Researchers find no progress in media representation of nurses over last 20 years
(George Washington University) A replication of the 1997 " Woodhull Study on Nursing and the Media " led by the George Washington University School of Nursing found nurses continue to be underrepresented as sources in heath news stories despite their increasing levels of education and expertise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers Discover Neanderthal Child Was Devoured by a Giant Bird
The oldest human remains discovered in Poland were found a few years ago, but it’s only recently that scientists have uncovered the unfortunate fate of the Neanderthal to whom they once belonged. It was only this year that researchers discovered that the bones, found amid the remains of animals, actually were once those of a Neanderthal child. A Neanderthal child, it turns out, that was eaten by a giant Ice Age-era bird, reported Science in Poland. The bones, determined to be phalanges from the child’s hand, were dotted with dozens of holes and that was the clue that led researchers to determine what happened t...
Source: TIME: Science - October 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized onetime Poland Source Type: news

Obesity linked to increased risk of early-onset colorectal cancer
(Washington University School of Medicine) Women who are overweight or obese have up to twice the risk of developing colorectal cancer before age 50 as women who have what is considered a normal body mass index (BMI), according to new research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

White Americans see many immigrants as 'illegal' until proven otherwise, survey finds
(Washington University in St. Louis) Fueled by political rhetoric evoking dangerous criminal immigrants, many white Americans assume low-status immigrants from Mexico, El Salvador, Syria, Somalia and other countries President Donald Trump labeled 'shithole' nations have no legal right to be in the United States, new research in the journal American Sociological Review suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study finds thalamus wakes the brain during development
(George Washington University) The study published in the Journal of Neuroscience suggests the thalamus controls the development of state dependency and continuity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cardialen raises $17m Series B
Cardialen said today that it closed a $17 million Series B round for the low-energy defibrillation technology it’s developing. The Minneapolis-based company said RiverVest Venture partners led the round, joined by Qiming Venture Partners, HBM Healthcare Investments and Cultivation Capital. The proceeds are earmarked for further clinical work on Cardialen’s “unpinning termination” therapy, which is designed to deliver low-energy electrical stimulation to restore abnormal cardiac rhythms. “This round of financing gives Cardialen the capital to establish acute safety of UPT therapy for ...
Source: Mass Device - October 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Cardiovascular Featured Funding Roundup Wall Street Beat Cardiac Rhythm Management Cardialen Inc. Source Type: news

Women with erratic sleep schedules take longer to get pregnant
The study by Washington University in St Louis, presented at a conference in Denver, is the first to show a link between sleep patterns and female fertility, partly because it is so hard to measure. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scoliosis linked to essential mineral
(Washington University School of Medicine) An inability to properly use the essential mineral manganese could be to blame for some cases of severe scoliosis, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In childbirth, when to begin pushing does not affect C-section rates
(Washington University in St. Louis) Obstetricians have differing opinions about when women should begin pushing during labor and whether the timing of pushing increases the likelihood of a cesarean section. Many obstetricians recommend that a woman begin pushing as soon the cervix is fully dilated, while others advise waiting until she feels the urge to push. Washington University School of Medicine led a multicenter study that found the timing of pushing has no effect on whether women deliver vaginally or by C-section. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mosquito-borne viruses that attack the brain can also infect your bowel and cause digestive issues
A new study from the Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, Missouri, has found that these viruses infect neurons in the intestinal walls, which are then killed by immune cells. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Implantable, biodegradable devices speed nerve regeneration in rats
(Washington University School of Medicine) Peripheral nerve injuries leave people with tingling, numbness and weakness in their arms, hands and legs. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Northwestern have developed an implantable, bioabsorbable device that speeds recovery in rats by stimulating injured nerves with electricity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers demonstrate first example of a bioelectronic medicine
(Northwestern University) Northwestern University and Washington University School of Medicine researchers have developed the first example of a bioelectronic medicine: an implantable, biodegradable wireless device that speeds nerve regeneration and improves healing of a damaged nerve. Their device delivered pulses of electricity to damaged nerves in rats after a surgical repair process, accelerating the regrowth of nerves and enhancing the recovery of muscle strength and control. The device is the size of a dime and the thickness of a sheet of paper. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Daily Drinking Associated With Increased Mortality Risk
FRIDAY, Oct. 5, 2018 -- Daily drinking, even at low levels, may be detrimental to one's health, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Alcoholism: Clinical& Experimental Research. Sarah M. Hartz, M.D., Ph.D., from Washington University... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 5, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Study raises questions about impact of daily alcohol consumption
Researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found consuming one to two drinks four or more times a week increases the risk of premature death by 20 percent. The study looked at data from more than 400,000 people. Dr. Tara Narula joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss why the results suggest people should take a personalized approach to how much alcohol they consume. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - October 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Drinking More Than Three Times a Week May Harm Your Health, Study Says
Decades-old advice about alcohol has recently come under fire, with two recent studies suggesting that even a moderate drinking habit may raise the risk of early death. The latest study, published Wednesday in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, finds that drinking lightly four or more times per week may raise the risk of early death, even though that amount of drinking is consistent with federal guidelines. (The researchers defined “light” drinking as having a drink or two per sitting. The CDC and other federal agencies recommend moderate drinking — no more than a drink per day ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Viruses in blood lead to digestive problems
(Washington University School of Medicine) Some people suffer unpredictable bouts of abdominal pain and constipation. A new study in mice, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, shows that viruses that target the nervous system can kill neurons in the gut that coordinate the process of moving waste along. Such viruses may be involved in causing people's digestive woes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Drinking daily glass of wine is not good for your health, study says
A new study from Washington University School of Medicine has found that a daily drink can protect against heart disease but any drinking was detrimental to cancer risk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Drinking daily glass of wine is NOT good for your health, it only works if you have 3 per week
A new study from Washington University School of Medicine has found that a daily drink can protect against heart disease but any drinking was detrimental to cancer risk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Case For Taking a Walk After You Eat
At the end of a long day, it’s tempting to dive into your social feeds or Netflix queue the minute you’ve finished eating. But back before screens bogarted all our free time, an after-dinner stroll was a popular activity and one associated with improved health and digestion. “Italians have been walking after meals for centuries,” says Loretta DiPietro, a professor of exercise science at George Washington University’s Milken Institute School of Public Health, “so it must be good.” Research backs this up. One small study co-authored by DiPietro found that when older adults at risk fo...
Source: TIME: Health - September 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness Source Type: news

