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Lung experts 'deeply concerned' by low flu jab uptake in England
Barely two in five people in at-risk groups have been vaccinated as NHS hospitals buckle under strain caused by cold snapFewer than half those eligible for a free winter flu jab have had one, despite high-profile warnings that this winter could bring the biggest flu outbreak in years, NHS figures reveal.The low uptake, which will alarm NHS bosses, come as many hospitals showed clear signs of starting to buckle under the extra demand for care caused by the cold snap that began last week.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Denis Campbell and Pamela Duncan Tags: Flu Vaccines and immunisation Society Flu pandemic Health World news NHS GPs Doctors Hospitals Infectious diseases Science Microbiology Source Type: news

Sanofi and the Institut Pasteur reward five researchers in the service of human health
(Institut Pasteur) Paris, France - December 13th 2017 - Sanofi and the Institut Pasteur presented the Sanofi - Institut Pasteur Awards for the sixth year in a row. Five internationally recognized researchers were rewarded for their work in two major fields with implications for global health: Immunology and Microbiology& Infection. The National Junior award winners are Dr Fabrizia Stavru and Dr Fran ç ois Leulier. The International award winners are Prof. Jeffrey I. Gordon, Prof. Antonio Lanzavecchia and Prof. Michel C. Nussenzweig. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trends and Issues in Public Health Laboratory Testing
North Dakota Department of Health. 06/23/2017 This course discusses new and upcoming testing methods in microbiology, and recent disease outbreaks in North Dakota and the nation. It also lists new testing methodologies that have been implemented at the North Dakota public health laboratory in response to outbreaks. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Many more bacteria have electrically conducting filaments
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) Microbiologists led by Derek Lovley at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, who is internationally known for having discovered electrically conducting microfilaments or 'nanowires' in the bacterium Geobacter, announce in a new paper this month that they have discovered the unexpected structures in many other species, greatly broadening the research field on electrically conducting filaments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 8, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

CIDRAP ASP - Improving the antibiotic stewardship value of clinical microbiology tests
December 12, 2017 2:00-3:00pm ET. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - December 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fastidious and Furious: Reporting Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing for Fastidious or Infrequently Isolated Bacteria
Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of fastidious bacteria is an essential yet challenging exercise for the clinical microbiology laboratory. An understanding of bacterial growth requirements is essential to ensure optimal recovery of pathogens. A working knowledge of reference methods for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, such as agar and broth microdilution, as well as knowledge of modifications to these systems, will aid the laboratory in the selection of the appropriate AST method to meet regulatory requirements and ensure quality results for patient care. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - December 6, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: D. Jane Hata Source Type: news

Fighting HIV through a better delivery method of anti-retrovirals
(Boston University School of Medicine) Rahm Gummuluru, PhD, associate professor of microbiology at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), and Bjoern Reinhard, PhD, professor of chemistry at Boston University, have been awarded a Research Project Grant (R01) from the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/National Institute of Health. The R01 is the original and historically oldest grant mechanism used to provide support for health-related research and development based on the mission of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The disposable chip that will allow GPs to write the perfect prescription
A new method of distinguishing viral from bacterial infections will help control the misuse of antibioticsYou have a rasping cough. Your speech is reduced to a whisper and your throat is raw and aching. You cannot sleep. So you tell your sad story to your doctor, who faces a simple issue: do you have a viral infection, or is a bacterium responsible for your illness?It sounds a trivial issue. In fact, the problem goes beyond your immediate health and has implications for the general wellbeing of society. If your doctor makes a misdiagnosis and – thinking your condition is caused by a bacterium – prescribes a cou...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Antibiotics Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society Health Healthcare industry Business Source Type: news

Press invitation to Europe's largest congress on hepatology
(European Association for the Study of the Liver) The International Liver Congress ™ (ILC) is the annual EASL meeting, and the flagship event in EASL's educational calendar. Every year in April, scientific and medical experts from a broad range of fields including hepatology, gastroenterology, internal medicine, cell biology, transplant surgery, infectious diseases, microbiology and virology, pharmacology, pathology and radiology and imaging come together from around the world to learn about the latest in liver research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ocean biogeochemistry modeled with emergent trait-based genomics
Marine ecosystem models have advanced to incorporate metabolic pathways discovered with genomic sequencing, but direct comparisons between models and "omics" data are lacking. We developed a model that directly simulates metagenomes and metatranscriptomes for comparison with observations. Model microbes were randomly assigned genes for specialized functions, and communities of 68 species were simulated in the Atlantic Ocean. Unfit organisms were replaced, and the model self-organized to develop community genomes and transcriptomes. Emergent communities from simulations that were initialized with different cohorts...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 30, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Coles, V. J., Stukel, M. R., Brooks, M. T., Burd, A., Crump, B. C., Moran, M. A., Paul, J. H., Satinsky, B. M., Yager, P. L., Zielinski, B. L., Hood, R. R. Tags: Geochemistry, Geophysics, Microbiology r-articles Source Type: news

