Researchers uncover tools used by predatory bacteria to escape unharmed from prey cell
(University of Nottingham) Predatory bacteria, capable of invading and consuming harmful bugs such as E .coli and Salmonella, use a unique tool to help them escape the cell they have invaded without harming themselves, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 23, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

E. coli bacteria offer path to improving photosynthesis
(Cornell University) Cornell University scientists have engineered a key plant enzyme and introduced it in Escherichia coli bacteria in order to create an optimal experimental environment for studying how to speed up photosynthesis, a holy grail for improving crop yields. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Structural basis of transcription-translation coupling
In bacteria, transcription and translation are coupled processes in which the movement of RNA polymerase (RNAP)–synthesizing messenger RNA (mRNA) is coordinated with the movement of the first ribosome-translating mRNA. Coupling is modulated by the transcription factors NusG (which is thought to bridge RNAP and the ribosome) and NusA. Here, we report cryo–electron microscopy structures of Escherichia coli transcription-translation complexes (TTCs) containing different-length mRNA spacers between RNAP and the ribosome active-center P site. Structures of TTCs containing short spacers show a state incompatible with...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Wang, C., Molodtsov, V., Firlar, E., Kaelber, J. T., Blaha, G., Su, M., Ebright, R. H. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Flipping light on-off turns bacteria into chemical factories
(Princeton University, Engineering School) Researchers at Princeton University have created a new and improved way to more precisely control genetically engineered bacteria: by simply switching the lights on and off. Working in E. coli, the workhorse organism for scientists to engineer metabolism, researchers developed a system for controlling one of the key genetic circuits needed to turn bacteria into chemical factories that produce valuable compounds such as the biofuel isobutanol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 9, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genomic analysis of STEC in a child reveals insights on a virulent, emerging fo
(University at Buffalo) University at Buffalo researchers have completed the genomic analysis of an increasingly common strain of Shiga-toxin E. coli (STEC) that can cause severe disease outbreaks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 2, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Significantly more Danes infected with campylobacter in 2019
(Technical University of Denmark) In 2019, the number of registered campylobacter infections increased by almost a fifth and studies show that many of the campylobacter outbreaks recorded that year were caused by chicken meat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 2, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Emergency care for transgender and gender-diverse children and adolescents - Janeway H, Coli CJ.
Transgender and gender-diverse (TGD) youth may present to the emergency department with a range of medical problems and health concerns. Some of these may be directly related to their gender identity, but the vast majority are not. While gender diversity i... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Study: Honey May Be Better At Treating Coughs, Colds Than Over-The-Counter Medicines
(CNN) — Honey may be a better treatment for coughs and colds than over-the-counter medicines, a new study has found. Researchers said honey was more effective in relieving the symptoms of cold and flu-like illnesses than the usual commercial remedies, and could provide a safer, cheaper and more readily available alternative to antibiotics. They encouraged doctors to consider recommending it to patients in place of prescribing antibiotics, which can cause side effects and lead to antibiotic resistance when overused. Honey has long been used as a home remedy for coughs, but its effectiveness in treating common illnesse...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Source Type: news

