Paper on Anal Swabs for COVID-19 Retracted for Ethical Issues Paper on Anal Swabs for COVID-19 Retracted for Ethical Issues
The article,'Anal swab as the potentially optimal specimen for SARS-CoV-2 detection to evaluate the hospital discharge of COVID-19 patients,'appeared in July in Future Microbiology.Retraction Watch (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - April 16, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis after treatment with tocilizumab in a patient with COVID-19 ARDS: a case report, Diagnostic microbiology and infectious disease
We present the case of a previously immunocompetent man with coronavirus disease-2019 who developed invasive pulmonary aspergillosis after treatment with tocilizumab, illustrating the importance of considering opportunistic infections when providing immune modulating therapy. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

One year of SARS-CoV-2 evolution
(Microbiology Society) Today, researchers published an in-depth look at the SARS-CoV-2 mutations that have taken place during the past year in the Journal of General Virology. The review discusses the findings of over 180 research articles and follows the changes that have taken place in the SARS-CoV-2 genome, and the variants that have occurred as a result. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diversity and functional landscapes in the microbiota of animals in the wild
Animals in the wild are able to subsist on pathogen-infected and poisonous food and show immunity to various diseases. These may be due to their microbiota, yet we have a poor understanding of animal microbial diversity and function. We used metagenomics to analyze the gut microbiota of more than 180 species in the wild, covering diverse classes, feeding behaviors, geographies, and traits. Using de novo metagenome assembly, we constructed and functionally annotated a database of more than 5000 genomes, comprising 1209 bacterial species of which 75% are unknown. The microbial composition, diversity, and functional content e...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Levin, D., Raab, N., Pinto, Y., Rothschild, D., Zanir, G., Godneva, A., Mellul, N., Futorian, D., Gal, D., Leviatan, S., Zeevi, D., Bachelet, I., Segal, E. Tags: Genetics, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

SARS-CoV-2 within-host diversity and transmission
Extensive global sampling and sequencing of the pandemic virus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have enabled researchers to monitor its spread and to identify concerning new variants. Two important determinants of variant spread are how frequently they arise within individuals and how likely they are to be transmitted. To characterize within-host diversity and transmission, we deep-sequenced 1313 clinical samples from the United Kingdom. SARS-CoV-2 infections are characterized by low levels of within-host diversity when viral loads are high and by a narrow bottleneck at transmission. Most varian...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Lythgoe, K. A., Hall, M., Ferretti, L., de Cesare, M., MacIntyre-Cockett, G., Trebes, A., Andersson, M., Otecko, N., Wise, E. L., Moore, N., Lynch, J., Kidd, S., Cortes, N., Mori, M., Williams, R., Vernet, G., Justice, A., Green, A., Nicholls, S. M., Ansa Tags: Evolution, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Patterns and bottlenecks
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Evolution, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Mining wild animal microbiomes
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Genetics, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Will Covid vaccines protect us against new variants? | Julian Tang
New strains such as the South African variant that ’s emerged in south London will require constant vigilance as lockdown easesAll viruses mutate. They do this to adapt and survive better in their specific host. The virus that causes Covid-19 is no different: it has moved from the animal realm, where it most likelyoriginated in bats, to the human world. Since then, scientists have been locked in a battle between the spread of the virus and the ability to immunise against it. We now have the vaccines to protect us against Covid-19 – but what happens when this virus mutates further, as it likely will?As lockdown ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Julian Tang Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Vaccines and immunisation Society Pfizer AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals industry World news UK news Source Type: news

UK study on mixing Covid vaccines between jabs to be expanded
Researchers to examine whether mixing vaccines may give longer-lasting immunity against virusCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA major UK study examining whether Covid vaccines can be safely mixed with different types of jabs for the first and second doses is to be expanded.Researchers running theCom-Cov study, launched in February to investigate alternating doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca and Pfizer vaccines for the first and second doses, will now include a shot of the Moderna or Novavax vaccines.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Marsh Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Health Society Coronavirus World news Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science UK news Source Type: news

