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New crystal structures reveal mysterious mechanism of gene regulation by the 'magic spot'
(Penn State) Using an innovative crystallization technique for studying 3D structures of gene transcription machinery, researchers revealed new insights into the long debated action of the 'magic spot' -- a molecule that controls gene expression inE. coli and many other bacteria when the bacteria are stressed. The study contributes to fundamental understanding of how bacteria adapt and survive under adverse conditions and provides clues about key processes that could be targeted in the search for new antibiotics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists Develop A Way To Use A Smartphone To Prevent Food Poisoning
A microscope that clips on to your phone's camera can detect bacteria, such as salmonella or E. coli, even in tiny amounts. But the technology can't yet distinguish between good and bad bacteria.(Image credit: Karen Brown/New England Public Radio) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Karen Brown Source Type: news

Infection outbreaks at hospitals could be reduced by copper-coated uniforms
(University of Manchester) Doctors, nurses and healthcare professionals could soon be wearing uniforms brushed with tiny copper nanoparticles to reduce the spread of bacterial infections and viruses, such as Escherichia coli (E. coli), at hospitals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 15, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Natural noncanonical protein splicing yields products with diverse {beta}-amino acid residues
Current textbook knowledge holds that the structural scope of ribosomal biosynthesis is based exclusively on α-amino acid backbone topology. Here we report the genome-guided discovery of bacterial pathways that posttranslationally create β-amino acid–containing products. The transformation is widespread in bacteria and is catalyzed by an enzyme belonging to a previously uncharacterized radical S-adenosylmethionine family. We show that the β-amino acids result from an unusual protein splicing process involving backbone carbon-carbon bond cleavage and net excision of tyramine. The reaction can be used t...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Morinaka, B. I., Lakis, E., Verest, M., Helf, M. J., Scalvenzi, T., Vagstad, A. L., Sims, J., Sunagawa, S., Gugger, M., Piel, J. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Don't make yourself ill with E. coli - safety precautions to guard against contamination
(Natural News) Hundreds of thousands of people fall ill from E. coli contamination each year. Despite local outcry to improve food manufacturing practices, pathogenic E. coli is still a prevalent bacterium that continues to impact the healthcare system. The most common sources of foodborne infection of E. coli are raw fruits and vegetables, unpasteurized dairy... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Outbreak of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Campylobacter jejuni Infections Associated with Raw Milk Consumption from a Herdshare Dairy — Colorado, 2016
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - February 8, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

WATCH: What exactly is the 'stomach flu?'
Norovirus, sometimes referred to as "the stomach flu" or "food poisoning," causes gastroenteritis or inflammation of the stomach and intestines. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Heal and nourish your gut with fermented foods: A beginner’s guide to making your own
(Natural News) Eating fermented foods has numerous benefits, such as protecting the body from harmful bacteria including salmonella and E. coli. Probiotics generally refer to live bacteria and yeasts that are good for your digestive system. These “good bacteria” are found in a variety of foods such as cheese, yogurt, chocolate, wine, and beer. It’s possible... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Culturing Cells in Defined 3-D Structures
In this study, the authors present in-air microfluidics (IAMF), a new chip-free platform technology that enables in-flight (that is, on-the-fly) formation of droplets, fibers, and particles and their one-step deposition into 3D constructs with a modular internal architecture.Figure: Concept of IAMF and guide to the article. (A) Chip-based microfluidics enables in-line control over droplets and particles, making it a versatile platform technology. A chip design where droplets (blue) are transported by a coflow (pink) is shown. (B) IAMF maintains the in-line control of chip-based microfluidics but relies on jet ejection and ...
Source: Neuromics - February 7, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Tags: 3-D Bioprinting 3-D Cell based Assays Bio-inks Fibroblast Growth Factor Basic Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells ISOKine FGF Source Type: news

Common antibiotics linked to E. coli resistance in children
Primary care prescribers should consider curbing scripts for antibiotics in children with urinary tract infections caused by E. coli, according to the UK authors of new study. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - February 2, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Antibiotic resistance in children ’ s E. coli is high when commonly prescribed antibiotics are used
Antibiotic resistance in children ’ s E. coli, a bacteria that is the most common cause of urinary tract infection, is high against many antibiotics commonly prescribed in primary care and could make them ineffective as first-line treatments, warns a study led by researchers at the University of Bristol and Imperial College London. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 2, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School; Press Release Source Type: news