Programmed bacteria have something extra
(Rice University) Rice University chemists expand the genetic code of Escherichia coli bacteria to produce a synthetic building block, a " noncanonical amino acid " that makes it a living indicator for oxidative stress. The research is a step toward designed cells that detect disease and produce their own drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 12, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Simultaneous cross-evaluation of heterogeneous E. coli datasets via mechanistic simulation
The extensive heterogeneity of biological data poses challenges to analysis and interpretation. Construction of a large-scale mechanistic model of Escherichia coli enabled us to integrate and cross-evaluate a massive, heterogeneous dataset based on measurements reported by various groups over decades. We identified inconsistencies with functional consequences across the data, including that the total output of the ribosomes and RNA polymerases described by data are not sufficient for a cell to reproduce measured doubling times, that measured metabolic parameters are neither fully compatible with each other nor with overall...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 23, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Macklin, D. N., Ahn-Horst, T. A., Choi, H., Ruggero, N. A., Carrera, J., Mason, J. C., Sun, G., Agmon, E., DeFelice, M. M., Maayan, I., Lane, K., Spangler, R. K., Gillies, T. E., Paull, M. L., Akhter, S., Bray, S. R., Weaver, D. S., Keseler, I. M., Karp, Tags: Engineering, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Couscous de broccoflower con aceite de curry y vinagre bals ámico añejo - AARP Everywhere Everywhere Everywhere
Experimente la comida t ípica magrebí, hecha con sémola en grano y salsa, servida con verduras. ... *Un broccoflower es un cruce entre brócoli y coliflor ... En un tazón agrega el broccoflower, las ... (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - July 22, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Turmeric could have antiviral properties
(Microbiology Society) Curcumin, a natural compound found in the spice turmeric, could help eliminate certain viruses, research has found. A study published in the Journal of General Virology showed that curcumin can prevent Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) - an alpha-group coronavirus that infects pigs - from infecting cells. At higher doses, the compound was also found to kill virus particles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 17, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Avoiding food contamination with a durable coating for hard surfaces
(University of Missouri-Columbia) A new study from a team of University of Missouri engineers and food scientists demonstrates that a durable coating, made from titanium dioxide, is capable of eliminating foodborne germs, such as salmonella and E. coli, and provides a preventative layer of protection against future cross-contamination on stainless steel food-contact surfaces. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 16, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

TREMFYA ® (guselkumab) Approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration as the First Selective Interleukin (IL)-23 Inhibitor for Active Psoriatic Arthritis
HORSHAM, PA, July 14, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved TREMFYA® (guselkumab) for adult patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a chronic progressive disease characterized by painful joints and skin inflammation.[1],[2] TREMFYA is the first treatment approved for active PsA that selectively inhibits interleukin (IL)-23, a naturally occurring cytokine that is involved in normal inflammatory and immune responses associated with the symptoms of PsA. The safety and efficacy of TREMFYA in PsA have b...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - July 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Fighting E. coli with E. coli
(American Society for Microbiology) According to findings published this week in mBio, Nissle, a strain of Escherichia coli, is harmless to intestinal tissue and may protect the gut from enterohemorrhagic E. coli, a pathogen that produces Shiga toxin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 7, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bad E. coli we know, but good E. coli?
(University of Cincinnati) Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine say E. coli Nissle may protect human cells against other more pathogenic strains of E. coli such as E. coli 0157:H7, which is commonly associated with contaminated hamburger meat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sneaky salmonella finds a backdoor into plants
(University of Delaware) Researchers have discovered that bacteria such as salmonella, E.coli and listeria have a backdoor to take advantage of humans' reliance on leafy greens for a healthy diet. They found that wild strains of salmonella are delivering foodborne illnesses by circumventing a plant's immune defense system, getting into the leaves of lettuce by opening up the plant's tiny breathing pores. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows antibiotic resistance genes persist in E. coli through " genetic capitalism "
(University of North Carolina at Charlotte) A new study analyzes the genomes of 29,255 E. coli strains collected between 1884 and 2018 to examine the evolution of 409 different genes that enable the bacterium to resist various antibiotics. The researchers examined whether the genes that confer antibiotic resistance, once acquired, tended to unusually accumulate -- a phenomenon known as " genetic capitalism " -- or disappear because they are unused, through a normal evolutionary process known as " stabilizing selection. " Recently, genetic capitalism is found common. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 29, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Outbreaks Associated with Untreated Recreational Water - California, Maine, and Minnesota, 2018-2019
This report highlights three examples of disease outbreaks linked to untreated recreational water that occurred during 2018-2019. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - June 25, 2020 Category: American Health Tags: E. coli Infection MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Recreational Water Illness (RWI) Shigellosis Water Recreation Water-Related Diseases Source Type: news

