Proton therapy for cancer lowers risk of side effects
(Washington University School of Medicine) Proton therapy results in fewer side effects than traditional X-ray radiation therapy for many cancer patients, according to a new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania. Even with reduced side effects, proton therapy resulted in cure rates similar to those of X-ray radiation therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

California law led to an increase in childhood vaccination rates
(George Washington University) A first of its kind analysis published today by researchers at the George Washington University (GW) found that a 2016 California vaccine law boosted protective coverage against measles and other serious childhood diseases compared to states that acted as statistical controls. At the same time, the data also revealed a sharp increase in medical exemptions to the vaccine mandate, concentrated in a few California counties. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A tale of two skeeters
(Washington University in St. Louis) A native mosquito in Missouri has fewer parasites when it shares its waters with an interloper, according to new research from biologists at Tyson Research Center, the environmental field station for Washington University in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 16, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Children describe technology that gives them a sense of ambiguity as 'creepy'
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have defined for the first time what children mean when they say technology is 'creepy.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GW researcher seeks to improve diagnostic utility of neonatal EEGs
(George Washington University) A researcher at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences is working to improve diagnostic utility of neonatal EEGs thanks to grant awards from the National Eye Institute and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 15, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mobile Prenatal App Shown to Reduce in-Person Visits During Pregnancy
Using the mobile app Babyscripts reduced in-person prenatal care visits while maintaining patient and provider satisfaction, according to research published in JMIR mHealth and uHealth by physician researchers from the George Washington University (GW). (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - May 6, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Oral and genital herpes are 'having sex' and creating new viruses
Oral and genital herpes were thought to split off into two separate viruses six million years ago, but a new Washington University study found their DNA is mixing to form new viruses. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Children who drink diet drinks 'end up eating more calories elsewhere'
Researchers from George Washington University in Washington DC studied the diets of more than 7,000 children to find those who regularly drank sugar-free soft drinks consumed more calories. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mobile prenatal app shown to reduce in-person visits during pregnancy
(George Washington University) Using the mobile app Babyscripts reduced in-person prenatal care visits while maintaining patient and provider satisfaction, according to research published in JMIR mHealth and uHealth by physician researchers from the George Washington University (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pregnancy shifts the daily schedule forward
(Washington University in St. Louis) New research from Washington University in St. Louis finds that women and mice both shift their daily schedules earlier by up to a few hours during the first third of their pregnancy. A new study by researchers in Arts& Sciences and at the School of Medicine shows how impending motherhood induces changes in daily timing of a mother which, when disrupted, may put a pregnancy at risk, as reported in the Journal of Biological Rhythms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nine out of 11 pregnancy tests tell women they are 'not pregnant' when they ARE
Washington University, St Louis, researchers found that a hormone 'fragment' can throw off nine of the top 11 urine pregnancy tests used by hospitals, causing them to return false negatives. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dermcidin may play role in the pathogenesis of skin disease hidradenitis suppurativa
(George Washington University) A team from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences have identified the protein dermcidin as having a potential role in the pathogenesis of the chronic skin disease hidradenitis suppurativa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Most Americans spend more than 6 hours a day sat down - up from 5 hours a decade ago, study finds
A new study from Washington University School of Medicine found that sitting time for adults rose from 5.5 hours per day to almost 6.5 hours and, for teenagers, it rose from 7 hours to 8 hours. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Washington U medical school hires first CIO
Washington University School of Medicine has hired Maria Russo to serve as its chief information officer, a newly created position, effective May 1. Russo currently serves as executive director for systems integration in Kaiser Permanente’s Washington Region, as well as leading a support team for the hospital and health plan’s electronic medical records in Kaiser Permanente’s Northern California region. She also previously served as ch ief information officer and senior vice president of… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 23, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Brian Robbins Source Type: news

