had no control over his supporters who ultimately voted for Donald Trump. “Let me just say this; I worked as hard as I could after endorsing Hillary Clinton. I went all over this country. And I would remind people, people say, ‘Not everyone who voted for Bernie ended up voting for Hillary.’ No kidding, thats what happens in politics,” Sanders told NBC News’ Chuck Todd on Meet the Press Sunday. “I worked as hard as I could...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alana Abramson Tags: Uncategorized Bernie Sanders onetime Source Type: news

Medical students not trained to prescribe medical marijuana
(Washington University School of Medicine) More than half of the states in the US now allow some type of legal marijuana use, primarily medical marijuana. But, in a survey of medical residents and deans at the nation's medical schools, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that the majority of schools are not teaching their students about medical marijuana, and the majority of students don't feel prepared to discuss the subject with patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

With community health center fund expiration looming, health center services at risk
(George Washington University) Safety net clinics all over the country could suffer catastrophic losses, resulting in site closures, job and economic loss, and a disruption in health access for 9 million people (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why More Women Are Getting a Double Mastectomy
Recent research has shown that despite more having more treatment options, women with cancer in one breast are increasingly choosing to remove both breasts—even though experts in the field say the procedure is not necessarily accompanied by better outcomes. Now, a new study published Wednesday in JAMA Surgery finds that the increase is being driven in part by their surgeons. Doctors generally discourage contralateral prophylactic mastectomy—also known as CPM, or the removal of a healthy breast when the other has cancer—for women at an average risk for additional breast cancer. They do recommend it for wo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized Breast Cancer breast cancer treatment contralateral prophylactic mastectomy double mastectomy lumpectomy symptoms breast cancer Source Type: news

Climate change challenges the survival of fish across the world
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have published the first analysis looking at how vulnerable the world's freshwater and marine fishes are to climate change. Their paper, appearing online Sept. 11 in Nature Climate Change, used physiological data to predict how nearly 3,000 fish species living in oceans and rivers will respond to warming water temperatures in different regions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Washington U. professor wins $790,000 prize for cancer research
Washington University professor Robert Schreiber is one of two U.S. researchers who are receiving a $790,000 prize for their work developing immunological cancer treatments. Schreiber and James Allison of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center were named co-recipients of the Balzan Prize, which recognizes the "most meritorious initiatives in the cause of humanity, peace and fraternity among peoples throughout the world." This year's winners were announced M onday in Milan. Jules Hoffmann,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - September 12, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Angela Mueller Source Type: news

Scientists think they may have the answer for your itch
Tofacitinib, when taken twice daily, helped five patients with severe itches from unknown causes make 'dramatic' improvements, a Washington University, St Louis, study showed. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study on climate change shows how cities can prioritize public health
(George Washington University) Involving health experts in planning can have profound consequences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Zika virus may be useful in treating brain tumours
Conclusion This is an interesting piece of research that shows how knowledge in one field of medicine can sometimes be applied to another field with surprising results. But it's important to be realistic about the stage of research. This is very much a "proof of concept" study, and tests on cells, tissues and mice don't necessarily translate into a safe and effective treatment for humans. The study has several limitations, but the fact the treatment so far hasn't been tested on humans is the most important. For one thing, Zika virus doesn't naturally infect mice, so researchers had to use a specially engineered v...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

PupilScreen aims to allow parents, coaches, medics to detect concussion, TBIs with a phone
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers are developing a smartphone app that is capable of objectively detecting concussion and other traumatic brain injuries in the field, which could provide a new level of screening for athletes and accident victims. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Zika can kill brain tumors like John McCain's, study says
New research by Washington University School of Medicine found it is possible to use the virus to target glioblastoma tumor cells in adult brains. It is so far an incurable cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zika virus could be used to treat brain cancer patients, study suggests
(Rockefeller University Press) Recent outbreaks of Zika virus have revealed that the virus causes brain defects in unborn children. But in a study to be published Sept. 5 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California, San Diego report that the virus could eventually be used to target and kill cancer cells in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Zika virus kills brain cancer stem cells
(Washington University School of Medicine) While Zika virus causes devastating damage to the brains of developing fetuses, it one day may be an effective treatment for glioblastoma, a deadly form of brain cancer. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California San Diego School of Medicine shows that the virus kills brain cancer stem cells, the kind of cancer cells most resistant to standard treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Medrobotics touts 1st colorectal procedure with Flex robotic system
Medrobotics said today that its Flex robotic system was used in its 1st colorectal surgery, touting it as a global 1st for the system. The surgery was performed at George Washington University Hospital by Dr. Vincent Obias, the company said, to remove a suspected cancerous lesion from the rectum of an adult male. The procedure required no incisions through the skin, the Raynham Mass.-based company said. “The Flex Robotic System is the first robotic platform that allows surgeons to visualize and access lesions in the rectum with a steerable and shapeable robotic scope and flexible instruments. This offers some patient...
Source: Mass Device - August 30, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Robot-Assisted Surgery Robotics Medrobotics Source Type: news

Washington University institute receives $46 million NIH grant
The ​Washington University School of Medicine has received a $46 million grant to support efforts to turn scientific discoveries into meaningful treatments and diagnostics for patients. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 30, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Angela Mueller Source Type: news

Being a couch potato past 50 could leave you disabled
For those that cannot tear themselves away, the effects could be mitigated by doing more than seven hours a week of exercise, say the team at George Washington University. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news