Diclofenac mitigates virulence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Archives of microbiology 202(10): 2751-2760.
In conclusion, diclofenac can be used in combination with antibiotics as anti-virulence agent against MDR-MRSA which will enhance the ability of immune system to eradicate infection. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Now we have the coronavirus vaccine, how soon can we get back to normal life?
The government has ordered sufficient doses to inoculate the entire population of the UK against Covid-19 but we are in for a long haulCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWhen will the Covid-19 vaccine begin to have an effect on the nation?The government has pledged to offer vaccines to 15 million people – the over-70s, healthcare workers and those required to shield by mid-February, and millions more by spring. This should slowly bring the virus under control although it will take many weeks before we can be sure the vaccine is having an effect. Numbers of daily cases of Covid-19 may dr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Health Science UK news Society Source Type: news

Covid-19: how and why is the virus mutating?
The new Covid variant, B117, is rapidly spreading around the UK and has been detected in many other countries. Although it is about 50% more infectious than previous variants, B117 does not seem to cause more severe disease or be immune to current vaccines. Yet it has raised concerns over how the virus may adapt to our antibodies and vaccines in the future. To explore these issues, the health editor,Sarah Boseley, speaks to Prof Ravi Gupta about how and why viruses mutateContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Sarah Boseley and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Coronavirus Infectious diseases Microbiology Medical research Source Type: news

GPER1 in utero to the rescue!
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Scanlon, S. T. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

GPER1 is required to protect fetal health from maternal inflammation
Type I interferon (IFN) signaling in fetal tissues causes developmental abnormalities and fetal demise. Although pathogens that infect fetal tissues can induce birth defects through the local production of type I IFN, it remains unknown why systemic IFN generated during maternal infections only rarely causes fetal developmental defects. Here, we report that activation of the guanine nucleotide–binding protein–coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1) during pregnancy is both necessary and sufficient to suppress IFN signaling and does so disproportionately in reproductive and fetal tissues. Inactivation of GPER1 in mi...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Harding, A. T., Goff, M. A., Froggatt, H. M., Lim, J. K., Heaton, N. S. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

The Guardian view on lockdown law: democracy must keep up | Editorial
The prime minister is getting too comfortable with a pandemic regime that allows him to escape scrutiny and accountabilityEven in the most extreme emergency, the prime minister does not have the power to make law by himself, live on television. The pandemic has sometimes created the impression that something along those lines is happening when Boris Johnson announces new lockdown rules, but his words are mere guidance until parliament upgrades them.That constitutional process matters. Britain ’s apparatus of Covid regulations is notreminiscent of East Germany, nor is it evolving into “something akin to a police...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Coronavirus Boris Johnson Infectious diseases Science World news UK news House of Commons Law Conservatives Microbiology Politics Source Type: news

Evolution in a test tube: these bacteria survive on deadly copper surfaces
(Martin-Luther-Universit ä t Halle-Wittenberg) The descendants of regular wild-type bacteria can evolve to survive for a long time on metallic copper surfaces that would usually kill them within a few minutes. An international research team led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology was able to produce these tiny survivalists in the lab and has been able to study them more closely. The team reports on its findings inApplied and Environmental Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Julius Schachter, Renowned Chlamydia Researcher, Dies at 84
Starting in the late 1960s, the UCSF microbiologist pioneered investigations into the deadly disease that have led to the near eradication of trachoma, a chlamydia-related eye infection. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - January 12, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Experts call for rethink of lateral flow mass testing for Covid in UK
Government urged to pause non-lab tests for asymptomatic cases amid fears over accuracyCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageExperts are calling on the UK government to halt or pause its mass testing programme for people without symptoms in care homes, schools, communities and potentially at home, warning that the lateral flow devices it has bought are inaccurate and can do more harm than good.Prof Jon Deeks, of Birmingham University and the Royal Statistical Society, and colleagues say the public is being misled.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Coronavirus UK news Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Source Type: news

