Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Health center services at risk if Congress fails to renew funding
(George Washington University) Community health centers all over the country could suffer catastrophic losses, resulting in site closures, job and economic losses, and a disruption in health care access for 9 million people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Breathing dirty air may harm kidneys
(Washington University in St. Louis) Outdoor air pollution may increase the risk of chronic kidney disease and contribute to kidney failure, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Veterans Affairs (VA) St. Louis Health Care System. Scientists used VA data to evaluate the effects of air pollution and kidney disease on nearly 2.5 million people and compared it to air-quality levels collected by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 21, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Alzheimer's gene found by scientists decrease symptoms
Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis studied ApoE4. This mutant gene has been linked to Alzheimer's disease. It helps cause brain damage by knotting proteins within neurons. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists find way to convert bad body fat into good fat
There's good fat and bad fat in our bodies. The good fat helps burn calories, while the bad fat hoards calories, contributing to weight gain and obesity. Now, new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified a way to convert bad, white fat into good, brown fat, at least in mice. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - September 20, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Bernie Sanders: I Did Everything I Could to Get Hillary Clinton Elected
Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders pushed back against Hillary Clinton’s criticism that he did not do enough on her behalf in the general election — claiming he had no control over his supporters who ultimately voted for Donald Trump. “Let me just say this; I worked as hard as I could after endorsing Hillary Clinton. I went all over this country. And I would remind people, people say, ‘Not everyone who voted for Bernie ended up voting for Hillary.’ No kidding, thats what happens in politics,” Sanders told NBC News’ Chuck Todd on Meet the Press Sunday. “I worked as hard as I could...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alana Abramson Tags: Uncategorized Bernie Sanders onetime Source Type: news

Medical students not trained to prescribe medical marijuana
(Washington University School of Medicine) More than half of the states in the US now allow some type of legal marijuana use, primarily medical marijuana. But, in a survey of medical residents and deans at the nation's medical schools, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that the majority of schools are not teaching their students about medical marijuana, and the majority of students don't feel prepared to discuss the subject with patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

With community health center fund expiration looming, health center services at risk
(George Washington University) Safety net clinics all over the country could suffer catastrophic losses, resulting in site closures, job and economic loss, and a disruption in health access for 9 million people (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why More Women Are Getting a Double Mastectomy
Recent research has shown that despite more having more treatment options, women with cancer in one breast are increasingly choosing to remove both breasts—even though experts in the field say the procedure is not necessarily accompanied by better outcomes. Now, a new study published Wednesday in JAMA Surgery finds that the increase is being driven in part by their surgeons. Doctors generally discourage contralateral prophylactic mastectomy—also known as CPM, or the removal of a healthy breast when the other has cancer—for women at an average risk for additional breast cancer. They do recommend it for wo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized Breast Cancer breast cancer treatment contralateral prophylactic mastectomy double mastectomy lumpectomy symptoms breast cancer Source Type: news

Climate change challenges the survival of fish across the world
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have published the first analysis looking at how vulnerable the world's freshwater and marine fishes are to climate change. Their paper, appearing online Sept. 11 in Nature Climate Change, used physiological data to predict how nearly 3,000 fish species living in oceans and rivers will respond to warming water temperatures in different regions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Washington U. professor wins $790,000 prize for cancer research
Washington University professor Robert Schreiber is one of two U.S. researchers who are receiving a $790,000 prize for their work developing immunological cancer treatments. Schreiber and James Allison of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center were named co-recipients of the Balzan Prize, which recognizes the "most meritorious initiatives in the cause of humanity, peace and fraternity among peoples throughout the world." This year's winners were announced M onday in Milan. Jules Hoffmann,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - September 12, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Angela Mueller Source Type: news