Covid-19: what ’s going on with the AstraZeneca vaccine? – podcast
After mounting concern over reports of rare but serious blood clots in a small number of recipients of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, last week the UK ’s Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) recommended that healthy adults under 30 should have an alternative jab if they can. To find out what’s behind the change in advice,Nicola Davis speaks to Dr Sue Pavord about what this rare clotting syndrome is, and asksProf Adam Finn about how the JCVI made its decisionContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Nicola Davis and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Health Vaccines and immunisation Society Source Type: news

UK ’s Covid vaccine programme on track despite AstraZeneca problems
Three-quarters of population could be fully immunised by first week in August, according to forecastsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe UK ’s vaccination programme is expected to be effectively completed shortly after the US’s this summer, and several weeks ahead of the EU’s effort, despite falling up to six weeks behind because of problems affecting the Oxford/AstraZeneca jab.Airfinity, which tracks vaccination programmes worldwide, forecasts that 75% of the population can be fully immunised in the UK by the first week in August, a level whereherd immunity arguably begi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Dan Sabbagh Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Health Society Coronavirus Infectious diseases World news US news Medical research Microbiology Science Source Type: news

Global Covid vaccine rollout threatened by shortage of vital components
Pharmaceutical firms warn of delays to items such as the large bags in which vaccine cells are grownCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageVaccine-makers around the world face shortages of vital components including large plastic growbags, according to the head of the firm that is manufacturing a quarter of the UK ’s jab supply.Stan Erck, the chief executive of Novavax – which makes the second vaccine to begrown and bottled entirely in Britain– told theObserver that the shortage of 2,000-litre bags in which the vaccine cells were grown was a significant hurdle for global supply....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: James Tapper Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Pharmaceuticals industry Business Health Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society World news Source Type: news

Prediction of Sepsis in COVID-19 Using Laboratory Indicators, Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology
This study retrospectively investigated laboratory test data of 2,453 patients with COVID-19 from electronic health records. Extreme gradient boosting (XGBoost) was employed to build four models with different feature subsets of a total of 69 collected indicators. Meanwhile, the explainable Shapley Additive ePlanation (SHAP) method was adopted to interpret predictive results and to analyze the feature importance of risk factors.; Findings: The model for classifying COVID-19 viral sepsis with seven coagulation function indicators achieved the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) 0.9213 (95% CI, 89.94...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - April 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Comparison of SOFA Score, SIRS, qSOFA, and qSOFA + L Criteria in the Diagnosis and Prognosis of Sepsis,
Conclusion: The SOFA score was highly sensitive and predictive in the diagnosis of sepsis. The SOFA score had a high discriminative ability to predict emergency and in-hospital mortality. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - April 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

COVID-19: it's all about sepsis, Future microbiology
Initially considered as a community-acquired pneumonia that could worsen into the acute respiratory distress syndrome, it soon became apparent that dysfunction of other organs, in addition to the lungs, is often present in patients with COVID-19; indeed, multiple organ failure (MOF) accounts for most of the deaths from COVID19 [3]. MOF in COVID-19 can involve any organs, the six most common being the lungs, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, the brain, the liver and the coagulation system. COVID-19 is characterized by a thrombotic endotheliopathy involving the entire body. The resulting endothelial dysfunction may be ...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - April 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

April 8th, 2021: mRNA vaccines may cause your body to churn out PRIONS that "eat your brain" like Mad Cow Disease
(Natural News) The spike protein outer shell of the coronavirus contains “prion-like regions” that give the virus very high adhesion to ACE2 receptors in the human body. This has been documented by a study entitled, “SARS-CoV-2 Prion-Like Domains in Spike Proteins Enable Higher Affinity to ACE2,” published by the Human Microbiology Institute: The presence and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Covid-19: how does it cause heart damage?
Cardiovascular problems aren ’t just a risk factor for Covid-19, but can also be acomplication of having the disease. A growing number of studies are showing that many of those who have been hospitalised for Covid-19, as well as people who managed the initial infection at home, are being left with heart injuries including inflammation, blood clots and abnormal heart rhythms.Nicola Davis speaks to Dr Betty Raman to find out how the virus damages organs outside the lungs, and what ’s being done to helpContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Nicola Davis and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Health Heart disease Source Type: news

