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Schistosoma vaccine to enter phase Ib clinical trial
(George Washington University) Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, in collaboration with a team of researchers at the George Washington University and the Rene Rachou Institute, have received funding from the National Institutes of Health for a Phase Ib clinical trial for a Schistosomiasis vaccine in an endemic area of Brazil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Biomarker Disruptor
Would you rather get a biopsy or a blood test to check for prostate cancer? Quanterix chairman/CEO Kevin Hrusovsky said with the help of his company's latest product, the SR-X Ultra-Sensitive Biomarker Detection System, a simple blood test could replace, or complement, invasive diagnostic procedures. Using digital technology, the SR-X can detect cancer, neurological disorders, inflammatory and infectious diseases, and heart events months or even years earlier, and less invasively, than existing technology.   Using Quanterix's single molecule array (Simoa) science, which is similar to a digital enzyme-linked immunosorb...
Source: MDDI - January 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Heather R. Johnson Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Pediatric physician-scientists struggle for funding
(Washington University in St. Louis) A new, multicenter study that included Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that most NIH grants awarded to researchers in pediatrics during the past five years have been limited to physicians in senior positions at a small number of institutions. The findings indicate an overall downward trend in funding for pediatric research, particularly among early-career physician-scientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Memory loss from West Nile virus may be preventable
(Washington University School of Medicine) More than 10,000 people in the United States are living with memory loss and other persistent neurological problems that occur after West Nile virus infects the brain. Now, a new study in mice suggests that such ongoing neurological deficits may be due to unresolved inflammation that hinders the brain's ability to repair damaged neurons and grow new ones. When the inflammation was reduced by treatment with an arthritis drug, the animals' ability to learn and remember remained sharp after West Nile disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

We Still Have No Idea What Happened With SpaceX ’s Classified Government Satellite Launch
It was one of the most important things Elon Musk has ever launched into space: a government satellite so shrouded in secrecy that virtually everything about it is classified. Its code name: Zuma. Only now, what was supposed to be a triumph for Musk and his Space Exploration Technologies Corp. has turned into a potential setback after the satellite went missing. The episode is also shaping up as a test for the billionaire’s ambitions in space — especially SpaceX’s hard-won ability to compete for military missions. “They’re concerned any failure might hinder their ability to get future national...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - January 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized onetime SpaceX Source Type: news

Eggs are brain food: Study shows eggs improve infant brain development
(Natural News) It turns out, eggs aren’t just good for you, it can also be good for babies too, according to researchers from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. In the study, they discovered that introducing eggs to newborn children starting at six months resulted in higher blood centralizations of choline and docosahexaenoic... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Did ancient irrigation technology travel Silk Road?
(Washington University in St. Louis) Using satellite imaging and drone reconnaissance, archaeologists from Washington University in St. Louis have discovered an ancient irrigation system that allowed a farming community in northwestern China to raise livestock and cultivate crops in one of the world's driest desert climates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dancing backwards in high heels
(Springer) Who do students turn to when they want to ask for an extended assignment deadline or an increase in their marks? Most likely their female professors, says Amani El-Alayli of the Eastern Washington University in the US. El-Alayli is lead author of an article in Springer's journal Sex Roles which investigates the added work demands often faced by women in academia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers discover higher environmental impact from cookstove emissions
(Washington University in St. Louis) Millions of Asian families use cookstoves and often fuel them with cheap biofuels to prepare food. But the smoke emitted from these cookstoves has a definite, detrimental environmental impact, particularly in India. New research from Washington University in St. Louis offers a clearer picture of the topic's true scope. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 2, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Just one sleepless night increases Alzheimer's risk
Harmful proteins build up in the brain after just one night without sleep, reaching the levels of people genetically predisposed to Alzheimer's, a Washington University study revealed. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A phospholipid pathway from plants to parasites
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Recent findings by researchers at Washington University in St. Louis may aid in the development of therapies to treat parasitic infections, including malaria, and may help plant scientists one day produce hardier crops. The research team's work will be published in the Dec. 29 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 29, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Clinical Microbiology Newsletter Welcomes New Editors
Dr. Christopher Doern is currently the Associate Director of Microbiology at Virginia Commonwealth University Health System in Richmond, Virginia and an Assistant Professor of Pathology at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine. He is board-certified by the American Board of Medical Microbiology (ABMM). In 2008, Dr. Doern received his Ph.D. in Microbiology from Wake Forest University and then completed his fellowship in Medical and Public Health Microbiology at Washington University in St. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - December 27, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: M. Wolk, Elizabeth M. Marlowe Tags: Announcement Source Type: news

