Can you catch germs from a public toilet seat? Scientist on whether it's really worth squatting
Primrose Freestone, a Senior Lecturer in Clinical Microbiology at the University of Leicester, explains what scientists know about the art of squatting over a toilet. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson hits the Big Apple with latest JLabs site
Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) opened its latest life science incubator in New York City, the healthcare giant said today. The 30,000-square-foot JLabs @ NYC is a collaboration between Johnson & Johnson Innovation, New York State and the New York Genome Center. Sited at the genome center in SoHo, the incubator is home to 26 startups and has room for four more, New Brunswick, N.J.-based J&J said. “Johnson & Johnson has deep entrepreneurial roots in New York and we are pleased to see our unique JLabs model applied in this rich ecosystem to foster the creation of new healthcare innovations that have t...
Source: Mass Device - June 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Funding Roundup Research & Development johnsonandjohnson Source Type: news

Comment on "Sterilizing immunity in the lung relies on targeting fungal apoptosis-like programmed cell death"
Shlezinger et al. (Reports, 8 September 2017, p. 1037) report that the common fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, a cause of aspergillosis, undergoes caspase-dependent apoptosis-like cell death triggered by lung neutrophils. However, the technologies they used do not provide reliable evidence that fungal cells die via a protease signaling cascade thwarted by a fungal caspase inhibitor homologous to human survivin. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Aouacheria, A., Cunningham, K. W., Hardwick, J. M., Palkova, Z., Powers, T., Severin, F. F., Vachova, L. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology t-comment Source Type: news

Response to Comment on "Sterilizing immunity in the lung relies on targeting fungal apoptosis-like programmed cell death"
Aouacheria et al. question the interpretation of contemporary assays to monitor programmed cell death with apoptosis-like features (A-PCD) in Aspergillus fumigatus. Although our study focuses on fungal A-PCD for host immune surveillance and infectious outcomes, the experimental approach incorporates multiple independent A-PCD markers and genetic manipulations based on fungal rather than mammalian orthologs to circumvent the limitations associated with any single approach. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Shlezinger, N., Irmer, H., Dhingra, S., Beattie, S. R., Cramer, R. A., Braus, G. H., Sharon, A., Hohl, T. M. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology t-comment Source Type: news

No clear evidence probiotics can help with human anxiety, study finds
But beneficial bacteria do appear to reduce anxiety in rodents with various problemsThere is no clear sign that taking probiotics can help dampen feelings of anxiety in humans, according to new research, despite evidence that it works for rodents.A wide range of conditions, from obesity to asthma, have been linked to themicrobes living in our guts, with a number of studies suggesting a link to mood and behaviour. As a result, there is a burgeoning interest in psychobiotics: using beneficial bacteria known as probiotics to tinker with the gut ’s microbes to affect brain health.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Microbiology Science Anxiety Source Type: news

Test your poison ivy knowledge before the plant ruins your summer
It was a close encounter in 2012 that made microbiologist John Jelesko take an interest in poison ivy. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How party dips can give you Norovirus and even HERPES
Microbiologists reveal on Channel 4's Food Unwrapped how double dipping can spread bacteria very quickly as even a small amount of someone's saliva in a dip will allow germs to multiply. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New method to preserve boy cancer patient fertility being developed at Ben-gurion U.
This study may open the way for new therapeutic strategies for fertility preservation of PCPBs and for azoospermic patients. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preclinical study finds stevia is comparable to antibiotics in the treatment of Lyme disease
(Natural News) Research published in the European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology revealed yet another sweet benefit of stevia. Known for its natural sweetening properties, stevia was discovered to be a safer and even more effective alternative to conventional, toxic antibiotics in treating Lyme disease. The researchers from the University of New Haven used an alcohol extract... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Faecal transplants ‘could save endangered koala’
Team of researchers changes microbes in koalas ’ guts in order to improve type of food they consumeScientists believe they have found a new weapon in the battle to save endangered species: faecal transplants. They say that by transferring faeces from the gut of one animal to another they could boost the health and viability of endangered creatures. In particular, they believe the prospects of saving the koala could be boosted this way.The idea of using faecal transplants as conservation weapons was highlighted this month at the American Society for Microbiology meeting in Atlanta, where scientists outlined experiment...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie, Observer science editor Tags: Endangered species Conservation Environment Animals Wildlife Science World news Source Type: news