E.coli in children: Doctors' fears as antibiotics stop working
ANTIBIOTIC resistance towards children's E.coli is high against many commonly prescribed antibiotics and could make them ineffective, scientists have warned. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gut Microbes Combine to Cause Colon Cancer, Study Suggests
Two types of bacteria common in the gut may accelerate the growth of tumors, suggesting new possibilities for diagnosis and prevention. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Colon and Colorectal Cancer Digestive Tract Bacteria Tumors Microbiology E Coli (Bacteria) Colonoscopy Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Science (Journal) Source Type: news

Patients with familial adenomatous polyposis harbor colonic biofilms containing tumorigenic bacteria
Individuals with sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) frequently harbor abnormalities in the composition of the gut microbiome; however, the microbiota associated with precancerous lesions in hereditary CRC remains largely unknown. We studied colonic mucosa of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), who develop benign precursor lesions (polyps) early in life. We identified patchy bacterial biofilms composed predominately of Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis. Genes for colibactin (clbB) and Bacteroides fragilis toxin (bft), encoding secreted oncotoxins, were highly enriched in FAP patients’ colonic muc...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Dejea, C. M., Fathi, P., Craig, J. M., Boleij, A., Taddese, R., Geis, A. L., Wu, X., DeStefano Shields, C. E., Hechenbleikner, E. M., Huso, D. L., Anders, R. A., Giardiello, F. M., Wick, E. C., Wang, H., Wu, S., Pardoll, D. M., Housseau, F., Sears, C. L. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

This Type of Non-Dairy Milk is the Healthiest, Study Says
That almond milk latte may be delicious, but a study just published in the Journal of Food Science and Technology suggests that the trendy beverage also has some drawbacks. When researchers compared the nutritional profiles of four popular “alternative” milks, they found that soy milk came out on top—and that almond, rice and coconut “milks” all lacked essential nutrients important for overall health. Plant-based “milks” are often marketed as wholesome and appropriate substitutes for the real thing. To find out if these claims measured up, scientists at McGill University in Canada ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized almond milk almond milk calories almond milk nutrition coconut milk Diet/Nutrition healthytime is soy milk fattening Lactose Intolerance onetime soy milk calories soy milk nutrition soy milk vs milk Source Type: news

UN health agency finds high levels of antibiotic resistance to world ’ s most common infections
Antimicrobials have been a driver of unprecedented medical and societal advances, but their overuse has resulted in antibiotic resistant bacteria, with the World Health Organization (WHO) reporting new surveillance data on Monday which reveals widespread resistance to some of the world ’ s most common infections, includingE. coli and pneumonia. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - January 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UN health agency finds high levels of antibiotic resistance to world ’s most common infections
Antimicrobials have been a driver of unprecedented medical and societal advances, but their overuse has resulted in antibiotic resistant bacteria, with the World Health Organization (WHO) reporting new surveillance data on Monday which reveals widespread resistance to some of the world ’s most common infections, including E. coli and pneumonia. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - January 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists discover how giardia parasite makes you ill
Giardia parasites mimic human cells to help bacteria feed off nutrients in the gut, a study says. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High levels of antibiotic resistance found worldwide, new data show
BANGKOK 29 January 2018 – The World Health Organization’s first release of surveillance data on antibiotic resistance reveals high levels of resistance to a number of serious bacterial infections in both high- and low-income countries. WHO’s new Global Antimicrobial Surveillance System (known as GLASS) reveals widespread occurrence of antibiotic resistance among 500 000 people with suspected bacterial infections across 22 countries.  The most commonly reported resistant bacteria were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Salmo...
Source: WHO EMRO News - January 29, 2018 Category: Middle East Health Source Type: news

Parasite mimics human proteins to provide 'ready meals' from the gut
(University of East Anglia) Giardia parasites -- responsible for one of the world's most common gastric diseases -- mimic human cell functions to break apart cells in the gut and feed off them.The secret behind giardia's success has eluded scientists for more than 300 years.Researchers found that the parasite produces two types of protein that enable it to cut through layers of protective mucus in the gut, breaking the links that knit cells together to access the nutrients within them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