AstraZeneca vaccine: 'Sensible' to delay trial in children following blood clot fears
THE ASTRAZENECA vaccine trial in children has been halted while the UK's medicines regulator investigates a possible link with rare blood clots in adults. Speaking on ITV's Good Morning Britain this morning, Professor Paul Hunter, medical microbiologist at the University of East Anglia, said halting the trial was a "sensible" move. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Organic composts may help farmers prevent foodborne disease outbreaks
(Wiley) Foodborne disease outbreaks linked to the consumption of fresh produce have caused farmers to re-evaluate their practices. A recent analysis published in the Journal of Applied Microbiology of a 27-year experiment comparing organic and conventional soil management indicates that animal-based composts do not promote pathogen survival and may even promote bacterial communities that suppress pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 7, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

AstraZeneca vaccine: Blood clotting in younger people 'not surprising' says professor
REPORTS suggest younger people are more at risk of blood clotting after receiving the AstraZeneca jab than their older counterparts. Although research has not identified a causal connection, the risk of blood clotting in younger people is not altogether surprising, said Professor Paul Hunter, medical microbiologist at the University of East Anglia. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

James Mcallister was a much-loved family man. Did the Christmas mixing confusion cause his death?
In the run-up to Christmas, the government dithered and made last-minute rule changes that left many people baffled. A surge in coronavirus cases soon followedAll through the spring of 2020, and into the summer, Michelle Mcallister carefully shielded her husband, James Mcallister. Michelle, 39, who lives in the Wednesfield area of Wolverhampton, was a full-time carer to James, 52. A former used car dealer, James had heart failure and had used a colostomy bag since a stomach ulcer burst in 2016. He was unable to work and was often in pain, reliant on a walking stick and occasionally a wheelchair to get around.The couple had...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 6, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sirin Kale Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Science World news Microbiology Society Source Type: news

UK's Covid traffic light travel plan too simplistic, say scientists
Idea raises concerns among some scientists who say it could fail to stop new variants entering countryCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coveragePotential plans to introduce a traffic light scheme for travel abroad have prompted concerns among scientists that the approach is too simplistic and could fail to prevent new variants from entering the UK.At present,it is illegal to travel abroad for holidays, with foreign travel only allowed in specific circumstances. Those who do travel abroad must quarantine either at home or in a hotel on return to England. All must do so in a hotel on return to Scotlan...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Travel Health policy UK news Source Type: news

The 'elite controllers' who can naturally suppress HIV
Research into how some HIV-positive people keep the virus at bay promises to yield new treatment possibilities, from vaccines to gene therapiesThe year was 1998 when Joel Blankson encountered a patient he would never forget. Blankson was working in the HIV clinic at John Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, when an HIV-positive woman in her mid-40s arrived for some routine tests.Blankson gave her a PCR test, intending to prescribe a newly developed combination of medicines called antiretroviral therapies to suppress the infection, and prevent her developing Aids.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: David Cox Tags: Aids and HIV Science Society Health Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Source Type: news

Two new vaccines on the way – with more to follow this year
Half of UK adults have had a first jab, and future supplies of millions of doses look assuredCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageTwo very different jabs have been responsible for inoculating Britain ’s strikingly high number ofvaccine recipients– with more than half of the country’s adult population having now received a first dose and several million people having received second doses. The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine uses pieces of the Covid virus’s genetic code which, after injection, enter cells and instructs them to start making pie ces of virus protein, which stimulat...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation AstraZeneca Pfizer Health Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Business Science Society Pharmaceuticals industry Source Type: news