Health Ranger issues urgent warning about salmonella in pumpkin seed protein as Kellogg's issues nationwide recall
(Natural News) Pumpkin seed protein being sold across America right this minute is contaminated with salmonella and “crazy high” bacteria counts. We know this because we rejected a large lot of pumpkin seed protein after it failed our microbiology tests and flagged positive for salmonella. We then learned that the entire lot was sold to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trilobites: Using Harpoon-Like Appendages, Bacteria ‘ Fish ’ for New DNA
Seeing how microbes snatch new genetic material from their environment could help in the fight against antibiotic resistance. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: STEPH YIN Tags: Bacteria Genetics and Heredity Antibiotics Microbiology Research Dalia, Ankur Ellison, Courtney Brun, Yves Nature Microbiology Source Type: news

How Often Should I Clean My Phone?
The world is a giant petri dish. You and everything you come into contact with are carpeted with bacteria—so there’s no escaping microorganisms. The good news is that the vast majority of them are either benign or beneficial. That’s true even of those infamous “fecal bacteria.” While a sick person’s excrement harbors illness-causing germs, a healthy person’s poop—though gross—usually isn’t dangerous. (If you’ve read anything about fecal transplants, you know that the bacteria in feces may in some cases confer health benefits.) So even if your smartphone is e...
Source: TIME: Health - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

Kitchen Towels Are Source of Possibly Pathogenic Bacteria
MONDAY, June 11, 2018 -- Family composition and hygiene practices are associated with the microbial load of kitchen towels, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7 to 11 in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 11, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Negative rapid test results may delay antiviral therapy in patients with severe influenza
(American Society for Microbiology) A new study has found that half of influenza cases in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) received a false negative rapid influenza antigen test (RIAT). The false negative RIAT results could delay antiviral therapy for patients who were in the ICU with severe influenza. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the American Society for Microbiology's annual meeting, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Drug resistance genes shared among bacteria in hospitals can be deadly
(American Society for Microbiology) A hospital outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) became more worrisome when researchers found resistance genes being shared among unrelated bacteria via plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. This new research will be presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bacteriophages: Are they an overlooked driver of Parkinson's disease?
(American Society for Microbiology) In the first study of its kind, researchers from the New York-based Human Microbiology Institute have discovered the role certain bacteriophages may play in the onset of Parkinson's disease (PD). The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Treg cells protect babies from getting HIV infection from their mothers
(American Society for Microbiology) Scientists now report that Treg cells, a type of regulatory lymphocyte, may be protecting babies in the womb from getting infected with the HIV virus when the mother is infected. The research, from the Emory Vaccine Center, is presented at ASM Microbe, the American Society for Microbiology's annual meeting, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Development of vaccines from AIDS to Zika, using a novel 'plug and play' viral platform
(American Society for Microbiology) Researchers from GeoVax have developed a flexible 'Plug and Play' technology platform that delivers single-dose vaccines that fully protect against emerging infectious diseases such as Zika, Lassa fever, and Ebola. The research will be presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Weekly injections of PRO 140 in combination with optimized ART shows HIV-1 viral suppression
(American Society for Microbiology) Results from a pivotal trial of PRO 140, a new HIV therapy, show that PRO 140 is an effective, long-acting therapeutic in combination with antiretroviral treatment (ART) for previously treated HIV-1 infected patients. This is an ongoing randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kitchen towels could contribute to the growth of potential pathogens that cause food poisoning
(American Society for Microbiology) Researchers from the University of Mauritius have shown that factors such as family size, type of diet, multi-usage of towels, among other factors, impact the growth of pathogens on kitchen towels, potentially causing food poisoning. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11, 2018 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria found in the US presents a triple threat
(American Society for Microbiology) Researchers from the Emory Antibiotic Resistance Center describe the first strain of carbapenem-resistant, hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibiting colistin heteroresistance and enhanced virulence isolated from a patient in the United States. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11, in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Colistin-resistant multidrug-resistant bacteria pervasive in rural Vietnam town
(American Society for Microbiology) A new study has found that the majority of residents in a rural village of Vietnam harbored multi-drug-resistant (MDR), colistin-resistant E. coli bacteria. Colistin is typically used as a last-resort treatment when there are no other therapy options available. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bone apetit: How bacteria eat bone to sustain invasive infection
(American Society for Microbiology) Researchers from Vanderbilt University Medical Center have determined the metabolic pathway that Staphylococcus aureus use to survive in bones. Invasive S. aureus infections frequently occur in the bone and are notoriously resistant to antimicrobial therapy. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ARS scientists are working to ensure safe waterways in Georgia
(American Society for Microbiology) Scientists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) are developing ways to identify the sources of any potentially harmful bacteria found in the surface waters around Athens, Georgia. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The burglary microbiome project
(American Society for Microbiology) Researchers have demonstrated that microbial signatures, the unique microbial make-up of each individual, from the built environment can identify persons involved in crimes occurring in the home, such as burglaries. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Efficacy of Probiotics in Prevention and Treatment of Infectious Diseases
Deaths from infectious diseases and deep concerns about increases in microbial resistance make it necessary for scientists to develop innovative therapeutic solutions and complementary therapies. Growing evidence is available on the therapeutic effects of probiotics. There are also documents about the beneficial effects of probiotics, but it is difficult to draw a definitive conclusion regarding the results of these studies because of the small sample size, the limitations of the study methods, and the use of different strains of probiotic bacteria. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - June 7, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Farzaneh Mohammadzadeh Rostami, Hadis Mousavi, Morteza Rabi Nezhad Mousavi, Milad Shahsafi Source Type: news

