GWU to oversee UMC replacement hospital in Southeast
D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser is expected to sign an agreement Friday that would put George Washington University in charge of a new hospital that will replace United Medical Center in Southeast, according to The Washington Post. According to the report, GWU and the District will spend the next several months negotiating the precise terms of the partnership. GWU may eventually own the hospital, according to the report, and Bowser and GWU Hospital CEO Kimberly Russo hope to have an agreement finalized… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - August 10, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Drew Hansen Source Type: news

Only 3% of Americans know that being overweight increases cancer risk  
A new study from Washington University has found that just three percent of Americans were able identify obesity as a risk factor for cancer compared to heart disease or metabolic disorders. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Washington U to get $10 million for rare disease research
Washington University School of Medicine is partnering with Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals on a new research partnership to pursue new therapies for patients with complex conditions. Mallinckrodt will fund up to $10 million in grants over five years to support the research projects. The grants will be awarded on a competitive basis, with projects selected by a committee of experts from the university and the company. “Washington University is a research powerhouse, and by p artnering with Mallinckrodt… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 6, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Veneta Rizvic Source Type: news

Women survive heart attacks better with women doctors: Study
(Washington University in St. Louis) A review of nearly 582,000 heart attack cases over 19 years showed female patients had a significantly higher survival rate when a woman treated them in the ER, according to research by faculty members at Minnesota, Washington University in St. Louis and Harvard. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Transgender individuals likely have higher risk for heart disease
(George Washington University) Transgender individuals may be at higher risk for heart disease, according to a review article published by Michael S. Irwig, M.D., associate professor of medicine at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, in Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Locusts help uncover the mysteries of smell
(Washington University in St. Louis) By looking into the brains of locusts, researchers in the School of Engineering& Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis have determined how one smell can affect another, and how a locust can recognize a smell even though its brain activity looks different depending on the context. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Presumed Remains of Korean War Casualties Are Back in the U.S. —But They Could Take Months to Identify
Fifty-five caskets containing the presumed remains of U.S. servicemen killed during the Korean War were returned to American soil on Wednesday, marking “a new season of hope for the families of our missing fallen,” in the words of Vice President Mike Pence. But a forensic expert says the task of identifying those remains has only just begun. “I think it’ll be months; it may be many months” before results are determined, says Victor Weedn, a professor of forensic sciences at the George Washington University who established the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory in Delaware. “But I...
Source: TIME: Science - August 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized forensics onetime Source Type: news

Role of cell group behavior in cancer target of $1.9 million award
(Washington University in St. Louis) Researchers have thought that cancer begins when a single cell goes rogue in the body, then begins to grow and multiply. Now, they are investigating evidence of more damage when a group of cells breaks off from a colony and more follow, leading to large-scale metastasis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Siteman Cancer Center breaks ground on $26.3 million facility in North County
Siteman Cancer Center, based at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and the Washington University School of Medicine, broke ground Tuesday on a new $26.3 million outpatient facility in north St. Louis County. “Leading-edge cancer care encompasses highly trained doctors and the latest technology, and Siteman Cancer Center’s north St. Louis County facility at Northwest HealthCare will include both,” Dr. Timothy Eberlein, director of Siteman, said in a statement. “We are dedicated to making the be st cancer… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - July 31, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Veneta Rizvic Source Type: news

Unless we spot changes, most life experiences are fabricated from memories
(Washington University in St. Louis) We may not be able to change recent events in our lives, but how well we remember them plays a key role in how our brains model what's happening in the present and predict what is likely to occur in the future, finds new research in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pazopanib/Cetuximab Combo Promising in Recurrent, Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma
A Washington University School of Medicine team ’s findings might inform future research into inhibitors of angiogenesis and PD-1 in head and neck cancer. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - July 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Leah Lawrence Source Type: news

NASA Could Have People Living on the Moon in 8 Years. And That ’s Just the Beginning
The moon is a very patient place. It once was a very busy place. Early in its long history, a constant bombardment of space debris left it with great lava bleeds that formed its so-called seas and tattooed it with thousands of craters that endure today. The shooting eventually stopped and the moon fell quiet, and for billions of years it did more or less nothing at all, while the blue-white, watery world just next door bloomed and thrived and exploded with life. And then, for a tiny blink of time, the moon hosted life too. Over the course of four years, from December 1968 to December 1972, nine crews of human beings orbite...
Source: TIME: Science - July 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized moon NASA space Source Type: news

