Clever math enables MRI to map biomolecules
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Cho, A. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Microbiology In Depth Source Type: news

Swarming in parallel toward sociality
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Evolution, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Social genes are selection hotspots in kin groups of a soil microbe
The composition of cooperative systems, including animal societies, organismal bodies, and microbial groups, reflects their past and shapes their future evolution. However, genomic diversity within many multiunit systems remains uncharacterized, limiting our ability to understand and compare their evolutionary character. We have analyzed genomic and social-phenotype variation among 120 natural isolates of the cooperative bacterium Myxococcus xanthus derived from six multicellular fruiting bodies. Each fruiting body was composed of multiple lineages radiating from a unique recent ancestor. Genomic evolution was concentrated...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Wielgoss, S., Wolfensberger, R., Sun, L., Fiegna, F., Velicer, G. J. Tags: Evolution, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

New Antibiotics Are Desperately Needed: Machine Learning could Help
As the threat of antibiotic resistance looms, microbiologists aren’t the only ones thinking up new solutions. James Zou, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical data science at Stanford, has applied machine learning to create an algorithm that generates thousands of entirely new virtual DNA sequences with the intent of one day creating antimicrobial proteins. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - March 20, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Human microbiome metabolites tip the scale in intestinal E. coli infections
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A multi-disciplinary team of biological engineers, microbiologists, and systems biologists at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering working on the Institute's DARPA-supported 'Technologies for Host Resilience' (THoR) Project, whose goal it is to uncover the causes of tolerance to infection exhibited by certain individuals or species, has now succeeded in modeling infection of human colon with EHEC in vitro using a microfluidic Organ-on-a-Chip (Organ Chip) culture device. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 20, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bacterial contamination in household and office building tap water
(Wiley) Water is a source of concern for disseminating the bacteria Legionella pneumophila and Mycobacterium avium, which cause lung disease (legionellosis and pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterium disease, respectively). A new Journal of Applied Microbiology study has examined the presence of these microbes in tap water from residences and office buildings across the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Superbugs have colonized the International Space Station -- but there's a silver lining
(Frontiers) Researchers have taken another small step towards deep space exploration, by testing a new silver- and ruthenium-based antimicrobial coating aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, their study shows that the AGXX ® dramatically reduced the number of bacteria on contamination-prone surfaces -- and could help protect future astronauts beyond the moon and Mars. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 19, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Microbes can grow on nitric oxide
(Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology) Nitric oxide (NO) is a central molecule of the global nitrogen cycle. A study by Boran Kartal from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Germany, and colleagues reveals that microorganisms can grow on NO. Their results, which are now published in Nature Communications, change our view of the earth's nitrogen cycle and how microorganisms regulate the release of greenhouse gases from natural and man-made environments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dormant viruses activate during spaceflight -- NASA investigates
(Frontiers) Herpes viruses reactivate in more than half of crew aboard Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions, according to NASA research published in Frontiers in Microbiology. While only a small proportion develop symptoms, virus reactivation rates increase with spaceflight duration and could present a significant health risk on missions to Mars and beyond. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 15, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Vaccine study confirms sensitivity of cholera test
(PLOS) Recently, the sensitivity of fecal microbiological cultures for detecting cholera has come under question. Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases investigated this claim using a 'vaccine probe' analysis of a completed cholera vaccine cluster randomized trial to support the sensitivity of conventional microbiological culture for cholera. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 14, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Your Environment Is Cleaner. Your Immune System Has Never Been So Unprepared.
A century ago, British scientists suggested a link between increased hygiene and allergic conditions — the first hint that our immune systems are becoming improperly “ trained. ” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MATT RICHTEL Tags: your-feed-science Immune System Allergies Hygiene and Cleanliness Children and Childhood Antibiotics Hay Fever Water Food Microbiology Infections Source Type: news

Novel potent antimicrobial from thermophilic bacterium
(University of Groningen) University of Groningen microbiologists and their colleagues from Lithuania have discovered a new glycocin, a small antimicrobial peptide with a sugar group attached, which is produced by a thermophilic bacterium and is stable at relatively high temperatures. They also succeeded in transferring the genes required to produce this glycocin to an E. coli bacterium. This makes it easier to produce and investigate this compound, which could potentially be used in biofuel production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