Functional ocean biogeography
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 30, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Geochemistry, Geophysics, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Obesity and the tumor microenvironment
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 30, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Olson, O. C., Quail, D. F., Joyce, J. A. Tags: Microbiology perspective Source Type: news

Navigating in a sea of genes
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 30, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Rynearson, T. A. Tags: Geochemistry, Geophysics, Microbiology perspective Source Type: news

An interferon-independent lncRNA promotes viral replication by modulating cellular metabolism
Viruses regulate host metabolic networks to improve their survival. The molecules that are responsive to viral infection and regulate such metabolic changes are hardly known, but are essential for understanding viral infection. Here we identify a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that is induced by multiple viruses, but not by type I interferon (IFN-I), and facilitates viral replication in mouse and human cells. In vivo deficiency of lncRNA-ACOD1 (a lncRNA identified by its nearest coding gene Acod1, aconitate decarboxylase 1) significantly attenuates viral infection through IFN-I–IRF3 (interferon regulatory factor 3)&ndas...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Wang, P., Xu, J., Wang, Y., Cao, X. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Major role of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in dark ocean carbon fixation
Carbon fixation by chemoautotrophic microorganisms in the dark ocean has a major impact on global carbon cycling and ecological relationships in the ocean’s interior, but the relevant taxa and energy sources remain enigmatic. We show evidence that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria affiliated with the Nitrospinae phylum are important in dark ocean chemoautotrophy. Single-cell genomics and community metagenomics revealed that Nitrospinae are the most abundant and globally distributed nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the ocean. Metaproteomics and metatranscriptomics analyses suggest that nitrite oxidation is the main pathway of e...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Pachiadaki, M. G., Sintes, E., Bergauer, K., Brown, J. M., Record, N. R., Swan, B. K., Mathyer, M. E., Hallam, S. J., Lopez-Garcia, P., Takaki, Y., Nunoura, T., Woyke, T., Herndl, G. J., Stepanauskas, R. Tags: Microbiology, Oceanography reports Source Type: news

Host RNA helps promote viral replication
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Dissolved inorganic carbon fixers revealed
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Microbiology, Oceanography twis Source Type: news

Survey of archaea in the body reveals other microbial guests
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Pennisi, E. Tags: Ecology, Microbiology In Depth Source Type: news

Do bacteriophage guests protect human health?
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Guglielmi, G. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology In Depth Source Type: news

Promoting Good Laboratory Practices for Waived Infectious Disease and Provider-Performed Microscopy Testing
Laboratory testing at the point of patient care was documented hundreds of years ago and has greatly expanded in the last 25 years due to improvements in technology, miniaturization, and the availability of rapid tests for a wide variety of analytes and microorganisms. Since the implementation of the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988, the number of non-traditional testing sites that provide testing with minimal oversight through a Certificate of Waiver (CW) or Certificate of Provider-Performed Microscopy (PPM) has increased. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - November 21, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Nancy Anderson, Heather Stang Source Type: news

Concomitant Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Influenza B Virus Pneumonia in a Child without Evidence of Influenza A (H5N1) Virus Infection
We describe an 8-year-old boy who was admitted to our hospital with pneumonia caused by M. pneumoniae and influenza B virus without evidence of influenza A (H5N1) virus infection, during a concurrent H5N1 virus outbreak among domestic chickens in Kelantan, a state in Malaysia. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - November 21, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Zeti Norfidiyati Ayub, Azian Harun, Chan Yean Yean, Alwi Muhd Besari, Mimi Azliha Abu Bakar Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

