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Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math
Empirical data and humans' biased interpretations can only get so far in truly understanding life at the micro scale. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - October 12, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Opinion Source Type: news

Newborns exposed to BPA more likely to have gut issues
A new study from the American Society for Microbiology has found that exposing your child to BPA right before or after they are born can cause stomach problems for them later in life. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Your probiotics might not be enough unless you're also taking PREbiotics, expert warns
(Natural News) A professor of microbiology and pathology at Colorado State University warns that taking probiotics means diddly squat if you don’t supplement them with prebiotics. Ian Orme describes the prevailing assumption that probiotics taken by themselves can improve health as just “dodgy” and unrealistic. He claims that the practice is essentially useless as gastric... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Microbiology of the Built Environment (MoBE) symposium highlights growing field
(Alfred P. Sloan Foundation) A Washington, D.C. symposium highlighting research in an expanding field of science - the Microbiology of the Built Environment (MoBE) - is bringing together leading scientists from around the globe. Co-hosted by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, this event features the current state-of-the-science about the formation and function of microbial communities in built environments, their impacts on human health, and how human occupants shape complex indoor microbiomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 10, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study identifies whale blow microbiome
(American Society for Microbiology) A new study by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and colleagues identified for the first time an extensive conserved group of bacteria within healthy humpback whales' blow -- the moist breath that whales spray out of their blowholes when they exhale. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 10, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study identifies whale blow microbiome
(Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) A new study by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and colleagues identified for the first time an extensive conserved group of bacteria within healthy humpback whales' blow--the moist breath that whales spray out of their blowholes when they exhale. The research published Oct. 10, 2017, in mSystems, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 10, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Microbiomes of the Built Environment: A Research Agenda for Indoor Microbiology, Human Health, and Buildings (2017)
This report reviews what is known about the intersection of microbial biology and ecology, chemistry, building science, and human physiology, and how new tools may facilitate advances in understanding the ecosystem of built environments, indoor microbiomes, and effects on human health and well-being. It offers a research agenda to generate the information needed so that stakeholders with an interest in understanding the impacts of built environments will be able to make more informed decisions. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - October 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Butchering Art: Joseph Lister ’s Quest to Transform the Grisly World of Victorian Medicine – review
Lindsey Fitzharris ’s story of Lister’s battle to introduce hygiene to the operating theatre makes compelling readingArmed with surgical instruments, chloroform and his sterilising spray, Joseph Lister was ready for action. It was 1871 and the eminent surgeon was about to tackle an enormous abscess that, left unchecked, could prove fatal.There was one further complication: the patient was the Queen. It was a crucial operation – not just for Victoria, but the practice of surgery itself. Radical change was afoot, at its heart the substance Lister was about to use on the monarch: carbolic acid.Cont...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: History Biography Books Microbiology Science Culture Source Type: news

‘Antibiotic apocalypse’: doctors sound alarm over drug resistance
The terrifying prospect that even routine operations will be impossible to perform has been raised by experts alarmed by the rise of drug-resistant genesScientists attending a recent meeting of the American Society for Microbiology reported they had uncovered a highly disturbing trend. They revealed that bacteria containing a gene known as mcr-1 – which confers resistance to the antibiotic colistin – had spread round the world at an alarming rate since its original discovery 18 months earlier. In one area of China, it was found that 25% of hospital patients now carried the gene.Colistin is known as the “a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Drug resistance Antibiotics Society Health Agriculture Science Source Type: news

The Changing Epidemiology and Diagnosis of Valley Fever
Coccidioidomycosis, commonly known as valley fever, is a disease caused by two species of fungi, Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii. Coccidioidomycosis is often self-limiting; however, in some patients, the disease can rapidly progress to a severe and potentially life-threatening illness. Proper diagnostics for coccidioidomycosis are important because acute disease can manifest as community-acquired pneumonia, and can be misdiagnosed as a viral or bacterial infection. Improper diagnosis can lead to unnecessary antibacterial therapy and may encourage extra-pulmonary proliferation of the fungus, which then requi...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - October 7, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Bridget M. Barker Source Type: news

Frequent Relapse of Plasmodium vivax Infection: Case Report and Literature Review
We describe a 52-year-old man with frequent episodes of reoccurring Plasmodium vivax infection that was successfully treated with a combination of artemether-lumefantrine and primaquine. This is the first reported case of relapsing P. vivax infection in Malaysia that was successfully treated with this ACT. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - October 7, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Zeti Norfidiyati Ayub, Habsah Hasan, Zeehaida Mohamed, Alwi Muhd Besari, Mohd Zulfakar Mazlan Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

