The 5 Most Germ-Filled Places In Your Office —And How to Protect Yourself
Just getting to work can be a bacteria-ridden experience. The subway is full of it, as are stair railings and revolving doors. But once you finally sit down at your desk for the day, you’re still exposed. The germiest places tend to be high-traffic areas where a lot of different people touch the same surface, and your office is no exception. But by taking one main precaution—washing your hands regularly—you’ll reduce your risk for getting sick. Here are five of the most bacteria-filled spots in your workplace. Elevator buttons and escalator railings Pretty much everyone who goes above the second fl...
Source: TIME: Health - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cassie Shortsleeve  Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Caprylic acid, a nutrient found in coconut oil, kills persistent Candida biofilms
(Natural News) Caprylic acid, a natural compound found in abundance in coconut oil, has been observed to penetrate and eradicate persistent Candida biofilms. A recent peer-reviewed study published in Frontiers of Microbiology concluded that a combination of caprylic acid and pectic acid (a water-soluble fiber found in most fruits and vegetables) completely eliminated pathogenic biofilms... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Case Western Reserve researchers cure drug-resistant infections without antibiotics
(Case Western Reserve University) Biochemists, microbiologists, drug discovery experts and infectious disease doctors have teamed up in a new study that shows antibiotics are not always necessary to cure sepsis in mice. Instead of killing causative bacteria with antibiotics, researchers treated infected mice with molecules that block toxin formation in bacteria. Every treated mouse survived. The breakthrough study, published in Scientific Reports, suggests infections in humans might be cured the same way. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trilobites: Watch This Blob of Cells Become an Embryo in High-Resolution
Researchers developed a new microscope that traces embryonic cell movement in real time, sketching a virtual map of how organ systems develop. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: EMILY BAUMGAERTNER Tags: Microscopes Reproduction (Biological) Research Microbiology Mice Cell (Journal) Birth Defects Stem Cells (Embryonic) McDole, Kate Source Type: news

Discovery of widespread type I and type V CRISPR-Cas inhibitors
Bacterial CRISPR-Cas systems protect their host from bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements. Mobile elements, in turn, encode various anti-CRISPR (Acr) proteins to inhibit the immune function of CRISPR-Cas. To date, Acr proteins have been discovered for type I (subtypes I-D, I-E, and I-F) and type II (II-A and II-C) but not other CRISPR systems. Here, we report the discovery of 12 acr genes, including inhibitors of type V-A and I-C CRISPR systems. AcrVA1 inhibits a broad spectrum of Cas12a (Cpf1) orthologs—including MbCas12a, Mb3Cas12a, AsCas12a, and LbCas12a—when assayed in human cells. The acr genes...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Marino, N. D., Zhang, J. Y., Borges, A. L., Sousa, A. A., Leon, L. M., Rauch, B. J., Walton, R. T., Berry, J. D., Joung, J. K., Kleinstiver, B. P., Bondy-Denomy, J. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Genome hypermobility by lateral transduction
Genetic transduction is a major evolutionary force that underlies bacterial adaptation. Here we report that the temperate bacteriophages of Staphylococcus aureus engage in a distinct form of transduction we term lateral transduction. Staphylococcal prophages do not follow the previously described excision-replication-packaging pathway but instead excise late in their lytic program. Here, DNA packaging initiates in situ from integrated prophages, and large metameric spans including several hundred kilobases of the S. aureus genome are packaged in phage heads at very high frequency. In situ replication before DNA packaging c...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Chen, J., Quiles-Puchalt, N., Chiang, Y. N., Bacigalupe, R., Fillol-Salom, A., Chee, M. S. J., Fitzgerald, J. R., Penades, J. R. Tags: Microbiology r-articles Source Type: news

Pathologizing Staphylococcus, fast
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Cas12 inhibitors join the anti-CRISPR family
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Anti-CRISPRs on the march
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Koonin, E. V., Makarova, K. S. Tags: Microbiology perspective Source Type: news