These less common proteins may help fend off the flu
(American Society for Microbiology) Influenza type B, though generally less widespread than type A, poses a formidable threat for vulnerable populations like the elderly and the young. In the 2012-2013 flu season, for example, influenza type B caused the majority of deaths due to flu among children, according to data from the CDC. Findings published this week in mBio suggest that an efficient way to boost the efficacy of vaccines against influenza type B might be hiding in plain sight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Access to Water Is a Daily Battle in Poor Neighborhoods in Buenos Aires
Julio Esquivel and two children in the La Casita de La Virgen soup kitchen in Villa La Cava stand next to the filter that removes 99.9 percent of bacteria, viruses and parasites, with a capacity of up to 12 liters per hour. The purifier became the starting point for raising awareness in this shantytown on the outskirts of the Argentine capital about access to water as a human right. Credit: Daniel Gutman/IPSBy Daniel GutmanBUENOS AIRES, Mar 11 2019 (IPS) “Look at this water. Would you drink it?” asks José Pablo Zubieta, as he shows a glass he has just filled from a faucet, where yellow and brown sediment...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Daniel Gutman Tags: Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Environment Featured Headlines Health Integration and Development Brazilian-style Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs Projects Regional Categories TerraViva Unit Source Type: news

University of Georgia Researchers Develop Algorithm That Determines Source of Salmonella Bacteria Based on Its Genomes
Microbiologists may soon have a new tool to identify sources of infections in humans and track infections across patient populations Researchers at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety have developed an algorithm that can identify genetic variations in Salmonella found in the feces of four of the most common hosts of the bacteria—pigs, […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - March 11, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Pathology Source Type: news

Unveiling the role of selenocysteine, the mysterious 21st amino acid
(Center for Genomic Regulation) Selenocysteine is an essential amino acid for certain species, such as humans and the other vertebrates, although it has disappeared from others, such as insects. CRG researchers have discovered that it is also preserved in fungi, contrary to existing belief. Understanding the role it plays in these organisms may help us to understand why it is essential to human health. The study has been published in Nature Microbiology (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Endocytosis of commensal antigens by intestinal epithelial cells regulates mucosal T cell homeostasis
Commensal bacteria influence host physiology, without invading host tissues. We show that proteins from segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) are transferred into intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) through adhesion-directed endocytosis that is distinct from the clathrin-dependent endocytosis of invasive pathogens. This process transfers microbial cell wall–associated proteins, including an antigen that stimulates mucosal T helper 17 (TH17) cell differentiation, into the cytosol of IECs in a cell division control protein 42 homolog (CDC42)–dependent manner. Removal of CDC42 activity in vivo led to disruption of e...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ladinsky, M. S., Araujo, L. P., Zhang, X., Veltri, J., Galan-Diez, M., Soualhi, S., Lee, C., Irie, K., Pinker, E. Y., Narushima, S., Bandyopadhyay, S., Nagayama, M., Elhenawy, W., Coombes, B. K., Ferraris, R. P., Honda, K., Iliev, I. D., Gao, N., Bjorkman Tags: Immunology, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Hooking into antigen transfer
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Nebraska food science professor releases second edition of fermented foods textbook
(International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics) An updated edition of the textbook Microbiology and Fermentation of Foods, a definitive resource in food science, has now been published by Wiley-Blackwell, USA. The author Dr. Robert Hutkins, professor at University of Nebraska-Lincoln and member of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics, says when he started writing the first edition, fermentation was considered an old science. Since then, some universities have seen increased enrollment in studies specific to fermentation within food science programs. (Source: EurekAlert...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antibiotics for treating urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infection in men and nonpregnant women
This review of 14 RCTs (n=2715) concludes in men, regimens with azithromycin are less effective than doxycycline for microbiological failure, but no difference for clinical failure; in women, it is uncertain whether azithromycin vs doxycycline increases risk of microbiological failure (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Using local clinical and microbiological data to develop an institution specific carbapenem-sparing strategy in sepsis: a nested case-control study
From a stewardship perspective it is recommended that antibiotic guidelines are adjusted to the local setting, accounting for the local epidemiology of pathogens. In many settings the prevalence of Gram-negative pathogens with resistance to empiric sepsis therapy is increasing. How and when to escalate standard sepsis therapy to a reserve antimicrobial agent, is a recurrent dilemma. The study objective was to develop decision strategies for empiric sepsis therapy based on local microbiological and clinical data, and estimate the number needed to treat with a carbapenem to avoid mismatch of empiric therapy in one patient (N...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Extracellular vesicles in parasite survival
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ofir-Birin, Y., Regev-Rudzki, N. Tags: Microbiology perspective Source Type: news

