Covid-19: v | podcast
Last week, testing at a private Covid lab in Wolverhampton was halted, after the UK Health Security Agency found tens of thousands of people may have been falsely given a negative PCR result. But since the start of September, scientists had been alerted to strange patterns in the testing data which suggested something was out of the ordinary. Anand Jagatia speaks to Dr Kit Yates, a mathematical biologist, about why it took so long for these errors to be traced back to the lab, and what the consequences could beContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 19, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Anand Jagatia and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Source Type: news

Covid-19: how 43,000 false negative tests were uncovered as wrong | podcast
Last week, testing at a private Covid lab in Wolverhampton was halted, after the UK Health Security Agency found tens of thousands of people may have been falsely given a negative PCR result. But since the start of September, scientists had been alerted to strange patterns in the testing data which suggested something was out of the ordinary. Anand Jagatia speaks to Dr Kit Yates, a mathematical biologist, about why it took so long for these errors to be traced back to the lab, and what the consequences could beContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 19, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Anand Jagatia and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Source Type: news

Factory farms of disease: how industrial chicken production is breeding the next pandemic
At least eight types of bird flu, all of which can kill humans, are circulating around the world ’s factory farms – and they could be worse than Covid-19One day last December, 101,000 chickens at a gigantic farm near the city of Astrakhan in southern Russiastarted to collapse and die. Tests by the state research centre showed that a relatively new strain of lethal avian flu known as H5N8 was circulating, and within days 900,000 birds at the Vladimirskaya plant werehurriedly slaughtered to prevent an epidemic.Avian flu is the world ’s other ongoing pandemic and H5N8 is just one strain that has torn through...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: John Vidal Tags: Global health Food Bird flu Coronavirus Farming Environment Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society World news Wildlife & drink industry Business China Asia Pacific Global development Source Type: news

The FDA ’s Vaccine Expert Panel Recommends Approval of a J & J Booster for Anyone Who Had an Initial Shot
The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) expert vaccine panel on Friday, Oct. 15, recommended a booster dose of the Johnson&Johnson-Janssen COVID-19 vaccine. In a unanimous vote, the 19-member panel recommended the booster for anyone who was previously immunized with the vaccine, at least two months after the that first dose. With the advice, the panel has now backed boosters for all three vaccines currently available in the US. J&J’s vaccine is the only one authorized in the U.S. (and globally) that requires only a single dose. If the FDA accepts the committee’s decision, which it is expected to ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Vacancy: Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Nutritional Science (JNS)
The Trustees are seeking applications  for an Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Nutritional Science (JNS). JNS is an international, peer-reviewed, online only, open access journal that welcomes high-quality research articles in all aspects of nutrition. The underlying aim of all work should be, as far as possible, to develop nutritional concepts - though the key criterion for acceptance is scientific soundness.  JNS encompasses the full spectrum of nutritional science including public health nutrition, epidemiology, dietary surveys, nutritional requirements, metabolic studies, body composition, energet...
Source: The Nutrition Society - October 15, 2021 Category: Nutrition Authors: Cassandra Ellis Source Type: news

'More data needed before we can start vaccinating children'
What we really need is data, based on which we can make informed decisions. All that we have at the moment is DCGI approval of the vaccines. But for the programme to make a decision, I would expect that they do a risk-benefit analysis, said Gagandeep Kang, professor of microbiology at CMC Vellore. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - October 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists abused and threatened for discussing Covid, global survey finds
Poll of 321 scientists found 15% received death threats after speaking publicly on the pandemicHow my ivermectin research led to Twitter death threatsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageScientists around the world have received threats of death and sexual assault after speaking to the media about Covid-19, a survey has revealed.Of 321 scientists asked by Nature magazine, 15% said they had received death threats and 22% had been threatened with physical or sexual violence as a result of talking publicly about the pandemic.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Denis Campbell Health policy editor Tags: Coronavirus Science Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Health Microbiology World news Source Type: news