A common trick for transferring bacterial DNA
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Davidson, A. R. Tags: Microbiology perspective Source Type: news

Expanding fungal diversity, one cell at a time
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Reported Oct. 8, 2018, in Nature Microbiology, a team led by researchers at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Facility, has developed a pipeline to generate genomes from single cells of uncultivated fungi. The approach was tested on several uncultivated fungal species representing early diverging fungi, the earliest evolutionary branches in the fungal genealogy that provide a repertoire of important and valuable gene products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Monkeypox cases put UK's tropical disease response to the test
Unprecedented diagnoses show system set up after Ebola works well, medics saysLate on a Friday night Dr Mike Beadsworth left the Royal Liverpool hospital after a “pretty hellish couple of weeks”. The clinical director of tropical and infectious diseases and his team had spent weeks trying to save the life of a Middle Eastern man who had been diagnosed with a deadly virus.The man had contracted Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (Mers), the first such diagnosis in the UK since 2013.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nazia Parveen North of England correspondent Tags: NHS Health Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Ebola UK news Society Source Type: news

Build 'Noah's ark' for beneficial gut microbes, scientists say
Repository would store ‘friendly’ germs from the intestines of people in remote communities for future medical treatmentsScientists have put forward plans for a microbial “Noah’s ark” to preserve beneficial bugs found in the guts of people living in some of the most remote communities on Earth.The move to save the microbes is driven by concerns that modern lifestyles are wiping out organisms that have colonised human intestines for millennia and are vital for good health.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Microbiology Science Obesity Asthma Allergies Autism Source Type: news

UCLA researchers discover aggressive prostate and lung cancers are driven by common mechanisms
UCLA researchers have discovered a common process in the development of late-stage, small cell cancers of the prostate and lung. These shared molecular mechanisms could lead to the development of drugs to treat not just prostate and lung cancers, but small cell cancers of almost any organ.The key finding: Prostate and lung cells have very different patterns of gene expression when they ’re healthy, but almost identical patterns when they transform into small cell cancers. The research suggests that different types of small cell tumors evolve similarly, even when they come from different organs.The study, led by Dr. O...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 4, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Preserving microbial diversity
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bello, M. G. D., Knight, R., Gilbert, J. A., Blaser, M. J. Tags: Microbiology perspective Source Type: news

Rotem Sorek Searches for Bacteria ’s Defenses Against Viruses
Using his expertise in microbiology and bioinformatics, he is bringing a new understanding to microbial immune systems. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - October 1, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Scientist to Watch Magazine Issue Source Type: news

UK public health antimicrobial resistance alerts
These Antimicrobial resistance alerts (ARAs) inform microbiologists of emerging antimicrobial-resistant pathogen strains which could spread in the UK health service. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A naturally occurring antibiotic active against drug-resistant tuberculosis
(Penn State) A naturally occurring antibiotic called kanglemycin A is effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that cause tuberculosis, even in drug-resistant strains, according to an international team of researchers who used chemistry, molecular biology, microbiology, and X-ray crystallography to show how the compound maintains its activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bacterial antagonism in host-associated microbial communities
Antagonistic interactions are abundant in microbial communities and contribute not only to the composition and relative proportions of their members but also to the longer-term stability of a community. This Review will largely focus on bacterial antagonism mediated by ribosomally synthesized peptides and proteins produced by members of host-associated microbial communities. We discuss recent findings on their diversity, functions, and ecological impacts. These systems play key roles in ecosystem defense, pathogen invasion, spatial segregation, and diversity but also confer indirect gains to the aggressor from products rel...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Garcia-Bayona, L., Comstock, L. E. Tags: Ecology, Microbiology, Online Only review Source Type: news

Interspecies competition shapes communities
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Ecology, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Trilobites: Kidney Stones Are More Beautiful Than You Might Think
New research found that the painful deposits are surprisingly dynamic, forming much like microscopic coral reefs, and could help with treating them. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: EMILY BAUMGAERTNER Tags: Kidneys Rock and Stone Geology Microbiology Scientific Reports (Journal) Fouke, Bruce Source Type: news