Scientists think they may have the answer for your itch
Tofacitinib, when taken twice daily, helped five patients with severe itches from unknown causes make 'dramatic' improvements, a Washington University, St Louis, study showed. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study on climate change shows how cities can prioritize public health
(George Washington University) Involving health experts in planning can have profound consequences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Zika virus may be useful in treating brain tumours
Conclusion This is an interesting piece of research that shows how knowledge in one field of medicine can sometimes be applied to another field with surprising results. But it's important to be realistic about the stage of research. This is very much a "proof of concept" study, and tests on cells, tissues and mice don't necessarily translate into a safe and effective treatment for humans. The study has several limitations, but the fact the treatment so far hasn't been tested on humans is the most important. For one thing, Zika virus doesn't naturally infect mice, so researchers had to use a specially engineered v...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

PupilScreen aims to allow parents, coaches, medics to detect concussion, TBIs with a phone
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers are developing a smartphone app that is capable of objectively detecting concussion and other traumatic brain injuries in the field, which could provide a new level of screening for athletes and accident victims. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Zika can kill brain tumors like John McCain's, study says
New research by Washington University School of Medicine found it is possible to use the virus to target glioblastoma tumor cells in adult brains. It is so far an incurable cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zika virus kills brain cancer stem cells
(Washington University School of Medicine) While Zika virus causes devastating damage to the brains of developing fetuses, it one day may be an effective treatment for glioblastoma, a deadly form of brain cancer. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California San Diego School of Medicine shows that the virus kills brain cancer stem cells, the kind of cancer cells most resistant to standard treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Zika virus could be used to treat brain cancer patients, study suggests
(Rockefeller University Press) Recent outbreaks of Zika virus have revealed that the virus causes brain defects in unborn children. But in a study to be published Sept. 5 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California, San Diego report that the virus could eventually be used to target and kill cancer cells in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Medrobotics touts 1st colorectal procedure with Flex robotic system
Medrobotics said today that its Flex robotic system was used in its 1st colorectal surgery, touting it as a global 1st for the system. The surgery was performed at George Washington University Hospital by Dr. Vincent Obias, the company said, to remove a suspected cancerous lesion from the rectum of an adult male. The procedure required no incisions through the skin, the Raynham Mass.-based company said. “The Flex Robotic System is the first robotic platform that allows surgeons to visualize and access lesions in the rectum with a steerable and shapeable robotic scope and flexible instruments. This offers some patient...
Source: Mass Device - August 30, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Robot-Assisted Surgery Robotics Medrobotics Source Type: news

Washington University institute receives $46 million NIH grant
The ​Washington University School of Medicine has received a $46 million grant to support efforts to turn scientific discoveries into meaningful treatments and diagnostics for patients. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 30, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Angela Mueller Source Type: news

Being a couch potato past 50 could leave you disabled
For those that cannot tear themselves away, the effects could be mitigated by doing more than seven hours a week of exercise, say the team at George Washington University. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Washington University institute receives $46 million NIH grant
The ​Washington University School of Medicine has received a $46 million grant to support efforts to turn scientific discoveries into meaningful treatments and diagnostics for patients. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 30, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Angela Mueller Source Type: news

Combating Antibiotic Resistance: A Policy Roadmap to Reduce Use of Medically Important Antibiotics in Livestock
George Washington University, Milken Institute School of Public Health. 08/2017 This 82-page policy roadmap focuses on more prudent use of antibiotics in human medicine and in livestock production, which is paramount to slowing the spread of antibiotic resistance. It provides 11 recommendations that are aimed at federal, state, and local policymakers; food companies; institutional food purchasers (i.e., hospitals, schools and universities); and medical groups. The recommendations are split into three key areas: decreasing livestock use of medically important antibiotics; monitoring livestock antibiotic use; and enhancing s...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - August 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

GW researcher awarded $2 million to study natural immune response to HIV
(George Washington University) GW researcher received an almost $2 million grant to study the body's natural defenses against HIV in order to drive development of better vaccines and therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

WATCH: Hand transplant recipient thanks doctors who first saved his life: Part 6
Jonathan Koch returned to George Washington University Hospital to thank the doctors and nurses. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - August 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: 2020 Source Type: news