How my ivermectin research led to Twitter death threats | Dr Andrew Hill
I was sent images of coffins and hanged Nazi war criminals after finding medical fraud in clinical trialsThe story of online threats and abuse is very dark. In early 2021, my research team was analysing a new drug called ivermectin. In the first clinical trials, this drug seemed to prevent new infections and improve survival. When I first wrote about this, I started getting regular threats on Twitter, demanding that ivermectin should be approved worldwide and questioning the safety of vaccines.In March 2021, I received my first vaccine dose and posted a photo on Twitter from the clinic. Within minutes I was receiving stran...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Hill Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Microbiology Medical research Science Health UK news Source Type: news

Homegrown Covid vaccines fill gap as UN Covax scheme misses target
India, Egypt and Cuba among first states to develop and make their own vaccines as Covax falls behindDeveloping countries are increasingly turning to homegrown Covid vaccinations as the UN-backedCovax programme falls behind.Whilewestern countries roll out booster jabs to their own populations, Covax, which was set up by UN agencies, governments and donors to ensure fair access to Covid-19 vaccines for low- and middle-income countries, has said it will miss its target to distribute 2bn doses globally by the end of this year.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Hazem Badr, Helen Mendes and Papiya Bhattacharya Tags: Global development Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Infectious diseases Science World news Health Medical research Society Microbiology Egypt Indonesia India Brazil Pharmaceuticals industry China European Commission Source Type: news

Canadian doctor and medical professor speaks out against COVID-19 vaccines and mandates
(Natural News) A Canadian medical doctor and professor at the University of Waterloo has written a letter to his academic superiors outlining his opposition to the school’s COVID vaccine mandate, which he believes is illegal. The letter was penned by Dr. Michael Palmer, who is a board-certified medical microbiologist who teaches pharmacology at the university.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Covid by numbers: 10 key lessons separating fact from fiction
To make sense of coronavirus data, the Observer asked David Spiegelhalterand Anthony Masters of the Royal Statistical Society Covid taskforce to write a column. That column has now inspired a book. Here are some of its insightsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageGenomic sequencing has identified more than 1,000 different seeds of Sars-CoV-2 introduced in early 2020. Instead of one central outbreak, reverberating outwards like an explosion, we now know there were many erupting simultaneously across the country. There were far more imports of Sars-CoV-2 from France, Italy and Spain than from Chi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: David Spiegelhalter and Anthony Masters Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Focus Source Type: news

Unions call for tighter Covid safety measures in schools
Government urged to take action as one in 14 secondary school children in England infected last weekCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageUnions have called on the government to stop “standing by” and reinstate safety measures at schools to prevent further disruption to education this winter as the rate of Covid surges among teenagers.The spread of the virus appears to besignificantly outpacing the government ’s vaccination programme, with one in 14 secondary school-age children in England infected with Covid last week,figures from the Office for National Statistics show, up fr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Clea Skopeliti Tags: Schools Coronavirus Trade unions Secondary schools Education Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Vaccines and immunisation Science Teaching Politics UK news Source Type: news

UK unions call for tighter Covid safety measures in schools as cases surge
Government urged to take action as one in 14 secondary school children in England infected last weekCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageUnions have called on the government to stop “standing by” and reinstate safety measures at schools to prevent further disruption to education this winter as the rate of Covid surges among teenagers.The spread of the virus appears to besignificantly outpacing the government ’s vaccination programme, with one in 14 secondary school-age children in England infected with Covid last week,figures from the Office for National Statistics show, up fr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Clea Skopeliti Tags: Schools Coronavirus Trade unions Secondary schools Education Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Vaccines and immunisation Science Teaching Politics UK news Source Type: news

Covid travel: which countries are on the red list?
There are dozens of countries on England ’s red list for international travel – but do the rules match case and vaccine data?Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageDespite scrapping its traffic light system for international travel, England is still operating a “red list” for the countries that are deemed to be the highest risk for coronavirus.The red list dictates different rules for testing and quarantining travellers. A country may be placed on the list based on a number of factors including the percentage of the population that has been vaccinated, infection rates and ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Pablo Guti érrez and Ashley Kirk Tags: Coronavirus Travel Business Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology World news Science Source Type: news