Feeding babies eggs boosts their brain development
Researchers from the Brown School at Washington University found just one egg a day for six months significantly boosts youngsters' levels of the nutrients choline and DHA. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Major measurement issues found in emergency department patient experience data
(George Washington University) There are major measurement issues in patient experience data collected from US emergency departments, including high variability and limited construct validity, according to an analysis published by researchers at the George Washington University and US Acute Care Solutions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study prompts new ideas on cancers' origins
(Washington University School of Medicine) Cancer therapies often target cells that grow and divide rapidly, such as stem cells, but in studying how stomach cancers occur, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that even when the stomach isn't able to make stem cells, other cells in the stomach can begin to divide and contribute to precancerous lesions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society awards $1.7 million in local grants
The Leukemia& Lymphoma Society is awarding more than $1.7 million grants in St. Louis to blood cancer research efforts. The local grants are part of the organization's broader research commitment of $46 million globally focused on research for blood cancer cures. Local researchers receiving funding from LLS include four Washington University medical school doctors: Dr. Takeshi Egawa, who received a career developm ent program grant; Dr Timothy Ley, who received a translational research program… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - December 8, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Angela Mueller Source Type: news

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society awards $1.7 million in local grants
The Leukemia& Lymphoma Society is awarding more than $1.7 million grants in St. Louis to blood cancer research efforts. The local grants are part of the organization's broader research commitment of $46 million globally focused on research for blood cancer cures. Local researchers receiving funding from LLS include four Washington University medical school doctors: Dr. Takeshi Egawa, who received a career developm ent program grant; Dr Timothy Ley, who received a translational research program… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 8, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Angela Mueller Source Type: news

Obesity prevented in mice fed high-fat diet
(Washington University School of Medicine) Washington University researchers activated the Hedgehog protein pathway in the fat cells of mice. After eight weeks of eating a high-fat diet, mice that had been engineered with genes to activate the pathway didn't gain weight, but control animals whose Hedgehog pathways were not activated became obese. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Community health center funding cliff could cause more than 100,000 jobs to be lost
(George Washington University) If the Community Health Center Fund is not restored, millions of patients served by community health centers may lose access to crucial health care and up to 161,000 jobs could be lost in communities across the nation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medicare shift to quality over quantity presents challenges
(Washington University School of Medicine) A new study hints that even large physician practices may have trouble moving to a payment system that rewards quality of health care over quantity of services delivered. The analysis included data from the first year of a program run by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and known as the Physician Value-Based Payment Modifier program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Washington University's Virgin to join Bill Gates-backed startup
Virgin, who has been Washington University School of Medicine ’s Edward Mallinckrodt Professor and Chair of the Department of Pathology& Immunology since 2006, will start in that new role Jan. 1. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - December 1, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Brian Feldt Source Type: news

Washington University's Virgin to join Bill Gates-backed startup
Virgin, who has been Washington University School of Medicine ’s Edward Mallinckrodt Professor and Chair of the Department of Pathology& Immunology since 2006, will start in that new role Jan. 1. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 1, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Brian Feldt Source Type: news