What are the new coronavirus variants and how do we monitor them? – podcast
Over the course of the pandemic, scientists have been monitoring emerging genetic changes to Sars-Cov-2. Mutations occur naturally as the virus replicates but if they confer an advantage – like being more transmissible – that variant of the virus may go on to proliferate. This was the case with the ‘UK’ or B117 variant, which is about 50% more contagious and is rapidly spreading around the country. So how does genetic surveillance of the virus work? And what do we know about the new variants? Ian Sample speaks to Dr Jeffrey Barrett, the director of the Covid-19 genomics initiative at the Wellcome Sa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Genetics Microbiology Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Source Type: news

WHO's Covid mission to Wuhan: 'It's not about finding China guilty'
Scientists express caution about what they may find and the political sensitivity around investigationCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWhen the scientists on the World Health Organization ’s mission to research the origins of Covid-19 touch down in China as expected on Thursday at the beginning of their investigation they are clear what they will – and what they will not – be doing.They intend to visit Wuhan, the site of the first major outbreak of Covid-19, and talk to Chinese scientists who have been studying the same issue. They will want to see if there are unexamined ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Peter Beaumont Tags: Coronavirus China World Health Organization Asia Pacific Science Infectious diseases Society Microbiology World news Source Type: news

Poor gut health connected to severe COVID-19, new review shows
(American Society for Microbiology) In a review published this week in mBio, researchers examined emerging evidence suggesting that poor gut health adversely affects COVID-19 prognosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 12, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Foods That May Lead to a Healthier Gut and Better Health
A diet full of highly processed foods with added sugars and salt promoted gut microbes linked to obesity, heart disease and diabetes. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Anahad O ’Connor Tags: Microbiology Research Digestive Tract Diet and Nutrition Obesity Weight Diabetes Heart Vegetables Cholesterol Health Foods Nature Medicine (Journal) Source Type: news

The new UK Covid variant: your questions answered
You asked us about the fast-spreading coronavirus variant, here are the answersCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageHow do scientists know the new UK variant is 70% more transmissible, and how certain are they of this figure?Our gift to the world: the UK variant of Sars-CoV-2. There are sufficient data to quote 70% greater infectivity, but how was this figure ascertained? ”D Moon, BrightonContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science UK news Vaccines and immunisation Source Type: news

Now we have the coronavirus vaccine, how soon can we get back to normal life?
The government has ordered sufficient doses to inoculate the entire population of the UK against Covid-19 but we are in for a long haulCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWhen will the Covid-19 vaccine begin to have an effect on the nation?The government has pledged to offer vaccines to 15 million people – the over-70s, healthcare workers and those required to shield by mid-February, and millions more by spring. This should slowly bring the virus under control although it will take many weeks before we can be sure the vaccine is having an effect. Numbers of daily cases of Covid-19 may dr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science UK news Health Society Source Type: news

Rapid Covid testing across England will help identify symptomless carriers
Tens of thousands are unwittingly spreading coronavirus – lateral flow devices will confirm infection in under 30 minutesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageRapid testing to findsymptomless carriers of Covid-19 is to be launched in England this week. The aim of the programme is to identify some of the tens of thousands of infected people who are unwittingly spreading the virus across the country.The dramatic escalation of the programme – which uses detectors known as lateral flow devices – comes asCovid death rates have continued to soar and hospitals have reported alarming n...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science UK news Source Type: news

University of Vermont Microbiology Laboratory Identifies Inefficiencies When Performing Pooled Testing for COVID-19
The key to success with pooled testing, says the lab’s director, is having the right personnel and equipment, and an LIS that supports the added steps Experts believe pooled testing for COVID-19 could reduce the number of standard tests for SARS-CoV-2 by conserving testing resources and cutting lab spending on tests and testing supplies. However, […] The post University of Vermont Microbiology Laboratory Identifies Inefficiencies When Performing Pooled Testing for COVID-19 appeared first on Dark Daily. (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - January 8, 2021 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment International Laboratory News Laboratory Hiring & Human Resources Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations AlphaFold anatomic patho Source Type: news