Building capacity for dissemination and implementation research: one university's experience
This paper describes the process, challenges, and lessons with building dissemination and implementation research capacity at Washington University in St. Louis. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - August 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People who regularly groom their pubic hair at risk of injuries
Conclusion Pubic hair removal is now common practice, and this study suggests it is not without risk. It seems sensible to find out more about how it can be done safely, with minimal risk of injury. However, while the study provides useful information about peoples' experiences of pubic hair removal and injury (at least in the US), it doesn't tell us which is the safest method. Although waxing was linked to fewer repeated injuries among women, previous studies suggest it can be harmful if done incorrectly, leading to severe injury or infection. Similarly, although frequent removal of all pubic hair is linked to higher...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Kenny ’s story: Determined to play again
Photo credit: Keith Bedford, Boston Globe Dear young athlete, Don’t let anyone tell you that you’ll never be able to play sports again. Don’t let them take away what you love to do. If I had given up sports, I wouldn’t have my dream job today. Let me share my story. When I was an adolescent growing up in Sharon, Massachusetts, I was very active. To say I was “hyper” would be an understatement. My mom used to tell me to run around the house when I was annoying my brother and sister. I played every sport including basketball, baseball, touch football, and street hockey. I played soccer yea...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 17, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Kenny Ames Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Division of Sports Medicine Dr. Lyle Micheli Source Type: news

Women of color exposed to more beauty toxins than whites
Researchers at George Washington University found cosmetics marketed to ethnic minorities - such as skin lighteners and straighteners - contain more toxins than products marketed to white women. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The environmental injustice of beauty
(George Washington University) A commentary calls for policies to protect women, especially minority women, from exposure to toxic chemicals in beauty products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BioGenerator backs startup making holograms of hearts
A startup spun out of Washington University is raising a seed round with the help of BioGenerator. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 14, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Brian Feldt Source Type: news

Cyclodextrin slows NPC progression in new Washington University trial
A new clinical trial conducted by Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the US has shown that a drug called cyclodextrin slows progression of Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease. (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - August 13, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Novel nanotech enables earlier diagnosis, treatment of Zika virus
Researchers from Washington University have developed a novel diagnostic test that uses nanotech to rapidly detect the presence of Zika virus in blood samples. The team’s system, which was described in the journal Advanced Biosystems, could enable earlier diagnosis and treatment for people infected with Zika virus compared to traditional diagnostic methods. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Novel nanotech enables earlier diagnosis, treatment of Zika virus appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - August 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Diagnostics Research & Development Washington University Source Type: news

Air conditioning reduces in-car pollution by 34%
Researchers from Washington University in St Louis discovered that a simple shift in driving habits can help to reduce in-car pollution while out on the road. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Test uses nanotechnology to quickly diagnose Zika virus
(Washington University School of Medicine) Currently, testing for Zika requires that a blood sample be refrigerated and shipped to a medical center or laboratory, delaying diagnosis and possible treatment. Now, Washington University in St. Louis researchers have developed a test that quickly can detect the presence of Zika virus in blood. Although the new proof-of-concept technology has yet to be produced for use in medical situations, test results can be determined in minutes, and the materials do not require refrigeration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Crank the AC, cut in-car pollution
(Washington University in St. Louis) After conducting a new research approach using actual commutes, a group of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis discovered a simple shift in driving habits can help to reduce exposure to pollutants while out on the road. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 10, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Washington University ophthalmology department receives $10 million gift
The Washington University School of Medicine's ophthalmology department has received a $10 million gift to fund research and patient care. Jane Hardesty Poole, a Washington University alumna, made the donation in honor of her father, the late St. Louis ophthalmologist Dr. John Hardesty. Washington University will rename the ophthalmology department as the John F. Hardesty Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences. Funds from t he gift will be used to support vision research and to provide… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 9, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Angela Mueller Source Type: news

