$5 million supports research into neglected tropical diseases
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have received two grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) totaling more than $5 million to study two types of parasitic worm infection that cause devastating illness in millions of people worldwide. One project will focus on onchocerciasis, commonly known as river blindness. The second project will target fascioliasis, commonly found in cattle-farming operations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 21, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Global trial to assess chloroquine against COVID-19 in health workers
More than 50,000 healthcare workers will be enrolled in a clinical trial to assess chloroquine for protection against COVID-19, according to researchers at the Washington University of St. Louis. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - May 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

There Isn ’t a COVID-19 Vaccine Yet. But Some Are Already Skeptical About It
Amid the American flags, “Make America Great Again” hats and “freedom is essential” posters appearing at recent protests against coronavirus lockdowns in Sacramento, Calif., another familiar slogan has materialized: “We do not consent.” It’s long been a popular rallying cry among antivaccine activists, who claim without evidence that vaccines cause autism or other conditions. As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, those activists have become intertwined with demonstrators who want businesses to reopen despite public health experts’ warnings. Offline, the “anti-vaxxers&rdquo...
Source: TIME: Health - May 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Global study to test malaria drug to protect health workers from COVID-19
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers around the world, led by investigators at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, are helming a global study of up to 30,000 health-care workers to establish whether the antimalaria drug chloroquine might prevent or reduce the severity of COVID-19 infections in such workers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aluminum may affect lead levels in drinking water
(Washington University in St. Louis) Until recently, researchers have not inspected the interplay between three common chemicals found in drinking water. Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has found they all affect each other and a closer look is needed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BioCompute Object Specification Project receives IEEE Standardization Acceptance
(George Washington University) The BioCompute Object Specification Project led by a team at the George Washington University has been officially approved for publication as an internationally recognized standard by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Standards Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A New Study Explores The Spread Of Misinformation About Coronavirus On Facebook
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Neil Johnson, a professor of physics at George Washington University, about his study on the spread of scientific misinformation about the coronavirus and its effects. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New map reveals distrust in health expertise is winning hearts and minds online
(George Washington University) Communities on Facebook that distrust establishment health guidance are more effective than government health agencies and other reliable health groups at reaching and engaging 'undecided' individuals, according to a study published today in the journal Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Short Takes
President Trump has announced his intent to nominate three new members to the National Science Board (NSB), the policymaking body of the National Science Foundation. He will nominate Catholic University Provost and particle physicist Dr. Aaron Dominguez, Director of IBM Research Dr. Dario Gil, and Dr. Sudarsanam Babu of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to serve six year terms on the board. Dr. Roger Beachy, Professor Emeritus in Biology at Washington University in St. Louis, will be reappointed to serve another six-year term. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is soliciting nominations for member...
Source: Public Policy Reports - May 11, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Breaking down wood decomposition by fungi
(George Washington University) Through a combination of lab and field experiments, researchers have developed a better understanding of the factors accounting for different wood decomposition rates among fungi. The new findings reveal how an understanding of fungal trait variation can improve the predictive ability of early and mid-stage wood decay, a critical driver of the global carbon cycle. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 11, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Beyond the List: NIH grants continue to increase in St. Louis
Health research is thriving in St. Louis. In 2019, the region was awarded a total of $568 million in National Institutes of Health funding, up by 40% since 2015. Although most of that funding went to Washington University, plenty of local startups also got NIH awards. The majority of the 25 largest award recipients on this week’s list are located in either St. Louis’ Cortex Innovation Community or its affiliate, the Center for Emerging Technologies (se e below). Although grant volume for startups… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 8, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Lea Konczal Source Type: news