The COVID-19 Virus Is Mutating. What Does That Mean for Vaccines?
As we enter the second year of living with the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the virus is celebrating its invasion of the world’s population with yet more mutated forms that help it to spread more easily from person to person. One, first detected in the U.K. in December, has already raised alarms about whether the COVID-19 virus is now escaping from the protection that vaccines just being rolled out now might provide. The variant has also been found in the U.S. Already, U.K. officials have tightened lockdowns in England, Scotland and Wales, and over the holidays, more than 40 countries banned travelers from the region ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Nigeria: "I Decided to Be Pregnant With My Wife" - Men As Nurturers for Healthy Pregnancy and Delivery
[Nigeria Health Watch] In January 2020, in the middle of the dry season known as harmattan in Nigeria, I was in Kano state performing my duties as a health advocate when I received news from my wife which redefined my plans for the next nine months. "Babe, I think my body is changing, I bought a pregnancy rapid test kit to test my urine and it showed double lines," she said to me on the phone. As a microbiologist, I understood the meaning of the rapid test reading. However, it required another level of confirmation by a doctor. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 7, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Recapitulation of HIV-1 Env-antibody coevolution in macaques leading to neutralization breadth
We report that primary HIV-1 envelope proteins—when expressed by simian-human immunodeficiency viruses in rhesus macaques—elicited patterns of Env-antibody coevolution very similar to those in humans, including conserved immunogenetic, structural, and chemical solutions to epitope recognition and precise Env–amino acid substitutions, insertions, and deletions leading to virus persistence. The structure of one rhesus antibody, capable of neutralizing 49% of a 208-strain panel, revealed a V2 apex mode of recognition like that of human broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) PGT145 and PCT64-35S. Another rhe...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Roark, R. S., Li, H., Williams, W. B., Chug, H., Mason, R. D., Gorman, J., Wang, S., Lee, F.-H., Rando, J., Bonsignori, M., Hwang, K.-K., Saunders, K. O., Wiehe, K., Moody, M. A., Hraber, P. T., Wagh, K., Giorgi, E. E., Russell, R. M., Bibollet-Ruche, F., Tags: Immunology, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Coordination between microbiota and root endodermis supports plant mineral nutrient homeostasis
Plant roots and animal guts have evolved specialized cell layers to control mineral nutrient homeostasis. These layers must tolerate the resident microbiota while keeping homeostatic integrity. Whether and how the root diffusion barriers in the endodermis, which are critical for the mineral nutrient balance of plants, coordinate with the microbiota is unknown. We demonstrate that genes controlling endodermal function in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana contribute to the plant microbiome assembly. We characterized a regulatory mechanism of endodermal differentiation driven by the microbiota with profound effects on nutr...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Salas-Gonzalez, I., Reyt, G., Flis, P., Custodio, V., Gopaulchan, D., Bakhoum, N., Dew, T. P., Suresh, K., Franke, R. B., Dangl, J. L., Salt, D. E., Castrillo, G. Tags: Botany, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Structural basis for antibody inhibition of flavivirus NS1-triggered endothelial dysfunction
Medically important flaviviruses cause diverse disease pathologies and collectively are responsible for a major global disease burden. A contributing factor to pathogenesis is secreted flavivirus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1). Despite demonstrated protection by NS1-specific antibodies against lethal flavivirus challenge, the structural and mechanistic basis remains unknown. Here, we present three crystal structures of full-length dengue virus NS1 complexed with a flavivirus–cross-reactive, NS1-specific monoclonal antibody, 2B7, at resolutions between 2.89 and 3.96 angstroms. These structures reveal a protective mecha...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Biering, S. B., Akey, D. L., Wong, M. P., Brown, W. C., Lo, N. T. N., Puerta-Guardo, H., Tramontini Gomes de Sousa, F., Wang, C., Konwerski, J. R., Espinosa, D. A., Bockhaus, N. J., Glasner, D. R., Li, J., Blanc, S. F., Juan, E. Y., Elledge, S. J., Mina, Tags: Biochemistry, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

