National Academy of Medicine honors three members for outstanding service
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) The National Academy of Medicine (NAM) honored three members today at its annual meeting for their outstanding service. The honorees are David Relman, Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor in Medicine and professor of microbiology and immunology at Stanford University; David Eaton, dean and vice provost emeritus of the Graduate School of the University of Washington; and Sara Rosenbaum, Harold and Jane Hirsh Professor of Health Law and Policy at George Washington University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What Developing Countries Can Teach Us About How To Respond To a Pandemic
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post What Developing Countries Can Teach Us About How To Respond To a Pandemic appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Prenatal Cannabis Exposure May Raise Risk for Psychopathology
THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2020 -- Prenatal cannabis exposure is associated with a greater risk for psychopathology during middle childhood, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in JAMA Psychiatry. Sarah E. Paul, from Washington University in St.... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 15, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

GWU will continue with virtual classes in the spring
George Washington University on Friday became one of the first colleges in Greater Washington to announce it will continue with mostly virtual learning for the spring semester, which begins in early 2021. “Managing this pandemic has called on us all to do our part to keep the community healthy and safe, and to support one another through these difficult decisions,” GWU President Thomas LeBlanc wrote in a letter to the university community. “We again want to thank you for your understanding… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 12, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Drew Hansen Source Type: news

We Still Don ’t Know When President Trump Last Tested Negative for COVID-19. Here’s Why That’s a Big Deal
It’s been only about four days since the world learned U.S. President Donald Trump tested positive for COVID-19—but that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s been four days since he was infected. White House officials and Trump’s personal physician Sean Conley have repeatedly dodged questions about when the President last tested negative for COVID-19. “I don’t want to go backwards,” Conley said when asked about Trump’s last negative test during a Monday press briefing, at which he announced Trump would be discharged from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to return t...
Source: TIME: Health - October 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

President Trump ’s COVID-19 Recklessness Will Bring More Illness, Death and Suffering
Here’s where we are: Donald J. Trump, the President of the United States and the most powerful person on the planet, is sick with COVID-19. We do not know with any confidence how ill he truly is; both his physician and White House officials have been unclear and evasive. Journalists’ fascination with Trump’s health may seem morbid, but the presidency confers enormous power—and the example he sets shapes people’s response to the pandemic. The official line is that Trump is improving and is set to be released Monday evening. But he’s receiving a battery of medicinal firepower, some of it e...
Source: TIME: Health - October 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alex Fitzpatrick Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Three Share Nobel Prize for Hepatitis C Research
The three recipients are: Harvey Alter, a clinical scientist at a U.S. National Institutes of Health blood bank; Charles Rice, of the Washington University in St. Louis; and British-born virologist Michael Houghton. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - October 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vaccine opposition online uniting around 'civil liberties' argument
(George Washington University) Anti-vaccination discourse on Facebook increased in volume over the last decade, coalescing around the argument that refusing to vaccinate is a civil right, according to a study published today in the American Journal of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 1, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cerebral palsy also has genetic underpinnings
(Washington University School of Medicine) Scientists have identified mutations in single genes that can be responsible for at least some cases of cerebral palsy, according to a new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The study indicates that many of the mutations occur randomly and are not inherited from a child's parents. The new knowledge could help improve the diagnosis of cerebral palsy and lead to future therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coronavirus live news: 60m Indians may have contracted Covid; Disney announces mass layoffs
India ’s pandemic agency says cases may be ten times official figure; New York introduces face mask fines as positivity rates climb;Boris Johnson apologises for getting north-east England lockdown rules wrong. Follow the latest updatesGlobal coronavirus deaths pass 1m with no sign rate is slowingWalt Disney sheds 28,000 jobs at theme parks as pandemic bitesInteractive: how did we get to one million deaths?France struggles to push Covid app as neighbours race aheadSee all our coronavirus coverage1.22amBSTCharlotte Graham-McLay reports for the Guardian:New Zealand on Wednesday reported a fifth consecutive day of no new...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Helen Sullivan Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news UK news Science Infectious diseases US news Australia news Microbiology Medical research Source Type: news

George Washington University Hospital parent reportedly hit with cyberattack
Universal Health Services Inc. (NYSE: UHS) — the majority owner of George Washington University Hospital in Foggy Bottom that’s also set to run a future community hospital in Ward 8 — has been hit with an aggressive cyberattack across its facilities, according to reports. NBC News first reported Monday that the issues were the result of a cyberattack that started over the weekend and cut computer and phone access for UHS hospitals across the U.S. It reportedly involved the Ryuk ransomware,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 28, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