Americans Are Sitting at Record Rates. Here ’s Why That’s So Dangerous
Every day, we modern humans stay comfortably seated on our behinds for hours at a time: binge watching shows on Netflix, pecking away on keyboards at work, scrolling through social media feeds. But do people really sit more than they used to? That’s what Yin Cao and an international group of colleagues wanted to find out in their latest study published in JAMA. While studies on sitting behavior in specific groups of people — such as children or working adults with desk jobs — have recorded how sedentary people are, there is little data on how drastically sitting habits have changed over time. “We do...
Source: TIME: Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Washington University Med School Latest to Offer Free Tuition Washington University Med School Latest to Offer Free Tuition
The St. Louis school becomes the seventh in the nation to give full or partial tuition relief to medical students.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Med Students News Source Type: news

Lifeline: Wash U medical school to provide $100M in scholarships for future students
The Washington University School of Medicine has announced it will allocate $100 million over the next decade for a new scholarship program that allows nearly half of its 2019-2020 entering class to attend tuition-free. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 16, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Brian Robbins Source Type: news

Taylors give Wash U multimillion-dollar gift to research mental illness
Enterprise Holdings ’ Executive Chairman Andy Taylor and his wife, Barbara, along with the Crawford Taylor Foundation, have committed $10 million to Washington University to improve diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric illnesses, focusing on depression. The new gift consists of $7 million to support research, and another $3 million to endow a professorship at the Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research at the university’s School of Medicine. The institute was founded in… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 11, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Diana Barr Source Type: news

Taylors give Wash U multimillion-dollar gift to research mental illness
Enterprise Holdings ’ Executive Chairman Andy Taylor and his wife, Barbara, along with the Crawford Taylor Foundation, have committed $10 million to Washington University to improve diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric illnesses, focusing on depression. The new gift consists of $7 million to support research, and another $3 million to endow a professorship at the Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research at the university’s School of Medicine. The institute was founded in… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 10, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Diana Barr Source Type: news

Millions of children worldwide develop asthma annually due to traffic-related pollution
(George Washington University) About 4 million children worldwide develop asthma each year because of inhaling nitrogen dioxide air pollution, according to a study published today by researchers at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health (Milken Institute SPH). The study, based on data from 2010 to 2015, estimates that 64 percent of these new cases of asthma occur in urban areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why Does Medicine Cost So Much? Here ’s How Drug Prices Are Set
From 2007 to 2016, Mylan raised the list price of its EpiPen about 500%, from just under $100 to more than $600. From 2002 to 2013, insulin prices more than tripled. From 2012 to 2019, the average price of AbbVie’s rheumatoid-arthritis drug Humira climbed from $19,000 a year to $60,000 a year—and that’s after rebates. These are dramatic examples of a systemwide problem: prices for brand-name drugs are rising at a rate that far outstrips inflation. What’s behind these rapid price hikes? It’s a simple question with a complicated answer that involves three central entities: drug manufacturers, ph...
Source: TIME: Health - April 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura Entis Tags: Uncategorized medicine Source Type: news

Specialist enzymes make E. coli antibiotic resistant at low pH
(Washington University in St. Louis) New research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that many cell wall enzymes that were previously considered 'redundant' are actually specialists that ensure maximal growth across different environments. Further, these specialist enzymes were found to increase E. coli's resistance to antibiotics at low pH conditions, such as those found in the GI tract or urinary tract -- raising concerns that current antibiotic susceptibility tests are inadequate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 9, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'This is really a St. Louis story': Wash U medical school dean on $100M partnership with Centene
Dr. David Perlmutter, dean of Washington University School of Medicine, said a newly announced, 10-year research partnership with Centene Corp. will help put the city of St. Louis on the map as a research hub. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 8, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Brian Robbins Source Type: news

'This is really a St. Louis story': Wash U medical school dean on $100M partnership with Centene
Dr. David Perlmutter, dean of Washington University School of Medicine, said a newly announced, 10-year research partnership with Centene Corp. will help put the city of St. Louis on the map as a research hub. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 8, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Brian Robbins Source Type: news

Centene Commits $100M To Personalized Medicine Research
Centene will contribute $100 million over the next decade to a partnership with Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis to “accelerate research into treatments for Alzheimer's disease, breast cancer, diabetes and obesity. ” (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 8, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Japsen, Contributor Source Type: news