A broadly protective antibody that targets the flavivirus NS1 protein
There are no approved flaviviral therapies and the development of vaccines against flaviruses has the potential of being undermined by antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). The flavivirus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a promising vaccine antigen with low ADE risk but has yet to be explored as a broad-spectrum therapeutic antibody target. Here, we provide the structural basis of NS1 antibody cross-reactivity through cocrystallization of the antibody 1G5.3 with NS1 proteins from dengue and Zika viruses. The 1G5.3 antibody blocks multi-flavivirus NS1-mediated cell permeability in disease-relevant cell lines, and therapeuti...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Modhiran, N., Song, H., Liu, L., Bletchly, C., Brillault, L., Amarilla, A. A., Xu, X., Qi, J., Chai, Y., Cheung, S. T. M., Traves, R., Setoh, Y. X., Bibby, S., Scott, C. A. P., Freney, M. E., Newton, N. D., Khromykh, A. A., Chappell, K. J., Muller, D. A., Tags: Biochemistry, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 on mink farms between humans and mink and back to humans
Animal experiments have shown that nonhuman primates, cats, ferrets, hamsters, rabbits, and bats can be infected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). In addition, SARS-CoV-2 RNA has been detected in felids, mink, and dogs in the field. Here, we describe an in-depth investigation using whole-genome sequencing of outbreaks on 16 mink farms and the humans living or working on these farms. We conclude that the virus was initially introduced by humans and has since evolved, most likely reflecting widespread circulation among mink in the beginning of the infection period, several weeks before detectio...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Oude Munnink, B. B., Sikkema, R. S., Nieuwenhuijse, D. F., Molenaar, R. J., Munger, E., Molenkamp, R., van der Spek, A., Tolsma, P., Rietveld, A., Brouwer, M., Bouwmeester-Vincken, N., Harders, F., Hakze-van der Honing, R., Wegdam-Blans, M. C. A., Bouwstr Tags: Evolution, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Two-way transmission on mink farms
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Evolution, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Microbes modify plant root permeability
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Hines, P. J. Tags: Botany, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Convergent HIV evolution across species
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Kelly, P. N. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Two antibodies against flaviviruses
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Biochemistry, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

EU approves Moderna jab amid tensions over slow rollout of vaccines
Move should ease frustrations over low supplies of Pfizer vaccine and EU ’s longer authorisation processCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe European Medicines Agency has approved the Moderna vaccine, making it the second coronavirus shot to be cleared for general use across the EU, as tensions continued to rise over the slow progress of vaccination programmes in the bloc.In a move that should ease frustrations over a shortfall in supplies of the Pfizer/BioNTech jab and the EU ’s longer authorisation process, the Amsterdam-based regulatorsaid on Wednesday it had granted a condit...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 6, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jon Henley Europe correspondent Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation European Union Health Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society World news European commission Netherlands Source Type: news

China blocks entry to WHO team studying Covid's origins
Officials say visas not yet approved for World Health Organization delegation due to visit WuhanCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageChina has blocked the arrival of a team from the World Health Organization investigatingthe origins of the coronavirus pandemic, claiming that their visas had not yet been approved even as some members of the group were on their way.The WHO ’s director general, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, expressed his dismay and said he had called on China to allow the team in. “I’m very disappointed with this news, given that two members have already begun thei...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 5, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Coronavirus World Health Organization World news China Asia Pacific Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Source Type: news