Corynebacterium diphtheriae Infection: Two Case Reports and Literature Review
In this report, we describe two cases of C. diphtheriae infection. The first is a case of cutaneous diphtheria in a Malaysian woman caused by a toxigenic strain of C. diphtheriae. In the second case, a nontoxigenic C. diphtheriae strain was isolated from the blood of a fully vaccinated pediatric patient with underlying congenital heart disease. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - June 7, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Zeti Norfidiyati Salmuna, Wan Amani Wan Abdul Azim, Murnihayati Hassan, Azian Harun, Siti Asma' Hasan, Alwi Muhd Besari, Mohd Rizal Mohd Zain Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

Microbial Resistance Tops Diverse Agenda for 2018 ASM Microbe
(MedPage Today) -- Meeting will highlight advances, touch on'unique'host city to microbiology (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - June 6, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Dogs can be a potential risk for future influenza pandemic
(American Society for Microbiology) Dogs are a potential reservoir for a future influenza pandemic, according to a study published in the journal mBio. The study demonstrated that influenza virus can jump from pigs into canines and that influenza is becoming increasingly diverse in canines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Probing the microbial
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Vega, F. E. Tags: Microbiology books Source Type: news

Collaboration Needed to Fight Antimicrobial Resistance
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the greatest threats to human health throughout the world, warns Gary Cohen, executive vice president of global health for BD. “There is an increasing risk of going back to the pre-antibiotic era,” he told MD+DI. “Resistance is not a new issue—it is just a bigger problem, at an accelerated pace. Because antibiotics have been overprescribed for humans as well as overused in food production, antimicrobial resistance is not just a theoretical threat.” Everyone needs to play a role, including diagnostics manufacturers and even medical device innovators, he ...
Source: MDDI - May 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Why Can't We Just Use PCR? The Role of Genotypic versus Phenotypic Testing for Antimicrobial Resistance Testing
There is a need for phenotypic susceptibility testing that is expeditious and that can be performed directly from clinical specimens. While rapid pathogen identification is important, it is the susceptibility result that is essential for antimicrobial optimization. The options for rapid susceptibility testing are limited, with the majority of commercial tests available offering genotypic resistance detection only. In this article, a laboratorian and a clinician discuss the benefits and limitations of genotypic and phenotypic susceptibility testing and provide examples of how results should be interpreted to maximize the cl...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - May 22, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Jennifer Dien Bard, Francesca Lee Source Type: news

A special invitation to Authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - May 22, 2018 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Many Americans say infectious and emerging diseases in other countries will threaten the US
(Research!America) An overwhelming majority of Americans (95%) think infectious and emerging diseases facing other countries will pose a 'major' or 'minor' threat to the U.S. in the next few years, but more than half (61%) say they are confident the federal government can prevent a major infectious disease outbreak in the US, according to a new national public opinion survey commissioned by Research!America and the American Society for Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gut microbiota utilize immunoglobulin A for mucosal colonization
The immune system responds vigorously to microbial infection while permitting lifelong colonization by the microbiome. Mechanisms that facilitate the establishment and stability of the gut microbiota remain poorly described. We found that a regulatory system in the prominent human commensal Bacteroides fragilis modulates its surface architecture to invite binding of immunoglobulin A (IgA) in mice. Specific immune recognition facilitated bacterial adherence to cultured intestinal epithelial cells and intimate association with the gut mucosal surface in vivo. The IgA response was required for B. fragilis (and other commensal...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Donaldson, G. P., Ladinsky, M. S., Yu, K. B., Sanders, J. G., Yoo, B. B., Chou, W.- C., Conner, M. E., Earl, A. M., Knight, R., Bjorkman, P. J., Mazmanian, S. K. Tags: Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Benign colonization of the gut
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Study shines light on gut microbiome in colon cancer
(American Society for Microbiology) Researchers have identified a correlation between gut microbial composition and microRNA expression in human colorectal cancer, according to a recent study published in the journal mSystems. The study is the first to demonstrate that the interaction between microRNA and the gut microbiome may play a role in colorectal cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists' discovery in Yellowstone 'extremely relevant' to origin of life
(Montana State University) Montana State University professor William Inskeep and his team of researchers published their findings May 14 in the scientific journal Nature Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UCLA-led research finds vaccines against anthrax, plague and tularemia are effective in mice
Anthrax, plague and tularemia are three potent agents terrorists would be likely to use in an attack, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Each is highly and quickly lethal to humans. But there are no licensed vaccines for tularemia and plague, and although there is an anthrax vaccine, it requires a burdensome immunization schedule and has severe side effects.Now, a UCLA-led group of researchers may have found a solution that, if found to be safe and effective in humans, could protect people from all three bacteria. The team used molecular engineering to develop vaccines against each that use a comm...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 10, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Stanley Falkow, Who Saw How Bacteria Cause Disease, Dies at 84
He found resistance to antibiotics spreading among bacteria and was hailed for his discoveries, though a Nobel Prize eluded him. (Not that he wanted one.) (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Falkow, Stanley Deaths (Obituaries) Microbiology Bacteria Stanford University Nobel Prizes Source Type: news