Why, When and How to Test At-Home for COVID-19
As we close in on two years of living with COVID-19, quick and accurate tests for COVID-19 remain an urgent priority. In fact, as schools reopen, businesses resume operations and people return to work, rapid testing could be the key to preventing Delta or any new variants of SARS-CoV-2 from flaring into even larger outbreaks. But that’s only if testing is used in the right way, at the right time and in the right places. With more opportunities for people to interact in public settings where the virus can spread, it’s never been more important to know who is infected and potentially seeding new COVID-19 infectio...
Source: TIME: Health - October 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Royal Society of Biology photography competition 2021 – in pictures
Highlights of the Royal Society of Biology ’s photography competition 2021, from ants feasting on honeydew to zebras drinking in the savannahContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 7, 2021 Category: Science Tags: Photography Biology Microbiology Science Biodiversity Wildlife Environment Source Type: news

Covid ICU patients with low antibody levels face a higher risk of dying, study confirms
Hospitalised Covid patients are more likely to die if they have low levels of antibodies and higher viral loads, researchers at Spain's National Centre for Microbiology found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UK might not be over the worst, scientists warn, as Covid case numbers stay high
Inoculation programme must be stepped up before the onset of winterCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageBritain is heading into winter with the number of Covid cases remaining at a worryingly high level. At the same time, the nation ’s vaccination programmeappears to have stalled.That is the bleak view of leading epidemiologists who have warned that the worst effects of the pandemic may not yet be over for the UK. As the weather gets colder, more and more people are likely to socialise in restaurants, bars and cinemas rather than in parks or gardens with the result that transmission rates...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 3, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Health Society Epidemics Source Type: news

Covid antiviral pill halves hospitalisations and deaths, maker says
If approved, Merck ’s drug would be first simple oral medication shown to be effective against coronavirusCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAn antiviral pill was found to cut hospitalisations and deaths by half in patients newly diagnosed with Covid-19, in clinical trial results announced on Friday.If approved, the drug made by the US firm Merck and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics would be the first simple oral medication shown to be effective against Covid-19 and a major advance in the fight against the pandemic. Other drugs,such as remdesivir, have been shown to be effective if given early...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 1, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Coronavirus Medical research Infectious diseases Microbiology Health Science Society World news Vaccines and immunisation Source Type: news

Enhanced Ultrafiltration Technology Makes Dental Office Water Safer
Toppen Dental Launches UltrasafeTM, a Proprietary Platform for Cost Efficient, Chemical Free Dental Unit Waterline TreatmentSanford, FL; September 30, 2021 – Toppen Dental, an innovator in dental office disinfection and water treatment solutions, announces the launch of its UltraSafeTM ultrafiltration platform. UltraSafe provides a chemical free answer to keeping dental unit water lines in compliance with CDC and ADA recommendations that protect pati ents and staff from waterborne microorganisms known to cause disease.“Untreated dental unit water lines provide a perfect breeding ground for biofilms that can har...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - September 30, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Covid by Numbers review – how to make sense of the statistics
David Spiegelhalter and Anthony Masters delve into the detail behind the data and explore the true human cost of the pandemicAlong with successive waves of infection, the coronavirus pandemic has provided us with a tsunami of data and graphs. Thanks to the Public Health Englanddashboard and websites such asOur World in Data, every internet user can access accurate and timely information on Covid cases, deaths, hospitalisations and vaccines, broken down by age, gender and location.However, while this wealth of information can be immensely valuable, it can also cause problems. Taken out of context and spun in a misleading wa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 30, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Oliver Johnson Tags: Science and nature books Coronavirus Microbiology Infectious diseases Medical research Culture Source Type: news

Microbiological Quality Considerations in Non-Sterile Drug Manufacturing
Pharmaceutical Quality/ Microbiology Pharmaceutical Quality/ Manufacturing Standards (CGMP) (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - September 29, 2021 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: FDA Source Type: news