The Institute for Public Health at Washington University Summer Research Program
An eight-week summer research program in 2018 with opportunities for students to develop public or global health expertise and experience. Applications are due by February 1, 2018. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - November 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient barley took high road to China
(Washington University in St. Louis) First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What counts as 'nature'? It all depends
(University of Washington) University of Washington psychology professor Peter Kahn describes 'environmental generational amnesia' as the idea that each generation perceives the environment into which it's born, no matter how developed, urbanized or polluted, as the norm. And so what each generation comes to think of as 'nature' is relative, based on what it's exposed to. Kahn argues that more frequent and meaningful interactions with nature can enhance our connection to -- and definition of -- the natural world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is it an Emergency? Insurer Asks Patients to Question ED Visits
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Alison Wrenne was making waffles for her two young children one morning when abdominal pain forced her to the floor. A neighbor who is a physician assistant urged her to go to the emergency room. Wrong decision, according to her health insurer. Wrenne was diagnosed with a ruptured ovarian cyst, but Anthem said that wasn't an emergency and stuck her with a $4,110 bill. "How are you supposed to know that?" said the 34-year-old from Lexington, Kentucky. "I'm not a doctor ... that's what the emergency room is for." In an effort to curb unnecessary and costly ER visits, the Blue Cro...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - November 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tom Murphy, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Is it an Emergency? Insurer Asks Patients to Question ED Visits
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Alison Wrenne was making waffles for her two young children one morning when abdominal pain forced her to the floor. A neighbor who is a physician assistant urged her to go to the emergency room. Wrong decision, according to her health insurer. Wrenne was diagnosed with a ruptured ovarian cyst, but Anthem said that wasn't an emergency and stuck her with a $4,110 bill. "How are you supposed to know that?" said the 34-year-old from Lexington, Kentucky. "I'm not a doctor ... that's what the emergency room is for." In an effort to curb unnecessary and costly ER visits, the Blue Cro...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - November 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tom Murphy, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Is it an Emergency? Insurer Asks Patients to Question ED Visits
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Alison Wrenne was making waffles for her two young children one morning when abdominal pain forced her to the floor. A neighbor who is a physician assistant urged her to go to the emergency room. Wrong decision, according to her health insurer. Wrenne was diagnosed with a ruptured ovarian cyst, but Anthem said that wasn't an emergency and stuck her with a $4,110 bill. "How are you supposed to know that?" said the 34-year-old from Lexington, Kentucky. "I'm not a doctor ... that's what the emergency room is for." In an effort to curb unnecessary and costly ER visits, the Blue Cro...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tom Murphy, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

How cells detect, mend DNA damage may improve chemotherapy
(Washington University School of Medicine) Human cells have a way of detecting and mending DNA damage caused by some common chemotherapy drugs, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings could have important implications for treating cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 8, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Washington University receives $10 million gift for personalized medicine research
The Washington University School of Medicine has received a $10 million gift from George and Debra Couch to support personalized medicine research. The gift will establish an endowed fund dedicated to personalized medicine efforts and will also provide support to the university's Genome Engineering and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Center. Washington University named its newly built research building at 4515 McKinley Ave. as the Debra and Ge orge W. Couch III Biomedical Research Building in honor… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - November 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Angela Mueller Source Type: news

Study: PCI procedures ineffective at treating chest pain
Cardiovascular stents intended to relieve chest may not be effective at all for a good number of patients they’re implanted in, according to a new study reported yesterday by the New York Times. The study, published in the Lancet, examined the use of stents to open blocked arteries to treat chest pain, often experienced during exercise, according to the report. Results from the study stood in stark contrast to existing medical evidence and call into question the use of stents for treating chest pain, the Times reports. In the blinded, randomized, study, researchers compared percutaneous coronary interventions against...
Source: Mass Device - November 3, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Stents Source Type: news

How toxic air clouds mental health
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have found a link between air pollution and psychological distress. The higher the level of particulates in the air, the UW-led study showed, the greater the impact on mental health.The study is believed to be the first to use a nationally representative survey pool, cross-referenced with pollution data at the census block level, to evaluate the connection between toxic air and mental health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penny-wise, pound-foolish decisions explained by neurons' firing
(Washington University School of Medicine) People sometimes spend as much time deciding whether to spend a few cents more on groceries as they do deciding whether to spend a few thousand dollars extra when buying a car. A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that these spending habits may reflect how our brains tally differences in value among objects that vary greatly in worth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 2, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

