New report offers detailed analysis of Capitol Hill siege
(George Washington University) A report released today by the George Washington University Program on Extremism reveals new information about the 257 people charged in federal court for playing a role in the Jan. 6 attack on the United States Capitol. The report, " This is Our House! " A Preliminary Assessment of the Capitol Hill Siege Participants, " also provides several recommendations aimed at combating domestic extremism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Under climate stress, human innovation set stage for population surge
(Washington University in St. Louis) Aridification in the central plains of China during the early Bronze Age did not cause population collapse, a result that highlights the importance of social resilience to climate change, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis. Instead of a collapse amid dry conditions, development of agriculture and increasingly complex human social structures set the stage for a dramatic increase in human population around 3,900 to 3,500 years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 26, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

My Family Is Still Being Careful About COVID-19. Why Does It Feel Like We ’re the Only Ones?
Welcome to COVID Questions, TIME’s advice column. We’re trying to make living through the pandemic a little easier, with expert-backed answers to your toughest coronavirus-related dilemmas. While we can’t and don’t offer medical advice—those questions should go to your doctor—we hope this column will help you sort through this stressful and confusing time. Got a question? Write to us at covidquestions@time.com. Today, K.K. in California asks: My son is almost two, and he was born prematurely at 33 weeks. We don’t ever want to see him in the hospital again, and especially not becaus...
Source: TIME: Health - February 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 Source Type: news

George Washington University to participate in Sanofi COVID-19 vaccine trial
(George Washington University) The George Washington University is a site for a phase 2 clinical trial for Sanofi's adjuvanted recombinant protein-based COVID-19 vaccine candidate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 24, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New strategy blocks chronic lung disease in mice
(Washington University School of Medicine) A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has uncovered a previously unknown role for exosomes in inflammatory respiratory diseases. The study has implications for finding new therapies. Exosomes are tiny compartments released from cells that carry different types of cargo, including inflammatory chemicals called cytokines that can drive lung disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 23, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GW receives funding to develop AI systems to help people with health problems drive safely
(George Washington University) Samer Hamdar, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the George Washington University, is partnering with Moment AI to launch a project aimed at developing AI systems that could one day prevent health-induced traffic accidents, including those linked to stress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 18, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antibody may hold key to treatment of Alzheimer's, strokes
Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis said Wednesday they have discovered an antibody that removes harmful brain plaques associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease and strokes. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Antibody-based COVID-19 treatments work best in concert with immune cells
(Washington University School of Medicine) Antibody-based drugs have been authorized for emergency use in COVID-19 patients by the Food and Drug Administration. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that the ability to interact with other elements of the immune system is an indispensable part of the effectiveness of such antibodies. The findings could help improve the design of the next generation of antibody-based COVID-19 drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 16, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Liquid biopsy for colorectal cancer could guide therapy for tumors
(Washington University School of Medicine) A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis demonstrates that a liquid biopsy examining blood or urine can help gauge the effectiveness of therapy for colorectal cancer that has just begun to spread beyond the original tumor. Such a biopsy can detect lingering disease and could serve as a guide for deciding whether a patient should undergo further treatments due to some tumor cells evading an initial attempt to eradicate the cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aggressive brain tumor mapped in genetic, molecular detail
(Washington University School of Medicine) A new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has revealed a detailed map of the genes, proteins, infiltrating cells and signaling pathways that play key roles in driving glioblastoma. The study, of 99 tumors from patients, is the largest and most detailed schematic of this deadly brain tumor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 11, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