St. Louis Children ’s doctor gets $1 million grant for pediatric cancer research
The Hyundai Hope on Wheels organization awarded Dr. Todd Druley, a pediatric oncologist and hematologist at Washington University and Siteman Kids at St. Louis Children ’s Hospital, with a $1 million grant to study pediatric cancer. Children’s Hospital, part of BJC HealthCare, is one of four recipients of the Hyundai Quantum Grant this year. With this latest award, Children’s has received more than $2.6 million in grants from Hyundai Hope on Wheels, the non profit arm of Hyundai Motor America,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Veneta Rizvic Source Type: news

St. Louis Children ’s doctor gets $1 million grant for pediatric cancer research
The Hyundai Hope on Wheels organization awarded Dr. Todd Druley, a pediatric oncologist and hematologist at Washington University and Siteman Kids at St. Louis Children ’s Hospital, with a $1 million grant to study pediatric cancer. Children’s Hospital, part of BJC HealthCare, is one of four recipients of the Hyundai Quantum Grant this year. With this latest award, Children’s has received more than $2.6 million in grants from Hyundai Hope on Wheels, the non profit arm of Hyundai Motor America,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 19, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Veneta Rizvic Source Type: news

Does Thinking Burn Calories? Here ’s What the Science Says
You spent Sunday on the couch, skimming your social feeds and watching HGTV. Monday at work was a different story; your job involves creative problem solving and other difficult mental activities. Does the extra brainpower you use at work burn more energy than your Sunday spent watching Fixer Upper reruns? “The basic answer is yes,” says Ewan McNay, an assistant professor of psychology and behavioral neuroscience at the University of Albany. The brain—unlike any other part of the body—runs exclusively on the sugar glucose, and strenuous cognitive activities require more glucose than simple ones, say...
Source: TIME: Health - September 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness Source Type: news