In autism, too many brain connections may be at root of condition
(Washington University School of Medicine) Mutations in a gene linked to autism in people causes neurons to form too many connections in rodents, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings suggest that malfunctions in communication between brain cells could be at the root of autism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New NIH grant to help researchers follow children with autism transition to adulthood
(George Washington University) A George Washington University-led national collaborative network aimed at improving outcomes for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder will receive more than $11.7 million from the National Institutes of Health over the next five years to help propel innovative research in the field. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Red wine could HELP you get pregnant
Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine in the US examined the effect of alcohol on fertility because previous findings were ‘conflicting’. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Large declines seen in teen substance abuse, delinquency
(Washington University School of Medicine) Survey data indicate that in recent years, teens have become far less likely to abuse alcohol, nicotine and illicit drugs, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Teens also are less likely to engage in behaviors like fighting and stealing, and the researchers believe the declines in substance use and delinquency are connected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cells' mechanical memory could hold clues to cancer metastasis
(Washington University in St. Louis) In the body, cells move around to form organs during development; to heal wounds; and when they metastasize from cancerous tumors. A mechanical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis found that cells remember the properties they had in their first environment for several days after they move to another in a process called mechanical memory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Older Neandertal survived with a little help from his friends
(Washington University in St. Louis) An older Neandertal from about 50,000 years ago, who had suffered multiple injuries and other degenerations, became deaf and must have relied on the help of others to avoid prey and survive well into his 40s, indicates a new analysis published Oct. 20 in the online journal PLoS ONE. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Washington University gets $3.7 million to study neurological disorders
Washington University has received $3.7 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health to study neurological disorders linked to manganese, an element found in smoke from steel production and coal fires. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 16, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Angela Mueller Source Type: news

Portable 3-D scanner assesses patients with elephantiasis
(Washington University in St. Louis) An estimated 120 million people worldwide are infected with lymphatic filariasis, a parasitic, mosquito-borne disease that can cause major swelling and deformity of the legs, a condition known as elephantiasis. Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that a portable scanning device can measure limb enlargement and disfigurement faster and more easily in patients with elephantiasis. The research tool makes it easy to obtain accurate measurements and determine whether treatments to reduce swelling are effective. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NIH awards almost $10 million to UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment
The National Institutes of Health, recognizing UCLA ’s leadership in understanding and developing interventions for autism spectrum disorder, has renewed its support of the UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment with a five-year, $9.7 million grant.The Autism Center of Excellence grant is directed by Susan Bookheimer, director of the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center at UCLA. It supports research projects led by autism experts Mirella Dapretto, Dr. Shafali Jeste, Connie Kasari, Elizabeth Laugeson, Dr. Daniel Geschwind and Dr. Jim McCracken.“This renewed support will allow UCLA t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers create map of the gut's microbial landscape
(Forsyth Institute) A collaborative effort by a team of researchers from three institutions including the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, the Forsyth Institute in Cambridge and Washington University in St. Louis provided an early glimpse of how microbial communities in the gut -- known collectively as the gut microbiome -- are spatially organized, uncovering a surprising degree of mixing among different bacterial members. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study casts doubt on warming implications of brown carbon aerosol from wildfires
(Washington University in St. Louis) As devastating wildfires rage in California wine country, a team of environmental engineers at Washington University in St. Louis have made a new discovery about wildfire smoke, and its effect on the atmosphere. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

US ’ George Washington University to conduct Zika virus trial in Brazil
The George Washington University (GW) School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) in the US is set to conduct the clinical trial of an investigational vaccine for prevention of the Zika infection in Brazil. (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - October 10, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Alzheimer's gene poses both risk -- and benefits
(Washington University School of Medicine) Scientists studying the molecular roots of Alzheimer's disease have encountered a good news/bad news scenario. The bad news is that in the early stages of the disease, high-risk TREM2 variants can hobble the immune system's ability to protect the brain from amyloid beta. The good news, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is that later in the disease, the absence of TREM2 protein seems to protect the brain from damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GW research team brings Zika virus vaccine clinical trial to Brazil site
(George Washington University) A research team at GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences awarded over $2 million to participate in Zika vaccine trial in Brazil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 9, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

GW researcher receives more than $2.3 million to study cocaine's influence on HIV
(George Washington University) Following studies showing that cocaine influences the transcription and replication of HIV, Mudit Tyagi, PhD, at GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, will lead a team researching the underlying mechanisms of that influence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Specific gut microbes found to prevent influenza by "digesting" flavonoids found in superfoods
(Natural News) Scientists behind the latest nutritional review on gut microbiomes and flavonoids call their results “intriguing” after observing an unusual connection between the two. The description was made after observing that a specific gut microbe directly influenced how naturally-occurring compounds called flavonoids impacted our immune system. Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Text messaging program may help pregnant women kick the smoking habit
(George Washington University) An intensive text messaging program provides some pregnant women help in fighting the urge to light up a smoke (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news