Better Methods for Clinical Studies in Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology: An ESCMID Hands-on Workshop
Date: Monday, August 13, 2018Year: 2018Location: Seville, SpainContent-type: current_conferences (Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - August 13, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: BethBradshaw Source Type: news

It ’s Not Yet Clear How to Boost the Microbiome. But Diet Is the Best Bet
The gut microbiome—the billions of bacteria that live inside the human digestive tract—is the focus of some of today’s most exciting and compelling medical research. Studies have linked microbiome-related imbalances to health conditions ranging from depression and Parkinson’s disease to heart disease. Some researchers have even started referring to the microbiome as a “forgotten organ” because of the indispensable role it plays in human health. It’s fairly clear that the foods a person eats—or doesn’t eat—can affect the composition of his or her microbiome. Resear...
Source: TIME: Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

Product Quest Manufacturing LLC Issues Voluntary Nationwide Recall of CVS Health 12 Hour Sinus Relief Nasal Mist Due to Microbiological Contamination
Holly Hill, FL, Product Quest Manufacturing ( “Product Quest”) is voluntarily recalling Lot# 173089J of CVS Health 12 Hour Sinus Relief Nasal Mist, a clear, colorless liquid, to the consumer level. The product was found to have had microbiological contamination identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - August 8, 2018 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Ozone application as adjunctive therapy in chronic periodontitis: Clinical, microbiological and biochemical aspects
ConclusionWithin the limitations of this study, adjunctive ozone therapy did not provide additional benefits to clinical, microbiological and biochemical parameters over SRP in chronic periodontitis patients. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - August 8, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Lower Respiratory Multiplex Panels for the Detection of Bacterial and Viral Infections
Development of commercial multiplex panels for the detection and diagnosis of lower respiratory tract infections is rapidly progressing, and FDA-cleared assays are currently available. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current or soon-to-be available commercial assays, focusing on their analytical performance, advantages, and challenges and the potential impact on patient outcomes when laboratories deploy the assays. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 4, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Kevin Alby, Stephanie L. Mitchell Source Type: news

Mycobacterium bovis Infection in a Human in Malaysia
Mycobacterium bovis is a zoonotic microorganism that can be transmitted to humans by ingestion and inhalation and, less frequently, by direct contact through mucous membranes and broken skin. Clinically, tuberculosis (TB) caused by M. bovis in humans is indistinguishable from TB caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). Specific diagnosis of Mycobacterium infection may be achieved only by using a series of laboratory tests, including mycobacterial growth characteristics, biochemical properties, susceptibility to pyrazinamide (PZA), and molecular methods. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 4, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Siti Suraiya, Nur Izzah Farakhin Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

A special invitation to Authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 4, 2018 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

New DxM MicroScan WalkAway System Uses Direct Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations
The DxM MicroScan WalkAway System is designed for bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing in microbiology laboratories. The units are used in applications where laboratories seek to improve patient care. DxM MicroScan offers gold-standard MIC accuracy that helps the laboratories to reduce costs related to confirmatory- or offline-testing. The system comes with latest fluid-level sensing technology external LED indicators and quick bottle release.This story is related to the following:Biomedical Test Equipment (Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies)
Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies - August 2, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Source Type: news

Bacteria becoming resistant to hospital disinfectants, warn scientists
The alcohol-based handrubs that hospitals use to prevent infection are becoming less effective, research has shownHospitals will need to use new strategies to tackle bacteria experts have warned, after finding a type of hospital superbug is becoming increasingly tolerant of alcohol – the key component of current disinfectant hand rubs.Handwashes based on alcohols such as isopropanol have become commonplace as a method of infection control. But while the move has been linked to benefits, including a fall in rates of hospital infections of methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA), new research suggests it migh...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: MRSA and superbugs Medical research Health Science Society Microbiology Source Type: news