Analysis of prostate tumors reveals clues to cancer's aggressiveness
(Washington University School of Medicine) Using genetic sequencing, scientists have revealed the complete DNA makeup of more than 100 aggressive prostate tumors, pinpointing important genetic errors these deadly tumors have in common. The study lays the foundation for finding new ways to treat prostate cancer, particularly for the most aggressive forms of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

GW study will examine molecular mechanisms of male bias in autism
(George Washington University) With more than $2 million from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, a team at GW led by Chiara Manzini, PhD, will study the CC2D1A gene and its role in the development of autism in males versus females. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Washington U hiring medical assistant apprentices
Washington University is partnering with St. Louis County to train medical assistants through an apprenticeship program. Workers accepted into the one-year program will work for the university’s School of Medicine in its clinics and other clinical setting, according to Legail Chandler, the university’s vice chancellor for human resources. Apprentices will collect vital signs, prepare patients for exams, schedu le lab work, perform blood draws and maintain electronic records, according to a… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 18, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Diana Barr Source Type: news

Researchers engineer bacteria to create fertilizer out of thin air
(Washington University in St. Louis) A team at Washington University in St. Louis has created a bacteria that uses photosynthesis to create oxygen during the day, and at night, uses nitrogen to create chlorophyll for photosynthesis. This development could lead to plants that do the same, eliminating the use of some -- or possibly all -- man-made fertilizer, which has a high environmental cost. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers identify cost-cutting option in treating nail fungus with nanotechnology
(George Washington University) Adam Friedman, M.D., professor of dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, and his team investigated the use of nanotechnology to improve efinaconazole treatment and make it more cost effective. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

D.C. hospital gets the green light for a new helipad
Key story highlights: D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser has signed a bill that gives George Washington University Hospital approval to begin helipad construction. The helipad will expand access for patients to its trauma center and comprehensive stroke center, according to hospital spokeswoman Susan Griffiths. The hospital plan s to start building the helipad this year, to be completed in spring 2019. More than 30 years after its first attempt, George Washington University Hospital will finally get its… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 10, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

D.C. hospital gets the green light for a new helipad
Key story highlights: D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser has signed a bill that gives George Washington University Hospital approval to begin helipad construction. The helipad will expand access for patients to its trauma center and comprehensive stroke center, according to hospital spokeswoman Susan Griffiths. The hospital plan s to start building the helipad this year, to be completed in spring 2019. More than 30 years after its first attempt, George Washington University Hospital will finally get its… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 10, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

Hope for multiple sclerosis treatment as scientists say limiting calories could reduce symptoms
Researchers at Washington University in St Louis are starting a trial to examine whether reducing people's calorie intake could help to relieve their multiple sclerosis symptoms. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can fasting improve MS symptoms?
(Washington University School of Medicine) People with multiple sclerosis (MS) can find an abundance of conflicting advice suggesting that special diets will ease their symptoms. But the evidence is scanty. Laura Piccio, M.D., an associate professor of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has launched a trial to evaluate whether drastically cutting calories twice a week can change the body's immune environment and the gut microbiome, and potentially change the course of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New patch boosts brightness in medical diagnostic tests
(Washington University in St. Louis) A multidisciplinary team from Washington University in St. Louis and the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base has developed a high-tech fix that brings some medical diagnostic tests out of the dark and into the light. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Non-opioid drug relieves pain in mice, targets immune cells
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that inhibiting a receptor on immune cells called macrophages may help relieve pain in some patients, particularly those with chronic neuropathic pain, such as those with conditions such as diabetic neuropathy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Air pollution is driving type 2 diabetes - even at levels considered SAFE
Growing evidence has suggested a link between pollution and diabetes in recent decades - but the new study led by researchers at Washington University is the first to quantify the burden. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Air pollution contributes significantly to diabetes globally
(Washington University in St. Louis) New research links outdoor air pollution -- even at levels deemed safe -- to an increased risk of diabetes globally, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Veterans Affairs (VA) St. Louis Health Care System. The findings raise the possibility that reducing pollution may lead to a drop in diabetes cases in heavily polluted countries such as India and less polluted ones such as the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New imaging technique to use bioinspired camera to study tendon, ligament damage
(Washington University in St. Louis) Tommy John surgery, or reconstruction of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) in the elbow, has been dubbed an epidemic among Major League Baseball pitchers. A mechanical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis plans to develop a bioinspired imaging technique to study how damage accumulates in the UCL during loading, or the stress of activating the ligament. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Washington University researcher moves closer to perfecting artificial blood
Implications for the artificial blood could be monumental, from the U.S. Military equipping their medics to aid fellow soldiers, to emergency medical personnel giving blood transplants to patients in ambulances. It has the potential to save millions of lives. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - June 25, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Brian Robbins Source Type: news

