12 Ways Yoga Meditation Helps Nourish The Body, Brain and Mind

An easy, low cost, natural practice can help us boost our brain power, be healthier and more spiritually attuned as we age, and improve our quality of life and happiness. It could also reduce some of the staggering health care costs seen today. Curious about what that practice is? Recently The Alzheimer’s Research and Prevention Foundation (ARPF), of which I’m the founding president and medical director, presented a summary of our innovative yoga meditation research at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Boston. For the past 12 years, the ARPF has organized, helped design, and fund innovative research on a simple 12-minute singing yoga meditation called Kirtan Kriya (KK). This work has specifically focused on reducing risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease and the enhancement of total brain fitness. To determine the benefits, these studies included well-recognized methods to measure aspects of brain health and brain scans such as SPECT and fMRI, as well as sophisticated memory and blood tests. What are the results so far? What are the documented body, brain and mind benefits from this type of yoga meditation? 1. Increased telomerase: Telomerase is the enzyme that controls the length of your telomeres, the cap of your DNA. Longer telomeres equal better health. Shorter telomeres equal Alzheimer’s disease and accelerated aging and a shortened life. An increase of 44 percent in telomerase was shown in a study on highly stressed care...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neurologists Authors: Tags: Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Alzheimers-disease brain-power cerebral blood flow cognitive-decline depression improve sleep Kirtan-Kriya meditation memory-loss memory-tests neurotransmitters Prevent-Alzheimers Source Type: blogs

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There are a number of things that can increase the risk of dementia: age, of course, as well as certain genetic profiles and behaviors such as smoking and drinking. Some of the same things that contribute to heart disease, such as high cholesterol levels and the build up of plaques in the blood vessels, can also boost the chances of developing dementia. And in a large study published in JAMA Internal Medicine conducted in the UK, researchers report another possible factor: a group of drugs known as anticholinergics. These include prescription medications for treating depression, pulmonary disease, and Parkinson’s, as...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Brain Dementia Drugs Source Type: news
ConclusionsDifferent patterns of sleep disturbances are observed in HD patients: insomnia, difficulties in falling asleep, frequent nocturnal awakenings, and excessive daytime sleepiness are the most common sleep problems reported by patients with HD. In several HD studies, specific changes in sleep architecture and in circadian melatonin secretion were identified in laboratory testing.Sleep disorders in HD have diverse and complex determinants, the most significant of which includes damage to brain areas that are responsible for the proper sleep pattern and circadian rhythm regulation. Sleep and circadian rhythm disorders...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
The study found that 91.7% of caregivers suffer from poor sleep and that this can lead to depression, heart disease, and premature death.By Alzheimer's Reading RoomThe study suggests that sleep quality for family caregivers of individuals with dementia varies considerably from night to night.Understanding the complex interrelationships among caregivers ’ sleep and other contributing variablesis an important first step toward the development of individualized and effective treatment strategies.What is the Difference Between Alzheimer ’s and DementiaThe GistThe study aimed to identify factors related to family ca...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's Alzheimer's family alzheimers care Alzheimers Dementia care of dementia patients caregiving statistics Family Caregivers help alzheimer's help with dementia care sleep Source Type: blogs
According to the Alzheimer’s Association, “Today, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s every 65 seconds. By mid-century, someone in the United States will develop the disease every 33 seconds.” To date, there is no cure regarding this most common form of dementia, which affects nearly all individuals worldwide regardless of race, or socioeconomic status, a trend that continues to grow at a disturbingly alarming rate. Scientists however are close to identifying contributing factors that may hinder or help the progression of this illness in the long run. Listed below are the top 5 f...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Aging Alzheimer's Health-related Memory and Perception Stress Alzheimer's disease Memory Loss Source Type: blogs
By SHANNON HALLOWAY &MELISSA KALENSKY A patient walked into clinic wearing only a hospital gown, feet bare and EKG wires trailing. Just hours after having surgery, his dementia had prompted him to wander out of the hospital and walk two miles to proudly show off his new surgical scar to a familiar face. Physically unharmed, his heart was easy to fix but his memory was beyond repair. Though the road to a cure has long seemed insurmountable, dementia advocates have recently found reason to celebrate. Scientists announced this week the development of a new tool that may help identify people who are prone to Alzheimer&rsqu...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Dementia prevention Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, documentation is important, a critical part of advocacy and the development process at the larger scale. It isn't just words, but rather a vital structural flow of information from one part of the larger community to another, necessary to sustain progress in any complex field. We would all do well to remember this - and to see that building this documentation is an activity in which we can all pitch in to help. Evidence Suggests that, at Least in Earlier Stages, Alzheimer's Disease Blocks Rather than Destroys Memories https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/07/evidence-suggests-that-at-least-in-ea...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Pain, memory problems and nicotine addiction are formidable problems that have quite different consequences. But in terms of what’s happening in the brain that causes people to suffer from each, they share a close connection. And now scientists say one drug might be able to help people with all three of these problems. Estimates suggest 2 million people in the U.S. suffered from an opioid abuse disorder in 2015 (the most recent year with data available), about 5 million Americans are currently living with Alzheimer’s disease and more than 36 million Americans are currently cigarette smokers (more than half of w...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion This early stage experimental research has demonstrated a beneficial neurological effect of trazodone and dibenzoylmethane on mice with diseases mimicking neurodegenerative diseases. It is important to acknowledge that this is animal research and therefore the drugs might not have the same effect when they are trialled on humans. That being said, trazodone is already an approved drug for depression and sleep problems and has therefore already passed safety tests. If the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in humans and mice are similar, it is possible trazodone could be used in the future in treating Alzheimer's and...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Older people Neurology Medication Source Type: news
This study is still epidemiological data, Heisz noted ― which means it shows a link between sedentary behavior and dementia risk, but doesn’t necessarily explain how one leads to the other. But taken with previous research that has linked physical activity is to lower dementia risk, the results are fairly convincing, she added. This study included a large number of individuals, it followed those individuals for five years and it controlled for other dementia risk factors, including age, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, high blood pressure, depression and smoking.  More studies are needed to identify what types...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
If the Lewy bodies are found in the neurons that make up the cerebral cortex, the gray outside covering of the brain, then the person has Lewy body dementia.By Rita Jablonski-JaudonAlzheimer's Reading RoomFirst, let me address the word “dementia.”Dementia is a general word that describes a person who is losing his or her memory over time. Alzheimer ’s Disease and Lewy Body areTYPES of dementia, just like Labrador or beagle are types of dogs.Alzheimer ’s disease can occur in people younger than 60, and this type of AD is labelled as early onset AD.Coping with DementiaPersons who have AD havePROGRESSI...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's care ’s dementia dementia and caregivers dementia care Lewy Body Dementia lewy body dementia definition lewy body dementia symptoms memory care facility Source Type: blogs
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