How Can Parents Help Teach Generation Z Teens about Living in Uncertain Times?  

The prolonged health and safety stressors of COVID-19 has many parents reaching out to mental health professionals with concern over their teenagers’ increased levels of anxiety. In the United States, teenagers already experience higher rates of anxiety disorders than any previous generation in history. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, the prevalence of anxiety disorders among adolescents aged 13-18 is 31.9%, with females at a higher rate (38%) than males (26.1%). Some teen anxiety is normal due to typical teen life stressors, including friends and family dynamics, self-identity, body image, achievement, and college admission. However, these stressors are heavily impacted by COVID-19, with added challenges brought on by distance learning, the disruption of the college process, and shelter-in-place orders disconnecting Generation Z teens from their vital in-person relationships. The result has high school seniors feeling robbed of their teenage memories with the hallmarks of their high school experience all but canceled. On the other hand, freshman high school students worry if the effects of the pandemic will allow them to have a “normal” high school experience at all. Living in these uncertain times, should parents be concerned that Generation Z’s mental health wellness has become increasingly fragile? One of the unique stress factors Generation Z faces is that teenagers today have, unfortunately, grown up in a heightened state ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Children and Teens Parenting Child Development Coping Skills coronavirus COVID-19 Emotional Development pandemic Uncertainty Source Type: blogs

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The COVID-19 pandemic has been stressful for all of us, and this includes our youngest children. It’s easy, and tempting, to think that infants, toddlers, and preschoolers aren’t affected by the pandemic. The truth is, though, that that life has changed for them, too — and for some of them it has changed dramatically. Even if the change is mostly positive for them — such as having their parents home all the time — it’s still a change that can be confusing and unsettling. Young children are less able to understand the nuances of all of this; for them, the world truly is all about them. An...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Children's Health Parenting Source Type: blogs
COVID-19 and its associated quarantine have messed with pretty much every aspect of our lives. Work time, meal time, family time, play time; our moods, our stress level, our tolerance; our ability to spend so much as one more minute staring at the same four walls of the same den or living room or home office in which we spend most of our days. And if you’re like plenty of people, the quarantine has also completely bollixed up your sleep cycle, wrecking what might have been the most predictable and peaceful eight hours of your day. Unless, that is, you’re like plenty of other people—and the quarantine has ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
We examined the associations between psychological distress and changes in selected health behaviors since the onset of COVID-19 in Australia. An online survey was distributed in April 2020 and included measures of depression, anxiety, stress, physical activity, sleep, alcohol intake and cigarette smoking. The survey was completed by 1491 adults (mean age 50.5 ± 14.9 years, 67% female). Negative change was reported for physical activity (48.9%), sleep (40.7%), alcohol (26.6%) and smoking (6.9%) since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Significantly higher scores in one or more psychological distress states were...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
According to this study, green spaces are restorative and boost attention, while viewing concrete worsens attention during tasks. Finding a forest therapy guide The Association of Nature and Forest Therapy trains and certifies forest therapy guides across the world. Guides help people forge a partnership with nature through a series of invitations that allow participants to become attentive to the forest, to deepen their relationship with nature, and allow the natural world to promote healing and well-being. Ultimately, guides support what the forests have to offer us, inviting participants into practices that deepen physi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Exercise and Fitness Health Mental Health Stress Source Type: blogs
The global novel coronavirus pandemic afflicting everyone is showing mixed signs of activity. In some countries it appears to be easing, while in others it appears to be experiencing a resurgence. It’s not at all clear when the pandemic will end, but it’s unlikely to do so before 2021. What has become increasingly clear is that the toll of the pandemic will impact more than the people who come down with COVID-19. The mental health impact of living with a pandemic is being mostly ignored — for now. But as the deaths continue to rise, we need to pay close attention to the cost of the pandemic’s reperc...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy coronavirus COVID-19 Source Type: blogs
The media we consume daily has an impact on our thinking, behavior, and emotions. If you’ve fallen into a pattern of regularly watching or listening to the news, the majority of what you’re consuming is likely about the coronavirus crisis. While staying up to date on local and national news, especially as it relates to mandates and health updates, is critical during this time, experts say over-consumption of the news can take a toll on your physical, emotional, and mental health. With that in mind, the goal is to find the balance between feeling informed and educated on the situation at hand while not becoming...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Self-Help anxiety coronavirus COVID-19 News Media pandemic stress reduction Source Type: blogs
Driving around her Kearney, Missouri neighborhood is both respite and torture for Kathie Hodgson. She likes seeing other people out and about; it reminds her what life was like before COVID-19. But Hodgson, a 41-year-old teacher who lives alone after a recent divorce, says seeing happy families playing in their yards or walking their dogs can also send her plunging deep into a spiral of loneliness. “You know, as much as I have valued my independence in the past year, it’s finally hitting me that I would like to curl up on the couch with somebody at night,” Hodgson says. The irony, Hodgson says, is she wa...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
The kind of trauma doctors, nurses, and others in direct contact with COVID-19 patients have endured for months now — with an uncertain future posing a threat of many more months of horror in the hardest-hit areas — is the kind of exhausting and overwhelming stress that impacts the brain and the rest of the body in the worst ways. Whether or not these individuals were mentally healthy before the pandemic, this work takes an often-invisible toll. Sometimes, in a life and death struggle, that toll becomes a pull toward suicide. Compassionate Fatigue, also called Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS), can happen when p...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Trauma Compassionate Fatigue coronavirus COVID-19 Healthcare Workers Secondary Traumatic Stress Source Type: blogs
As lockdowns drag on and on in many U.S. states, there are worrying signs that people’s resolve to continue social distancing is flagging. An illicit house party in Chicago made headlines this week, as did photos of crowded beaches in Southern California and packed parks in New York City. Anonymized cell-phone data tracked by the University of Maryland also shows more and more people are making non-work-related trips outside as quarantines drag on, and a TIME data analysis found that some states are experiencing new surges in coronavirus cases after initial declines. Jacqueline Gollan, an associate professor of psyc...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is commonly linked with war veterans. This mental health condition however can be triggered by suffering or witnessing any terrifying event like accidents, natural disasters,  violent experience – or a disastrous pandemic. It comes as no surprise that medical health professionals and other people in the frontline of the fight against coronavirus are expected to have a surge in trauma-related illnesses, particularly PTSD. Beside protecting and helping personnel physically as well as mentally, there are also digital health solutions that can come to the rescue. A Canadian r...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Telemedicine & Smartphones Virtual Reality digital health ptsd stress stress management medical professionals digital healthcare coronavirus covid covid19 Source Type: blogs
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