Stroke evaluations drop by nearly 40% during COVID-19 pandemic
(Washington University School of Medicine) A study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that stroke evaluations fell by nearly 40% during a period of the COVID-19 pandemic, suggesting that many stroke patients are not seeking potentially life-saving medical treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 8, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Gene therapy in mice builds muscle, reduces fat
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that gene therapy in mice helped build strength and significant muscle mass quickly, while reducing the severity of osteoarthritis. The gene therapy also prevented obesity, even when the mice were fed a high-fat diet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GW survey evaluates influence of social media in attracting patients
(George Washington University) A recent survey from the George Washington University suggests that patients do not take social media into consideration when looking for a dermatologist and recommend that practitioners should use social media as a tool in engaging and educating patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Supportive oncodermatology interventions improve patient quality of life
(George Washington University) A recent survey from the GW Cancer Center found that enrollment in a supportive oncodermatology program is associated with a significantly improved quality of life score. The results are published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New targets for childhood brain tumors identified
(Washington University School of Medicine) People with the genetic condition neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are prone to developing tumors on nervous system tissue. A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that the development and growth of such tumors are driven by nearby noncancerous neurons and immune cells. The findings point to potential new therapeutic targets for people with NF1. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator
Source: George Washington University (GWU). Published: 5/2020. This tool is for state and local leaders to prepare for COVID-19 contact tracing in order to safely reopen and protect the health of communities. It uses a baseline of 15 contact tracers per 100,000 population and increases the number of contact tracers, as needed, to contact trace the 14-day number of new COVID-19 cases for each county over the course of a week. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Here ’s How Scientists and Public-Health Experts Recommend the U.S. Gets Back to ‘Normal’
There is both promise and peril in being a pioneer, and the people of Hokkaido have learned both lessons well over the past few months. After infections of COVID-19 on the Japanese island exploded following its annual winter festival this year, officials in February declared a state of emergency to control the disease. Soon after, new daily cases plummeted, and Hokkaido’s quick action was heralded as a beacon for the rest of Japan to follow. But it wasn’t just infections that dropped; over the next month, agriculture and tourism business also dried up, and Hokkaido’s governor decided to ease social restri...
Source: TIME: Health - April 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news

United Imaging reaches installation milestone
United Imaging said it has delivered its 8,500th medical imaging system worldwide.Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: United Imaging signs another portable CT collaboration United Imaging donates scanning rooms to Chinese clinics United Imaging aids fight against coronavirus United Imaging launches mobile PET/CT unit at RSNA 2019 United Imaging teams with Washington University (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 29, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Dr. Larry Brilliant and Dr. Leana Wen on How We Need to Prepare for the Next Pandemic
This article is part of #TIME100Talks: Finding Hope, a special series featuring leaders across different fields sharing their ideas for navigating the pandemic. Want more? Sign up for access to more virtual events, including live conversations with influential newsmakers. (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - April 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 TIME 100 TIME100 Talks video Source Type: news

New York able to begin lifting coronavirus restrictions in June, model shows
(Natural News) According to new projections, New York — as well as the neighboring states of New Jersey and Connecticut — may be able to begin safely lifting coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions as early as June. This prediction is based on a model by Washington University‘s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) that shows the beginnings of a downward... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lizards develop new 'love language'
(Washington University in St. Louis) Free from the risk of predators and intent to attract potential mates, male lizards relocated to experimental islets in Greece produce a novel chemical calling card, according to new research from biologists in Arts& Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study shows sharp decrease of intimate partner violence in Nicaragua
(George Washington University) The percentage of women and girls in Nicaragua's second-largest city who reported experiencing physical violence by their partners during their lifetimes decreased from 55% in 1995 to 28% in 2016, according to a new study published in the journal BMJ Global Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Facebook Is Notifying Users Who Have Shared Coronavirus Misinformation. Could It Do the Same for Politics?
Hoping to stem the torrent of false cures and conspiracy theories about COVID-19, Facebook announced Thursday it would begin informing users globally who have liked, commented on, or shared “harmful” misinformation about the coronavirus, pointing them instead in the direction of a reliable source. Facebook hopes the move will drastically reduce the spread of false information about the coronavirus online, a growing crisis that the World Health Organization (WHO) has described as an “infodemic.” “We want to connect people who may have interacted with harmful misinformation about the virus with ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news