Covid vaccine tracker: when will a coronavirus vaccine be ready?
More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. Here is their progressNote: This page is no longer being updated. Graphics and text reflect the state of progress on 18 December.Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, withmore than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO).Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 5, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Niko Kommenda and Frank Hulley-Jones Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Vaccines and immunisation Health Source Type: news

Scientists appeal for calm over new Covid variant in South Africa
Questions raised over potential effect on vaccines as health secretary says he is ‘incredibly worried’Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageScientists are appealing for calm following suggestions that Covid vaccines might not protect people against a new variant of the virus that has emerged in South Africa.Experts say there is no need for panic, even though the health secretary, Matt Hancock, has said he is very concerned about the latest variant of Sars-Cov-2, which has emerged in South Africa and is said to be highly transmissible, as is thevariant first seen in Kent.Continue read...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Science Vaccines and immunisation Health Society Microbiology South Africa Source Type: news

How modelling Covid has changed the way we think about epidemics | Adam Kucharrski
The pandemic has created a tragic ‘natural experiment’ - a once-in-a-century jolt that could produce unexpected insightsAdam Kucharski is an associate professor at the London School of Hygiene& Tropical MedicineCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThink back on some of the things you learned about Covid-19 in 2020: information such as “fatality risk” and “incubation period”; the potential for “super-spreading events” , and the fact that transmission can happen before symptoms appear. There werethe suggestions in mid-January that the Covid-19 o...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Adam Kucharski Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Science World news Microbiology Source Type: news

Results of comprehensive SARS-CoV-2 animal model study published in Nature Microbiology
(Texas Biomedical Research Institute) Findings by Texas Biomed and SNPRC scientists support the rhesus macaque as an excellent animal model for vaccine development; suggest baboon as an animal model for drug development. Results provide insight on the complex lung immune response to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Defining animal models has been a critical step in advancing COVID-19 vaccines& therapeutics (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 4, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Symptomless cases in schools could be key driver in spread of Covid-19
Up to 70% of schoolchildren infected with coronavirus may not know they have it until after a positive test resultWhen will vaccines bring results?Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA key factor in the spread of Covid-19 in schools issymptomless cases. Most scientists believe that between 30% and 40% of adults do not display any Covid symptoms on the day of testing, even if they have been infected. For children, however, this figure is higher.“It is probably more like 50% for those in secondary school while for boys and girls in primary school, around 70% may not be displaying symptoms ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science editor Tags: Coronavirus Children Young people Schools Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society Education UK news World news Source Type: news

Giving people false hope about the pandemic isn't 'balanced' – it's dangerous | Owen Jones
The media should not promote disinformation under the guise of debateProfessor Karol Sikora, an oncologist at the private Buckingham University, has become a social media star and a regular on TV screens, thanks to his viral tweets. You can see why the “Positive Professor” has developed such a wide fanbase: in an era of death, disease, economic turmoil and suspended freedoms, he offers desperate – often vulnerable – people the one thing they crave most: hope. His formula is simple: contrary to the misery peddled by the doom merchants, the measures strangling our economic and personal lives might act...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 1, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Owen Jones Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science BBC Daily Mail Twitter Media Source Type: news

The Guardian view on Covid science: cooperation, not just competition | Editorial
Scientists should follow the example of the Chinese professor whose selfless decision to share his breakthrough led to the medical miracle of a vaccineThere are many people deserving of praise for selfless acts during the past 12 months. But one person whose act of scientific generosity ought to be remembered isZhang Yongzhen. The scientist, who works out of the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Centre, was the first to map the whole genome sequence of Sars-CoV-2. He did so on 5 January 2020 and hoped to share it with researchers by uploading his work to the US National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI).The profess...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 31, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Coronavirus Medical research Infectious diseases Microbiology Science China World news Asia Pacific Source Type: news

