Global Evolution of Pathogenic Bacteria With Extensive Use of Fluoroquinolone Agents

It is well-established that the spread of many multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria is predominantly clonal. Interestingly the international clones/sequence types (STs) of most pathogens emerged and disseminated during the last three decades. Strong experimental evidence from multiple laboratories indicate that diverse fitness cost associated with high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones contributed to the selection and promotion of the international clones/STs of hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA), extended-spectrum β-lactamase-(ESBL)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and Clostridioides difficile. The overwhelming part of the literature investigating the epidemiology of the pathogens as a function of fluoroquinolone use remain in concordence with these findings. Moreover, recent in vitro data clearly show the potential of fluoroquinolone exposure to shape the clonal evolution of Salmonella Enteritidis. The success of the international clones/STs in all these species was linked to the strains’ unique ability to evolve multiple energetically beneficial gyrase and topoisomerase IV mutations conferring high-level resistance to fluorquinolones and concomittantly permitting the acquisition of an extra resistance gene load without evoking appreciable fitness cost. Furthermore, by analyzing the clonality of multiple species, the review highlights, that in environments under high antibiotic exposure virul...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research

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Authors: Reissier S, Cattoir V Abstract INTRODUCTION: Streptogramins (pristinamycin and quinupristin-dalfopristin) can be interesting options for the treatment of infections due to Gram-positive cocci, especially multidrug-resistant isolates. AREAS COVERED: This review provides an updated overview on structural and activity characteristics, mechanisms of action and resistance, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and clinical use of streptogramins. EXPERT OPINION: The streptogramin antibiotics act by inhibition of the bacterial protein synthesis. They are composed of two chemically distinct compounds, namely typ...
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Xyloglucan/gelose plus ORS was effective and safe in treating acute diarrhea in children. PMID: 33028102 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol Source Type: research
Conclusions: (1) Data at our center suggests at least a regional implementation gap in GBS screening and IAP. (2) The decline in the resistance rate ofE. coli for all antimicrobial substances might indicate that the reduction of prenatal antibiotics use is beneficial and that neonatal antibiotic stewardship programs should include pregnant women as well.What is Known:• GBS screening and intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis led to a 32%-reduction in GBS disease in Germany with a 0.75 (92:122) ratio of early-onset disease to late-onset disease in 2009–2010.• Prenatal antibiotic use might increase the risk of E....
Source: European Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
This study investigated antibacterial-producing Streptomyces isolated from the gut of estuarine fish Chanos chanos, emphasizing screening for the producer of peptide-containing antibacterial compounds. Eighteen isolates were found during preliminary screening, in which four isolates showed the best antibacterial activities. Based on the morphological, physiological, and biochemical characterization, as well as 16S rRNA partial sequencing, all of the four isolates belonged to Streptomyces. Three isolates were suspected as novel isolate candidates based on homology presentations and phylogenetic tree analysis. Disk-diffusion...
Source: International Journal of Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Tags: Int J Microbiol Source Type: research
Authors: Eve A, Aliero AA, Nalubiri D, Adeyemo RO, Akinola SA, Pius T, Nabaasa S, Nabukeera S, Alkali B, Ntulume I Abstract The current upsurge in resistance to conventional antibiotics, as well as high cost of orthodox medical treatment, called for the use of medicinal plants as an alternative therapy. This research was aimed at determining the antibacterial activity of Artocarpus heterophyllus seed extracts (Jackfruit as it is locally called) in the treatment of diarrhoea. Ethanolic and hexanolic seed crude extracts of the plant were screened for antidiarrhoeal activity against bacteria isolated from clinical sam...
Source: The Scientific World Journal - Category: Science Tags: ScientificWorldJournal Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to identify and isolate lactic acid bacterial (LAB) strains from the intestinal tracts of pigs and feces of dogs and then characterize them as potential probiotics with antimicrobial activity against multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. In a preliminary isolation screening, 45 of 1167 isolated LAB strains were found to have anti-S. aureus ATCC 27,735 activity. Using 16S rDNA and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region (ISR) sequences, five of these isolates were further identified as Lactobacillus animalis 30a-2, Lactobacillus reuteri 4-12E, Weissella cibaria C34, Lactococcus lactis 5-12H,...
Source: Archives of Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Arch Microbiol Source Type: research
Cosmeri Rizzato1, Javier Torres2, Elena Kasamatsu3, Margarita Camorlinga-Ponce2, Maria Mercedes Bravo4, Federico Canzian5 and Ikuko Kato6* 1Department of Translation Research and of New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy 2Unidad de Investigación en Enfermedades Infecciosas, Unidades Médicas de Alta Especialidad Pediatría, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico City, Mexico 3Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud, National University of Asunción, Asunción, Paraguay 4Grupo de Investigación en Biología del C&aacut...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
François Chassagne1†, Xinyi Huang1†, James T. Lyles1 and Cassandra L. Quave1,2* 1Center for the Study of Human Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States 2Department of Dermatology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States In the search for new therapeutic solutions to address an increasing number of multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens, secondary metabolites from plants have proven to be a rich source of antimicrobial compounds. Ginkgo biloba, a tree native to China, has been spread around the world as an ornamental tree. Its seeds have been used as snacks and medical mater...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Mariana Girão1,2, Inês Ribeiro1, Tiago Ribeiro1, Isabel C. Azevedo1, Filipe Pereira1, Ralph Urbatzka1, Pedro N. Leão1 and Maria F. Carvalho1* 1Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal 2Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal Nature is the major reservoir of biologically active molecules. The urgent need of finding novel molecules for pharmaceutical application is prompting the research of underexplored environments, such as marine ecosystems. Here, we investigated cultivable actinobacteria asso...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
The World Health Organization is issuing a warning about a group of deadly bacteria: Recently, the WHO released its first-ever list of “priority pathogens,” a list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that the organization says pose the greatest threat to human health. The list is divided into three categories: critical-, high- and medium-priority. Three pathogens made it into the critical-priority group. These bacteria are resistant to multiple antibiotics and pose a high risk to people in hospitals and nursing homes, the WHO says. Multidrug-resistant bacteria, sometimes called “superbugs,” are a ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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