Carbon emissions from warming soils could trigger disastrous feedback loop
26-year study reveals natural biological factors kick in once warming reaches certain point, leading to potentially unstoppable increase in temperaturesWarming soils are releasing more carbon into the atmosphere than previously thought, suggesting a potentially disastrous feedback mechanism whereby increases in global temperatures will trigger massive new carbon releases in a cycle that may be impossible to break.The increased production of carbon comes from the microbes within soils, according to areport in the peer-review journal Science, published on Friday.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Fiona Harvey Environment correspondent Tags: Soil Greenhouse gas emissions Climate change Fossil fuels Environment UK news Microbiology Science Geology Arctic Source Type: news

Researchers create molecule that could ‘kick and kill’ HIV
Current anti-AIDS drugs are highly effective at making HIV undetectable and allowing people with the virus to live longer, healthier lives. The treatments, a class of medications called antiretroviral therapy, also greatly reduce the chance of transmission from person to person.But the medications do not actually rid the body of the virus, which has the ability to elude medications by lying dormant in cells called CD4+ T cells, which signal another type of T cell, the CD8, to destroy HIV-infected cells. When a person with HIV stops treatment, the virus emerges and replicates in the body, weakening the immune system and rai...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 5, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Your mouth's role in gut health and immunity: Researchers discover childhood environment has more influence than genetics
(Natural News) A new study discovered that the mix of microorganisms that dwell in a person’s saliva is largely determined by the human’s household environment rather than genetics, reported Science Daily. The study, published in the journal of the American Society for Microbiology called mBio, showed that household environment had a larger role than human genetics in... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Smart' immune cells: Emerging cancer therapy research boosted with NIH award
(University of California - Davis) Assistant Professor Sean Collins, Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics in the UC Davis College of Biological Sciences, has received a $1.5 million award from the National Institutes of Health to advance the development of 'smart' immune cells for therapies to treat cancer and other diseases. The five-year NIH Director's New Innovator Award aims to provide new insight into how to engineer immune cells to control their recruitment and response to tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMass Amherst microbiologist receives $2.3 million NIH grant for TB research
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) The NIH Director's Awards were created 'to accelerate the pace of biomedical discoveries by supporting exceptionally creative scientists' and to 'support unconventional approaches to major challenges in biomedical and behavioral research.' One such major challenge in biomedical research, Siegrist says, is the long-standing problem of TB treatment. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infects one-third of the world's population and kills an estimated 1.5 million people each year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

IUPUI microbiologists uncover clues to clustering of lethal bacteria in CF patients' lungs
(Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis School of Science) In a new study IUPUI microbiologists are adding to body of knowledge of biofilm formation with the ultimate goal of finding better ways to disrupt that formation, leading to improved treatments for the chronic pneumonia in CF patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Long-term pattern and magnitude of soil carbon feedback to the climate system in a warming world
In a 26-year soil warming experiment in a mid-latitude hardwood forest, we documented changes in soil carbon cycling to investigate the potential consequences for the climate system. We found that soil warming results in a four-phase pattern of soil organic matter decay and carbon dioxide fluxes to the atmosphere, with phases of substantial soil carbon loss alternating with phases of no detectable loss. Several factors combine to affect the timing, magnitude, and thermal acclimation of soil carbon loss. These include depletion of microbially accessible carbon pools, reductions in microbial biomass, a shift in microbial car...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melillo, J. M., Frey, S. D., DeAngelis, K. M., Werner, W. J., Bernard, M. J., Bowles, F. P., Pold, G., Knorr, M. A., Grandy, A. S. Tags: Ecology, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Climate and the carbon cycle
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Smith, H. J. Tags: Ecology, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Microbial change in warming soils
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Metcalfe, D. B. Tags: Ecology, Microbiology perspective Source Type: news

What is cryo-electron microscopy, the Nobel prize-winning technique?
The 2017 chemistry laureates were recognised for developing cryo-electron microscopy. But what is it, why is it exciting and where will it take us next?A trio of scientists share this year ’s Nobel prize for chemistry: Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson.Their win is for work on a technique known as cryo-electron microscopy that has allowed scientists to study biological molecules in unprecedented sharpness, not least theZika virus and proteins thought to be involved inAlzheimer ’s disease.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Nobel prizes People in science Science prizes Chemistry Microbiology Source Type: news

Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson win the 2017 Nobel prize in chemistry – as it happened
This year ’s prize has been awarded for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solutionNobel prize in chemistry awarded for method to visualise biomolecules12.36pmBSTThere we have it, Crispr and lithium-ion batteries lose out to cryo-electron microscopy, a technique that has allowed scientists to study molecules in unprecedented resolution – an advance that could help with drug discovery and fundamental understanding of biological processes.Congratulations to the three winners Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson.12.32pmBSTToday &r...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Nobel prizes Chemistry Science People in science Science prizes Microbiology Source Type: news

'The enemy within': Mars crews could be at risk from onboard microbes – study
Mocked-up Mars spacecraft inhabited for 17 months full of microbial life despite adequate cleaning, raising issues for craft design and human healthOf the many potential hazards astronauts might ponder on a trip to Mars, radiation poisoning, weightlessness and the foibles of crewmates might top the list.But according to scientists, there ’s another potential problem. Researchers examining a mocked-up spacecraft inhabited for 17 months by a six-man crew say parts of the capsule were rife with microbial life.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Mars Microbiology European Space Agency Science Infectious diseases Medical research Source Type: news

Getting to the guts of mosquito control
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Driving mosquito refractoriness to Plasmodium falciparum with engineered symbiotic bacteria
We describe a Serratia bacterium strain (AS1) isolated from Anopheles ovaries that stably colonizes the mosquito midgut, female ovaries, and male accessory glands and spreads rapidly throughout mosquito populations. Serratia AS1 was genetically engineered for secretion of anti-Plasmodium effector proteins, and the recombinant strains inhibit development of Plasmodium falciparum in mosquitoes. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Wang, S., Dos-Santos, A. L. A., Huang, W., Liu, K. C., Oshaghi, M. A., Wei, G., Agre, P., Jacobs-Lorena, M. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Jefferson awarded $30M contract to develop Ebola vaccine
The National Institutes of Health has awarded a five-year contract worth up to $30 million to Thomas Jefferson University to prepare and test a vaccine formulation designed to protect against the Ebola, Sudan, Marburg and Lassa fever viruses. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the NIH, made an initial award of $2.6 million to Jefferson for the global project that will be led by principal investigator Matthias Schnell, the chairman of Jefferson's department of microbiology… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 27, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

Jet Hand Dryers are Less Hygienic than Paper Towels, Study Says, and Can Spread Viruses Up to Nine Feet; Clinical Laboratories Particularly Susceptible to Airborne Contaminants
High-powered hand dryers, like those used in public restrooms, are the latest targets in pursuit of cleanliness in public and medical environments Microbiologists and clinical laboratory scientists will be fascinated by the findings of a research study into a method of hand drying that the study scientists described as like “virus hand grenades.” If these […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - September 27, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Pathology Airblade Aspergillus clinical laboratory Dark Daily dark intelligence group Dark Report Dyson Journal of Applied Microbiology Klebsiella pneumonia medical laboratory scientist MetaSUB MS2 pathologist PathoM Source Type: news

Pioneering bacterial energetics and antimicrobial resisitance group honored
(University of Otago) A world-leading team of microbiologists, whose work on a novel new way to fight TB infections shows great promise, has been selected as the recipient of New Zealand's University of Otago's latest Research Group Award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 27, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

BD launches fully-automated diagnostic to fight antimicrobial resistance in Europe
Becton Dickinson (NYSE: BDX) today launched the first automated phenotypic diagnostic test for infections caused by carbapenemase-producing organisms. The new BD Phoenix CPO test is available as part of the BD Phoenix automated microbiology system in Europe, the company said, and is designed to help hospitals detect and contain infections caused by CPOs. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post BD launches fully-automated diagnostic to fight antimicrobial resistance in Europe appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - September 26, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Diagnostics Hospital Care Pharmaceuticals Wall Street Beat bectondickinson Source Type: news

14 Things Flight Attendants Know About Flying — and You Probably Don’t
This article originally appeared on BusinessInsider.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Gillett / Business Insider Tags: Uncategorized onetime onetimetravel Source Type: news

Fighting the flu can be a matter of life and death – so what more can we do?
Australia is coming out of its most deadly influenza season for more than 10 years and experts say increased vaccination alone will not help enoughAs Australia endures one of its worst flu seasons in more than a decade, questions are being raised about how the public can be better prepared and what can be done to protect the most vulnerable.At least 170,000 influenza cases have been confirmed this season, almost two-and-a-half times more than in 2016. The federal health department logged 72 flu-related deaths by Thursday, including that ofeight-year-old Rosie Andersen in Melbourne. Experts say Australia is on track fora re...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Tags: Health Flu Infectious diseases Australia news Medical research Science Microbiology Source Type: news