Brazil records 70,238 new cases; Netherlands halts AstraZeneca jab for under 60s - as it happened
Country has registeredmore than 12.9 million cases;10,000 appointments scrapped, reports Dutch news agency citing Netherlands health ministry Turkey records 42,308 new Covid cases in last 24 hoursCovid: seven deaths reported in Oxford/AstraZeneca UK recipientsPakistan, Bangladesh, Kenya and Philippines on England travel ‘red list’Curfews and quarantines: Europe ’s Easter of Covid restrictions‘We’re in a really good place’: is Israel nearing the Covid endgame?US coronavirus – latest updates12.24amBSTThat ’s it from the global blog team for now. Thanks for following our coverag...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 3, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nadeem Badshah (now); Yohannes Lowe; Rhi Storer and Jedidajah Otte (earlier) Tags: Coronavirus World news Infectious diseases Vaccines and immunisation Medical research Microbiology Science UK news Boris Johnson Politics NHS Asia Pacific Africa Source Type: news

‘Has everyone in Kent gone to an illegal rave?': on the variant trail with the Covid detectives
At the end of last year, a crack team of British scientists discovered a new coronavirus strain that would spread across the world. As new variants emerge, can they keep them at bay?In late November last year, the people of Swale in Kent were being lambasted for disobedience. They were being Covid-shamed. The district, home to a large number of apple orchards, as well as the historic towns of Faversham and Sittingbourne, hadthe highest infection rates in the country. Close behind was nearby Thanet, the two areas totalling a little less than 500 sq km. The rules on wearing masks and social distancing were being “wilfu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 3, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Tags: Coronavirus Science Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology World news Source Type: news

Covid live: Brazil records 70,238 new cases; Netherlands halts AstraZeneca jab for under 60s - as it happened
Country has registeredmore than 12.9 million cases;10,000 appointments scrapped, reports Dutch news agency citing Netherlands health ministry Turkey records 42,308 new Covid cases in last 24 hoursCovid: seven deaths reported in Oxford/AstraZeneca UK recipientsPakistan, Bangladesh, Kenya and Philippines on England travel ‘red list’Curfews and quarantines: Europe ’s Easter of Covid restrictions‘We’re in a really good place’: is Israel nearing the Covid endgame?US coronavirus – latest updates12.24amBSTThat ’s it from the global blog team for now. Thanks for following our coverag...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nadeem Badshah (now); Yohannes Lowe; Rhi Storer and Jedidajah Otte (earlier) Tags: Coronavirus World news Infectious diseases Vaccines and immunisation Medical research Microbiology Science UK news Boris Johnson Politics NHS Asia Pacific Africa Source Type: news

Covid live: Netherlands halts AstraZeneca jab for under 60s – reports; Turkey records highest level of new cases
10,000 appointments scrapped, reports Dutch news agency citing Netherlands health ministry;Turkey records42,308 new Covid cases in last 24 hoursCovid: seven deaths reported in Oxford/AstraZeneca UK recipientsPakistan, Bangladesh, Kenya and Philippines on England travel ‘red list’Curfews and quarantines: Europe ’s Easter of Covid restrictions‘We’re in a really good place’: is Israel nearing the Covid endgame?US coronavirus – latest updates6.47pmBSTHere is a quick recap of the main Covid updates from around the world:6.37pmBSTRussia has recorded over 225,000 Covid related deaths sinc...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Yohannes Lowe (now); Rhi Storer and Jedidajah Otte (earlier) Tags: Coronavirus World news Infectious diseases Vaccines and immunisation Medical research Microbiology Science UK news Boris Johnson Politics NHS Asia Pacific Africa Source Type: news

Away with the bad clich é : Bacterial complexity is often underestimated
(Technische Universit ä t Dresden) With the new Priority Program 'Emergent Functions of Bacterial Multicellularity' (SPP 2389), spokesperson Thorsten Mascher, Professor of Microbiology at TU Dresden, aims at understanding the importance and development of multicellularity and differentiated microbial tissues in bacteria. Thus, the new priority program aims at bringing about a paradigm shift in microbiology: bacteria are preferentially multicellular organisms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Getting One Vaccine Is Good. How About Mix-and-Match?
Researchers are exploring the possible benefits of pairing doses from two different Covid-19 vaccines. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 30, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carl Zimmer Tags: your-feed-science Clinical Trials Vaccination and Immunization Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Immune System Proteins Ebola Virus AstraZeneca PLC Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology Pfizer Inc Great Britain Russia Source Type: news

