IJERPH, Vol. 17, Pages 4921: Allergic Anaphylactic Risk in Farming Activities: A Systematic Review

IJERPH, Vol. 17, Pages 4921: Allergic Anaphylactic Risk in Farming Activities: A Systematic Review International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph17144921 Authors: Giulio Arcangeli Veronica Traversini Emanuela Tomasini Antonio Baldassarre Luigi Isaia Lecca Raymond P. Galea Nicola Mucci Allergic disorders in the agriculture sector are very common among farm workers, causing many injuries and occupational diseases every year. Agricultural employees are exposed to multiple conditions and various allergenic substances, which could be related to onset of anaphylactic reactions. This systematic review highlights the main clinical manifestation, the allergens that are mostly involved and the main activities that are usually involved. This research includes articles published on the major databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, Scopus), using a combination of keywords. The online search yielded 489 references; after selection, by the authors, 36 articles (nine reviews and 27 original articles) were analyzed. From this analysis, the main clinical problems that were diagnosed in this category were respiratory (ranging from rhinitis to asthma) and dermatological (eczema, dermatitis, hives) in nature, with a wide symptomatology (from a simple local reaction to anaphylaxis). The main activities associated with these allergic conditions are harvesting or cultivation of fruit and cereals, beekeepers and people working in greenhouses. Fi...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research

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Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
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Source: Clinical and Translational Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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