Nucleation a boon to sustainable nanomanufacturing
(Washington University in St. Louis) Young-Shin Jun, professor of energy, environmental& chemical engineering in the School of Engineering& Applied Science, and Quingun Li, a former doctoral student in her lab, are the first to measure the activation energy and kinetic factors of calcium carbonate's nucleation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study IDs why some TB bacteria prove deadly
(Washington University School of Medicine) A new study has found that the same mutation that gives TB bacteria drug resistance also elicits a different --   and potentially weaker -- immune response. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Turmoil behind primate power struggles often overlooked by researchers
(Washington University in St. Louis) Anyone who peruses relationship settings on social media knows that our interactions with other humans can be intricate, but a new study in Nature: Scientific Reports suggests that researchers may be overlooking some of these same complexities in the social relations of our closest primate relatives, such as chimpanzees and macaques. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sniffing out error in detection dog data
(Washington University in St. Louis) New research finds three alternative answers beyond errors in handler or dog training that can explain why dogs trained to identify scat for conservation purposes sometimes collect non-target scats. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why It ’s So Hard to Calculate Death Tolls From Hurricanes
President Donald Trump on Thursday denounced a George Washington University study that attributed 2,975 deaths to Hurricane Maria, suggesting that the estimate — which is far higher than the 64 deaths initially reported — was politically motivated. In response, representatives from the GWU Milken Institute School of Public Health said they stand by their science, and “are confident that the number — 2,975 — is the most accurate and unbiased estimate of excess mortality to date.” But how can a death toll jump from 64 to nearly 3,000? The answer hinges on one fundamental question: What con...
Source: TIME: Health - September 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme and Arpita Aneja Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news

Genetic testing helps predict disease recurrence in myelodysplastic syndrome
(Washington University School of Medicine) A DNA-based analysis of blood cells soon after a stem cell transplant can predict likelihood of disease recurrence in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a group of cancerous disorders characterized by dysfunctional blood cells, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Such a practice could help doctors identify patients at high risk of disease recurrence early after a transplant and help guide treatment decisions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The Costs of Human Spaceflight Are High. History Shows the Benefits Are Too
Almost from the time the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) opened its doors for business 60 years ago on Oct. 1, 1958, it has had to be ready to provide an answer to one question: “Why send people into space, given the costs and risks associated with human spaceflight?” In its six decades, NASA launched just over 400 different people, many for more than one mission. Of that number, only 24 journeyed beyond Earth orbit to the Moon and back; three made that trip twice. The rest stayed close to their home planet. Although privately-funded space flights, both suborbital and into orbit and beyond,...
Source: TIME: Science - September 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: John Logsdon Tags: Uncategorized Opinion space Source Type: news

Washington U names new director of pediatric and developmental neurology
Washington University has named Dr. Christina Gurnett director of the division of pediatric and developmental neurology at the School of Medicine and neurologist-in-chief at St. Louis Children ’s Hospital. Gurnett is a professor of neurology at the university’s School of Medicine. She succeeds Dr. Bradley Schlaggar, who had held the post since 2014 and left in May to serve as president and CEO of the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore. “Dr. Christina Gurnett is a superb phy sician-scientist,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - September 6, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Veneta Rizvic Source Type: news

& #126;3,000 Excess Deaths Estimated Due to Hurricane Maria
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5, 2018 -- The total excess mortality attributed to Hurricane Maria is estimated at 2,975 deaths, according to a report issued by George Washington University. Researchers from the Milken Institute School of Public Health at the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 5, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

GW Researcher investigating link between parasitic infection and bile duct cancer
(George Washington University) Paul Brindley, Ph.D., at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, has received more than $1.7 million from the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health to investigate the cellular and molecular links between liver fluke infection and bile duct cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists identify weak point in deadly eye melanoma
(Washington University School of Medicine) A natural plant compound exploits a newly identified Achilles' heel in a cancer of the eye, uveal melanoma. In human cancer cells growing in the lab, the compound shuts down the overactive signaling that drives uveal melanoma cell growth, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New clues found to understanding relapse in breast cancer
(Washington University School of Medicine) A large genomic analysis has linked certain DNA mutations to a high risk of relapse in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer, while other mutations were associated with better outcomes, according to researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the Baylor College of Medicine and the University of British Columbia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 4, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Focused delivery for brain cancers
(Washington University in St. Louis) Hong Chen reached across disciplines, and within her own department, to work toward a more focused drug delivery system that could target tumors lodged in the brainstem, the body's most precious system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Blink' and you won't miss amyloids
(Washington University in St. Louis) Tiny protein structures called amyloids are key to understanding certain devastating age-related diseases, but they are so minuscule they can't be seen using conventional microscopic methods. A team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis has developed a new technique that uses temporary fluorescence, causing the amyloids to flash or 'blink', allowing researchers to better spot these problematic proteins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Faster than we thought: sulfurization of organic material
(Washington University in St. Louis) Processes that were thought to take tens of thousands of years can happen in hours, according to new research. And that may change our understanding of the carbon cycle, and maybe the history of Earth's climate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why STD Rates Are Higher Than They ’ve Ever Been
The numbers are clear: With nearly 2.3 million cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis diagnosed in 2017, rates of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are at an all-time high in the U.S., according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). What’s harder to pinpoint, however, is the reason behind those soaring statistics. On paper, it seems like STD rates should be dropping. Condom use is up. Teenagers and millennials are having less sex with fewer partners than generations past. Stigmas around sexuality and sexual health are beginning to break down. And yet, for four consecutive years...
Source: TIME: Health - August 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Sex/Relationships Source Type: news