UC group launches clinical trial using CRISPR to correct sickle cell disease gene defect
Scientists at UCLA, UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to jointly launch an early phase, first-in-human clinical trial of a CRISPR gene correction therapy in patients with sickle cell disease using the patients ’ own blood-forming stem cells.The trial will combine CRISPR technology developed at the Innovative Genomics Institute — a UC Berkeley–UCSF initiative founded by Berkeley’s Nobel Prize–winning scientist Jennifer Doudna — with UCLA’s expertise in genetic analysis and cell manufacturing, and the decades-long expertise at U...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 30, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Coronavirus: April will be 'second dose month', says UK vaccines minister
Nadhim Zahawi hails milestone of 30m first doses and says UK still on track to protect all adults by JulyCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe minister for vaccine deployment, Nadhim Zahawi, has said that April will be the “second dose month”, as the UK passed the milestone of giving a first jab to 30 million people, comprising the vast majority of those in the first nine priority groups.The minister ’s remark confirms a near pausing of the first dose programme – even as an additional vaccine,from Moderna, becomes available in April – as other supplies are focus...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 28, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Dan Sabbagh and Andrew Sparrow Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Politics Nadhim Zahawi Health Infectious diseases Medical research Science Microbiology Society UK news Health policy Source Type: news

A Cultural Triumph: Microbiology Student Makes A Petri Dish Masterpiece
Balaram Khamari has been spending a lot of time in his lab in Puttaparthi, India, culturing colorful bacteria and artfully arranging it on a jelly like substance called agar.(Image credit: Balaram Khamari) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 28, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah McCammon Source Type: news

Moderna Covid vaccine to be introduced in UK from April
Government confident it will get over-50s vaccinated by 15 April and and remaining adults by end of JulyA third coronavirus vaccine will start being administered in the UK next month, joining the Pfizer and AstraZeneca jabs already in use, the culture secretary, Oliver Dowden, has confirmed.Britain has ordered 17m doses of the Moderna vaccine, which has a94% efficacy rate in trials, and Dowden said the first supplies were expected to arrive in April.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 28, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Sparrow Political correspondent Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Politics Health Infectious diseases Medical research Science Microbiology Society UK news Source Type: news

Capitalism won't save us from Covid, no matter what Boris Johnson might think | Mariana Mazzucato
His claim that ‘greed’ was the driver behind the UK’s vaccine success ignores the huge role of state fundingBoris Johnson has attributed the UK ’s vaccine success to“capitalism” and “greed”. Though these were crude remarks, if the prime minister ’s words are any indication of his vision for how the UK can recover from the pandemic, there are worrying implications for the country’s policies at home and abroad.This is not the first time that Johnson has taken thewrong economic lessons from the Covid crisis. A few months agohe said in the same spirit that for “...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Mariana Mazzucato Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Science Research funding World news Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Boris Johnson Politics UK news Health Society Source Type: news

Don't be fooled: Covid won't be cured by a panacea | Philip Ball
‘Cure-alls’ such as vitamin D and ivermectin seem appealing. But the truth is, specific diseases demand specific medicinesIf the coronavirus had struck in the middle ages, there would have been a cure. You could have got it at all good apothecaries, though not cheaply. It was calledtheriac, and it also cured epilepsy, indigestion, heart trouble and swellings and fevers of all kinds. The recipes were often secret but were said to include the roasted flesh of vipers – it was the original snake-oil remedy. Sugar may have been a common ingredient, too, as the name is the root of the English “treacle&rdq...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 26, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: Coronavirus Science Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology UK news Source Type: news