The FDA Is Coming Around to the Idea That Cheese, Microbes, and Mold Can Work Just Fine
Fuzzy ashen mold billows around wheels of cheese stacked on wooden planks at La Ferme de L’Abérieux. Inside its cheese cave nestled in the hills of Cordon, southeastern France, proprietor Albert Bottollier Depois removes one wheel and lowers it to the wide eyes of two children. “Mushrooms,” he says threading his fingers through the cloudy wreath of fungus forming the cheese’s distinctive crust. For a stronger cheese, he’ll even pierce the rind so it seeps in and blooms in the eyes. This is a Tomme de Savoie, one of France’s most distinguished and sought-after cheeses. And yet it h...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Casey Quackenbush / Cordon, France Tags: Uncategorized Cheese Food Safety onetime Source Type: news

Your Towels Are Way Dirtier Than You Think
Dirty towels can carry a huge variety of microbes, and they’ve even been linked to spreading infectious disease. You can’t keep your towels 100% germ-free, experts say, but you can limit the grossest ones by washing your towels—only way more often than you probably do now. Towels are such great bacteria traps because every time you use a towel, you transfer your natural skin bacteria, and any other germs you’re carrying, onto their surface. Most of these germs won’t have any negative health effects because they’re coming from you. “Our bodies are adapted to being able to live in th...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Bacteria bath towels coliform bacteria dirty towels E. coli fungus how often should i do laundry how often should i wash my bath towels how often should i wash my towels how to wash towels Hygiene kitchen towels mic Source Type: news

Point-of-Care Testing for Group A Streptococcus Infection and Influenza
Point of care (POC) testing has emerged as a critical tool in the early and rapid diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. While the mainstay of these POC tests has been lateral-flow-based antigen detection assays, recent technological advances in nucleic acid detection combined with regulatory changes has allowed more sensitive detection of infectious etiologies in the near-patient setting. This advancement is particularly impactful in the ambulatory setting, where rapid diagnosis can ensure appropriate treatment at the early stages of infection, both preventing more serious sequelae and also improving physician wo...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - September 21, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Jennifer Woo, Valerie Arboleda, Omai B. Garner Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - September 21, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Taking the PERVs out of pigs
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Purnell, B. A. Tags: Genetics, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Advances in organ transplant from pigs
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Denner, J. Tags: Genetics, Microbiology perspective Source Type: news

Inactivation of porcine endogenous retrovirus in pigs using CRISPR-Cas9
Xenotransplantation is a promising strategy to alleviate the shortage of organs for human transplantation. In addition to the concerns about pig-to-human immunological compatibility, the risk of cross-species transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) has impeded the clinical application of this approach. We previously demonstrated the feasibility of inactivating PERV activity in an immortalized pig cell line. We now confirm that PERVs infect human cells, and we observe the horizontal transfer of PERVs among human cells. Using CRISPR-Cas9, we inactivated all of the PERVs in a porcine primary cell line and gene...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Niu, D., Wei, H.-J., Lin, L., George, H., Wang, T., Lee, I.-H., Zhao, H.-Y., Wang, Y., Kan, Y., Shrock, E., Lesha, E., Wang, G., Luo, Y., Qing, Y., Jiao, D., Zhao, H., Zhou, X., Wang, S., Wei, H., Güell, M., Church, G. M., Yang, L. Tags: Genetics, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Too few antibiotics in pipeline to tackle global drug-resistance crisis, WHO warns
Nowhere near enough new drugs are currently in development says report, which calls for urgent investment and responsible use of existing antibioticsToo few antibiotics are in the pipeline to tackle the global crisis of drug resistance, which is responsible for the rise of almost untreatable infections around the world, the World Health Organisation (WHO) warns.Among the alarming diseases that are increasing and spreading ismulti-drug resistant tuberculosis (TB), which requires treatment lasting between nine and 20 months. There are 250,000 deaths a year from drug-resistant TB and only 52% of patients globally are successf...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Antibiotics Drug resistance Society Medical research Health Science World Health Organization Tuberculosis Microbiology Source Type: news

Emergency Access Initiative
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has activated the Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) in response to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey which devastated Florida and several Caribbean islands, as well as parts of South Carolina, Texas, and Louisiana. The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from more than 650 biomedical journals and more than 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or supplement for libraries affected by disasters that...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - September 19, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Disaster / Emergency Preparedness News from NLM/NIH Source Type: news