George Washington University Hospital parent reportedly hit with cyberattack
Universal Health Services Inc. (NYSE: UHS) — the majority owner of George Washington University Hospital in Foggy Bottom that’s also set to run a future community hospital in Ward 8 — has been hit with an aggressive cyberattack across its facilities, according to reports. NBC News first reported Monday that the issues were the result of a cyberattack that started over the weekend and cut computer and phone access for UHS hospitals across the U.S. It reportedly involved the Ryuk ransomware,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 28, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

Antibodies protect against wide range of influenza B virus strains
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers have identified two antibodies that protect mice against lethal infections of influenza B virus, report scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Together with an antibody that targets the other major kind of influenza viruses that infect people -- influenza A -- these antibodies potentially could form the basis of a broad-spectrum flu drug that could treat almost all flu cases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 24, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Smoking marijuana during pregnancy increases risk of psychotic-like behaviors in children
A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis found children exposed to pot in utero were more likely to have psychotic-like behavior such as delusions. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prenatal cannabis exposure associated with adverse outcomes during middle childhood
(Washington University in St. Louis) Research from the Department of Psychological& Brain Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis shows prenatal cannabis exposure may impact child behavior later in life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

William Danforth, Longtime Research Philanthropist, Dies at 94
Danforth founded the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center and expanded scientific research at Washington University and beyond campus in St. Louis. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 22, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Funding climate action policies: Consumers weigh in
(Washington University in St. Louis) There is growing demand for countries to take aggressive action to combat climate change, but less consensus on how to fund it. In a new study published September 21 in Nature Climate Change, researchers asked more than 10,000 people from the US, UK, Germany and France to weigh in. The majority preferred a constant-cost plan - even if costs are high. The finding surprised researchers, but provides valuable insight for policymakers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Donald Trump Is Losing On An Issue Voters Care A Lot About. Here ’s How He’s Trying to Change That
With nearly 200,000 Americans dead from COVID-19 and millions more who lost their health insurance when they lost their jobs this year, President Donald Trump tried this week—as he has done throughout his presidency—to change the conversation. On Sunday, the President issued a new executive order aimed at lowering prescription drug prices, an issue dear to many voters, and boasted on Twitter that “prices are coming down FAST.” The reality is more complicated. Trump’s new executive order, which revokes and replaces a different executive order on drug prices that he signed in July, directs the...
Source: TIME: Health - September 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized 2020 Election COVID-19 Explainer News Source Type: news