Richard L. Wahl, M.D., receives SNMMI 2018 Georg Charles de Hevesy Nuclear Pioneer Award
(Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging) Richard L. Wahl, M.D., FACNM, FACR, received this year's Georg Charles de Hevesy Nuclear Pioneer Award for his contributions to nuclear medicine at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2018 Annual Meeting, June 23-26 in Philadelphia. Wahl is the Elizabeth E. Mallinckrodt Professor and head of radiology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, director of the university's Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology and a professor of radiation oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 24, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Parent-child therapy helps young children with depression
(Washington University School of Medicine) New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis demonstrates that an interactive therapy involving parents and their depressed preschoolers can reduce rates of depression and lower the severity of children's symptoms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ADHD drugs may fuel obesity in children
Taking antipsychotic drugs for aggression and ADHD led to rapid weight gain and insulin sensitivity in children, a new Washington University and Florida Atlantic University study found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Youths prescribed antipsychotics gain body fat, have increased diabetes risk
(Washington University School of Medicine) Doctors sometimes prescribe antipsychotic drugs to treat behavior disorders in youths who don't respond to traditional medications. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Florida Atlantic University have found that young people taking antipsychotics for as little as 12 weeks experience significant gains in body fat and also become less sensitive to insulin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Puerto Rico Issues New Data on Hurricane Maria Deaths
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Eight days after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, Efrain Perez felt a pain in his chest. Doctors near his small town sent him to Puerto Rico's main hospital for emergency surgery for an aortic aneurysm. But when the ambulance pulled into the parking lot in the capital, San Juan, after a more than two-hour drive, a doctor ran out to stop it. "He said, 'Don't bring him in here, I can't care for him. I don't have power. I don't have water. I don't have an anesthesiologist,'" Perez's daughter, Nerybelle, recalled. The 95-year-old Perez died as the ambulance drove him back to ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 12, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Danica Coto, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Category Source Type: news

Wash U gets $14 million to test program aimed at reducing childhood obesity
Washington University School of Medicine said Monday it's receiving $14 million to test a family based program that aims to curb childhood obesity. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - June 11, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Brian Robbins Source Type: news

Wash U gets $14 million to test program aimed at reducing childhood obesity
Washington University School of Medicine said Monday it's receiving $14 million to test a family based program that aims to curb childhood obesity. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 11, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Brian Robbins Source Type: news

Scientists ID source of damaging inflammation after heart attack
(Washington University School of Medicine) Scientists have zeroed in on a culprit that spurs damaging inflammation in the heart following a heart attack. The guilty party is a type of immune cell that tries to heal the injured heart but instead triggers inflammation that leads to even more damage. The researchers, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, also have found that an already approved drug effectively tamps down such inflammation in mice, protecting the heart from the progressive damage that often occurs after a heart attack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

George Rice Joins Redflash Group
Encinitas, Calif.--The RedFlash Group, a national strategic consulting firm specializing in public safety and healthcare, is pleased to announce the addition of George Rice as a Partner. Rice comes to the RedFlash Group most recently from the Industry Council for Emergency Response Technologies (iCERT), where he oversaw a period of growth and heightened influence for the association throughout a seven-year tenure as Executive Director. He previously served as Executive Director of the Association of Public Safety Communications Officials (APCO). Rice brings his experiences and insights acquired over a 30-year career in jus...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - June 6, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: The RedFlash Group Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