Puerto Rico Hurricane Death Toll Raised to Nearly 3,000
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Puerto Rico's governor raised the island's official death toll from Hurricane Maria from 64 to 2,975 on Tuesday after an independent study found that the number of people who succumbed in the desperate, sweltering months after the storm had been severely undercounted. The new estimate of nearly 3,000 dead in the six months after Maria devastated the island in September 2017 and knocked out the entire electrical grid was made by researchers with the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University. "We never anticipated a scenario of zero communication, zero en...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - August 28, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Hurricane Maria caused 2,975 deaths in Puerto Rico, new study estimates
Hurricane Maria caused an estimated 2,975 deaths in Puerto Rico, according to a new report from George Washington University. Researchers calculated excess deaths that occurred in the US commonwealth between September 2017 and February 2018. The study was commissioned by the Puerto Rican government after the September 2017 storm. The estimated death toll is far higher than the current official toll of 64. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - August 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

E. coli strain from retail poultry may cause urinary tract infections in people
(George Washington University) A strain of Escherichia coli (E. coli) found in retail chicken and turkey products may cause a wide range of infections in people, according to a study published today in the American Society for Microbiology's open access journal mBio. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 28, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

GW report delivers recommendations aimed at preparing Puerto Rico for hurricane season
(George Washington University) In an independent report published today, researchers at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health estimated there were 2,975 excess deaths in Puerto Rico due to Hurricane Maria from September 2017 through the end of February 2018. The researchers also identified gaps in the death certification and public communication processes and went on to make recommendations that will help prepare Puerto Rico for future hurricanes and other natural disasters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA-led study reveals the mechanism that helps malaria parasites take over human red blood cells
Researchers from UCLA and Washington University in St. Louis have discovered the previously unknown mechanism of how proteins from  Plasmodium parasites — which cause malaria — are exported into human red blood cells, a process that is vital for parasites to survive in humans. The finding could pave the way for new treatments for malaria.In the study, published today in Nature, researchers reveal the atomic structure of the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins, or PTEX, the protein complex that transports these malaria proteins into the red blood cell. The research also provides the first direct...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 27, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In sync: How cells make connections could impact circadian rhythm
(Washington University in St. Louis) Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and collaborating institutions developed a unified, data-driven computational approach to infer and reveal connections among cells in biological and chemical oscillatory networks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Russian trolls 'spreading discord' over vaccine safety online
Study discovered several accounts, now known to belong to the same Russian trolls who interfered in the US election, tweeting about vaccinesBots and Russian trolls spread misinformation about vaccines on Twitter to sow division and distribute malicious content before and during the American presidential election, according to a new study.Scientists at George Washington University, in Washington DC, made the discovery while trying to improve social media communications for public health workers, researchers said. Instead, they found trolls and bots skewing online debate and upending consensus about vaccine safety.Continue r...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Glenza in New York Tags: Vaccines and immunisation US elections 2016 Russia Blogging Digital media World news US news Cyberwar Internet Science Technology US politics Source Type: news

Russian trolls and Twitter bots are driving the global anti-vaxxer movement online, study reveals
Vaccination rates are falling, measles rates are surging and arguments about the shots rage on social media, thanks to Twitter bots and Russian trolls a George Washington University study reveals. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eye exam could spot your risk of Alzheimer's disease long before symptoms arise
New research from Washington University School of Medicine has found that patients with retinal thinning also have a buildup of proteins in the brain that lead to Alzheimer's disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

GW cancer researchers to develop targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer
(George Washington University) A team at the George Washington University Cancer Center received more than $1.8 million from the National Institutes of Health to develop genetically engineered models to comprehensively study the role of COMPASS, a protein complex that epigenetically regulates cell fate decisions that drive the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Integrated analysis finds vulnerabilities to target in a high-risk pediatric tumor
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) Research from the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital--Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project has revealed new vulnerabilities and leads for treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Alzheimer's one day may be predicted during eye exam
(Washington University School of Medicine) Using technology similar to what is found in many eye doctors' offices, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have detected evidence suggesting Alzheimer's in older patients who had no symptoms of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news