Emergent simplicity in microbial community assembly
A major unresolved question in microbiome research is whether the complex taxonomic architectures observed in surveys of natural communities can be explained and predicted by fundamental, quantitative principles. Bridging theory and experiment is hampered by the multiplicity of ecological processes that simultaneously affect community assembly in natural ecosystems. We addressed this challenge by monitoring the assembly of hundreds of soil- and plant-derived microbiomes in well-controlled minimal synthetic media. Both the community-level function and the coarse-grained taxonomy of the resulting communities are highly predi...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Goldford, J. E., Lu, N., Bajic, D., Estrela, S., Tikhonov, M., Sanchez-Gorostiaga, A., Segre, D., Mehta, P., Sanchez, A. Tags: Ecology, Microbiology r-articles Source Type: news

Interchanging species of similar function
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Ecology, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Computer simulations predict the spread of HIV
(DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory) In a recently published study in the journal Nature Microbiology, researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory show that computer simulations can accurately predict the transmission of HIV across populations, which could aid in preventing the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers turn powerful, viscous disinfectants into breathable mist for the first time
(University of California - San Diego) A team of San Diego researchers have developed a device that diffuses potent disinfectants for airborne delivery. The device works on a range of disinfectants that have never been atomized before, such as Triethylene glycol, or TEG. In the August issue of Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, the team used the device to atomize disinfectants onto environmental surfaces contaminated with bacteria and showed that it eliminated 100 percent of bacteria that commonly cause hospital-acquired infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New chair for uk neqas for microbiology steering committee
(Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - July 27, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: GAtherton Source Type: news

Sticky bacteria tolerated as future food
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 26, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Lectins modulate the microbiota of social amoebae
The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum maintains a microbiome during multicellular development; bacteria are carried in migrating slugs and as endosymbionts within amoebae and spores. Bacterial carriage and endosymbiosis are induced by the secreted lectin discoidin I that binds bacteria, protects them from extracellular killing, and alters their retention within amoebae. This altered handling of bacteria also occurs with bacteria coated by plant lectins and leads to DNA transfer from bacteria to amoebae. Thus, lectins alter the cellular response of D. discoideum to bacteria to establish the amoebae’s microbiome. ...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 26, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Dinh, C., Farinholt, T., Hirose, S., Zhuchenko, O., Kuspa, A. Tags: Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Report from the leech's gut: Even trace amounts of antibiotics boost resistant bacteria
(American Society for Microbiology) An international team of researchers recently took a deep dive into the microbiome of blood-sucking medicinal leeches and made a surprising observation: low levels of antibiotics in the animal's environment improved the survival of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in its gut. Those resistant bacteria, in turn, displaced healthy bacteria. The findings, published this week in mBio, could help explain why antibiotic resistant infections have been found in patients who undergo medicinal leech therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antibiotic resistance in a leech's gut
(University of Connecticut) Plastic surgery patients were getting infections with antibiotic resistant bacteria, and no one knew why. UConn microbiologists found the answer in a leech's gut. Their research, published today in mBio, provides proof that tiny levels of antibiotics found in the environment can encourage bacterial resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 24, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Short Takes
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) have released a new report on the research agenda for indoor microbiology, human health, and buildings. The report Microbiomes of the Built Environment examines the current knowledge in the research on indoor environments, examples of knowledge gaps, and new tools that may facilitate the understanding of ecosystems in built environments, in order to better predict and manage indoor interactions of humans with microorganisms and design healthy and sustainable buildings. Read the report here: http://nas-sites.org/builtmicrobiome/    &nbs...
Source: Public Policy Reports - July 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Avoiding the Headache: Laboratory Considerations for Implementation, Utilization, and Interpretation of Multiplex Molecular Panels for the Diagnosis of Meningitis and Encephalitis, Part II
Meningitis and encephalitis are infections of the central nervous system (CNS) that can range in severity from mild and self-limiting to severe and life threatening. These infections can be caued by a number of bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens. Appropriate management of these infections is dependent upon an accurate and rapid identification of the infecting organism. Despite diagnostic advances with improved detection and turnaround time, currently, the etiological pathogen in central nervous system infections is identified in only 30 to 50% of symptomatic patients. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - July 21, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Blake W. Buchan Source Type: news