Novel tool reveals which states could face shortages of COVID-19 workforce
(George Washington University) As the US healthcare workforce struggles to care for a rise in COVID-19 cases, there are growing reports that there are not enough workers to meet the surge in demand. Some hospitals are reporting they do not have enough respiratory therapists to operate ventilators. And rising numbers of nurses and other health care workers in New York and other states have fallen ill and are quarantined, or simply unable to report to work due to family needs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Milk pioneers: East African herders consumed milk 5,000 years ago
(Washington University in St. Louis) Animal milk was essential to east African herders at least 5,000 years ago, according to a new study. The research is important for understanding the history of milk drinking worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How families can use technology to juggle childcare and remote life
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers are beginning a national study to help families discover technology that helps them both successfully navigate home-based learning and combat social isolation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Soot may only be half the problem when it comes to cookstoves
(Washington University in St. Louis) Researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering spent two weeks in India cooking with local residents. They found that soot wasn't the only worrisome byproduct of traditional cookstoves; organic carbons are causing problems, too. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Whatever works: Survey reveals patients with psoriasis are willing to try alternative medicine to address symptoms
(Natural News) People with psoriasis tend to use alternative medicines to treat rashes, according to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. Through a survey distributed by the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF), a team of researchers from the George Washington University‘s School of Medicine and Health Sciences found that people with... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clinical trial launches to evaluate antimalarial drugs for COVID-19 treatment
(Washington University School of Medicine) Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is launching a clinical trial for patients hospitalized with COVID-19 at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. The trial will investigate the effectiveness of different combinations of the antimalarial drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine and the antibiotic azithromycin in treating ill patients infected with the novel coronavirus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

$1.2 million grant to study evolution of Central American lizards
(Washington University in St. Louis) A research team led by Jonathan Losos, the William H. Danforth Distinguished Professor and professor of biology in Arts& Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, was awarded $1.2 million for a CRISPR-based gene editing study of Central American lizards. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How Coronavirus Attacks the Body
It doesn ’t take long for mild coronavirus symptoms to turn serious. These virtual reality images show how the virus can invade the lungs and kill. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jonah M. Kessel and Aaron Byrd Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Ventilators (Medical) Respiratory Distress Syndrome Lungs Quarantines Virtual Reality (Computers) Pneumonia Death and Dying Oxygen George Washington University China Washington (DC) Wuhan (China) Source Type: news

United Imaging signs another portable CT collaboration
United Imaging has inked a collaboration with Sea Box in its efforts to make...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: United Imaging donates scanning rooms to Chinese clinics United Imaging aids fight against coronavirus United Imaging launches mobile PET/CT unit at RSNA 2019 United Imaging teams with Washington University United Imaging completes 1st U.S. uExplorer install (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 6, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Lifestyle trumps geography in determining makeup of gut microbiome
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis studied the gut microbiomes of wild apes in the Republic of Congo, of captive apes in zoos in the US, and of people from around the world and discovered that lifestyle is more important than geography or even species in determining the makeup of the gut microbiome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Are States Across the U.S. Projected to ‘Flatten the Curve’?
—Every day, the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the U.S. grows. On March 26, the country passed China to rise to the top of the list of most reported cases of the novel coronavirus in the world, and the spread of the illness shows little sign of abatement. However, the U.S. is a huge country, and the growth patterns of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease, differ significantly from state to state. Researchers at the University of Washington recently analyzed these early trends, along with factors like how states are implementing social distancing, their hospital capacities, and their testing capabiliti...
Source: TIME: Health - April 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elijah Wolfson and Sanya Mansoor Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 interactive Source Type: news

3D virtual reality video shows how rapidly coronavirus destroys the lungs
(Natural News) With diseases such as COVID-19, it can be hard to visualize the kind of damage that the virus does for anyone outside of the emergency room. Now, researchers have released a 3D virtual reality fly-through of a patient’s lungs showing exactly the kind of damage the coronavirus causes. Researchers at the George Washington University... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Emergency Workforce Policies to Address COVID-19
Source: George Washington University, Milken Institute School of Public Health. Published: 4/2020. This web page provides webinars from the Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity series that discuss emergency workforce policies to address COVID-19. Topics are: Is There a Right to Not Work During COVID 19?; Increasing Supply by Tapping Retirees and Other Health Practitioners; The Importance of Standards; and Summary: Expanding Scope of Practice. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neglected Diseases Kill More People than COVID-19 – It’s Time to Address Them
Credit: UNBy Ifeanyi Nsofor and Adaeze OrehABUJA, Mar 30 2020 (IPS) As COVID-19 surges globally and leaves fear and panic in its wake, global efforts are underway to find a cure. Yet, the same level of response is lacking for several other infectious diseases that kill millions annually. These kinds of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a broad group of communicable diseases which affect more than two billion people and cost developing economies billions of dollars every year. Lassa Fever is an example and is endemic in Nigeria and other West African countries such as Benin, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor and Adaeze Oreh Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) Source Type: news