Loyola Stritch School of Medicine names senior and junior scientists of the year
(Loyola University Health System) Mashkoor Choudhry, MPhil, PhD, professor in the Department of Surgery and Francis Alonzo, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology were named Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine's Senior and Junior Scientists of the Year, respectively. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Three UCLA professors named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
Two  doctors and a dentist from UCLA have been selected as 2017 fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. They are among 396 members awarded this honor by the AAAS for their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.New fellows will be presented with an official certificate and a gold and blue rosette pin, representing science and engineering, on Feb. 17, 2018, at the association ’s annual meeting in Austin, Texas, and formally announced in the “AAAS News and Notes” section of the journal Science on Nov. 24.UCLA ’...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 20, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Forsyth Institute researcher Floyd Dewhirst named as AAAS Fellow
(Forsyth Institute) The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) today announced Forsyth Institute senior member of the staff, Floyd Dewhirst, DDS, PhD, as an AAAS Fellow in the Dentistry and Oral Health Sciences field. Dewhirst was elected a Fellow by his peers for his distinguished contributions in the field of molecular microbiology, particularly using molecular methods for the identification and classification of the human oral microbiome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biopreparedness and Biosecurity with Gigi Kwik Gronvall
American Society for Microbiology. 11/09/2017 This 52-minute podcast discusses the importance of biopreparedness. The speaker, from the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, discusses her work in creating policies around potential natural, accidental, and man-made pandemics. She describes her experiences running pandemic thought exercises that help researchers, public health workers, and governmental officials apply preparedness ideas to real-world simulations. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Antibody-dependent enhancement of severe dengue disease in humans
For dengue viruses 1 to 4 (DENV1-4), a specific range of antibody titer has been shown to enhance viral replication in vitro and severe disease in animal models. Although suspected, such antibody-dependent enhancement of severe disease has not been shown to occur in humans. Using multiple statistical approaches to study a long-term pediatric cohort in Nicaragua, we show that risk of severe dengue disease is highest within a narrow range of preexisting anti-DENV antibody titers. By contrast, we observe protection from all symptomatic dengue disease at high antibody titers. Thus, immune correlates of severe dengue must be ev...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Katzelnick, L. C., Gresh, L., Halloran, M. E., Mercado, J. C., Kuan, G., Gordon, A., Balmaseda, A., Harris, E. Tags: Epidemiology, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Too much or too little--better than some
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Epidemiology, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Advancing dengue vaccine development
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Feinberg, M. B., Ahmed, R. Tags: Epidemiology, Microbiology perspective Source Type: news

Two sides of the same coin: High fat diets cause anxiety and stress causes digestion problems
(Natural News) A new study from Brigham Young University (BYU) reveals that digestive microorganisms change behavior when the host is under stress. BYU professor of microbiology and molecular biology Laura Bridgewater used male and female mice for the study experiment. She found that when the female mice were exposed to mild stress, their gut microbiota... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UK and EU action plans should 'lose jargon' in a bid to win the battle with 'sup
(University of Birmingham) One of the UK's leading microbiologists is concerned that confusing language and a lack of specific objectives are hampering the global fight against antibiotic-resistant infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA helps many to live long and prosper
In Westwood, more than 100 faculty experts from 25 departments have embarked on anall-encompassing push to cut the health and economic impacts of depression in half by the year 2050. The mammoth undertaking will rely on platforms developed by the new Institute for Precision Health, which will harness the power of big data and genomics to move toward individually tailored treatments and health-promotion strategies.On the same 419 acres of land, researchers across the spectrum, from the laboratory bench to the patient bedside, are ushering in a potentially game-changing approach to turning the body ’s immune defenses a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Genomes rewrite cholera's global story
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Kupferschmidt, K. Tags: Epidemiology, Medicine, Diseases, Microbiology In Depth Source Type: news