From Jekyll to Hyde: New study pinpoints mutation that makes E. coli deadlier
(Okayama University) We all know that there are " good " and " bad " bacteria, but scientists have little insight into how bacteria become " bad " or " pathogenic " and cause disease. Now, in a new study published in PLoS Pathogens, a team of scientists from Okayama University, Japan, described how mutations resulting in the malformation of the lipopolysaccharide transporter--an essential protein for bacterial growth--caused a non-pathogenic Escherichia coli strain to become pathogenic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 25, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Vaccine Might Guard Against Bacteria That Cause Diarrhea in Kids
WEDNESDAY, June 24, 2020 -- An experimental vaccine helps protect monkeys against bacteria that cause diarrhea in millions of children worldwide, researchers report. Bacterial gastroenteritis -- a digestive problem associated with malnutrition among... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 24, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

If you're firing up the grill this Father's Day, avoid these recalled meats and veggies
From meats to vegetables, US health officials are warning people to avoid some foods for various reasons, including E. coli and lack of inspection. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

E. Coli Outbreaks Fast Facts
Read CNN's E. Coli Outbreaks Fast Facts and learn more about the bacteria that can contaminate food. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nearly 43,000 Pounds of Ground Beef Products Recalled
MONDAY, June 15, 2020 -- Nearly 43,000 pounds of ground beef products have been recalled by New Jersey-based Lakeside Refrigerated Services due to possible contamination with potentially deadly Escherichia coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 15, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Over 40,000 pounds of ground beef recalled due to E. coli concerns
A New Jersey company is recalling nearly 43,000 pounds of raw ground beef products because they may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, the US Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service announced Saturday. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Causes Free Peritoneal Fluid?
Discussion Peritoneal fluid is normal. It decreases the friction of the peritoneum covering abdominal and pelvic organs and helps to protect them and allow their movement. A normal amount of peritoneal fluid is expected on radiological evaluation. Increased peritoneal fluid is a continuum and is concerning as a wide variety of pathological causes are associated with it such as abdominal trauma and appendicitis. At the far end of the scale is ascites that is the accumulation of free fluid more than 25 ml. It is usually associated with abdominal distension but fluid must accumulate before distension can occur and therefore i...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 8, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Seasonal Patterns of Ciprofloxacin Resistance in UTI Seasonal Patterns of Ciprofloxacin Resistance in UTI
Are there seasonal variations in resistance to fluoroqinolones and other antimicrobial agents among community-acquired urinary E. coli infections?American Journal of Epidemiology (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - June 5, 2020 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Public Health & Prevention Journal Article Source Type: news

Cytochrome P450 1A1 enhances inflammatory responses and impedes phagocytosis of bacteria in macrophages during sepsis
The hydroxylase cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) is regulated by the inflammation-limiting aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), but CYP1A1 immune functions remain unclear. We observed CYP1A1 overexpression in peritoneal macrophages (PMs) isolated from mice following LPS or heat-killed Escherichia. coli (E. coli) challenge. CYP1A1 overexpression augmented TNF-alpha and IL-6 production in RAW264.7 cells (RAW) by enhancing JNK/AP-1 signalling. CYP1A1 overexpression also promoted 12S-hydroxy-5Z,8Z,10E,14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (12(S)-HETE) production in activated RAW, while a 12(S)-HETE antibody attenuated and 12(S)-HETE alone induced...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - June 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Response to Comment on "RNA-guided DNA insertion with CRISPR-associated transposases"
Rice et al. suggest that the CRISPR-associated transposase ShCAST system could lead to additional insertion products beyond simple integration of the donor. We clarify the outcomes of ShCAST-mediated insertions in Escherichia coli, which consist of both simple insertions and integration of the donor plasmid. This latter outcome can be avoided by use of a 5' nicked DNA donor. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Strecker, J., Ladha, A., Makarova, K. S., Koonin, E. V., Zhang, F. Tags: Molecular Biology t-comment Source Type: news