Rhodococcus equi Pulmonary Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient: Case Report and Literature Review
We present a case of R. equi lung abscess in a 49-year-old immunocompromised male who was on long-term corticosteroid therapy. The patient recovered soon after he was treated with vancomycin and imipenem. The identification of R. equi is often difficult, because it closely resembles other bacterial pathogens, such as diphtheroids and Mycobacterium and Nocardia species. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - July 21, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Zeti Norfidiyati Salmuna, Wan Amani Wan Abdul Azim, Azian Harun Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

Do YOU leave the toilet seat up when you flush? Be warned!
Charles Gerba, a professor of microbiology at the University of Arizona, said: 'You get a good spray out of the toilet area.' This is known as the 'aerosol effect' to some scientists. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Better methods improve measurements of recreational water quality
(American Society for Microbiology) The concentration of enterococci, bacteria that thrive in feces, has long been the federal standard for determining water quality. Researchers have now shown that the greatest influences on that concentration are the quantity of mammalian feces in the water, and the numbers of enterococci that glom onto floating particulate matter. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Avoiding the Headache: Laboratory Considerations for Implementation, Utilization, and Interpretation of Multiplex Molecular Panels for the Diagnosis of Meningitis and Encephalitis, Part I
Meningitis and encephalitis are infections of the central nervous system (CNS) that can range in severity from mild and self-limiting to severe and life threatening. These infections can be caused by a number of bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens. Appropriate management of these infections is dependent upon an accurate and rapid identification of the infecting organism. Despite diagnostic advances with improved detection and turnaround time, currently, the etiological pathogen in central nervous system infections is identified in only 30 to 50% of symptomatic patients. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - July 11, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Blake W. Buchan Source Type: news

A special invitation to Authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - July 11, 2018 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Tampa medical firm sells clinical research arm
Point Guard Partners has sold its Oculos Clinical Research subsidiary to iuvo BioScience in Rush, New York. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed in a press release announcing the transaction. Oculos is a partner research organization focused on ophthalmology, while iuvo is a research and development services company specializing in safety, microbiology, toxicology and analytical chemistry tes ting for the medical device and pharmaceutical industries. The deal will allow each organization… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 10, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Margie Manning Source Type: news

Nominations Sought for EPA Science Advisory Board
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is inviting nominations of scientific experts to serve on its Science Advisory Board (SAB). SAB is a chartered Federal Advisory Committee that provides independent scientific advice and recommendations to the EPA Administrator on a range of science and research programs. SAB is seeking experts in the following scientific disciplines: Analytical chemistry; benefit-cost analysis; causal inference; complex systems; ecological sciences and ecological assessment; economics; engineering; geochemistry; health sciences; hydrology; hydrogeology; medicine; microbiology; modeling; pediatric...
Source: Public Policy Reports - July 9, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Research suggests new vaccine candidates for malaria
(American Society for Microbiology) Researchers have shown that higher levels of Plasmodium falciparum antibodies are protective against severe malaria in children living in Papua New Guinea. Children who have higher levels of antibodies to a specific short amino acid sequence in the malaria parasite, P. falciparum, have much lower rates of clinical and severe malaria. This amino acid sequence, an antigen, is similar among P. falciparum strains elsewhere in the world, suggesting that this antigen would make a good target for a malaria vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research points to potential shortcoming of antibiotic lab tests
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) To determine which antibiotics reliably treat which bacterial infections, diagnostic laboratories that focus on clinical microbiology test pathogens isolated from patients. However, a recent study out of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reveals that one aspect of these tests may fall short and not be stringent enough. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 6, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Central Venous Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Caused by Brevibacterium casei in a Hematology Patient
We report a case of B. casei catheter-related bacteremia in a severely immunocompromised hematology patient. Our experience and data from other reported cases indicate that hematology patients with indwelling catheters are at increased risk for infection with unusual bacterial pathogens. These unusual pathogens should be identified accurately, especially in immunocompromised patients. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - June 29, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Giorgio Piccinelli, Enrico Morello, Valeria Cancelli, Alessandro Turra, Michele Malagola, Giuseppe Ravizzola, Francesca Caccuri, Domenico Russo, Arnaldo Caruso, Maria Antonia De Francesco Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

