New 'light therapy' could treat constipation better than drugs
Scientists in Australia and at Washington University discovered that they could quickly cure constipation in mice that they had genetically engineered to have neurons that 'move' in response to blue light. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New 'light therapy' could treat constipation better than drugs, study finds   
Scientists in Australia and at Washington University discovered that they could quickly cure constipation in mice that they had genetically engineered to have neurons that 'move' in response to blue light. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIH-funded researchers identify target for chikungunya treatment
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Scientists have identified a molecule found on human cells and some animal cells that could be a target for drugs against chikungunya virus infection and related diseases, according to new research published in the journal Nature. A team led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis conducted the research, which was funded in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Clues found to early lung transplant failure
(Washington University in St. Louis) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Northwestern University have uncovered cells that flow into and harm the lung soon after transplant. The resulting dysfunction is the leading cause of early death after lung transplantation and contributes to organ rejection that can lead to death months or years later. The discovery, in mice, may lead to drug therapies that target the destructive cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blood type affects severity of diarrhea caused by E. coli
(Washington University School of Medicine) A new study shows that a kind of E. coli most associated with 'travelers' diarrhea' and children in underdeveloped areas of the world causes more severe disease in people with blood type A. The bacteria release a protein that latches onto intestinal cells in people with blood type A, but not blood type O or B, according to a study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Why chikungunya, other arthritis-causing viruses target joints
(Washington University School of Medicine) Scientists have understood little about how chikungunya and related viruses cause arthritis. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified the molecular handle that chikungunya grabs to get inside cells. The findings, published May 16 in the journal Nature, could lead to ways to prevent or treat disease caused by chikungunya and related viruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NHGRI Director Eric D. Green receives honorary degree from Washington University in St. Louis
Washington University in St. Louis awarded an honorary Doctor of Science degree to Eric D. Green, M.D., Ph.D., director of NIH's National Human Genome Research Institute, in recognition of his contributions to the field of genomics and its application to medicine. This is the third award given to Dr. Green by Washington University. (Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights)
Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights - May 16, 2018 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

Postdoctoral position available at washington university in saint louis
(Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - May 9, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: ROrritt Source Type: news

How a light touch can spur severe itching
(Washington University School of Medicine) Scientists at the Washington University Center for the Study of Itch have found that itching caused by touch is directly related to the number of touch receptors embedded in the skin. His team found, in mice, that fewer receptors make it more likely touch will induce itching. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Terumo Aortic launches feasibility study of RelayBranch thoracic stent-graft
Terumo Aortic, which formed earlier this month from a merger between Terumo Corp. (TYO:4543) subsidiary Vascutek and Bolton Medical, said today it launched an early feasibility study of its RelayBranch thoracic stent-graft system. The Sunrise, Fla.-based company said that the first two patients in the study have been implanted with the device by Dr. Luis Sanchez and Dr. Marc Moon of St. Louis’ Washington University, with the procedures performed at Barnes Jewish Hospital. “RelayBranch expands the range of endovascular treatment options for a high risk population. We are very pleased to be able to offe...
Source: Mass Device - April 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Stent Grafts Vascular terumoaortic Source Type: news

St. Louis Character: Dr. John Constantino works to get in front of youth autism
During his third year of medical school at Washington University, Dr. John Constantino decided to go into psychiatry after doing a rotation at the Malcolm Bliss Psychopathologic Institute, a facility for the severely mentally ill. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - April 27, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Margaret Crane Source Type: news

St. Louis Character: Dr. John Constantino works to get in front of youth autism
During his third year of medical school at Washington University, Dr. John Constantino decided to go into psychiatry after doing a rotation at the Malcolm Bliss Psychopathologic Institute, a facility for the severely mentally ill. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 27, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Margaret Crane Source Type: news