Evidence-based guidelines for paediatric gastroenteritis reduce costs
(Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News)
Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News - June 1, 2020 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Cows linked to E. coli lettuce outbreaks that sickened nearly 200
FDA ties feces from grazing cattle in California's Salinas Valley to food-borne illness from romaine lettuce leaves. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - May 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA says cows may have caused E. coli lettuce contamination
Federal officials say cows grazing near romaine lettuce fields in California's Central Valley may have caused outbreaks of E (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - May 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: Avoid E. coli with proper burger cooking
The return of the summer cookout brings with it the risk for sickness from a bacteria that can end up spoiling more than one meal. Cook hamburgers incorrectly, and you could end up with a case of E. coli. "E. coli stands for Escherichia coli, which is a type of bacteria," says Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - May 22, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

What Are Potential Complications of Tattooing?
Discussion “Tattooing of skin via deposition of pigment particles and ink ingredients in the dermis changes normal skin into abnormal skin. Fortunately, this often causes no harm and no disease, although with important exceptions.” Tattoos can be inadvertent from road dirt, gunpowder, pencil graphite etc., but most are desired. Tattoos are common in many cultures and over time..They have been increasing in popularity in the United States over the past few years particularly with a younger, wider and more diverse population. Newsweek reported an 18-country study in 2018 which showed 46% of Americans have a tat...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 18, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

She spent 10 days in hospital during Walkerton's tainted water scandal. Now she's studying to be a doctor
It's been 20 years this long weekend since E.coli was discovered in the water in Walkerton, Ont. Seven people died and more than 2,300 fell ill. Some people are still suffering the long-term effects. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/London Source Type: news

Prevalence ofAntibiotic-Resistant Pathogens in Culture-Proven Sepsis and Outcomes Associated With Inadequate and Broad-Spectrum Empiric Antibiotic Use
Conclusions and Relevance: In this study, most patients with community-onset sepsis did not have resistant pathogens, yet broad-spectrum antibiotics were frequently administered. Both inadequate and unnecessarily broad empiric antibiotics were associated with higher mortality. These findings underscore the need for better tests to rapidly identify patients with resistant pathogens and for more judicious use of broad-spectrum antibiotics for empiric sepsis treatment. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - May 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Preliminary Incidence and Trends of Infections with Pathogens Transmitted Commonly Through Food --- Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network, 10 U.S. Sites, 2016--2019
This report indicates that incidence of infections caused by Listeria, Salmonella, and Shigella remained unchanged, and those caused by all other pathogens reported to the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network increased during 2019. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - April 30, 2020 Category: American Health Tags: Foodborne Disease MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Salmonella Shigellosis Source Type: news

Regulation of the error-prone DNA polymerase Pol{kappa} by oncogenic signaling and its contribution to drug resistance
The DNA polymerase Pol plays a key role in translesion synthesis, an error-prone replication mechanism. Pol is overexpressed in various tumor types. Here, we found that melanoma and lung and breast cancer cells experiencing stress from oncogene inhibition up-regulated the expression of Pol and shifted its localization from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. This effect was phenocopied by inhibition of the kinase mTOR, by induction of ER stress, or by glucose deprivation. In unstressed cells, Pol is continually transported out of the nucleus by exportin-1. Inhibiting exportin-1 or overexpressing Pol increased the abundance of nu...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - April 28, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Temprine, K., Campbell, N. R., Huang, R., Langdon, E. M., Simon-Vermot, T., Mehta, K., Clapp, A., Chipman, M., White, R. M. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Infection Rate Up Prior to Detection of Malignant Cancer
Increased odds of influenza, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, pneumonia seen one year before detection (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - April 24, 2020 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Infections, Internal Medicine, Oncology, Pathology, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Infection Rate Up Prior to Detection of Malignant Cancer
FRIDAY, April 24, 2020 -- The rate of infection with influenza, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, and pneumonia is increased before detection of malignant cancer, according to a study published online April 17 in Cancer Immunology Research. Shinako... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 24, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Notes from the Field: Multiple Cruise Ship Outbreaks of Norovirus Associated with Frozen Fruits and Berries --- United States, 2019
This investigation highlights the importance of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) surveillance at sea to identify contaminated foods at sea not yet implicated on land and to prevent transmission of AGE illness through U.S. ports. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - April 23, 2020 Category: American Health Tags: Foodborne Disease MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Norovirus Infection Source Type: news