Wave upon wave of disease
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Epidemiology, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Integrated view of Vibrio cholerae in the Americas
Latin America has experienced two of the largest cholera epidemics in modern history; one in 1991 and the other in 2010. However, confusion still surrounds the relationships between globally circulating pandemic Vibrio cholerae clones and local bacterial populations. We used whole-genome sequencing to characterize cholera across the Americas over a 40-year time span. We found that both epidemics were the result of intercontinental introductions of seventh pandemic El Tor V. cholerae and that at least seven lineages local to the Americas are associated with disease that differs epidemiologically from epidemic cholera. Our r...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Domman, D., Quilici, M.-L., Dorman, M. J., Njamkepo, E., Mutreja, A., Mather, A. E., Delgado, G., Morales-Espinosa, R., Grimont, P. A. D., Lizarraga-Partida, M. L., Bouchier, C., Aanensen, D. M., Kuri-Morales, P., Tarr, C. L., Dougan, G., Parkhill, J., Ca Tags: Epidemiology, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Genomic history of the seventh pandemic of cholera in Africa
The seventh cholera pandemic has heavily affected Africa, although the origin and continental spread of the disease remain undefined. We used genomic data from 1070 Vibrio cholerae O1 isolates, across 45 African countries and over a 49-year period, to show that past epidemics were attributable to a single expanded lineage. This lineage was introduced at least 11 times since 1970, into two main regions, West Africa and East/Southern Africa, causing epidemics that lasted up to 28 years. The last five introductions into Africa, all from Asia, involved multidrug-resistant sublineages that replaced antibiotic-susceptible sublin...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Weill, F.-X., Domman, D., Njamkepo, E., Tarr, C., Rauzier, J., Fawal, N., Keddy, K. H., Salje, H., Moore, S., Mukhopadhyay, A. K., Bercion, R., Luquero, F. J., Ngandjio, A., Dosso, M., Monakhova, E., Garin, B., Bouchier, C., Pazzani, C., Mutreja, A., Grun Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Cybersecurity Vulnerability Tops 2018 Health Tech Hazards List
Recent alarming incidents involving hacking, ransomware, and vulnerable medical devices have made it clear that cybersecurity needs to be a top priority in healthcare. The ECRI Institute is highlighting its importance, placing “Ransomware and Other Cybersecurity Threats to Healthcare Delivery Can Endanger Patients” as the top issue on its list of Top 10 Health Technology Hazards for 2018. The issues are chosen by considering criteria including preventability, frequency, severity, and potential scope. The ECRI Institute authors wrote in an executive brief, “In a healthcare environment, a malware attack can...
Source: MDDI - November 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Marie Thibault Tags: Medical Device Business Source Type: news

Is your gut microbiome the key to health and happiness?
Research suggests the vast ecosystem of organisms that lives in our digestive systems might be as complex and influential as our genes in everything from mental health to athleticism and obesity. But is ‘poop doping’ really the way ahead?John Cryan was originally trained as a neuroscientist to focus on everything from the neck upwards. But eight years ago, an investigation into irritable bowel syndrome drew his gaze towards the gut. Like people with depression, those with IBS often report having experienced early-life trauma, so in 2009, Cryan and his colleagues set about traumatising rat pups by separating the...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amy Fleming Tags: Health & wellbeing Mental health Microbiology Obesity Science Life and style Source Type: news

Personal Health: Unlocking the Secrets of the Microbiome
Restoring the proper balance of microscopic organisms in every organ is perhaps the most promising yet challenging task of modern medicine. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JANE E. BRODY Tags: Microbiology Digestive Tract Obesity Bacteria Diet and Nutrition Source Type: news

Make-up testers carry herpes and salmonella
Using make-up testers in stores is probably not a good idea, a microbiologist has warned, because of the risk of herpes and salmonella. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Adjunctive use of an Ethyl Lauroyl Arginate (LAE)-containing mouthwash in the nonsurgical therapy of periodontitis: a randomized clinical trial.
CONCLUSIONS:0.147% LAE-containing mouthwash could be an alternative to the use of 0.12% CHX in the non surgical therapy of periodontitis considering the similar clinical effects, more stable microbiological improvement and absence of adverse effects. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - November 3, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

How Stryker Made Q3 Look Easy
Like a lot of medtech companies, Stryker faced both external and internal challenges during the third quarter. But the Kalamazoo, MI-based company still managed to impress investors with 5.5% organic growth compared to the same period last year. Stryker's revenue growth took a 2.4% hit from an ongoing recall combined with a negative impact from recent hurricanes. The company also had to adjust for one less selling day in the quarter, which brought the organic growth down by another 1%. Styker cut its guidance for the year in August as it recalled certain lots of oral care products sold by the company's Sage Produ...
Source: MDDI - November 3, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Medical Device Business Orthopedics Source Type: news