UK Covid: MPs vote to extend emergency powers for six months; NHS alert level in England to be cut to three – as it happened
MPsvote to renew Coronavirus Act by 484 votes to 76; NHS England chief says decisiondue to lower infections and vaccine impact. This live blog is now closed -please follow the global coronavirus live blog for updatesEU leaders told bloc has sent 21m Covid vaccine doses to the UKJean-Claude Juncker criticises EU over Covid spat with UKPub and restaurant Covid checks unworkable, says industry6.45pmGMTRelated:Coronavirus live news: EU vaccine campaign suffers new blow with Novavax delay; Italy to miss jabs target6.29pmGMTAnd here is the breakdown, by party, of the 76 MPs who voted against extending the Coronavirus Act.Conserv...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Sparrow Tags: Coronavirus Politics UK news Boris Johnson House of Commons Infectious diseases NHS Medical research Microbiology Matt Hancock Pubs Scotland Nicola Sturgeon Conservatives Labour Scottish National party (SNP) Scottish politi Source Type: news

UK Covid live news: backlash over plan to have pub landlords check Covid status
Latest updates: Boris Johnson tells MPs landlords could set criteria for entry, including demanding customers provide Covid vaccine certificateEU leaders push back against plan to halt Covid vaccine exportsPlans to let pub landlords check Covid status criticised as dangerousPubs that check Covid status may be allowed to drop social distancingCoronavirus – latest global updatesSee all our coronavirus coverage10.07amGMTEU leaders are likely to shy away from supporting the use of new powers to block Covid vaccine shipments to countries such as the UK with better jab coverage than the bloc, according to a draft statement...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Sparrow Tags: Coronavirus Politics UK news Boris Johnson House of Commons Infectious diseases NHS Medical research Microbiology Source Type: news

UCI study finds high-fiber diet brings significant changes to human gut microbiome
(University of California - Irvine) A short-term intervention in daily fiber consumption can significantly alter the gut microbiome and nutrient intake, according to a study led by University of California, Irvine researchers. The research was recently published by the American Society for Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hunting the eagle killer: A cyanobacterial neurotoxin causes vacuolar myelinopathy
Vacuolar myelinopathy is a fatal neurological disease that was initially discovered during a mysterious mass mortality of bald eagles in Arkansas in the United States. The cause of this wildlife disease has eluded scientists for decades while its occurrence has continued to spread throughout freshwater reservoirs in the southeastern United States. Recent studies have demonstrated that vacuolar myelinopathy is induced by consumption of the epiphytic cyanobacterial species Aetokthonos hydrillicola growing on aquatic vegetation, primarily the invasive Hydrilla verticillata. Here, we describe the identification, biosynthetic g...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Breinlinger, S., Phillips, T. J., Haram, B. N., Mares, J., Martinez Yerena, J. A., Hrouzek, P., Sobotka, R., Henderson, W. M., Schmieder, P., Williams, S. M., Lauderdale, J. D., Wilde, H. D., Gerrin, W., Kust, A., Washington, J. W., Wagner, C., Geier, B., Tags: Ecology, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Intranasal fusion inhibitory lipopeptide prevents direct-contact SARS-CoV-2 transmission in ferrets
Containment of the COVID-19 pandemic requires reducing viral transmission. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is initiated by membrane fusion between the viral and host cell membranes, which is mediated by the viral spike protein. We have designed lipopeptide fusion inhibitors that block this critical first step of infection and, on the basis of in vitro efficacy and in vivo biodistribution, selected a dimeric form for evaluation in an animal model. Daily intranasal administration to ferrets completely prevented SARS-CoV-2 direct-contact transmission during 24-hour cohousing with infecte...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: de Vries, R. D., Schmitz, K. S., Bovier, F. T., Predella, C., Khao, J., Noack, D., Haagmans, B. L., Herfst, S., Stearns, K. N., Drew-Bear, J., Biswas, S., Rockx, B., McGill, G., Dorrello, N. V., Gellman, S. H., Alabi, C. A., de Swart, R. L., Moscona, A., Tags: Microbiology reports Source Type: news