2017 Massry Prize honors microbiome research pioneers
(University of California - San Diego) Microbiome researchers Rob Knight, Ph.D., University of California San Diego, Jeffrey Gordon, M.D., Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and Norman Pace, Ph.D., University of Colorado Boulder, will share this year's Massry Prize, splitting the $200,000 honorarium. These researchers lead a field that works to produce a detailed understanding of microbiomes and methods for manipulating them for the benefit of human and environmental health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 9, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Blunt to discuss medical research funding at Washington University
Sen. Roy Blunt will be at Washington University Tuesday to discuss efforts to increase funding for medical research. Blunt will be joined by Mark Wrighton, chancellor of Washington University, and Dr. Christopher Austin, director of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) at the National Institutes of Health, at the press conference to be held at 1:45 p.m. at the university's Mid Campus Center. Washington University is part of the NCATS Clinical and Translational Science… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 8, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Angela Mueller Source Type: news

Extreme heat linked to climate change may adversely affect pregnancy
(George Washington University) A systematic review links extreme heat exposure to changes in gestation length, birth weight, stillbirth and neonatal stress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Solar cell breakthrough could DOUBLE energy capture efficiency to over 40%
(Natural News) A prototype for a new solar cell that compiles multiple devices into a single device that has the capability of obtaining almost all of the energy in the solar spectrum has been designed by scientists at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. The new model, which transforms direct sunlight into electricity at an... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Origin of human genus may have occurred by chance
(George Washington University) An often cited claim that humans, who are smarter and more technologically advanced than their ancestors, originated in response to climate change is challenged in a new report by a Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology researcher at George Washington University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Red meat, dairy, and chocolate could help relieve IBD
Professor of Pathology Dr Marco Colonna at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis said immune cells patrol the gut to ensure harmful microbes in food don't sneak into the body. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Natural compound coupled with specific gut microbes may prevent severe flu
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that a particular gut microbe can prevent severe flu infections in mice, likely by breaking down naturally occurring compounds -- called flavonoids -- commonly found in foods such as black tea, red wine and blueberries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 3, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

$2.6 million to build versatile genetic toolkit for studying animal behavior
(Washington University in St. Louis) Sophisticated techniques for testing hypotheses about the brain by activating and silencing genes are currently available for only a handful of model organisms. Scientists at Washington University in St. Louis are working on a simplified toolkit that will allow scientists who study animal behavior to manipulate the genomes of many other animals with the hope of accelerating progress in our understanding of the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research on nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles reveals viable skin infection treatment
(George Washington University) A research team led by Adam Friedman, MD, associate professor of dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, has found that topically applied nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles are a viable treatment for deep fungal infections of the skin caused by dermatophytes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

PPI drugs warning: Study finds 50% increased risk of death from long-term use of Proton Pump Inhibitors
(Natural News) PPI drugs commonly used to mask the symptoms of heartburn have been found to increase the risk of death by 50%, according to a new study carried out at the Washington University School of Medicine. As Natural News reports: PPIs, which are readily available over the counter under brand names such as Prevacid,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Infants know what we like best, WashU study finds
(Washington University in St. Louis) Behind the chubby cheeks and bright eyes of babies as young as 8 months lies the smoothly whirring mind of a social statistician, logging our every move and making odds on what a person is most likely to do next, suggests new research in the journal Infancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bacteria on the penis raises the risk of HIV by up to 63%
Researchers from George Washington University found that a 10-fold increase in certain bacterial species raises the risk of the virus' infection in uncircumcised men by 54 to 63 percent. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Elsevier announces seven new chemistry and chemical engineering titles
Elsevier, the information analytics company specializing in science and health, today announced the publication of the eighth edition of Bretherick’s Handbook of Reactive Chemical Hazards, edited by Peter G. Urben. This expanded edition provides the latest updates to help prevent the explosion and loss of containment of chemicals. Also among the seven new chemistry and chemical engineering titles announced by Elsevier is the second edition of its major reference work, Comprehensive Supramolecular Chemistry II. This nine-volume set, edited by Jerry L. Atwood, George W. Gokel and Len Barbour, is a “one-...
Source: News from STM - July 25, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Featured Source Type: news

Toddlers begin learning rules of reading, writing at very early age, study finds
(Washington University in St. Louis) New research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that children as young as 3 already are beginning to recognize and follow important rules and patterns governing how letters in the English language fit together to make words. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news