Review of the year: uncovering the science of Covid-19 (part two) - podcast
This year, the Sars-CoV-2 virus has come to dominate both the headlines and our lives. In the second of two episodes reviewing the science of the pandemic so far, the Guardian ’s health editor,Sarah Boseley, its science editor,Ian Sample, and producerMadeleine Finlay give their thoughts on what has happened over 2020, alongside professors Eleanor Riley, John Drury and Christina PagelReview of the year: part oneContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 31, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Madeleine Finlay , Sarah Boseley , and Ian Sample and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Coronavirus Science Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Psychology Health Source Type: news

The Guardian view on responding to the Covid-19 surge: not enough | Editorial
Millions more are in tier 4 and schools face a delayed return – but tougher action is needed to seize the opportunity offered by the new vaccineThe contrast between the good news and the bleak could not have been starker. The UK ’sapproval of the low-cost, highly efficacious Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine represents a shining moment of hope. Never has it been more needed.The announcement came as ambulances queued for hours outside overwhelmed hospitals in London and Birmingham, and Essexdeclared a major incident due to the pressure on health services. For a second day, more than 50,000 cases were recorded, along wi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Science Microbiology Education Children Schools Teaching Source Type: news

Bluer skies: inside the 1 January edition of Guardian Weekly
2020 was a year to forget, but here ’s why the new one bring reasons to hope.Get the Guardian Weekly delivered at homeFor many people, the back of 2020 can ’t come too soon. With a new virus strain upending millions of people’s Christmas plans in the UK, coupled with the threat of a no-deal Brexit, the lead-up to 25 December was … a hairy one. At least the belated announcement of a trade and security deal with the European Union on 24 December ga ve some clarity. But, as Britain finally detaches from the EU, it remains a country beset by the worst of the pandemic.On that note, we wanted to look at ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Will Dean Tags: World news Coronavirus Brexit European Union Foreign policy Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Politics Science UK news Source Type: news

Denmark extends lockdown; just 40% in France plan to get vaccine - as it happened
This blog is closedDenmark extends lockdown until 17 JanuaryEngland may face tougher ‘tier 5’ Covid restrictionsSpain to keep registry of people who refuse Covid vaccineThe lost year: could Covid lockdown have helped save the planet?South Africa bans alcohol sales to help curb spread of virusSee all our coronavirus coverage12.06amGMT Thank you all for following tonight ’s latest developments. You can keep up with the Guardian’s coverage of Covid-19 through our coronavirus keyword tag and our team in Australia but that’s it from me Nadeem Badshah.Related:Australia news live: NSW reports 18 new ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nadeem Badshah (now); Jedidajah Otte, Amy Walker and Kevin Rawlinson (earlier) Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news NHS Source Type: news

Spain will register people who refuse Covid vaccine, says health minister
Database could be shared across Europe, says Salvador IllaCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageSpain ’s health minister has said the country will create a vaccination registry that will include those who refuse to be vaccinated against Covid-19, yielding a document that could potentially be shared with other countries in Europe.Days afterEU countries began rolling out the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, Salvador Illa said that those who reject the vaccine for “whatever reason” would be documented, as is done currently for those with certain other treatments.Continue reading... (Sourc...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ashifa Kassam in Madrid Tags: Coronavirus Spain Europe Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Vaccines and immunisation Health Source Type: news

Coronavirus live news: India reports cases of UK Covid variant; Philippines extends travel bans
Latest updates:India finds six cases of UK variant;Philippines bans travel from 19 countries and territories until mid-JanuaryCovid vaccine uptake high in UK despite concerns over hesitancyUK doctors warn over ‘dire’ situation in health service as cases riseThe lost year: could Covid lockdown have helped save the planet?South Africa bans alcohol sales; Spain sets up Covid vaccine registerSee all our coronavirus coverage12.01pmGMTGreece ’s tourism sector is expected to recover next summer following a dramatic fall in revenues due to the coronavirus pandemic this year, a senior industry official said on Tue...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jedidajah Otte (now) and Kevin Rawlinson (earlier) Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news NHS Source Type: news