The Power of Delusion
Back in the Army when I was in the depths of undiagnosed schizophrenia, I wrote long letters asking my friends and family if they could see and feel what I was experiencing while stationed in the Mojave desert. I thought if I could persuade them to stare at a TV or computer screen and fixate on it, then they would be able to hear my voice, and I could hear theirs.  I tried to write everything that went through my mixed up mind into the letters I sent to my friends and family. For example, my brother was a cook at this restaurant at the time. In my mind, I thought I could see him driving and showing up to work. In the ...
Source: Psych Central - April 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jason Jepson Tags: Personal Stories Schizoaffective Disorder Schizophrenia Delusions positive symptoms Psychosis Source Type: news

We Need to Rethink Our Food System to Prevent the Next Pandemic
Once a dangerous new pathogen is out, as we are seeing, it can be difficult if not impossible to prevent it going global. One as contagious as SARS-CoV-2 has the potential to infect the whole of humanity. Eighty per cent of cases may be benign, but with such a large pool of susceptible hosts, the numbers who experience severe illness and die can still be shockingly high. So the only sensible answer to the question, how do we stop this from happening again, is: by doing all we can to prevent such pathogens infecting humans in the first place. And that means taking a long, hard look at our relationship with the natural world...
Source: TIME: Health - April 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura Spinney Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Personalized microrobots swim through biological barriers, deliver drugs to cells
(American Institute of Physics) Biohybrid robots on the micrometer scale can swim through the body and deliver drugs to tumors or provide other cargo-carrying functions. To be successful, they must consist of materials that can pass through the body's immune response, swim quickly through viscous environments and penetrate tissue cells to deliver cargo. In APL Bioengineering, researchers fabricated biohybrid bacterial microswimmers by combining a genetically engineered E. coli MG1655 substrain and nanoerythrosomes, small structures made from red blood cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 7, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Found in mistranslation
(National Centre for Biological Sciences) In a new study, scientists from Deepa Agashe's group at NCBS find that irrespective of which proteins are impacted, there is indeed a benefit to non-specific mistranslation. Postdoctoral fellow Laasya Samhita and project assistant Parth Raval induced different kinds of mistranslation in E. coli, manipulating both the genetic make-up of the cells and the environment in which they lived. They suggest a new hypothesis about why cells tolerate so much mistranslation of proteins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

E. Coli Outbreak Tied to Clover Sprouts Rises to 39 Cases in Six States
FRIDAY, March 20, 2020 -- The number of cases in an Escherichia coli outbreak linked to clover sprouts has reached 39 in six states, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. There were 25 new cases reported since the CDC's... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 20, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Novel bacterial acid tolerance system sheds light on development of antimicrobials
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A research team led by Professors XIAN Mo and ZHAO Guang from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) discovered a novel bacterial acid tolerance system, which confers the growth capability to E. coli at pH of 4.2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fewer Community Hospitals Admit Kids With Common Ailments Fewer Community Hospitals Admit Kids With Common Ailments
With hospital care for complex pediatric illnesses increasingly concentrated at large medical centers, children who go to local emergency departments for common problems like asthma, croup or gastroenteritis are more likely these days to be transferred to a different hospital if they need to be admitted, a U.S. study suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - March 19, 2020 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

UC San Diego synthetic biologists redesign the way bacteria 'talk' to each other
(University of California - San Diego) Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have redesigned how harmless E. coli bacteria " talk " to each other. The new genetic circuit could become a useful new tool for synthetic biologists who, as a field, are looking for ways to better control the bacteria they engineer to perform all sorts of tasks, including drug delivery, bioproduction of valuable compounds, and environmental sensing. This work is published in the March 4, 2020 issue of the journal Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 4, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Strain of E Coli Linked to About 5% of Colorectal Cancer Strain of E Coli Linked to About 5% of Colorectal Cancer
A link between a genotoxin-producing strain of E coli and about 5% of colorectal cancer cases could offer novel clues as to how the cancer develops.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - March 3, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news