Tidying up: A new way to direct trash to autophagy
(Washington University in St. Louis) Marie Kondo herself couldn't do it any better. Now researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have uncovered a previously unknown structural feature of living cells that is critical to tidying up. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Rusted root: Weedy rice repeatedly evolves 'cheater' root traits
(Washington University in St. Louis) Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis and the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center used a new imaging technique to reveal a takeover strategy that has worked for weedy rice over and over again: roots that minimize below-ground contact with other plants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Washington University names new director for occupational therapy program
Washington University School of Medicine has named Lisa Tabor Connor as the next executive director of its occupational therapy program, effective July 1. Connor is succeeding Carolyn Baum, who has headed the program for 31 years and is stepping down to focus on research. Currently, Connor serves as chair of the department of occupational therapy and associate director of research programs at Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions, where she has helped build its occupational… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 3, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Brian Robbins Source Type: news

Pot During Pregnancy May Raise Child's Psychosis Risk
MONDAY, April 1, 2019 -- Children born to mothers who used marijuana during pregnancy may be at increased risk for psychosis, according to a new study. Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis analyzed data from an ongoing nationwide study... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 1, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Making waves: Researchers shed light on how cilia work
(Washington University in St. Louis) An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the McKelvey School of Engineering and the School of Medicine have found the most efficient length for cilia, the tiny hair-like structures designed to sweep out the body's fluids, cells and microbes to stay healthy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Probiotic yoghurts could be harmful because 'good bacteria could EVOLVE'
In a study on mice by a team at Washington University, bacteria in the probiotics ate the protective coating of the intestines - which can lead to irritable bowel syndrome. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA clears first molybdenum rhenium pedicle screw
The FDA today cleared Mirus‘s Europea pedicle screw system, which is composed of its MoRe proprietary molybdenum rhenium superalloy, making it the first such device approved with the new class of implant material. The Atlanta-based medical device company said that the MoRe proprietary alloy is intended to provide improved strength, ductility, durability and biological safety. “Spine deformity surgery in adults remains plagued by the poor performance of current implants with rod failure occurring in 18%-20% of patients. The MoRe alloy shows great promise in improving the durability of adult spine deformity const...
Source: Mass Device - March 27, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Orthopedics Regulatory/Compliance mirus Source Type: news

PatientPoint tackles chronic disease with AMA, Sutter Health adopts Suki and more digital health deals
Also: Dictum Health and Complete Telehealth Solutions partner up; Washington University School of Medicine study features SilverCloud's digital intervention. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - March 27, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

GW Cancer receives $4 million award for technical assistance to comprehensive cancer control
(George Washington University) Mandi Pratt-Chapman, MA,   associate center director for patient-centered initiatives and health equity at the GW Cancer Center, has been awarded a $4.125 million cooperative agreement to continue work with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to provide comprehensive technical assistance for National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program grantees.   (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 27, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Washington University gets $15M from Scottrade founder
The Washington University School of Medicine has received a $15 million gift from Paula and Rodger Riney to accelerate research and develop new treatments for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Rodger Riney founded Scottrade Financial Services, which was acquired in 2017 by TD Ameritrade in a $4 billion deal. About $10 million of the gift will support Alzheimer's disease research, while the remaining $5 million will support Parkinson's disease research, officials said Tuesday. "The bu rden… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 26, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Veneta Rizvic Source Type: news

Washington University gets $15M from Scottrade founder
The Washington University School of Medicine has received a $15 million gift from Paula and Rodger Riney to accelerate research and develop new treatments for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Rodger Riney founded Scottrade Financial Services, which was acquired in 2017 by TD Ameritrade in a $4 billion deal. About $10 million of the gift will support Alzheimer's disease research, while the remaining $5 million will support Parkinson's disease research, officials said Tuesday. "The bu rden… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 26, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Veneta Rizvic Source Type: news