Direct Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Clinical Specimens Using Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests
Tuberculosis continues to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly in clinical specimens using nucleic acid amplification tests enables infected patients to be placed on appropriate therapy much sooner than when results of conventional culture methods are used. The availability of rapid results also facilitates infection control measures to interrupt transmission of tuberculosis in healthcare settings. The era of commercially available molecular diagnostics for detection of M. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - June 29, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Ellen Jo Baron, Fred C. Tenover, Devasena Gnanashanmugam Source Type: news

Simple sampling method eases identification of foot and mouth disease outbreaks
(American Society for Microbiology) Sampling the environment is an effective way to detect foot and mouth disease, according to a paper published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

IDSA/ASM lab diagnosis guide helps health care providers
(Infectious Diseases Society of America) Advances in rapid molecular testing mean infectious diseases can be accurately diagnosed in minutes or hours rather than days or weeks and patients can receive appropriate treatment sooner. A guide released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and American Society for Microbiology (ASM) helps health care providers keep up with the latest technology and know what tests to order and when. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blavatnik Family Foundation and New York Academy of Sciences Announce...
Three Blavatnik National Laureates—including a microbiologist from the Salk Institute, a nanoscientist from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and a chemical biologist from the University of California,...(PRWeb June 27, 2018)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/06/prweb15588314.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - June 27, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

UCLA researchers develop synthetic T cells that mimic form, function of human version
This study was funded by the National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research. The authors report no commercial conflicts of interest. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 26, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Report Warns About Misuse of Synthetic Biology
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Mathematics (NASEM) have released a new report on how the misuse of synthetic biology could potentially expand the creation of new weapons. Although synthetic biology is being used to treat diseases, improve agricultural productivity, and remediate pollution by engineering and creating organisms, the report titled “Biodefense in the Age of Synthetic Biology” warns about the malicious applications of synthetic biology that could become achievable in the near future. “In and of itself, synthetic biology is not harmful. The level of concern depends on the...
Source: Public Policy Reports - June 25, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Microbiologists and plant scientists find secret to tackling cholera
(Michigan State University) While cholera rages across many regions of the world, a team of microbiologists and plant scientists has pinpointed a genetic weakness in the pandemic's armor, which could lead to future treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 25, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Aimee Shen of Tufts Medical School granted PATH award from Burroughs Wellcome Fund
(Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus) Microbiologist Aimee Shen of Tufts University School of Medicine has received a prestigious 2018 Investigator in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease award from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund for her research on C. difficile. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 25, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists aim to stop the devastation of Zika-like pandemics
Killer viruses can ravage countries, but now a new project hopes to spot diseases likely to jump from animals to humansFor several months, health workers have been battling to contain anEbola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. A total of 60 cases, 28 of them fatal, have been reported around the town of Mbandaka, though authorities say the outbreak is now under control.Politicians, nevertheless, remain nervous. Thousands died in theWest African Ebola outbreak of 2014 after the virus – which probably spread from infected animals, such as fruit bats – triggered widespread cases of severe, sometimes ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science editor Tags: Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Ebola Zika virus Sars Science Health Society World news Africa China Source Type: news