David A. Leib Named Chair of the Dept. of Microbiology & Immunology at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth
David A. Leib, PhD, has been named the Chair of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine. Since joining Dartmouth in 2009, Leib has built a successful research program focusing on discovery and elucidation of new vaccines and therapeutics for neonatal herpesvirus infections. In addition to his research efforts, Leib also teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in virology at Dartmouth. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - September 19, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Derik Hertel Tags: Insider News Press Release Research chair David Leib faculty appointment Home-feature Microbiology and Immunology Source Type: news

Researchers find adult stem cell characteristics in aggressive cancers from different tissues
UCLA researchers have discovered  genetic similarities between the adult stem cells responsible for maintaining and repairing epithelial tissues — which line all of the organs and cavities inside the body — and the cells that drive aggressive epithelial cancers. Their findings could bring about a better understanding of how ag gressive, treatment-resistant cancers develop and progress, and could eventually lead to new drugs for a range of advanced epithelial cancers such as lung, prostate and bladder cancers. The study, led by senior authors Owen Witte and Thomas Graeber, both of the  UCLA E...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 18, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Take-up of MMR vaccine falls for fourth year in a row in England
Proportion of children being immunised down to 91.2% as experts warn of measles riskThe proportion of children in England getting immunised for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) has fallen for the fourth year in a row, as uptake for a further nine out of the 12 routine vaccinations has dropped, figures show.Related:Resurgence of deadly measles blamed on low MMR vaccination ratesContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Marsh Tags: MMR Vaccines and immunisation Health Infectious diseases Medical research NHS Microbiology Children Science Society Source Type: news

Zika vaccine shows promise for treating deadly brain cancer
(American Society for Microbiology) An international team of researchers has successfully deployed a Zika virus vaccine to target and kill human glioblastoma brain cancer stem cells, which had been transplanted into mice. In a study published this week in mBio ® , the team shows that a live, attenuated version of the Zika virus could form the basis of a new treatment option for this fatal brain cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Microbiome serves as sentinel for nerve gas exposure
(American Society for Microbiology) Exposure to banned nerve agents remains a major public health concern globally, especially because of the recent air-release of these agents in Syria. One main problem is the difficulty of determining whether an exposure has occurred. Now, a new study demonstrates that the mammalian microbiome can act as a 'sentinel' due to its high responsiveness to exposure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Farewell flat biology -- Tackling infectious disease using 3-D tissue engineering
(Arizona State University) In a new invited review article, ASU Biodesign microbiologists and tissue engineers Cheryl Nickerson, Jennifer Barrila and colleagues discuss the development and application of three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture models as they pertain to infectious disease. They describe these models as predictive pre-clinical platforms to study host-pathogen interactions, infectious disease mechanisms, and antimicrobial drug development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

First ever case of monkeypox recorded in the UK
The person is believed to have contracted the rare viral infection in NigeriaThe first ever case of monkeypox has been recorded in the UK. The rare viral infection was recorded on Friday in a Nigerian national staying at a naval base in Cornwall,Public Health England said.The patient was transferred to the infectious disease unit at the Royal Free hospital in London on Saturday morning. They are believed to have contracted the infection in Nigeria before travelling to the UK.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: UK news Infectious diseases Health Nigeria Medical research Microbiology Source Type: news

OU professor selected for 2019 ASM environmental research award
(University of Oklahoma) A University of Oklahoma professor, Jizhong Zhou, is the recipient of the 2019 American Society for Microbiology Award for Environmental Research for significant accomplishments in the field of microbiology. The award will be presented at the ASM Microbe meeting in San Francisco, California, in June 2019. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 7, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Probiotics 'not as beneficial for gut health as previously thought'
Research finds probiotics caused ‘very severe disturbance’ in gut when taken in conjunction with antibioticsProbiotics, hailed by some as a cure for all kinds of digestive ailments and recommended by many GPs alongside antibiotics, may not be as universally beneficial for gut health as previously thought.Thegut microbiome is the sum total of all the micro-organisms living in a person ’s gut, and has been shown to play a huge role in human health. New research has found probiotics – usually taken as supplements or in foods such as yoghurt, kimchi or kefir – can hinder a patient’s gut micr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Anthea Lacchia Tags: Microbiology Science Antibiotics Source Type: news