Plazomicin Tx Non-Inferior to Meropenem for Complicated UTI
(MedPage Today) -- At test-of-cure visit, higher percentage of patients in plazomicin group had microbiologic eradication (Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease)
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - February 20, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Investigators figure out how to block new antibiotic resistance gene
(American Society for Microbiology) A new antimicrobial-resistance gene, VCC-1, a ß -lactamase gene, has been discovered in benign close relatives of virulent Vibrio cholerae, which causes cholera. Now, a team of Canadian researchers has found a way to block the VCC-1 enzyme, which disables that resistance gene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cervical microbiome may promote high-grade precancerous lesions
(American Society for Microbiology) Infections with a Human Papillomavirus (HPV) cause 99 percent of cervical cancer cases, and the disease's first sign is often the appearance of precancerous lesions on a woman's cervix. But bacteria may play an important role, too. New research suggests that the cervical microbiome may influence HPV infection more than researchers previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Virus-infected bacteria could provide help in the fight against climate change
(University of Tennessee at Knoxville) Understanding the relationship between microbes and viruses is beneficial not only for medical research and practical applications but also in marine biology, says Alison Buchan, Carolyn W. Fite Professor of Microbiology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NASA scientists discover FIVE new previously unknown strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in SPACE
(Natural News) While cleaning the washrooms on the International Space Station (ISS), scientists from NASA reportedly discovered five new strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that have never before been identified, suggesting that deadly “superbugs” have the capacity to mutate and proliferate, even in outer space. Publishing its findings in the journal BMC Microbiology, the National Aeronautics... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bacterial warhead targets DNA
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Revealing a microbial carcinogen
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Bleich, R. M., Arthur, J. C. Tags: Microbiology perspective Source Type: news

The human gut bacterial genotoxin colibactin alkylates DNA
Certain Escherichia coli strains residing in the human gut produce colibactin, a small-molecule genotoxin implicated in colorectal cancer pathogenesis. However, colibactin’s chemical structure and the molecular mechanism underlying its genotoxic effects have remained unknown for more than a decade. Here we combine an untargeted DNA adductomics approach with chemical synthesis to identify and characterize a covalent DNA modification from human cell lines treated with colibactin-producing E. coli. Our data establish that colibactin alkylates DNA with an unusual electrophilic cyclopropane. We show that this metabolite i...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Wilson, M. R., Jiang, Y., Villalta, P. W., Stornetta, A., Boudreau, P. D., Carra, A., Brennan, C. A., Chun, E., Ngo, L., Samson, L. D., Engelward, B. P., Garrett, W. S., Balbo, S., Balskus, E. P. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Infection biology: What makes Helicobacter so adaptable?
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori owes its worldwide distribution to its genetic adaptability. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Munich microbiologists have identified an enzyme that plays a vital role in the flexible control of global gene expression in the species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 12, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New tuberculosis drug may shorten treatment time for patients
(American Society for Microbiology) A new experimental antibiotic for tuberculosis has been shown to be more effective against TB than isoniazid, a decades-old drug which is currently one of the standard treatments. In mouse studies, the new drug showed a much lower tendency to develop resistance, and it remains in the tissues where the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria reside for longer, killing them more effectively. The research is published Feb. 11 in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 11, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists advance new technology to protect drinking water from Lake Erie algal toxins
(University of Toledo) Microbiologist Dr. Jason Huntley identified groups of bacteria in Lake Erie that degrade microcystin and can be used to naturally purify water. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Innovative, simple treatment to combat the Candida albicans fungus
(University of the Basque Country) A study led by the UPV/EHU has developed an innovative, simple treatment based uterine stem cells to combat the Candida albicans fungus, responsible for vaginal candidiasis disease Despite not being life-threatening, this disease, which is very widespread among women, reduces patient life quality owing to its symptoms (itching and stinging). This research has been published in the international Frontiers in Microbiology journal, a world leader in the field of microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Separating host and microbiome contributions to drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity
The gut microbiota is implicated in the metabolism of many medical drugs, with consequences for interpersonal variation in drug efficacy and toxicity. However, quantifying microbial contributions to drug metabolism is challenging, particularly in cases where host and microbiome perform the same metabolic transformation. We combined gut commensal genetics with gnotobiotics to measure brivudine drug metabolism across tissues in mice that vary in a single microbiome-encoded enzyme. Informed by these measurements, we built a pharmacokinetic model that quantitatively predicts microbiome contributions to systemic drug and metabo...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zimmermann, M., Zimmermann-Kogadeeva, M., Wegmann, R., Goodman, A. L. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Sponsored Collection | Smarter imaging: Gaining more from your microscopy experiments
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Microbiology opms-sups Source Type: news

Choline acetyltransferase-expressing T cells are required to control chronic viral infection
Although widely studied as a neurotransmitter, T cell–derived acetylcholine (ACh) has recently been reported to play an important role in regulating immunity. However, the role of lymphocyte-derived ACh in viral infection is unknown. Here, we show that the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of ACh production, is robustly induced in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection in an IL-21–dependent manner. Deletion of Chat within the T cell compartment in mice ablated vasodilation in response to infection, impaired the migratio...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Cox, M. A., Duncan, G. S., Lin, G. H. Y., Steinberg, B. E., Yu, L. X., Brenner, D., Buckler, L. N., Elia, A. J., Wakeham, A. C., Nieman, B., Dominguez-Brauer, C., Elford, A. R., Gill, K. T., Kubli, S. P., Haight, J., Berger, T., Ohashi, P. S., Tracey, K. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