7 happiness tips this psychologist says you can do every single day
Want to feel content all the time? Give these tips a try and the stresses of life will be much more manageable, according to Washington University psychologist Tim Bono. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Noninvasive brain tumor biopsy on the horizon
(Washington University in St. Louis) Taking a biopsy of a brain tumor is a complicated and invasive surgical process, but a team of researchers at Washington University in St. Louis is developing a way that allows them to detect tumor biomarkers through a simple blood test. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Experimental arthritis drug prevents stem cell transplant complication
(Washington University in St. Louis) An investigational drug in clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis prevents a common, life-threatening side effect of stem cell transplants, new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows. Studying mice, the researchers found the drug prevented what's known as graft-versus-host disease, a debilitating, sometimes lethal condition that develops when transplanted stem cells attack the body's own organs or tissues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Airborne dust threatens human health in Southwest
(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Researchers from Harvard Unviersity and the George Washington University have found that in the coming decades, increased dust emissions from severe and prolonged droughts in the American Southwest could result in significant increases in hospital admissions and premature deaths. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Neurosurgeon Eric Leuthardt: ‘An interface between mind and machine will happen’
The US researcher – and sci-fi author – on how brain implants will drive the next turning point in human evolutionDr Eric C Leuthardt, 45, is a neurosurgeon at Washington University in St Louis. He is also the co-founder of NeuroLutions, a research laboratory developing directinterfaces between mind and computer. Leuthardt is pioneering the use of electrical brain implants to help restore motor function to the paralysed limbs of stroke victims. He is also helping to develop electrode systems that can directly decode the unspoken “inner voice” of the mind, and use it to direct external action; for ex...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Tim Adams Tags: Neuroscience Medical research Ethics Health Technology Biology Source Type: news

Experts Say Showering Too Much May Do More Harm Than Good
CBS Local — Many people start the day with shower to wake themselves up or at night to get the day’s grime off; however, health experts are saying people are probably washing up too much. According to multiple reports, excessive showering is actually doing damage to the skin and the body’s ability to heal itself. “Soap and the hot water dissolve the lipids in the skin and scrubbing only hastens the process,” experts say, via a report in PJ Media. The report added that scrubbing interrupts the body’s natural oil production which promotes healing. This results in dryer, cracked skin. ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Chris Melore Local TV showering skin care talkers Source Type: news

Text messaging tool may help fight opioid epidemic
(Washington University in St. Louis) Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Epharmix, a digital health company, have created a new automated text messaging service that may curb opioid abuse and prevent relapse. Patients receive text messages to gauge if they're feeling OK or struggling with potential relapse. Patients also can activate a panic button to request immediate help. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An END to fillings? Researchers create new product
The new peptide-based product, tested on damaged human enamel in the lab, offers hope of another way of preventing enamel loss and cavities. Washington University scientists created it. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The six reasons why social media is making you unhappy
Dr Tim Bono, a psychologist at Washington University in St Louis, says it's hard to be happy if we constantly concern ourselves with how we measure up to those around us. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How highly contagious norovirus infection gets its start
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers have shown, in mice, that norovirus infects a rare type of intestinal cell called a tuft cell. Noroviruses tucked inside tuft cells are effectively hidden from the immune system, which could explain why some people continue to shed virus long after they are no longer sick. These 'healthy carriers' are thought to be the source of norovirus outbreaks, so understanding how the virus evades detection in such people could lead to better ways to prevent outbreaks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

ALS, rare dementia share genetic link
(Washington University School of Medicine) Studying data from more than 125,000 individuals, an international team of researchers led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified genetic links between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia. The link between the seemingly unrelated disorders suggests that some drugs developed to treat ALS also may work against frontotemporal dementia and vice versa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hundreds of thousands of Kentucky residents could lose Medicaid under the work demonstration project
(George Washington University) Medicaid work requirements would harm low-income Kentucky families and strain the safety net system, says Friend of the Court Brief filed in support of plaintiffs in Stewart v. Azar. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New cellular insights in bone development
(Washington University in St. Louis) Most of us don't think about our teeth and bones until one aches or breaks. A team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis looked deep within collagen fibers to see how the body forms new bone and teeth, seeking insights into faster bone healing and new biomaterials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Camera Gives Surgeons a Butterfly's Eye View of Cancer
Cancer lurking in tissue could be more easily found when looking through a butterfly's eye. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis have developed a surgical camera inspired by the eye of the morpho butterfly. The tiny camera, connected to the goggles a surgeon wears, sees infrared signals given off by tumor-binding dyes so that the surgeon can find and remove all of the cancerous tissue. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - April 5, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