What's the latest on gut microbiota?
(Concordia University) How many undergraduate classes in microbiology -- or any scientific field, for that matter -- can say they're published in a peer-reviewed journal? 'Human Gut Microbiota: Toward an Ecology of Disease' is a review of the primary literature and latest discoveries on the interactions between gut microbiota and the human host. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Shapeshifting bacteria? Scientists discover how E. coli in space becomes antibiotic resistant
(Natural News) Bacterial cells such as E.coli were found to mutate or shapeshift in space to resist common antibiotics that successfully kill them on Earth, a study in the Frontiers in Microbiology revealed. The scientific community has long established that bacteria show different activities in space than when they are on Earth. Likewise, researchers have known that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Emergency Access Initiative Activated for Harvey and Irma
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has activated the Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) for September 15, 2017 – October 14, 2017 in response to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey which devastated Florida and several Caribbean islands, as well as parts of South Carolina, Texas, and Louisiana. The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from more than 650 biomedical journals and more than 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or sup...
Source: MCR News - September 15, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: liaison Tags: Community College/Academic Libraries Health Sciences Public Libraries Source Type: news

New technology could allow multiple vaccines to be delivered in single jab
A new technique allowing drugs or vaccines to be encapsulated within tiny biodegradable particles could see an end booster jabsMultiple injections for vaccinations could become a thing of the past, according to scientists who have developed an approach for delivering many doses of different substances in just one jab.The technology involves encapsulating drugs or vaccines within tiny particles made of biodegradable polymers. Depending on their makeup, these polymers break down at different points in time, releasing their contents into the body.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Medical research Health Science Society Microbiology Drugs Source Type: news

Multiple time-delayed drugs could be given in single injection, say scientists
A new technology allowing drugs or vaccines to be encapsulated within tiny biodegradable particles could see an end booster jabsMultiple injections for vaccinations could become a thing of the past, according to scientists who have developed an approach for delivering many doses of different substances in just one jab.The technology involves encapsulating drugs or vaccines within tiny particles made of biodegradable polymers. Depending on their makeup, these polymers break down at different points in time, releasing their contents into the body.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Medical research Health Science Society Microbiology Drugs Source Type: news

Microbial mass movements
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Zhu, Y.-G., Gillings, M., Simonet, P., Stekel, D., Banwart, S., Penuelas, J. Tags: Ecology, Microbiology perspective Source Type: news

Response to Comment on "The complex effects of ocean acidification on the prominent N2-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium"
Hutchins et al. question the validity of our results showing that under fast growth conditions, the beneficial effect of high CO2 on Trichodesmium is overwhelmed by the deleterious effect of the concomitant decrease in ambient and cellular pH. The positive effect of acidification reported by Hutchins and co-workers is likely caused by culture conditions that support suboptimal growth rates. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Shi, D., Shen, R., Kranz, S. A., Morel, F. M. M., Hong, H. Tags: Microbiology, Online Only t-comment Source Type: news

Comment on "The complex effects of ocean acidification on the prominent N2-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium"
We present and discuss results of multiple published studies refuting this toxicity hypothesis. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hutchins, D. A., Fu, F., Walworth, N. G., Lee, M. D., Saito, M. A., Webb, E. A. Tags: Microbiology, Online Only t-comment Source Type: news

Bacteremic capacity of a minimally invasive flapless accelerated orthodontic technique
Journal of the World Federation of OrthodontistsVolume 6, Issue 3, September 2017, Pages 105 –108AbstractObjectiveThe aim of present prospective cohort study was to investigate prevalence of bacteremia after a minimally invasive flapless accelerated orthodontic technique.Material and MethodsThe sample consisted of 30 orthodontic patients (18 female, 12 male; mean age: 19.57 ± 0.5 years). All patients had Class I malocclusion and had fixed orthodontic appliance treatment. The flapless technique was performed with a reinforced scalpel on the labial aspect of the mandibular incisors to separate the interprox...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - September 12, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Household environment -- not genetics -- shapes salivary microbes
(American Society for Microbiology) Researchers in the United Kingdom have discovered that the mix of microorganisms that inhabit a person's saliva are largely determined by the human host's household. The study, published this week in mBio ® , an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, shows that early environmental influences play a far larger role than human genetics in shaping the salivary microbiome--the group of organisms that play a crucial role in oral and overall health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news