Airport Security Trays Carry More Cold Germs Than Toilets, Study Finds
Scientists who tested surfaces at Helsinki Airport found the viruses responsible for colds and influenza on the trays used at security checkpoints. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PALKO KARASZ Tags: Airports Hygiene and Cleanliness Helsinki (Finland) Viruses Colds Research Airport Security Microbiology University of Nottingham Source Type: news

President Nominates NIFA, NPS Directors
The White House has nominated Dr. J. Scott Angle to be Director of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) at the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Mr. David Vela to be the Director of the National Park Service (NPS) at the Department of Interior (DOI). Dr. Angle, President and CEO of the International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC), has a background in heavy metals and their interaction with the environment. He worked for 24 years as a professor of soil science and administrator for the Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station and Maryland Cooperative Extension at the University of Maryland. He also ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 4, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Matter: Scientists Are Retooling Bacteria to Cure Disease
By manipulating DNA, researchers are trying to create microbes that, once ingested, work to treat a rare genetic condition — a milestone in synthetic biology. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: Digestive Tract Microbiology Bacteria Synthetic Biology Genetic Engineering Phenylketonuria (PKU) E Coli (Bacteria) Biotechnology and Bioengineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology Collins, James J Source Type: news

Cryptosporidiosis worsened in mice on probiotics
(American Society for Microbiology) In an unexpected research finding infections with the intestinal parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum, worsened in mice that had been given a probiotic. The research was published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 31, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Arbovirus risk in Brazil
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Genetics, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Genomic and epidemiological monitoring of yellow fever virus transmission potential
The yellow fever virus (YFV) epidemic in Brazil is the largest in decades. The recent discovery of YFV in Brazilian Aedes species mosquitos highlights a need to monitor the risk of reestablishment of urban YFV transmission in the Americas. We use a suite of epidemiological, spatial, and genomic approaches to characterize YFV transmission. We show that the age and sex distribution of human cases is characteristic of sylvatic transmission. Analysis of YFV cases combined with genomes generated locally reveals an early phase of sylvatic YFV transmission and spatial expansion toward previously YFV-free areas, followed by a rise...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Faria, N. R., Kraemer, M. U. G., Hill, S. C., Goes de Jesus, J., Aguiar, R. S., Iani, F. C. M., Xavier, J., Quick, J., du Plessis, L., Dellicour, S., Theze, J., Carvalho, R. D. O., Baele, G., Wu, C.- H., Silveira, P. P., Arruda, M. B., Pereira, M. A., Per Tags: Genetics, Microbiology r-articles Source Type: news

UMass Amherst microbiologist will lead new soil warming studies
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) Microbial ecologist Kristen DeAngelis at UMass Amherst has an NSF CAREER award that will support research and teaching on soil microbes and their response to environmental change. She will enlist a small army of microbiology students who will annotate soil microbe genomes, map traits and carry out other investigations in bacteria in the lab and at Harvard Forest, home to the longest running soil warming experiment in the world, now 26 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

E. coli strain from retail poultry may cause urinary tract infections in people
(George Washington University) A strain of Escherichia coli (E. coli) found in retail chicken and turkey products may cause a wide range of infections in people, according to a study published today in the American Society for Microbiology's open access journal mBio. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 28, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UCLA-led study reveals the mechanism that helps malaria parasites take over human red blood cells
Researchers from UCLA and Washington University in St. Louis have discovered the previously unknown mechanism of how proteins from  Plasmodium parasites — which cause malaria — are exported into human red blood cells, a process that is vital for parasites to survive in humans. The finding could pave the way for new treatments for malaria.In the study, published today in Nature, researchers reveal the atomic structure of the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins, or PTEX, the protein complex that transports these malaria proteins into the red blood cell. The research also provides the first direct...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 27, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Ebola species found in bats ahead of any potential outbreak
(University of California - Davis) For the first time, scientists discovered a new ebola virus species in a host prior to detection in an infected human or sick animal. The discovery of the Bombali virus in bats in Sierra Leone and the sequencing of the complete genome was officially published today in the journal Nature Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 27, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