Immune system affects mind and body, study indicates
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that a molecule produced by the immune system acts on the brain to change the behavior of mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Older people with early, asymptomatic Alzheimer's at risk of falls
(Washington University School of Medicine) Older people without cognitive problems who experience a fall may have undetected neurodegeneration in their brains that puts them at high risk of developing Alzheimer's dementia, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient earthquake may have caused destruction of Canaanite palace at Tel Kabri
(George Washington University) A team of Israeli and American researchers has uncovered new evidence that an earthquake may have caused the destruction and abandonment of a flourishing Canaanite palatial site about 3,700 years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hair loss drug spironolactone may be safe for use in breast cancer survivors
(George Washington University) Researchers at the George Washington University have found that the hair loss drug spironolactone is not associated with increased risk of female breast cancer recurrence and may be safe to treat female pattern hair loss in breast cancer survivors. Their findings are published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 9, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Vaccine proponents and opponents are vectors of misinformation online
(George Washington University) Researchers from the George Washington University, University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University assessed content from the most active vaccine-related accounts on Twitter and found that even accounts with pro-vaccination views and higher public health credibility can be vectors of misinformation in the highly uncertain and rapidly changing environment caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 9, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New surgical tools with smart sensors can advance cardiac surgery and therapy
(George Washington University) Researchers developed a new class of medical instruments equipped with an advanced soft electronics system that could dramatically improve the diagnoses and treatments of a number of cardiac diseases and conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 7, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Vaccine researchers testing human hookworm vaccines in Brazil
(George Washington University) Investigators at the George Washington University are partnering with Institute Ren é Rachou in Brazil to produce a controlled human hookworm infection model and establish a hookworm vaccine challenge model for two of the most advanced hookworm vaccine candidate antigens in endemic areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coronavirus Is Surging In the U.S. Midwest. Here ’s What’s Going on Across the Region
The epicenter of the U.S. coronavirus epidemic is a moving target. In the spring, it was New York City. Then Florida, Texas and California became hotspots. And now, with fall approaching, the outbreak has a new locus: the Midwest. Daily coronavirus cases and deaths are trending downward nationally after a spike this summer. There were about 34,000 new cases of coronavirus and about 600 deaths on Aug. 31—decreases of about 12% and 30%, respectively, compared to two weeks ago. But the Midwest is an exception to the trend. It is the country’s only region where daily case counts are rising in nearly every state&mda...
Source: TIME: Health - September 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Misfiring brain cells may cause swallowing woes in children with developmental disorders
(Virginia Tech) Misfiring brain cells that control key parts of the mouth and tongue may be creating swallowing difficulties in children with neurodevelopmental disorders, according to neuroscientists with Virginia Tech and George Washington University. Problems ingesting, chewing, or swallowing food occur in up to 80 percent of children with developmental disorders and can lead to food aspiration, choking, or life-threatening respiratory infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists discover which immune cells a flu shot MUST target to provide 'long-lasting' protection 
Washington University, St Louis, scientists have developed a way to test lymph nodes to see if B cells crucial to long-lasting immunity react to a shot. Targeting these could improve shot efficacy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study provides insight on how to build a better flu vaccine
(Washington University School of Medicine) Repeated exposure to influenza viruses may undermine the effectiveness of the annual flu vaccine. A team of researchers led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has developed an approach to assess whether a vaccine activates the kind of immune cells needed for long-lasting immunity against new influenza strains. The findings could aid efforts to design an improved flu vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 31, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Genetic mutations may be linked to infertility, early menopause
(Washington University School of Medicine) A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis identifies a specific gene's previously unknown role in fertility. When the gene is missing in fruit flies, roundworms, zebrafish and mice, the animals are infertile or lose their fertility unusually early but appear otherwise healthy. Analyzing genetic data in people, the researchers found an association between mutations in this gene and early menopause. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

College students access eating disorders therapy via phone app
(Washington University School of Medicine) Studying college women with eating disorders, a team led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that a phone-based app that delivers a form of cognitive behavioral therapy was an effective means of intervention in addressing specific disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cochlear implants should be recommended for adults more often
(Washington University School of Medicine) An international group of hearing specialists has released a new set of recommendations emphasizing that cochlear implants should be offered to adults who have moderate to severe or worse hearing loss much more often than is the current practice. The group hopes the recommendations help increase usage of such devices, potentially improving hearing and quality of life for millions worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 human milk studies should continue without stopping breastfeeding
(Washington University in St. Louis) It is not easy to conduct human milk research during a pandemic. Yet despite the consistent lack of quality evidence for transmission of viral RNA from breast milk, some leaders are pushing ahead by altering public health and clinical practice guidance, according to E.A. Quinn, associate professor of biological anthropology in Arts& Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Changing landscapes, changing diets
(George Washington University) A new study led by Enquye Negash, a postdoctoral researcher in the George Washington University Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology, published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences documents dietary shifts in herbivores that lived between 1-3 million years ago in Ethiopia's Lower Omo Valley. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using light's properties to indirectly see inside a cell membrane
(Washington University in St. Louis) Using properties of light from fluorescent probes is at the heart of a new imaging technique developed at Washington University's McKelvey School of Engineering that allows for an unprecedented look inside cell membranes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nasal vaccine against COVID-19 prevents infection in mice
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a vaccine that targets the SARS-CoV-2 virus, can be given in one dose via the nose and is effective in preventing infection in mice susceptible to the novel coronavirus. The investigators next plan to test the vaccine in nonhuman primates and humans to see if it is safe and effective in preventing COVID-19 infection. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - August 24, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

FDA Issues Emergency Authorization For Convalescent Plasma To Treat Covid-19
(CNN) — The US Food and Drug Administration on Sunday issued an emergency use authorization for convalescent plasma to treat Covid-19, saying the “known and potential benefits of the product outweigh the known and potential risks of the product.” The FDA said more than 70,000 patients had been treated with convalescent plasma, which is made using the blood of people who have recovered from coronavirus infections. “Today I am pleased to make a truly historic announcement in our battle against the China virus that will save countless lives,” President Trump said at a White House briefing, referr...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Coronavirus Source Type: news