GW's Program on Extremism tracking criminal cases linked to the attack on Capitol Hill
(George Washington University) The George Washington University Program on Extremism has continued to update a project that is tracking individuals charged with crimes related to the attack on the US Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Imaging identifies breast cancer patients unlikely to benefit from hormone therapy
(Washington University School of Medicine) Hormone therapy can be very effective for so-called estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. But it only works for a little more than half of women who receive the treatment. In a small study, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that women whose tumors did not respond to a one-day estrogen challenge did not benefit from hormone therapy. The findings could help doctors choose treatments most likely to help their patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Biden Presidency Could Fundamentally Change the U.S. Space Program
Nobody was thinking much about the newly elected junior senator from Delaware back in December of 1972, when the Apollo 17 moonwalkers collected lunar sample 76015, 43. The senator was Joseph Biden, the moon walkers were Jack Schmitt and Gene Cernan, and the rock was a 3.9-billion-year-old, 332 gram (0.73 lb.) sample collected in the moon’s Taurus-Littrow Valley. Today, Schmitt is 85, Cernan has passed away, Biden is the 46th President of the United States and the rock rests on a bookshelf in his newly redecorated Oval Office, after he requested a lunar sample from NASA for display. For space lovers looking for reaso...
Source: TIME: Science - January 29, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Nixing bone cancer fuel supply offers new treatment approach, mouse study suggests
(Washington University School of Medicine) An innovative approach to treating bone tumors - starving cancer cells of the energy they need to grow - could one day provide an alternative to a commonly used chemotherapy drug without the risk of severe side effects, suggests a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 26, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Most patients find teledermatology appointments suitable alternative to office visits
(George Washington University) Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) surveyed dermatology patients at the GW Medical Faculty Associates to evaluate patient satisfaction with teledermatology appointments. The team found the majority of patients found the experience a suitable alternative to in-person office visits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Protecting Mental Health of Families in a Pandemic
Credit: Unsplash /Melanie Wasser. By Ifeanyi Nsofor and Shubha NageshABUJA, Jan 22 2021 (IPS) Dealing with COVID-19-related city lockdowns has been exceptionally stressful, particularly for those parents who have had to balance work, personal life, children and elderly, providing home schooling or facilitating virtual learning, managing infection control within the home, and more, all while being disconnected from support services. Beyond all this, other mediators and moderators play a key role in outcomes for parents and children, including their function and adaptation – sociodemographic, exposure, negative events,...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor and Shubha Nagesh Tags: Education Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

No more needles for diagnostic tests?
(Washington University in St. Louis) The lab of Srikanth Singamaneni at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis developed a biosensing microneedle patch that can be applied to the skin, capture a biomarker of interest and, thanks to its unprecedented sensitivity, allow clinicians to detect its presence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Supplemental Oxygen Often Unnecessary During Childbirth
THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2021 -- Use of maternal oxygen during childbirth is not associated with improved neonatal outcomes, according to a review published online Jan. 4 in JAMA Pediatrics. Nandini Raghuraman, M.D., from the Washington University School... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 21, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Auris Health Announces Publication of Results from BENEFIT Study of MONARCH ® Platform in CHEST
This study was conducted using strict definitions for diagnostic yield. In previous studies, variations in the definition of yield led to overestimation of a successful bronchoscopy. Given this strict trial design, the diagnostic yield of 74.1% is promising, and we hope this sets the stage for future multicenter trials,” said Dr. Silvestri, Hillenbrand Professor of Thoracic Oncology at Medical University. “We are thrilled to be making a meaningful impact on the diagnosis of lung conditions, particularly in patients with small and difficult to reach nodules that may progress to something more serious,” sai...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - January 21, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Here ’s What Joe Biden Can Do About the COVID-19 Pandemic Starting On His First Day as U.S. President
Every pandemic starts as a squall—a localized disturbance in a single city or town, causing all manner of problems there, but sparing the larger world outside. Squalls become storms, however, and storms become tempests and before long the entire world is being lashed by winds of disease and death that no one saw coming just a few months before. As President Joe Biden takes office, he is facing nothing short of a pathogenic typhoon, with COVID-19 raging around the world, nowhere more so than in the U.S., with some 24 million cases and 400,000 deaths—more than 20% of the global toll. If the pandemic unfolded in ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