State of Recovery: An Update on Community Health Centers in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands
George Washington University, Milken Institute School of Public Health. 04/2018 This seven-page issue brief presents information about Puerto Rico's community health centers in the wake of Hurricanes Irma and Maria, and the recovery status of the two health centers that serve residents of the U.S. Virgin Islands. Text and figures depict current supply and infrastructure status, currently available services and functions, and the top three challenges facing health center staff. Health center recovery is uneven, and while all health centers are open, many are still operating under hardship conditions. (PDF) (Source: Disaster...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Puerto Rico's Community Health Centers: Struggling to Recover in the Wake of Hurricane Maria
George Washington University, Milken Institute School of Public Health. 11/2017 This 11-page issue brief details how in the wake of Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico's health centers, which serve one in 10 residents, are helping to address urgent and emerging health care needs, at a time when communication is limited and access to electricity and clean water remains scarce. The authors make an urgent case for federal aid to restore health center services. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Review of Vitamin D Research identifies ethical issues in placebo use
(George Washington University) George Washington University's Dr. Leigh Frame reviewed several studies using placebo groups in clinical trials that may pose ethical issues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Major milestone reached in effort to ID cancers' genetic roots
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers nationwide have reached a major milestone in describing the genetic landscape of cancer. Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and other institutions have completed the genetic sequencing and analyses of more than 11,000 tumors from patients, spanning 33 types of cancer -- all part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, funded by the National Cancer Institute and National Human Genome Research Institute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New camera gives surgeons a butterfly's-eye view of cancer
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Cancer lurking in tissue could be more easily found when looking through a butterfly's eye. Researchers at the University of Illinois and Washington University in St. Louis have developed a surgical camera inspired by the eye of the morpho butterfly. The camera sees infrared signals given off by tumor-binding dyes so that surgeons can find and remove all of the cancerous tissue. The camera was tested in mice and in human patients with breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

For women with kidney cancer, belly fat matters
(Washington University School of Medicine) Belly fat affects the odds of women surviving kidney cancer but not men, according to a new study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings suggest that kidney cancer may develop and progress differently in women than men. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dining Out Could Be Riskier Than You Think
BOSTON (CBS) – Dining out could be riskier to your health than you might think. Researchers at George Washington University looked at data on more than 10,000 people and found that levels of certain chemicals called phthalates were 35% higher in those who regularly ate out at fast food places, cafeterias and restaurants. People who tend to eat out more, are more likely to have a high phthalate count. (WBZ-TV) Phthalates are found in many products including food packages like takeout boxes. We don’t know all of the long-term effects of phthalate exposure but these chemicals can disrupt hormones and could possibl...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Dining Out Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Dining out raises your risk of exposure to 'gender bending' chemicals
People who at a meal outside of their homes in the last day had 35 percent higher levels of hormone-blocking chemicals in their systems than others did, a George Washington University study found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Topical solution may be less toxic option for patients with noncancerous skin growth
(George Washington University) A team of researchers at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences compared the toxicological impact of cryosurgery with an FDA-approved topical 40 percent hydrogen peroxide solution (A-101) for the treatment of seborrheic keratosis, in human skin equivalents derived from darker skin types. The findings were recently published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social awareness increases prove brain changing in adults with autism
(Center for BrainHealth) Researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas, in collaboration with co-leading authors at George Washington University and Yale, have demonstrated in a pilot study that a clinician-driven virtual learning platform, tailored to young adults on the autism spectrum, shows improved social competency. Findings published in Autism Research reveal that increases in socio-emotional and socio-cognitive abilities correlate with brain change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dining out associated with increased exposure to harmful chemicals called Phthalates
(George Washington University) Dining out more at restaurants, cafeterias and fast-food outlets may boost total levels of potentially health-harming chemicals called phthalates in the body, according to a study out today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antibiotic use increases risk of severe viral disease in mice
(Washington University School of Medicine) Doctors recommend against taking antibiotics for viral infections because they don't work -- antibiotics don't kill viruses -- and do promote antibiotic resistance. Now, a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests another reason to avoid the pills: taking antibiotics increases susceptibility to subsequent viral infection, at least in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 27, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists successfully remove Alzheimer's from mice
On the heals of failed attempts by major pharmaceutical makers, Washington University scientists cut levels of Alzheimer's associated plaques in half using an antibody treatment in mice. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Care providers' understanding of obesity treatment is limited
(George Washington University) Despite the high prevalence of obesity among US adults, provision of recommended treatments for obesity remains low. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Telepathic superhumans could be a reality 'within decades'
According toDr Eric Leuthardt, a brain surgeon at Washington University in St. Louis, neural prosthetics will become mainstream in the coming decades (stock image). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Code Green Campaign President Conducts Study on the Effects of Storytelling
Spokane, WA – J. Ann Marie Farina, President of The Code Green Campaign is conducting a study through Central Washington University to better understand the effects sharing one’s traumatic experiences via writing has on the mental health of first responders. All former or current first responders over the age of 18 are invited to participate.   Ann Marie is an undergraduate student in the department of psychology and is working with Dr. Sara Bender on the study. “Being able to conduct this study with Dr. Bender is a great opportunity for me as a student and for Code Green as an organization. This...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - March 19, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Code Green Campaign Tags: Operations Industry News Source Type: news