Lab Tests Online: a Ground-Breaking and Enduring Health Resource
Long before patients were allowed to order lab tests themselves, many patients were confused about even routine tests that their doctor ordered. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry recognized early on the need for concise, peer-reviewed descriptions of individual tests. They set up a system that discussed (i) the reason to get tested, (ii) when to get tested, (iii) the sample required, (iv) any test preparation needed, (v) what was being tested, (vi) when the test should be ordered, and (vii) what the test result meant. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - November 2, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Dominique Smith Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - November 2, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Gut microbes shape response to cancer immunotherapy
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Kaiser, J. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Microbiology, Pharmacology, Toxicology In Depth Source Type: news

Tenure-track Assistant Professor in Cellular Biology or Cellular Physiology
The University of Washington Tacoma invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor in Cellular Biology or Cellular Physiology in the Division of Sciences and Mathematics within the School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences (SIAS). This is a full-time position with a nine-month service period. The successful candidate will be an intellectually expansive scholar with a proven record in cellular biology, cellular physiology, or related field, with biomedical applications. They will also have a demonstrated commitment to creating an inclusive classroom and laboratory environment with diverse and underreprese...
Source: AIBS Classifieds - October 30, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Classifieds Tags: Other Positions Available Source Type: news

Topical Silver Diamine Fluoride for Dental Caries Arrest in Preschool Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial and Microbiological Analysis of Caries Associated Microbes and Resistance Gene Expression
ConclusionAverage proportion of arrested caries lesions in the silver diamine fluoride group was higher (0.72; 95% CI; 0.55, 0.84) than in the placebo group (0.05; 95% CI; 0.00, 0.16). Confirmatory analysis using generalized estimating equation log-linear regression, based on the number of arrested lesions and accounting for the number of treated surfaces and length of follow-up, indicates the risk of arrested caries was significantly higher in the treatment group (relative risk, 17.3; 95% CI: 4.3 to 69.4). No harms were observed. RNA sequencing analysis identified no consistent changes in relative abundance of caries-asso...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - October 30, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Driving drug resistance out of fungi
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A collaborative team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, has developed a CRISPR-Cas9-based 'gene drive' platform to create diploid strains of the pathogen in which both gene copies could be efficiently deleted. The technique may lead the way toward a better understanding of drug resistance and biofilm-forming mechanisms, and through future research, it could help pinpoint new drug targets and combination therapies. The study is published in Nature Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 30, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Attention Microbiologists and Medical Laboratory Scientists: New Research Suggests an Organism ’s Microbiome Might Be a Factor in Longer, More Active Lives
Is gut microbiota the fabled fountain of youth? Researchers at Valenzano Research Lab in Germany found it works for killifish. Could it work for other vertebrates as well? Research into the microbiomes of humans and other animals is uncovering tantalizing insights as to how different microbes can be beneficial or destructive to the host. It […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - October 27, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Buck Institute for Research on Aging C. diff CDC centers for disease control and prevention Source Type: news

Obstruction of pilus retraction stimulates bacterial surface sensing
It is critical for bacteria to recognize surface contact and initiate physiological changes required for surface-associated lifestyles. Ubiquitous microbial appendages called pili are involved in sensing surfaces and facilitating downstream behaviors, but the mechanism by which pili mediate surface sensing has been unclear. We visualized Caulobacter crescentus pili undergoing dynamic cycles of extension and retraction. Within seconds of surface contact, these cycles ceased, which coincided with synthesis of the adhesive holdfast required for attachment. Physically blocking pili imposed resistance to pilus retraction, which...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ellison, C. K., Kan, J., Dillard, R. S., Kysela, D. T., Ducret, A., Berne, C., Hampton, C. M., Ke, Z., Wright, E. R., Biais, N., Dalia, A. B., Brun, Y. V. Tags: Cell Biology, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Second messenger-mediated tactile response by a bacterial rotary motor
When bacteria encounter surfaces, they respond with surface colonization and virulence induction. The mechanisms of bacterial mechanosensation and downstream signaling remain poorly understood. Here, we describe a tactile sensing cascade in Caulobacter crescentus in which the flagellar motor acts as sensor. Surface-induced motor interference stimulated the production of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate by the motor-associated diguanylate cyclase DgcB. This led to the allosteric activation of the glycosyltransferase HfsJ to promote rapid synthesis of a polysaccharide adhesin and surface anchoring. Although the membra...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hug, I., Deshpande, S., Sprecher, K. S., Pfohl, T., Jenal, U. Tags: Microbiology reports Source Type: news