Covid can infect cells in pancreas that make insulin, research shows
Results of two studies may explain why some people develop diabetes after catching the virusCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageCovid-19 can infect insulin-producing cells in the pancreas and change their function, potentially explaining why some previously healthy people develop diabetes after catching the virus.Doctors are increasingly concerned about the growing number of patients who have developed diabetes either while infected with coronavirus, or shortly after recovering from it.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 28, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Diabetes Coronavirus Science World news Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Society Source Type: news

Covid car parks to galactic lockdown: fascinating but futile quarantine ideas
Whether atomic priesthoods, 50ft concrete spikes or burying astronauts in concrete, humanity ’s attempts to keep free from infection are examined in Until Proven SafeIn January 2020, just a few days before the first Covid-19-infected passengers landed in the United States on a flight from Wuhan, preparations were already being made in a converted car park in Omaha, Nebraska. By complete coincidence, after a decade of planning,the country ’s first National Quarantine Unit opened its doors here on the eve of a global pandemic.The timing couldn ’t have been better. The need for such a place had been mooted e...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 28, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Oliver Wainwright Tags: Art and design Culture Architecture Books Infectious diseases Medical research Science Microbiology World news Source Type: news

Antibodies in breast milk remain for 10 months after Covid infection – study
Exclusive: Researchers believe such antibodies could be used to treat people with severe coronavirusCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageBreastfeeding women who have been infected with Covid-19 continue to secrete virus-neutralising antibodies into their milk for up to 10 months, data suggests.Besides emphasising the important role breastfeeding could play in helping to protect infants from the disease, researchers believe that such antibodies could be used to treat people with severe Covid-19, preventing their condition from getting worse.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 27, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Breastfeeding Coronavirus Science Infectious diseases Microbiology Immunology World news Medical research Biochemistry and molecular biology Source Type: news

‘We haven’t finished the job’: JVT reflects on 18 months of Covid
Exclusive: Listen to the experts, says deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam, not the celebritiesThey didn ’t ask for the spotlight, and sometimes they didn’t always seem comfortable under the media glare.But the scientists who came into our lives at the start of the coronavirus pandemic became household names. None more so than Prof Jonathan Van-Tam.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 24, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Coronavirus Public services policy Health policy Politics Science Infectious diseases UK news Epidemics Vaccines and immunisation Microbiology Medical research Society World news Source Type: news

Covid-19: how effective are face masks, really?
Since the start of the pandemic, face coverings and their ability to prevent the transmission of Covid-19 have been under constant scrutiny by scientists, politicians and the public. More than a year and a half in, what do – and don’t – we know? Madeleine Finlay speaks to Prof Cath Noakes about how effective different face coverings are, how best to use them, and when we should be masking-upContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 23, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented and produced by Madeleine Finlay and Anand Jagatia Tags: Science Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Source Type: news

Covid-19: how effective are face masks, really? – podcast
Since the start of the pandemic, face coverings and their ability to prevent the transmission of Covid-19 have been under constant scrutiny by scientists, politicians and the public. More than a year and a half in, what do – and don’t – we know? Madeleine Finlay speaks to Prof Cath Noakes about how effective different face coverings are, how best to use them, and when we should be masking-upContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 23, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented and produced by Madeleine Finlay and Anand Jagatia Tags: Science Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Source Type: news

‘I felt this huge relief’: how antibody injections could free the immunosuppressed under Covid
FDA expected to issue full emergency authorization for periodic antibody injections, or PrEP, to complement vaccinationsA proud sports mom, Shantay Brown longs to pack into a crowded stadium for her son ’s Ohio State football games and scream her face off over the action on the field.Related:Doctors treating unvaccinated Covid patients are succumbing to compassion fatigueContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 19, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Benjamin Ryan Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news US healthcare US news US domestic policy Vaccines and immunisation Society Source Type: news

‘I felt this huge relief’: how antibody injections free the immunosuppressed under Covid
FDA emergency authorizations boost use of periodic antibody injections, or PrEP, to complement vaccinationsA proud sports mom, Shantay Brown longs to pack into a crowded stadium for her son ’s Ohio State football games and scream her face off over the action on the field.Related:Doctors treating unvaccinated Covid patients are succumbing to compassion fatigueContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 19, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Benjamin Ryan Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news US healthcare US news US domestic policy Vaccines and immunisation Society Source Type: news