Code Green Campaign President Conducts Study on the Effects of Storytelling
Spokane, WA – J. Ann Marie Farina, President of The Code Green Campaign is conducting a study through Central Washington University to better understand the effects sharing one’s traumatic experiences via writing has on the mental health of first responders. All former or current first responders over the age of 18 are invited to participate.   Ann Marie is an undergraduate student in the department of psychology and is working with Dr. Sara Bender on the study. “Being able to conduct this study with Dr. Bender is a great opportunity for me as a student and for Code Green as an organization. This...
Source: JEMS Operations - March 19, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Code Green Campaign Tags: Operations Industry News Source Type: news

Artificial sweeteners raise the risk of developing type 2 diabetes
The research team from George Washington University believe obese people - the very group most likely to use artificial sweeteners - are particularly at risk from their use. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Community Health Centers and Family Planning in an Era of Policy Uncertainty
Building on earlier research conducted by George Washington University in 2011, this study examines the current state of community health centers'family planning services. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - March 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Higher doses of radiation don't improve survival in prostate cancer
(Washington University School of Medicine) A new study shows that higher doses of radiation do not improve survival for many patients with prostate cancer, compared with the standard radiation treatment. The analysis, which included 104 radiation therapy oncology groups across North America, was led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Missouri researcher wins $50,000 Sheila Essey Award: An award for ALS research
(American Academy of Neurology) LOS ANGELES - The American Academy of Neurology, The ALS Association and the American Brain Foundation are awarding the 2018 Sheila Essey Award to Timothy M. Miller, MD, PhD, from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mo., and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. The award recognizes significant research contributions in the search for the causes, prevention and cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers discover evidence of the technology & behaviors linked to the emergence of human species
(George Washington University) An anthropology professor from the George Washington University and a team of international collaborators, including scientists from the Smithsonian's National Museum of National History, have discovered that early humans in East Africa used coloring materials and obtained a range of raw materials from distant sources-- activities which imply the existence of social networks--about 320,000 years ago, much earlier than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘Remember to Look Up at the Stars.’ Read Some of Stephen Hawking’s Most Memorable Quotes
Professor Stephen Hawking, the theoretical physicist who died Wednesday at the age of 76, enthralled the world with his work and teachings on space, time, and the universe. He had a knack for making his pioneering research accessible to the wider public, and his brilliance deepened our understanding of the universe and our place within it. Throughout his illustrious career, he was known for his quick wit and humor, often demonstrated at conferences and in interviews with the press. He also offered insights on a whole range of subjects. Here are some of his most famous quotes: On life “Remember to look up at the star...
Source: TIME: Science - March 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Eli Meixler Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight remembrance Source Type: news

Keeping plant-cell motors on track
(Washington University in St. Louis) In a growing plant cell, motor proteins called kinesins work as transporters that haul materials built in one part of the cell to the place where they are needed. Now, biologists at Washington University in St. Louis have discovered the molecular brakeman that holds kinesins in check until their cargo is needed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news