George Rice Joins Redflash Group
Encinitas, Calif.--The RedFlash Group, a national strategic consulting firm specializing in public safety and healthcare, is pleased to announce the addition of George Rice as a Partner. Rice comes to the RedFlash Group most recently from the Industry Council for Emergency Response Technologies (iCERT), where he oversaw a period of growth and heightened influence for the association throughout a seven-year tenure as Executive Director. He previously served as Executive Director of the Association of Public Safety Communications Officials (APCO). Rice brings his experiences and insights acquired over a 30-year career in jus...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 6, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: The RedFlash Group Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

George Rice Joins Redflash Group
Encinitas, Calif.--The RedFlash Group, a national strategic consulting firm specializing in public safety and healthcare, is pleased to announce the addition of George Rice as a Partner. Rice comes to the RedFlash Group most recently from the Industry Council for Emergency Response Technologies (iCERT), where he oversaw a period of growth and heightened influence for the association throughout a seven-year tenure as Executive Director. He previously served as Executive Director of the Association of Public Safety Communications Officials (APCO). Rice brings his experiences and insights acquired over a 30-year career in jus...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - June 6, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: The RedFlash Group Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

Gut microbes can fight parasites: Probiotics may reduce infections, and severity of infections, in developing countries
(Natural News) Your ability to fight off parasitic worms may be aided by your gut microbiota. This was the conclusion that researchers from Washington University in St. Louis reached in their study, published in Microbiome. Studying the guts of people from Liberia and Indonesia revealed that their gut microbiomes were remarkably similar, regardless of the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Psychologist reveals 7 easy ways to achieve happiness now
(Natural News) We’ve all probably wondered what the exact formula is to achieving happiness. Well, if you ask Dr. Tim Bono, psychologist and lecturer at Washington University, there are seven concrete ways to being happy. (h/t to Healthista.com.) Take walk breaks often — The lack of physical activity doesn’t only increase our risk of developing illnesses, it also dampens our... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Why not take a risk' attitude widespread among patients and providers, GW study finds
(George Washington University) A new study led by David Broniatowski, an assistant professor in the George Washington University's department of engineering management and systems engineering, finds the 'Why not take a risk?' mentality is widespread among patients and medical care providers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Caseload volume in gynecologic surgery important consideration for women
(George Washington University) Experts at the GW, led by Gaby Moawad, M.D., assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, outlined some of the concerns and proposed solutions for choosing a surgeon in an article recently published in the Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What happens to plasmalogens, the phospholipids nobody likes to think about
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) In a paper to be published in the June 2 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis provide the first report of an enzyme that breaks down plasmalogens, a breakthrough in understanding the molecular processes that occur during Alzheimer's and other diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New 'light therapy' could treat constipation better than drugs
Scientists in Australia and at Washington University discovered that they could quickly cure constipation in mice that they had genetically engineered to have neurons that 'move' in response to blue light. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New 'light therapy' could treat constipation better than drugs, study finds   
Scientists in Australia and at Washington University discovered that they could quickly cure constipation in mice that they had genetically engineered to have neurons that 'move' in response to blue light. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIH-funded researchers identify target for chikungunya treatment
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Scientists have identified a molecule found on human cells and some animal cells that could be a target for drugs against chikungunya virus infection and related diseases, according to new research published in the journal Nature. A team led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis conducted the research, which was funded in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Clues found to early lung transplant failure
(Washington University in St. Louis) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Northwestern University have uncovered cells that flow into and harm the lung soon after transplant. The resulting dysfunction is the leading cause of early death after lung transplantation and contributes to organ rejection that can lead to death months or years later. The discovery, in mice, may lead to drug therapies that target the destructive cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blood type affects severity of diarrhea caused by E. coli
(Washington University School of Medicine) A new study shows that a kind of E. coli most associated with 'travelers' diarrhea' and children in underdeveloped areas of the world causes more severe disease in people with blood type A. The bacteria release a protein that latches onto intestinal cells in people with blood type A, but not blood type O or B, according to a study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news