UK scientist warns over relaxation of Covid travel rules
Prof Alan McNally says genome surveillance remains vital, as ministers prepare to overhaul travel rulesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageOne of the scientists behind the UK ’s testing network for quickly identifying Covid variants of concern has urged the government to continue surveillance of coronavirus cases brought in to the UK from abroad.Alan McNally, a professor in microbial evolutionary genomics who worked on setting up the lighthouse laboratories, made the comments amid reports ministers are preparing to overhaul Covid travel restrictions, including a relaxing of test rules.Co...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Grierson Tags: Coronavirus Medical research Vaccines and immunisation Foreign policy Health Infectious diseases Politics Society Microbiology UK news World news Science Source Type: news

Fauci review – laudatory but lenient portrait of the US vaccine czar
Anthony Fauci ’s firmness in the face of Trump’s anti-scientific stance is rightly celebrated, but this documentary doesn’t fully examine his record on AidsRetirement age doesn ’t apply to the increasingly legendary Dr Anthony Fauci, who at 80 years old continues in US public life like a benign version of J Edgar Hoover, or maybe like a supreme court justice. This documentary from National Geographic gives him something like the Ruth Bader Ginsburg treatment. Fauci is th e director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, having taken up that post in 1984 and served under seven ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Peter Bradshaw Tags: Film Documentary films Anthony Fauci Coronavirus Aids and HIV Culture Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society US news World news Source Type: news

Javid: Covid curbs will return in England if cases get out of control
Health secretary says emergence of new variant or pressure on NHS will trigger fresh measuresCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageCovid restrictions will return if the virus gets “out of control” again this year, the UK health secretary has said, with a dangerous new variant or the NHS at risk of being overwhelmed identified as the moment “plan B” could be triggered.Sajid Javid said he thought another lockdown was unlikely but admitted it would be “irresponsible” to rule out ordering people stay at home in England for a fourth time since the pandemic began.Co...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Aubrey Allegretti Political correspondent Tags: Coronavirus UK news Sajid Javid Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Politics World news Science Source Type: news

Dr Reddy ’s gets drug regulator's nod for Phase III bridging trials of Sputnik Light covid vaccine
After launching Sputnik V, Russia introduced a new single-dose vaccine, called Sputnik Light, in May. As in the case of Sputnik, Sputnik Light has also been developed by the Russian ministry of health, the Gamaleya National Research Centre of Epidemiology and Microbiology and the Russian Direct Investment Fund (RDIF). (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - September 15, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Children may get 'better' immunity from catching naturally instead of getting single vaccine
Professor David Livermore, a microbiologist at the University of East Anglia, said it was 'pretty pointless' to inocualte children against the virus. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Flu season: are we in for a bumpier ride this year? podcast
In a report earlier this summer, the Joint Committee on Vaccinations and Immunisations (JCVI) noted there could be a 50% increase in cases of influenza in comparison to other years. Madeleine Finlay speaks to Ian Sample about the factors at play, from weakened immunity to the expanded vaccine programme, and hears from Derek Smith, professor of infectious disease informatics about how the World Health Organization has decided on which influenza strains to vaccinate against this yearContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented and produced by Madeleine Finlay with reporting from Ian Sample Tags: Science Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Vaccines and immunisation Health Source Type: news

Flu season: are we in for a bumpier ride this year? – podcast
In a report earlier this summer, the Joint Committee on Vaccinations and Immunisations (JCVI) noted there could be a 50% increase in cases of influenza in comparison to other years. Madeleine Finlay speaks to Ian Sample about the factors at play, from weakened immunity to the expanded vaccine programme, and hears from Derek Smith, professor of infectious disease informatics about how the World Health Organization has decided on which influenza strains to vaccinate against this yearContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented and produced by Madeleine Finlay with reporting from Ian Sample Tags: Science Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Vaccines and immunisation Health Source Type: news