For some, GI tract may be vulnerable to COVID-19 infection
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that patients with Barrett's esophagus may be vulnerable to coronavirus infection from what they swallow. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 20, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Rapid blood test identifies COVID-19 patients at high risk of severe disease
(Washington University School of Medicine) Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that a relatively simple and rapid blood test can predict which patients with COVID-19 are at highest risk of severe complications or death. The blood test measures levels of mitochondrial DNA, which normally resides inside the energy factories of cells. Mitochondrial DNA spilling out of cells and into the bloodstream is a sign that a particular type of violent cell death is taking place in the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Acute itching in eczema patients linked to environmental allergens
(Washington University School of Medicine) New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that allergens in the environment often are to blame for episodes of acute itch in eczema patients, and that the itching often doesn't respond to antihistamines because the itch signals are being carried to the brain along a previously unrecognized pathway that current drugs don't target. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New report estimates 10,000 people 65 and older living with dementia in nation's capital
(George Washington University) A report released today estimates that about 10,000 Washington, DC residents 65 and older are living with dementia, a general term for a range of memory loss disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New treatment allows some people with spinal cord injury to regain hand and arm function
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers helped six Seattle-area people with spinal cord injuries regain some hand and arm mobility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Improving tests for tropical worm diseases aim of $2.95 million grant
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have received a grant to develop better diagnostic tests for worm infections as part of an international effort to eliminate two tropical infectious diseases: lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 6, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Highlights in Mantle Cell Lymphoma From ASH 2020 Highlights in Mantle Cell Lymphoma From ASH 2020
Dr Amanda Cashen from Washington University reviews key studies on mantle cell lymphoma from ASH 2020, including new data on chemotherapy-free frontline options and CAR T-cell therapy.Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology ReCAP Source Type: news

Women Need Support and Understanding after Miscarriage
Miscarriage is the most common reason for losing a baby during pregnancy. It happens for up to 15% of women who knew they were pregnant.. Credit: UNSPLASH/Claudia Wolff.By Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Dec 29 2020 (IPS) Recently, Meghan Markle, the Duchess of Sussex, wrote a piece sharing about her miscarriage. I knew, as I clutched my firstborn child, that I was losing my second, she wrote. She is part of a growing list of celebrities who have publicly shared their experiences with miscarriages. Model Chrissy Teigen also recently shared the pain she and her husband singer John Legend felt about the miscarriage ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Gender Headlines Health Women's Health Source Type: news

Common brain malformation traced to its genetic roots
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that Chiari 1 malformation can be caused by variations in two genes linked to brain development, and that children with large heads are at increased risk of developing the condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Modeling can help balance economy, health during pandemic
(Washington University in St. Louis) Using mathematical modeling, new interdisciplinary research from the lab of Arye Nehorai, the Eugene& Martha Lohman Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Preston M. Green Department of Electrical& Systems Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, determines the best course of action when it comes to walking the line between economic stability and the best possible health outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aren ’t We Missing Food Security Experts in the Incoming President-Elect Biden-Kamala Harris Administration?
We never imagined that we would witness food insecurity being an issue in developed countries such as the US. Credit: Stephen Leahy/IPS.By Esther Ngumbi and Ifeanyi NsoforURBANA, Illinois / ABUJA, Dec 17 2020 (IPS) Food insecurity across the U.S. continues to be on the rise because of the effects of COVID-19. According to Feeding America, over 50 million Americans will experience food insecurity, including 17 million children.  We both grew up in countries referred to as “developing countries,” Ifeanyi in Nigeria and Esther in Kenya. At the time, we never imagined that we would witness food insecurity...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Esther Ngumbi and Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Source Type: news

The Chang ’e 5 Capsule Returns to Earth Carrying Moon Rocks in the Latest Breakthrough for China’s Space Program
BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese lunar capsule returned to Earth on Thursday with the first fresh samples of rock and debris from the moon in more than 40 years. The capsule of the Chang’e 5 probe landed in the Siziwang district of the Inner Mongolia region, state media reported shortly after 2 a.m. (1800 GMT). The capsule earlier separated from its orbiter module and performed a bounce off Earth’s atmosphere to reduce its speed before passing through and floating to the ground on parachutes. Two of the Chang’e 5’s four modules set down on the moon on Dec. 1 and collected about 2 kilograms (4.4 pounds...
Source: TIME: Science - December 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized overnight Space wire Source Type: news