E. coli: How can I tell if food is contaminated?
(Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist)
Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist - January 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rare tropical disease masked a woman's bowel cancer
Anna Gilmour, 39, from Esher, Surrey, started losing weight and suffering from diarrhoea in 2015, prompting her to be diagnosed with giardiasis. When symptoms ease, they returned as cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Experts on how to spot if there is E.coli in your salad
Dr Jeffrey M Farber, a professor of food safety at the University of Guelph, explains how salad gets infected, whether you should wash your leaves, and what kinds of salad to look out for to stay safe. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

TECHLAB Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance To Market CAMPYLOBACTER QUIK CHEK(TM) and CAMPYLOBACTER CHEK(TM) Tests
Tests Help Clinicians Diagnose Diarrhea Caused by Campylobacter Bacteria BLACKSBURG, Va., Jan. 23, 2018 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- TECHLAB, Inc., a leading developer and manufacturer of rapid non-invasive diagnostic tests for gastroin... Diagnostics, Gastroenterology, Product Launch TECHLAB, CAMPYLOBACTER, QUIK CHEK (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - January 23, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The Proven & Unproven Health Benefits Of Honey
By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — Move over, prehistoric bears. Humans have loved honey since the Stone Age. Rock art pictures of honey harvesting, which at first glance look like drawings from A.A. Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh, date to about 8000 B.C. Beeswax has been found on pottery dating as far back as 7000 B.C., most likely used for waterproofing. The ancient Egyptians offered honey to the gods and then joined the Greeks, Romans and Chinese in using it as a salve for wounds and a treatment for fevers and stomach ailments. Today, proponents of honey tout its miraculous healing properties, claiming that it can prev...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Honey Source Type: news

Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Due to Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli: Possible Need for Method Improvement
We report here a case of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in a pediatric patient, caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O145 carrying genotype stx2a eae ehxA. STEC O145 strains are part of Karmali's serotype B classification. Karmali et al. [1] proposed a serotype classification that divided STEC strains into five groups on the basis of reported frequency of outbreaks and disease severity in humans. Serotypes other than O157, termed non-O157 STEC, have also been implicated frequently in outbreaks and severe disease in humans [2]. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - January 18, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Mar ía José González-Abad, Mercedes Alonso Sanz Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

Protein designed entirely from scratch functions in cells as a genuine enzyme
(Princeton University) Artificial biology is working toward creating a genuinely new organism. At Princeton, Chemistry Professor Michael Hecht and the researchers in his lab are designing and building proteins that can fold and mimic the chemical processes that sustain life. Now, Hecht and his colleagues have confirmed that at least one of their new proteins can catalyze biological reactions in E. coli, meaning that a protein designed entirely from scratch functions in cells as a genuine enzyme. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Phosphoethanolamine cellulose: A naturally produced chemically modified cellulose
Cellulose is a major contributor to the chemical and mechanical properties of plants and assumes structural roles in bacterial communities termed biofilms. We find that Escherichia coli produces chemically modified cellulose that is required for extracellular matrix assembly and biofilm architecture. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the intact and insoluble material elucidates the zwitterionic phosphoethanolamine modification that had evaded detection by conventional methods. Installation of the phosphoethanolamine group requires BcsG, a proposed phosphoethanolamine transferase, with biofilm-promoting...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Thongsomboon, W., Serra, D. O., Possling, A., Hadjineophytou, C., Hengge, R., Cegelski, L. Tags: Chemistry, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Multiplexed gene synthesis in emulsions for exploring protein functional landscapes
Improving our ability to construct and functionally characterize DNA sequences would broadly accelerate progress in biology. Here, we introduce DropSynth, a scalable, low-cost method to build thousands of defined gene-length constructs in a pooled (multiplexed) manner. DropSynth uses a library of barcoded beads that pull down the oligonucleotides necessary for a gene’s assembly, which are then processed and assembled in water-in-oil emulsions. We used DropSynth to successfully build more than 7000 synthetic genes that encode phylogenetically diverse homologs of two essential genes in Escherichia coli. We tested the a...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Plesa, C., Sidore, A. M., Lubock, N. B., Zhang, D., Kosuri, S. Tags: Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