Mothers who are obese while pregnant have children with heart problems, study in mice says
A new study from the Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis has found that obese mic had offspring with heart problems, and these issues last for at least three generations. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study shows how electricity-eating microbes use electrons to fix carbon dioxide
(Washington University in St. Louis) A Washington University team showed how a phototrophic microbe called Rhodopseudomonas palustris takes up electrons from conductive substances like metal oxides or rust to reduce carbon dioxide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Topical immunotherapy keeps skin cancer risk at bay
(Washington University School of Medicine) A combination of two topical creams already shown to clear precancerous skin lesions from sun-damaged skin also lowers the risk that patients will later develop squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. The study, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, appears March 21 in JCI Insight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How team sports change a child's brain
(Washington University in St. Louis) Adult depression has long been associated with shrinkage of the hippocampus, a brain region that plays an important role in memory and response to stress. Now, new research from Washington University in St. Louis has linked participation in team sports to larger hippocampal volumes in children and less depression in boys ages 9 to 11. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are there Zika reservoirs in the Americas?
(Washington University in St. Louis) A researcher at Washington University in St. Louis travels the Americas, collecting feces from nonhuman primates to determine the risk of Zika reservoirs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Enzyme USP15 may have potential role in future treatment of various cancers
(George Washington University) A team at the George Washington University Cancer Center found that the deubiquitinating enzyme USP15 is a potential biomarker for treatments of pancreatic cancer, as well as ovarian and breast cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Engineering treatments for the opioid epidemic
(Washington University in St. Louis) A biomedical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis is developing a therapeutic option that would prevent opiates from crossing the blood-brain barrier, preventing the high abusers seek. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blunting pain's emotional component
(Washington University School of Medicine) Pain researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown in rodents that they can block receptors on brain cells that appear to be responsible for the negative emotions associated with pain, such as sadness, depression and lethargy. The findings could lead to new, less addictive approaches to pain treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Washington U wins $10M Army grant to study hearing loss
Researchers at Washington University's School of Medicine are investigating the effectiveness of an anti-seizure drug in preventing noise-induced hearing loss, thanks to a new grant. The $10.5 million in funding comes from the Department of the Army. The Wash U researchers will study whether the drug can prevent hearing loss when given several hours before exposure to extremely loud noise. Loud noise that can cause permanent hearing damage, whether from a combat zone, rock con cert or factory, is… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 12, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Diana Barr Source Type: news

New species of frog sheds light on major biodiversity hotspot in southern India
(George Washington University) An expedition to an isolated hill range located in Southern India along one of the top biodiversity hotspots in the world led to the discovery of a new, ancient lineage of frog endemic to the area, according to a study published today in the journal PeerJ. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

These Researchers Are Using Artificial Intelligence to Make a Better Flu Vaccine
The influenza virus is a particularly nasty bug, thanks in no small part to how rapidly it mutates. Every time the flu virus changes, it becomes harder for humans to develop an immunity. Even our best external defense against influenza, the flu shot, is based on experts’ best guess as to which flu strain or strains are most likely to be prevalent during a given flu season. Sometimes they’re right — this season’s vaccine has turned out to be a relatively good match for the strains currently in circulation. But sometimes they get it wrong, potentially leading to a more severe flu season. And influenza...
Source: TIME: Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized Life Reinvented medicine onetime Source Type: news

These Researchers Are Using Artificial Intelligence to Make a Better Flu Vaccine
The influenza virus is a particularly nasty bug, thanks in no small part to how rapidly it mutates. Every time the flu virus changes, it becomes harder for humans to develop an immunity. Even our best external defense against influenza, the flu shot, is based on experts’ best guess as to which flu strain or strains are most likely to be prevalent during a given flu season. Sometimes they’re right — this season’s vaccine has turned out to be a relatively good match for the strains currently in circulation. But sometimes they get it wrong, potentially leading to a more severe flu season. And influenza...
Source: TIME: Science - March 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized Life Reinvented medicine onetime Source Type: news

Washington University planning $300M Cortex project
Washington University is planning a new development that could top out to be its most expensive in school history, the Business Journal has learned. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - March 1, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Steph Kukuljan Source Type: news

Washington University planning $300M Cortex project
Washington University is planning a new development that could top out to be its most expensive in school history, the Business Journal has learned. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 1, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Steph Kukuljan Source Type: news