Whatcom County (WA) Seeks Better, Cheaper Answer to 911 Call Centers
Robert Mittendorf The Bellingham Herald (Bellingham, Wash.) (MCT) Dec. 15—Combining Whatcom County’s two 911 dispatch centers, whose operators separately send law-enforcement officers or firefighters to calls for service, is back on the County Council’s agenda. It’s both logical and a cost-saving measure to combine the two 911 centers, said Councilman Tyler Byrd. “I’ve been working on all the documentation I can find on this and talking to people. I can’t find a single efficiency that comes out of this the way it is today,” Byrd said during a&nbs...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Communications & Dispatch News News Feed Source Type: news

Whatcom County (WA) Seeks Better, Cheaper Answer to 911 Call Centers
Robert Mittendorf The Bellingham Herald (Bellingham, Wash.) (MCT) Dec. 15—Combining Whatcom County’s two 911 dispatch centers, whose operators separately send law-enforcement officers or firefighters to calls for service, is back on the County Council’s agenda. It’s both logical and a cost-saving measure to combine the two 911 centers, said Councilman Tyler Byrd. “I’ve been working on all the documentation I can find on this and talking to people. I can’t find a single efficiency that comes out of this the way it is today,” Byrd said during a&nbs...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Communications & Dispatch News News Feed Source Type: news

Whatcom County (WA) Seeks Better, Cheaper Answer to 911 Call Centers
Robert Mittendorf The Bellingham Herald (Bellingham, Wash.) (MCT) Dec. 15—Combining Whatcom County’s two 911 dispatch centers, whose operators separately send law-enforcement officers or firefighters to calls for service, is back on the County Council’s agenda. It’s both logical and a cost-saving measure to combine the two 911 centers, said Councilman Tyler Byrd. “I’ve been working on all the documentation I can find on this and talking to people. I can’t find a single efficiency that comes out of this the way it is today,” Byrd said during a&nbs...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Communications & Dispatch News News Feed Source Type: news

Whatcom County (WA) Seeks Better, Cheaper Answer to 911 Call Centers
Robert Mittendorf The Bellingham Herald (Bellingham, Wash.) (MCT) Dec. 15—Combining Whatcom County’s two 911 dispatch centers, whose operators separately send law-enforcement officers or firefighters to calls for service, is back on the County Council’s agenda. It’s both logical and a cost-saving measure to combine the two 911 centers, said Councilman Tyler Byrd. “I’ve been working on all the documentation I can find on this and talking to people. I can’t find a single efficiency that comes out of this the way it is today,” Byrd said during a&nbs...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Communications & Dispatch News News Feed Source Type: news

Whatcom County (WA) Seeks Better, Cheaper Answer to 911 Call Centers
Robert Mittendorf The Bellingham Herald (Bellingham, Wash.) (MCT) Dec. 15—Combining Whatcom County’s two 911 dispatch centers, whose operators separately send law-enforcement officers or firefighters to calls for service, is back on the County Council’s agenda. It’s both logical and a cost-saving measure to combine the two 911 centers, said Councilman Tyler Byrd. “I’ve been working on all the documentation I can find on this and talking to people. I can’t find a single efficiency that comes out of this the way it is today,” Byrd said during a&nbs...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - December 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Communications & Dispatch News News Feed Source Type: news

Whatcom County (WA) Seeks Better, Cheaper Answer to 911 Call Centers
Robert Mittendorf The Bellingham Herald (Bellingham, Wash.) (MCT) Dec. 15—Combining Whatcom County’s two 911 dispatch centers, whose operators separately send law-enforcement officers or firefighters to calls for service, is back on the County Council’s agenda. It’s both logical and a cost-saving measure to combine the two 911 centers, said Councilman Tyler Byrd. “I’ve been working on all the documentation I can find on this and talking to people. I can’t find a single efficiency that comes out of this the way it is today,” Byrd said during a&nbs...
Source: JEMS Latest News - December 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Communications & Dispatch News News Feed Source Type: news