EXP2 protein helps deadliest malaria parasite obtain nutrients during infection
(NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) Researchers from the National Institutes of Health and other institutions have deciphered the role of a key protein that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum uses to obtain nutrients while infecting red blood cells. Their study appears in Nature Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 27, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Microbes hitch a ride inland on coastal fog
(Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies) Fog can act as a vector for microbes, transferring them long distances and introducing them into new environments. So reports an analysis of the microbiology of coastal fog, recently published in the journal Science of the Total Environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Enterovirus outbreak dynamics
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nikolay, B., Cauchemez, S. Tags: Microbiology perspective Source Type: news

Richard Libby to Lead Graduate Education at School of Medicine and Dentistry
Richard T. Libby, Ph.D., professor of Ophthalmology and of Biomedical Genetics at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, and a member of the University ’s Center for Visual Science, has been named Senior Associate Dean for Graduate Education and Postdoctoral Affairs, pending approval of the University Board of Trustees. He succeeds Edith M. Lord, Ph.D., who served a decade in the role and is shifting her focus to microbiology and immunology resea rch. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - August 22, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

Experimental drug takes aim at cancers associated with Epstein-Barr virus
(American Society for Microbiology) Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) doesn't directly cause cancer, but infection with this common herpes virus brings an increased risk of some cancers, including fast-growing lymphomas. This week in mSphere, researchers report on a new drug that works by targeting EBV-positive tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Better Methods for Clinical Studies in Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology: An ESCMID Hands-on Workshop
Date: Monday, August 13, 2018Year: 2018Location: Seville, SpainContent-type: current_conferences (Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - August 13, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: BethBradshaw Source Type: news

It ’s Not Yet Clear How to Boost the Microbiome. But Diet Is the Best Bet
The gut microbiome—the billions of bacteria that live inside the human digestive tract—is the focus of some of today’s most exciting and compelling medical research. Studies have linked microbiome-related imbalances to health conditions ranging from depression and Parkinson’s disease to heart disease. Some researchers have even started referring to the microbiome as a “forgotten organ” because of the indispensable role it plays in human health. It’s fairly clear that the foods a person eats—or doesn’t eat—can affect the composition of his or her microbiome. Resear...
Source: TIME: Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

Product Quest Manufacturing LLC Issues Voluntary Nationwide Recall of CVS Health 12 Hour Sinus Relief Nasal Mist Due to Microbiological Contamination
Holly Hill, FL, Product Quest Manufacturing ( “Product Quest”) is voluntarily recalling Lot# 173089J of CVS Health 12 Hour Sinus Relief Nasal Mist, a clear, colorless liquid, to the consumer level. The product was found to have had microbiological contamination identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - August 8, 2018 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Ozone application as adjunctive therapy in chronic periodontitis: Clinical, microbiological and biochemical aspects
ConclusionWithin the limitations of this study, adjunctive ozone therapy did not provide additional benefits to clinical, microbiological and biochemical parameters over SRP in chronic periodontitis patients. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - August 8, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Lower Respiratory Multiplex Panels for the Detection of Bacterial and Viral Infections
Development of commercial multiplex panels for the detection and diagnosis of lower respiratory tract infections is rapidly progressing, and FDA-cleared assays are currently available. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current or soon-to-be available commercial assays, focusing on their analytical performance, advantages, and challenges and the potential impact on patient outcomes when laboratories deploy the assays. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 4, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Kevin Alby, Stephanie L. Mitchell Source Type: news