Coronavirus: Virtual reality video shows how lungs are damaged
Doctors at George Washington University created a 360 degree, 3D virtual reality of the lungs of a coronavirus patient in his 50s. The images show the infection devastating his lungs in green. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NYU Med School Offers Early Graduation for Help With COVID-19
Hospitals need to bolster staffing ranks ahead of expected strains due to rising infections, said a George Washington University researcher. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - March 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NYU Med School Offers Early Graduation for Help With COVID-19 NYU Med School Offers Early Graduation for Help With COVID-19
Hospitals need to bolster staffing ranks ahead of expected strains due to rising infections, said a George Washington University researcher.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Internal Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Internal Medicine Headlines - March 25, 2020 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Med Students News Source Type: news

Diet, nutrition have profound effects on gut microbiome
(George Washington University) A new literature review from scientists at George Washington University and the National Institute of Standards and Technology suggests that nutrition and diet have a profound impact on the microbial composition of the gut. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Doctors, health workers now FALLING ILL to the coronavirus
(Natural News) Healthcare workers across the United States are now testing positive for the coronavirus even as they man the front lines against the rapidly spreading pandemic. The medical professionals who have tested positive for COVID-19 include two ER physicians at a Chicago suburban hospital, two doctors associated with Washington University, a doctor in Austin,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Immunotherapy using 'young cells' offers promising option against cancer
(Washington University School of Medicine) A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that the age of certain immune cells used in immunotherapy plays a role in how effective it is. These cells -- natural killer (NK) cells -- appear to be more effective the earlier they are in development, opening the door to the possibility of an immunotherapy that would not utilize cells from the patient or a matched donor. Instead, they could be developed from existing supplies of what are called human pluripotent stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

OncoMX knowledgebase enables research of cancer biomarkers and related evidence
(George Washington University) Researchers at the George Washington University published a new knowledgebase and web portal, OncoMX, which will improve the exploration and research of cancer biomarkers in the context of related evidence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 23, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

'Fatal attraction': Small carnivores drawn to kill sites, then ambushed by larger kin
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have discovered that large predators play a key yet unexpected role in keeping smaller predators and deer in check. Their 'fatal attraction' theory finds that smaller predators are drawn to the kill sites of large predators by the promise of leftover scraps, but the scavengers may be killed themselves if their larger kin return for seconds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

2020-2021 Baker Research Fellowship at Washington University School of Medicine
The Jackie and Randy Baker Research Fellowship in Orthopaedic Surgery is being offered by the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine. This program is designed to provide a one to two year mentored research experience in orthopaedic clinical science (total joint replacement and hip preservation). (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - March 16, 2020 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Breast milk may help prevent sepsis in preemies
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., have found -- in newborn mice -- that a component of breast milk may help protect premature babies from developing life-threatening sepsis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In the Wake of the Coronavirus, Here ’s Why Americans Are Hoarding Toilet Paper
There’s nothing quite like the behavior of panicky humans—especially when it comes to hoarding. Let a blizzard approach or a hurricane churn toward shore, and we descend on stores, buying up more batteries, bottled water and canned foods than we could use in a lifetime. We’re seeing the same thing again as America hunkers down against the novel coronavirus, and of all of the products that are being snatched up the fastest, there’s one that’s in special demand: toilet paper. The Washington Post reports a run on the rolls, with both Costco and the Giant supermarket chain stripped all but clean. ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Long-term analysis shows GM cotton no match for insects in India
(Washington University in St. Louis) In India, Bt cotton is the most widely planted cotton crop by acreage, and it is hugely controversial. Supporters long touted increased yields and reduced pesticides to justify its pickup. But that argument does not hold up under the first long-term study of Bt cotton impacts in India. The analysis is co-authored by a Washington University in St. Louis anthropologist in the journal Nature Plants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news