COVID-19 patients at higher risk of death, health problems than those with flu
(Washington University in St. Louis) A deep dive into federal data by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis reveals a clearer distinction between COVID-19 and the flu: Among hospitalized patients, COVID-19 was associated with an increased need for ventilators, more admissions into intensive care units, longer hospital stays and nearly five times the risk of death than faced by those with the flu. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 15, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Toxin provides clues to long-term effects of diarrhea caused by E. coli
(Washington University School of Medicine) A study from researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that a toxin produced by E. coli changes intestinal cells to benefit itself, an ability that could provide a clue to why the bacteria have been linked to nutritional problems such as malnutrition and stunted growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA creates nursing fellowship for Gluck Stroke Rescue Program with $1 million gift
UCLA has received $1 million from Mark and Laura Wittcoff to establish the Marjorie Scherck and Raymond Wittcoff Nursing Fellowship in Stroke Care Innovation. The fellowship will support nursing staff for the  UCLA Arline and Henry Gluck Stroke Rescue Program, which operates a mobile stroke unit that provides early diagnosis and care when patients are being transported to a hospital.The fellowship honors two of the Witcoffs ’ family members who were committed advocates for nursing care as supporters of Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, where Mark’s father, Raymond Wittcoff, was chairman of the board at ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 7, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Novel form of Alzheimer's protein found in spinal fluid indicates stage of the disease
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a novel form of the Alzheimer's protein tau in the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord. This form of tau -- known as MTBR tau -- indicates what stage of Alzheimer's a person is in and tracks with tangles of tau protein in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A recipe for protein footprinting
(Washington University in St. Louis) By publishing their method in the journal Nature Protocols, chemists have opened doors for fellow scientists to better address research questions related to Alzheimer's disease, the COVID-19 pandemic and more. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Increase in head start funding 'a national priority'
(Washington University in St. Louis) Increased funding for Head Start -- the largest federally funded, early childhood development program in the United States -- is needed to support families during the COVID-19 recession and to ensure a more stable economic recovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Names Dr. Nadja West, retired United States Army lieutenant general and former United States Army Surgeon General to its Board of Directors
New Brunswick, NJ (December 3, 2020) – Johnson & Johnson announced today that Dr. Nadja West, retired United States Army lieutenant general and former United States Army Surgeon General has been appointed to its Board of Directors.“I am pleased to welcome Dr. Nadja West to Johnson & Johnson’s Board of Directors,” said Alex Gorsky, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. “Nadja is an accomplished healthcare leader with a strong commitment to public service and she brings an impressive and unique combination of business and leadership expertise to Johnson & Johnson. I look forward to N...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - December 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

First report card on biosimilars in oncology
(George Washington University) In a Policy Review in The Lancet Oncology, Y. Tony Yang, a professor at the George Washington University School of Nursing and Milken Institute School of Public Health, along with his co-authors, identify factors preventing the effective launch of oncology biosimilars in the United States, including the struggle to garner market share and fighting patent litigation lawsuits across the country. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New tech can get oxygen, fuel from Mars's salty water
(Washington University in St. Louis) A new electrolysis system that makes use of briny water could provide astronauts on Mars with life-supporting oxygen and fuel for the ride home. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

In fire-prone West, plants need their pollinators -- and vice versa
(Washington University in St. Louis) A new study grounded in the northern Rockies explores the role of wildfire in the finely tuned dance between plants and their pollinators. Previous studies have looked at how fire affects plants, or how fire affects animals. But what is largely understudied is the question of how fire affects both, and about how linkages within those ecological networks might respond to fire disturbance. The findings are particularly significant in light of recent reports about the rapid and widespread decline of insects globally. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Child COVID Cases Have Increased 28% Over The Last Two Weeks, American Academy Of Pediatrics Says
(CNN) — As officials continue to warn about traveling over the holidays amid the fall surge, health experts are also investigating the virus’ impact on children. There were more than 144,000 new cases of Covid-19 reported among children last week, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said Monday. Over the last two weeks, there has been a 28% increase in child Covid-19 cases and children now account for more than 11% of all confirmed coronavirus cases in the US, according to the AAP. About 144,145 new cases among children 17 and under were reported from November 12 to 19, AAP said. As of Monday, the US has r...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Coronavirus Source Type: news

Secrets of the 'lost crops' revealed where bison roam
(Washington University in St. Louis) Blame it on the bison. If not for the wooly, boulder-sized beasts that once roamed North America in vast herds, ancient people might have looked past the little barley that grew under those thundering hooves. But the people soon came to rely on little barley and other small-seeded native plants as staple food. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news