SARS-CoV-2 Mpro inhibitors with antiviral activity in a transgenic mouse model
The COVID-19 pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continually poses serious threats to global public health. The main protease (Mpro) of SARS-CoV-2 plays a central role in viral replication. We designed and synthesized 32 new bicycloproline-containing Mpro inhibitors derived from either boceprevir or telaprevir, both of which are approved antivirals. All compounds inhibited SARS-CoV-2 Mpro activity in vitro, with 50% inhibitory concentration values ranging from 7.6 to 748.5 nM. The cocrystal structure of Mpro in complex with MI-23, one of the most potent compounds, revealed its in...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Qiao, J., Li, Y.-S., Zeng, R., Liu, F.-L., Luo, R.-H., Huang, C., Wang, Y.-F., Zhang, J., Quan, B., Shen, C., Mao, X., Liu, X., Sun, W., Yang, W., Ni, X., Wang, K., Xu, L., Duan, Z.-L., Zou, Q.-C., Zhang, H.-L., Qu, W., Long, Y.-H.-P., Li, M.-H., Yang, R. Tags: Microbiology, Virology reports Source Type: news

Halting transmission
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Microbiology twis Source Type: news

A lethal combination
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Vignieri, S. Tags: Ecology, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Targeting the SARS-CoV-2 main protease
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Microbiology, Virology twis Source Type: news

The emerging plasticity of SARS-CoV-2
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: McCormick, K. D., Jacobs, J. L., Mellors, J. W. Tags: Microbiology perspective Source Type: news

US agency questions AstraZeneca's Covid vaccine trial data
Drug firm may have provided incomplete view of efficacy data from US trial, says safety monitorCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine against Covid has been dealt yet another blow within hours of the pharmaceutical company posting excellent results from its long-awaited big trial in the US.Questions have been raised in the US by the independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB), which has suggested that AstraZeneca may have provided “outdated information” in its statement on Monday, which gave “an incomplete view” of the results.Continu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: AstraZeneca Business Medical research Pharmaceuticals industry US news Infectious diseases Coronavirus Science World news Microbiology Source Type: news

Covid vaccine used on apes at San Diego zoo trialled on mink
Experimental animal jabs could stop spillover back to humans, says firm behind vaccines for primatesAt the start of 2021, four orangutans and five bonobos becamethe first great apes at a US zoo to receive Covid-19 vaccinations. An outbreak in San Diego zoo ’s western lowland gorilla troop had caused panic among staff after the virus spread to the animals, probably from an asymptomatic zookeeper. Eight gorillas tested positive – with symptoms such as runny noses, lethargy and coughs – and there were fears the virus could spread to other primates.“We were approached by San Diego zoo asking if we had a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Greenfield Tags: Animals Wildlife Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Coronavirus Medical research World news Society Health Microbiology Science US news Environment Source Type: news

Covid-19: what happens next? – podcast
On 23 March 2020, the UK prime minister, Boris Johnson, announced the first lockdown in response to the growing number of cases of Covid-19. At the same time, countries around the world began to close their schools, restaurants, and offices and ask citizens to physically distance from one another. In the 12 months since, more than 2 million people have died, viral variants have emerged, and we have developed safe and effective vaccines.One year into the pandemic, Science Weekly is asking: what happens next?Ian Sample talks to the professors Martin Landray, Mike Tildesley, and Deborah Dunn-Walters about Covid treatments, va...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Coronavirus Science Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Vaccines and immunisation Health Source Type: news

Can the UK avoid a third wave of Covid?
Analysis: as lockdown restrictions ease, the country now faces a race between vaccination and infectionCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageBritain ’s latest lockdown has dramatically reduced cases of coronavirus, and the number of people being admitted to hospital and dying from the disease. What the country faces now is essentially a race between vaccination and infection: can we protect people faster than the virus spreads as restrictions are eased?This was always going to be a balancing act. The UK vaccination strategy of prioritising the most vulnerable people and moving down the age...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample and Oliver Holmes Tags: Coronavirus Health Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society World news Israel Source Type: news