ChAT-ty T cells fight viral infection
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Scanlon, S. T. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Off-target drug metabolism
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Pills give patients a shot inside the stomach
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Service, R. F. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Microbiology In Depth Source Type: news

Gut bacteria linked to mental well-being and depression
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Pennisi, E. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Microbiology In Depth Source Type: news

Deborah Hogan Named a 2019 Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology
Deborah Hogan, PhD, a professor of microbiology and immunology at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine, has been named a 2019 Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology based on her record of scientific achievement and original contributions to the field of microbiology. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - February 6, 2019 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Timothy Dean Tags: News Research award faculty recognition Source Type: news

Beneficial bacteria in the breasts can protect women from cancer
(Natural News) Probiotics promote digestive health. But according to a study, probiotics can also help lower your risk of developing breast cancer. The study results were published in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology in collaboration with the American Society for Microbiology. Probiotics and breast cancer prevention Probiotics are associated with an improved digestive and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Microbiologists Determine That Workout Warriors Are Drinking from Reusable Water Bottles Contaminated with Bacteria Found to Cause Hospital-Acquired Infections
Brazilian study finds Staph, E. coli, and other bacteria that contribute to hospital-acquired infections in reusable water bottles used by members of multiple fitness centers In the latest example of Microbiologists swabbing and culturing samples taken from common, everyday items, a research team in Brazil has found germs associated with hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) infections on […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - February 6, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Pathology Source Type: news

ECCMID Infectious Diseases Conference 2019
(European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases) The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) would like to invite media to register now for the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, April 13-16, 2019. Registration for bona fide journalists is free. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 5, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Gut bacteria may have impact on mental health, study says
Researchers found people with depression had low levels of Coprococcus and Dialister bacteriaMicrobes that set up home in the gut may have an impact on mental health, according to a major study into wellbeing and the bacteria that live inside us.Researchers in Belgium found that people with depression had consistently low levels of bacteria known as Coprococcus and Dialister whether they took antidepressants or not.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Microbiology Depression Belgium Source Type: news

The long battle against infectious diseases | Letters
Readers respond to a recent article and letter published in the GuardianI would like to clarify that, contrary to your article (The microbes are fighting back, and if anyone thinks there is a simple solution, they are wrong, 25 January), a few decades ago precisely no one in drug discovery thought that the war against infectious diseases had been won. Sir Alexander Fleming, who first discovered antibiotics, warned of microbial resistance and it has been known about ever since.The reason drug companies have shied away from antibiotic research is, as mentioned in the article, that it is extremely difficult to discover new on...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Infectious diseases Medical research People in science Health Society Microbiology Antibiotics China Asia Pacific World news Source Type: news

Microbes help make the coffee
(American Society for Microbiology) When it comes to processing coffee beans, longer fermentation times can result in better taste, contrary to conventional wisdom. Lactic acid bacteria play an important, positive role in this process. Other species of microbes may play a role in this process as well, but more research is needed to better understand their role. The research is published Feb. 1 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

FDA sets March dates for microbiology, neurology device panel meetings
The FDA this week set two new March dates for public medical device advisory committee meetings, the first to discuss microbiology devices and the second to discuss a specific neurological device, according to official FDA releases. In the microbiology devices panel meeting, slated to be held March 8, a committee of microbiology device experts will discuss and make recommendations regarding novel or alternative approaches to clinical studies and devices intended to detect Human Papillomavirus nucleic acid, according to the release. “These approaches will take into consideration scientific data generated since the app...
Source: Mass Device - January 31, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Diagnostics Featured Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Neurological Regulatory/Compliance neuronix Source Type: news

Opposing reactions in coenzyme A metabolism sensitize Mycobacterium tuberculosis to enzyme inhibition
Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the leading infectious cause of death in humans. Synthesis of lipids critical for Mtb’s cell wall and virulence depends on phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PptT), an enzyme that transfers 4'-phosphopantetheine (Ppt) from coenzyme A (CoA) to diverse acyl carrier proteins. We identified a compound that kills Mtb by binding and partially inhibiting PptT. Killing of Mtb by the compound is potentiated by another enzyme encoded in the same operon, Ppt hydrolase (PptH), that undoes the PptT reaction. Thus, loss-of-function mutants of PptH displayed antimicrobial resistance. Our PptT-inhib...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ballinger, E., Mosior, J., Hartman, T., Burns-Huang, K., Gold, B., Morris, R., Goullieux, L., Blanc, I., Vaubourgeix, J., Lagrange, S., Fraisse, L., Sans, S., Couturier, C., Bacque, E., Rhee, K., Scarry, S. M., Aube, J., Yang, G., Ouerfelli, O., Schnappin Tags: Biochemistry, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news