‘The virus is painfully real’: vaccine hesitant people are dying – and their loved ones want the world to listen
In the UK, the majority of those now in hospital with Covid-19 are unvaccinated. Many face their last days with enormous regret, and their relatives are telling their stories to try to convince others like themMatt Wynter, a 42-year-old music agent from Leek, Staffordshire, was working out in his local gym in mid-August when he saw, to his great surprise, that his best friend, Marcus Birks, was on the television. He jumped off the elliptical trainer and listened carefully.The first thing he noticed was that Birks, who was also from Leek and a performer with the dance group Cappella, looked terrible. He was gasping for brea...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sirin Kale Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Health Society Psychology Source Type: news

‘A very cruel exit’: UK’s aid cuts risk rapid return of treatable diseases
£200m project to eliminate avoidable blindness and disfigurement in Africa ends after funding is prematurely axedA chandelier sparkling in the background, the grandeur of Downing Street gleaming behind him, Boris Johnson looks into the camera and speaks with solemnity. He is marking World Neglected Tropical Diseases Day, he says, to raise awareness of these “terrible afflictions … which impose an immense burden of suffering in developing countries”.Huge progress has been made, he says, in the fight against the diseases, not least as a result of British aid to some of the poorest parts of the world....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Lizzy Davies Tags: Global development Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Africa Aid World news Blindness and visual impairment Health Source Type: news

Post-illness symptoms like long Covid are probably more common than we think | Megan Hosey
Clinicians tend to pay less attention to how patients with severe illness do once they are out of mortal danger, or once symptoms extend beyond an arbitrary time frameIn recent months, long Covid has received a great deal of media and public attention. Research has found that as many asone in four of those infected with Covid – perhaps millions of people in the US alone – suffer from chronic long-term symptoms, including headaches, dizziness, abdominal pain, heart problems, fatigue, anxiety, depression, cognitive impairment and other conditions.Related:When it comes to breakthrough cases, are we ignoring long C...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Megan Hosey Tags: Coronavirus Science Long Covid Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Source Type: news

UK vaccine volunteers to help prepare for next virus at new Pandemic Institute
The Liverpool site will work with other international centres to research the threat of emerging disruptive diseasesA new scientific institute which aims to prevent future pandemics may have been able to save thousands of lives by accelerating vaccine development had it existed before December 2019, its researchers believe.Liverpool ’s new Pandemic Institute will include a new human challenge facility, where volunteers will test new vaccines and treatments under controlled conditions.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: James Tapper Tags: Medical research Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Infectious diseases Epidemics UK news Science Microbiology Health Liverpool Society Source Type: news

Covid cases rising in Wales but more lockdowns ‘not inevitable’
Mark Drakeford, first minister, insists it is possible to avoid further lockdowns if people behave sensiblyCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe Welsh first minister, Mark Drakeford, has warned that Covid infections are rising sharply, with the current wave expected to peak at the end of this month. However, he said it was possible to avoid further lockdowns if people behaved sensibly.Drakeford said the Welsh cabinet would meet next week to discuss whether vaccination passports should be introduced and said the NHS in Wales was ready to begin giving jabs to children if they are approved.Cont...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Steven Morris Tags: Wales Mark Drakeford Vaccines and immunisation UK news Politics Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Health Society Source Type: news

Scientists ’ egos are key barrier to progress, says Covid vaccine pioneer
Prof Katalin Karik ó of BioNTech says she endured decades of scepticism over her work on mRNA vaccinesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageScientists would make swifter progress in solving the world ’s problems if they learned to put their egos aside and collaborate better, according to the leading researcher behind the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid vaccine.ProfKatalin Karik ó, the senior vice-president for RNA protein replacement therapies at BioNTech in Germany, endured decades of scepticism over her work and was demoted and finally kicked out of her lab while developing the techn...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Science Health Infectious diseases Microbiology Medical research World news Source Type: news