FDA Lays the Smackdown on Illegal Stem Cell Clinics
FDA is cracking down on stem cell clinics that market unapproved products and don't meet good manufacturing practice requirements. On behalf of the agency, the Department of Justice filed two complaints in federal court this week seeking permanent injunctions against a Florida-based clinic and a California-based clinic.  “Cell-based regenerative medicine holds significant medical opportunity, but we’ve also seen some bad actors leverage the scientific promise of this field to peddle unapproved treatments that put patients’ health at risk. In some instances, patients have suffered serious and per...
Source: MDDI - May 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

Structural basis for recognition of frizzled proteins by Clostridium difficile toxin B
Clostridium difficile infection is the most common cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in developed countries. The major virulence factor, C. difficile toxin B (TcdB), targets colonic epithelia by binding to the frizzled (FZD) family of Wnt receptors, but how TcdB recognizes FZDs is unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of a TcdB fragment in complex with the cysteine-rich domain of human FZD2 at 2.5-angstrom resolution, which reveals an endogenous FZD-bound fatty acid acting as a co-receptor for TcdB binding. This lipid occupies the binding site for Wnt-adducted palmitoleic acid in FZDs. TcdB binding locks th...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Chen, P., Tao, L., Wang, T., Zhang, J., He, A., Lam, K.-h., Liu, Z., He, X., Perry, K., Dong, M., Jin, R. Tags: Biochemistry, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Toxic hijack of a cell signaling pathway
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Biochemistry, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Aerococcus urinae, Alloscardovia omnicolens, and Actinotignum schaalii: the AAA Minor League Team of Urinary Tract Infection Pathogens
In clinical microbiology laboratories, advancements in the methods used for routine organism identification have facilitated more accurate species level resolution. This, along with increasing knowledge regarding “new” pathogens, has provided new insights into biology and has revealed clinical associations not previously known. Aerococcus urinae, Alloscardovia omnicolens, and Actinotignum schaalii are Gram-positive bacteria associated with urinary tract infections but can also be members of the urinary t ract microbiota. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - May 9, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: William Lainhart, Mark D. Gonzalez Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - May 9, 2018 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Malaria parasite accumulates undetected in bone marrow
(American Society for Microbiology) A Plasmodium vivax infection is like an iceberg: It's dangerous, in part, because much of it hides out of view. A new study published this week in mBio shows how researchers are revealing more of this parasite's biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Lurking Below: NIH Study Reveals Surprising New Source of Antibiotic Resistance That Will Interest Microbiologists and Medical Laboratory Scientists
Genomic analysis of pipes and sewers leading from the National Institutes of Health Clinical Care Center in Bethesda, Md., reveals the presence of carbapenem-resistant organisms; raises concern about the presence of multi-drug-resistant bacteria previously undetected in hospital settings If hospitals and medical laboratories are battlegrounds, then microbiologists and clinical laboratory professionals are frontline soldiers in […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - May 7, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists American Society for Microbiology ant Source Type: news

New breakthrough paving the way for universal Ebola therapeutic
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) A new collaborative study has identified and studied Ebola antibodies that could be used to design universal therapeutics that are effective against many different Ebola species. The findings were recently published in Nature Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 7, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

HKU AIDS Institute invents universal antibody drug for HIV-1 prevention and immunotherapy
(The University of Hong Kong) A research team led by scientists at AIDS Institute and Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine of The University of Hong Kong (HKU) invents a universal antibody drug against HIV/AIDS. By engineering a tandem bi-specific broadly neutralizing antibody, (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news