Coronavirus found to suppress immune response, but this new therapy can restore immune function
(Natural News) Complete suppression of immune response may be the real cause of death among coronavirus patients, claim two new studies led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis (WUSTL). Previous reports point to severe inflammation as the main cause of organ damage suffered by patients with severe COVID-19. But autopsy findings tell a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Meet hedge fund managers of avian world
(Washington University in St. Louis) New research from Washington University in St. Louis finds that brood parasites living in more variable and unpredictable habitats tend to parasitize -- or squat and drop their eggs in -- the nests of a greater variety and number of hosts. The study is published Aug. 21 in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nasal vaccine against COVID-19 prevents infection in mice
(Washington University School of Medicine) Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a vaccine that targets the SARS-CoV-2 virus, can be given in one dose via the nose and is effective in preventing infection in mice susceptible to the novel coronavirus. The investigators next plan to test the vaccine in nonhuman primates and humans to see if it is safe and effective in preventing COVID-19 infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 21, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Struggling to Focus? How to Improve Your Attention Span When ‘the World Is Sick’
If your mind wanders off before you finish reading this sentence, you’re not alone. Months into the COVID-19 pandemic, many of us are still learning to live with an ambient thrum of stress, anxiety, fear, grief and anger. For many people—especially those recovering from the virus or juggling work and child care—brain fog and inattention have been collateral damage. In a recent survey of 300 American workers, about 40% said they feel less productive than usual during the pandemic. Todd Braver, a professor of psychological and brain sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, says that’s completel...
Source: TIME: Health - August 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

Researchers one step closer to bomb-sniffing cyborg locusts
(Washington University in St. Louis) Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has determined that locusts can smell explosives and determine where the smells originated -- an important step in engineering cyborg bomb-sniffing locusts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Multiple Sclerosis Drug Shows Promise For HIV Prevention And Treatment
Researchers at The George Washington University in D.C. and their colleagues found that a drug called Fingolimod, that is approved for multiple sclerosis treatment, also blocks HIV transmission and infection in human cells. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - August 13, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Anuradha Varanasi, Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Source Type: news

Multiple sclerosis drug blocks HIV infection and transmission in human immune cells
(PLOS) An immunomodulatory drug called fingolimod, which is approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, blocks human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and transmission in human immune cells, according to a study published August 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Postdoctoral Fellow Rachel Resop and Assistant Professor Alberto Bosque of The George Washington University, and colleagues. These preliminary findings suggest that this compound may be a promising novel therapy for HIV treatment and prevention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

MS drug may be used to inhibit hiv infection and reduce latent reservoir
(George Washington University) A multiple sclerosis drug may be used to block HIV infection and reduce the latent reservoir, according to research published in PLOS Pathogens by a team at the RGeorge Washington University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Zeroing out their own zap
(Washington University in St. Louis) African fish called mormyrids communicate using pulses of electricity. New research from biologists in Arts& Sciences shows that a time-shifted signal in the brain helps the fish to ignore their own pulse. This skill has co-evolved with large and rapid changes in these signals across species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Experimental COVID-19 vaccine prevents severe disease in mice
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have created a COVID-19 vaccine candidate from a replicating virus. This experimental vaccine has proven effective at preventing pneumonia in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 11, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Immunotherapy-resistant cancers eliminated in mouse study
(Washington University School of Medicine) In a mouse study, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that an antibody that targets the protein TREM2 empowers tumor-destroying immune cells and improves the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 11, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

HDAC6 can control tumor growth and halt metastasis in triple-negative breast cancer
(George Washington University) Genetic modifier HDAC6 was found to control tumor growth and halt metastasis in triple-negative breast cancer in vivo, according to a new study published in the journal Cancer Research by investigators at the GW Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New Members Appointed to NSB
On July 20, 2020, President Donald Trump appointed new members to the National Science Board (NSB) — the governing body of the National Science Foundation (NSF). NSB advises Congress and the Administration on issues in science and engineering. The four new appointees to the 24-member Board will serve six-year terms: Sudarsanam Suresh Babu: Governor’s Chair of Advanced Manufacturing at the University of Tennessee/Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Aaron Dominguez: Provost and Professor of Physics at the Catholic University of America Darío Gil: Director of IBM Research Melvyn Huff: Lecturer at the Univ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - August 3, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news