Review of the year: uncovering the science of Covid-19 (part one)
There have been a number of incredible science stories in 2020, fromAI deciphering the facial expressions of mice to the discovery of ablack hole just 1,000 light-years from Earth. Yet, it was the Sars-CoV-2 virus that came to dominate both the headlines and our lives. In the first of two episodes, health editorSarah Boseley, science editorIan Sample and producerMadeleine Finlay give their thoughts on what has happened over the past year, alongside professors Eleanor Riley, John Drury and Christina Pagel.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Madeleine Finlay, Sarah Boseley and Ian Sample and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Health Society Psychology Source Type: news

Scientists fought coronavirus, now they face a battle against disinformation | Jim Al-Khalili
The public ’s appetite for science has never been stronger, but only openness can confound the deluge of fake narrativesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWay back, in those halcyon and innocent times pre-Covid, scientists ’ roles in society seemed much simpler. We knew where we stood when it came to explaining our work to the public. It was either exciting, like reporting on the discovery of a new particle or exoplanet, or it was completely ignored by an uninterested world struggling to understand subjects too remo te from everyday experience. It almost seems hard to believe now,...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 28, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jim Al-Khalili Tags: Coronavirus Science Science policy Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Health World news Source Type: news

I'm a consultant in infectious diseases. 'Long Covid' is anything but a mild illness | Joanna Herman
Nine months on from the virus, I am seriously debilitated. This is how the new NHS clinics need to help thousands of usWith the excitement of the Covid vaccine ’s arrival, it may be easy to forget and ignore those of us with “long Covid”, who are struggling to reclaim our previous, pre-viral lives and continue to live with debilitating symptoms. Even when the NHS has managed the herculean task of vaccinating the nation, Covid-19 and the new mutant variants of the virus will continue to circulate, leaving more people at risk of l ong Covid. Data from a King’s College London study in September suggest...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 27, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Joanna Herman Tags: Long Covid Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Health Source Type: news

Scientists call for UK lockdown after rapid spread of Covid-19 variant
Stricter measures needed as cases of mutated virus, linked to UK travellers, are reported across globeCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageCases of the new variant Covid-19 virus were confirmed in several European countries on Saturday, including Spain, Sweden and Switzerland. All were linked to people who had arrived from the UK.Meanwhile, Japan has announced it is banning all new entries of foreign nationals from Monday following the discovery of the variant in travellers from the UK.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 27, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie, Toby Helm and Jamie Doward Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases World news Microbiology Medical research Science Source Type: news

Ten reasons why we got Covid-19 vaccines so quickly without 'cutting corners' | Adam Finn
The speedy rollout is thanks to a combination of foresight, hard work and lucky breaksCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe speed at which effective Covid-19 vaccines have come through to authorisation has caused surprise. Compared with previous vaccines, the process has been very fast and so, naturally, people are asking how can it have happened without some kind of compromise on standards and care. Explaining it all as simply a result of the wonders of the latest scientific advances seems vague. So how has it actually come about? In reality, there are at least 10 reasons: some are about go...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Adam Finn Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Vaccines and immunisation Health Society Source Type: news

How did scientists tackle Covid so quickly? Because they pulled together | Charlotte Summers
From observational studies to rapid development of vaccines, knowledge-sharing was a key feature of science in 2020The raw numbers around Covid-19 are simply incredible when you consider that this was a disease almost no one had heard of in December 2019. At the time of writing, this year about 240,000 people in the UK have been admitted to hospitalwith Covid-19, and more than 70,000 people have had Covid-19 listed as a cause of death on theirdeath certificate.I began 2020 anxious about the reports emerging from Wuhan: they seemed to imply an asymptomatic transmission of a respiratory pathogen that was serious enough to pu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Charlotte Summers Tags: Coronavirus Science Infectious diseases Medical research World news NHS UK news Health Microbiology Source Type: news