Dame Sarah Gilbert: UK Covid booster jabs not necessary for all
Oxford jab scientist suggests extra doses should go instead to countries with low vaccination ratesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageOne of the leading scientists behind the Oxford vaccine for Covid-19 has said she does not support a widespread booster jab campaign in the UK as immunity among fully vaccinated people is “lasting well”.Prof Dame Sarah Gilbert, who developed the Oxford/AstraZeneca jab, one of the most widely used Covid vaccines in the world, suggested extra doses should be directed to countries with a low rate of vaccination.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Grierson Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Health Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society World news UK news Source Type: news

UK Covid booster not necessary for all, says Oxford jab scientist Sarah Gilbert
Gilbert suggests extra doses should go instead to countries with low vaccination ratesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageOne of the leading scientists behind the Oxford vaccine for Covid-19 has said she does not support a widespread booster jab campaign in the UK as immunity among fully vaccinated people is “lasting well”.Prof Dame Sarah Gilbert, who developed the Oxford/AstraZeneca jab, one of the most widely used Covid vaccines in the world, suggested extra doses should be directed to countries with a low rate of vaccination.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Grierson Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Health Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society World news UK news Source Type: news

Covid vaccine boosters could get go-ahead within days, says Javid
Health secretary also says decision imminent on jabs for 12- to 15-year-olds, with children allowed final sayCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe Covid vaccine booster programme and jabs for 12- to 15-year-olds could be given the go-ahead within days, Sajid Javid has said, as he confirmed that young people will have the right to overrule their parents on whether to be vaccinated.The health secretary said he expected to hear from the UK ’s four chief medical officers in the coming days on their views as to whether there should be a mass rollout of vaccines to 12- to 15-year-olds.Contin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Rowena Mason Deputy political editor Tags: Coronavirus UK news Sajid Javid Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Politics Science World news Vaccines and immunisation Health Society Source Type: news

UK decision on Covid vaccine boosters expected on Thursday
Javid also says decision imminent on jabs for 12- to 15-year-olds, and children would be allowed final say on whether to have itCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe UK ’s vaccines watchdog is expected to decide on Thursday about a Covid booster vaccine programme, with ministers hopeful that approval for vaccinations for 12- to 15-year-olds could follow imminently.The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) is scheduled to meet on Thursday to examine interim results from theCov-Boost study, which looks at the impact of one of seven different vaccines as a third dose, on ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Peter Walker and Rowena Mason Tags: Coronavirus UK news Sajid Javid Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Politics Science World news Vaccines and immunisation Health Society Source Type: news

Viruses, even alien ones, are delicate things | Letter
The Sars-CoV-2 virus cannot keep going beyond about two metres from its host, writesMartin YuilleProf Paul Davies ’s headline-grabbing proposal of an invasion by alien viruses (Viruses may exist ‘elsewhere in the universe’, warns scientist, 6 September) may well raise a scientific eyebrow or two.We can be confident that living cells emerged before viruses (on any planet) because viruses are, by definition, obligate parasites: they can only multiply inside a living cell. Even if you say that viruses were originally cells that then became stripped down, you are merely confirming that cells came first. And w...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Science Health Society Coronavirus Infectious diseases Microbiology World news Alien life Source Type: news

Recovery From Severe COVID-19 May Provide Better Future Protection Against Some Variants
Contracting a case of COVID-19 is bad enough. Contracting a case that requires you to be hospitalized is decidedly worse. But according to a new study published in the journal Science, there is one small good hidden in that otherwise unalloyed bad. Recovery from a coronavirus infection severe enough to land you in the hospital appears to provide better protection against later infection with at least three of the viral variants currently in circulation than does recovery from a less severe infection. The study, conducted by a team of researchers affiliated with the University of Amsterdam, involved a relatively small cohor...
Source: TIME: Health - September 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Viruses may exist ‘elsewhere in the universe’, warns scientist
Prof Paul Davies suggests viruses may form vital part of ecosystems on other planetsTheCovid pandemic has already turned life as we know it upside down – and no doubt prompted some people to want to leave the planet.Now a leading scientist has warned that viruses may not only be found on Earth, but might occur – should life exist – elsewhere in the universe.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 6, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Infectious diseases Alien life Science Biology Space Microbiology Planets World news Source Type: news