Can you catch germs from a public toilet seat? Scientist on whether it's really worth squatting
Primrose Freestone, a Senior Lecturer in Clinical Microbiology at the University of Leicester, explains what scientists know about the art of squatting over a toilet. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson hits the Big Apple with latest JLabs site
Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) opened its latest life science incubator in New York City, the healthcare giant said today. The 30,000-square-foot JLabs @ NYC is a collaboration between Johnson & Johnson Innovation, New York State and the New York Genome Center. Sited at the genome center in SoHo, the incubator is home to 26 startups and has room for four more, New Brunswick, N.J.-based J&J said. “Johnson & Johnson has deep entrepreneurial roots in New York and we are pleased to see our unique JLabs model applied in this rich ecosystem to foster the creation of new healthcare innovations that have t...
Source: Mass Device - June 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Funding Roundup Research & Development johnsonandjohnson Source Type: news

Comment on "Sterilizing immunity in the lung relies on targeting fungal apoptosis-like programmed cell death"
Shlezinger et al. (Reports, 8 September 2017, p. 1037) report that the common fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, a cause of aspergillosis, undergoes caspase-dependent apoptosis-like cell death triggered by lung neutrophils. However, the technologies they used do not provide reliable evidence that fungal cells die via a protease signaling cascade thwarted by a fungal caspase inhibitor homologous to human survivin. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Aouacheria, A., Cunningham, K. W., Hardwick, J. M., Palkova, Z., Powers, T., Severin, F. F., Vachova, L. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology t-comment Source Type: news

Response to Comment on "Sterilizing immunity in the lung relies on targeting fungal apoptosis-like programmed cell death"
Aouacheria et al. question the interpretation of contemporary assays to monitor programmed cell death with apoptosis-like features (A-PCD) in Aspergillus fumigatus. Although our study focuses on fungal A-PCD for host immune surveillance and infectious outcomes, the experimental approach incorporates multiple independent A-PCD markers and genetic manipulations based on fungal rather than mammalian orthologs to circumvent the limitations associated with any single approach. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Shlezinger, N., Irmer, H., Dhingra, S., Beattie, S. R., Cramer, R. A., Braus, G. H., Sharon, A., Hohl, T. M. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology t-comment Source Type: news

No clear evidence probiotics can help with human anxiety, study finds
But beneficial bacteria do appear to reduce anxiety in rodents with various problemsThere is no clear sign that taking probiotics can help dampen feelings of anxiety in humans, according to new research, despite evidence that it works for rodents.A wide range of conditions, from obesity to asthma, have been linked to themicrobes living in our guts, with a number of studies suggesting a link to mood and behaviour. As a result, there is a burgeoning interest in psychobiotics: using beneficial bacteria known as probiotics to tinker with the gut ’s microbes to affect brain health.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Microbiology Science Anxiety Source Type: news

Test your poison ivy knowledge before the plant ruins your summer
It was a close encounter in 2012 that made microbiologist John Jelesko take an interest in poison ivy. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How party dips can give you Norovirus and even HERPES
Microbiologists reveal on Channel 4's Food Unwrapped how double dipping can spread bacteria very quickly as even a small amount of someone's saliva in a dip will allow germs to multiply. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New method to preserve boy cancer patient fertility being developed at Ben-gurion U.
This study may open the way for new therapeutic strategies for fertility preservation of PCPBs and for azoospermic patients. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preclinical study finds stevia is comparable to antibiotics in the treatment of Lyme disease
(Natural News) Research published in the European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology revealed yet another sweet benefit of stevia. Known for its natural sweetening properties, stevia was discovered to be a safer and even more effective alternative to conventional, toxic antibiotics in treating Lyme disease. The researchers from the University of New Haven used an alcohol extract... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Faecal transplants ‘could save endangered koala’
Team of researchers changes microbes in koalas ’ guts in order to improve type of food they consumeScientists believe they have found a new weapon in the battle to save endangered species: faecal transplants. They say that by transferring faeces from the gut of one animal to another they could boost the health and viability of endangered creatures. In particular, they believe the prospects of saving the koala could be boosted this way.The idea of using faecal transplants as conservation weapons was highlighted this month at the American Society for Microbiology meeting in Atlanta, where scientists outlined experiment...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie, Observer science editor Tags: Endangered species Conservation Environment Animals Wildlife Science World news Source Type: news