6,000-year-old track record for healing leaky gut
When I was traveling in India, I had the privilege of studying Ayurvedic medicine with traditional Master Healers. Surrounded by lakes, oceans and mountains, Kerala, India, is the birthplace of Ayurveda medicine. My plane landed in Mumbai. From there, I made the 800-mile trip to Kerala down on the southwestern-most tip of the Indian peninsula. With origins dating back 6,000 years, Kerala is the birthplace of Ayurvedic medicine. I spent a lot of time at the AyurMana or “ancient healing house.” This is the oldest existing school of Ayurvedic medicine in the world. It was there that I observed how quickly...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - January 17, 2018 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Health Natural Cures anxiety arthritis Cancer celiac disease chronic fatigue depression diabetes digestive issues fibromyalgia leaky gut multiple sclerosis schizophrenia Source Type: news

Is deadly bacteria lurking in your dishwasher?
Researchers from the University of Ljubljana, in Slovenia, found the kitchen staple can contain E.coli, which causes life-threatening food poisoning, and pathogens linked to urinary tract infections. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Surfers three times more likely to have antibiotic-resistant bacteria in guts
(University of Exeter) Scientists compared fecal samples from surfers and non-surfers to assess whether the surfers' guts contained E. coli bacteria that were able to grow in the presence of the antibiotic cefotaxime. Cefotaxime has previously been prescribed to kill off these bacteria, but some have acquired genes that enable them to survive this treatment.The study found that 13 of 143 (9 percent) of surfers were colonized by these resistant bacteria, compared to just four of 130 (3 percent) of non-surfers swabbed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 14, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists criticise trend for raw meat pet food after analysis finds pathogens
Bacteria and parasites often found in raw dog and cat food products can pose health dangers to pets and their owners, researchers warnThe trend for feeding dogs and cats raw meat has been criticised by scientists, who say it often contains bacteria and parasites that could pose dangers to both pets and their owners.A growing trend has seen pet owners plump for products such as meat, bones and organs which can be bought frozen and then thawed before being fed to dogs and cats.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Microbiology Science Pets Life and style Dogs Cats Animals E coli Source Type: news

More illnesses linked to E. coli in leafy greens
Two dozen infections have been reported in 15 states, with 18 confirmed illnesses and one death, officials say (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Deadly E. Coli Outbreak Tied to Leafy Greens Likely Over, C.D.C. Says
The contaminated product is likely no longer on store shelves, the public health agency says. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NIRAJ CHOKSHI Tags: Food Contamination and Poisoning E Coli (Bacteria) Lettuce Centers for Disease Control and Prevention United States Canada Source Type: news

Update: Multistate Outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 Infections
In the United States, CDC, several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration continue to investigate a multistate outbreak of 24 STEC O157:H7 infections in 15 states. Since CDC's initial media statement on December 28, seven more illnesses have been added to this investigation. The last reported illness started on December 12, 2017. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - January 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More cases reported in deadly US E. coli outbreak
Federal health officials reported seven additional cases of E. coli illness Wednesday in a deadly E. coli outbreak that has now struck 15 US states. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce apparently over, Ottawa says
An outbreak of E. coli infections linked to romaine lettuce "appears to be over," according to the Public Health Agency of Canada. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

CDC: E.coli Outbreak Threat Likely Over Soon
There has been one death and nine people have been hospitalized, including two with kidney failure, CNN reported. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - January 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

SURGICEL & #194; & #174; Powder Absorbable Hemostat is used in surgeries.
SURGICEL® Powder Absorbable Hemostat is used for broad-surface oozing and stops bleeding fast. Unit is suitable for gynecologic, oncologic, cardiovascular and general procedure applications. Product offers bactericidal activity in vitro against MRSA, MRSE, VRE, PRSP, E Coli pathogens.This story is related to the following:Hemostats (Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies)
Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies - January 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Source Type: news

Stomach Flu (Gastroenteritis) Symptoms, Signs Treatment Remedies, Diet
Title: Stomach Flu (Gastroenteritis) Symptoms, Signs Treatment Remedies, DietCategory: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 12/31/1997 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 1/10/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Digestion General)
Source: MedicineNet Digestion General - January 10, 2018 Category: Nutrition Source Type: news

A biological solution to carbon capture and recycling?
(University of Dundee) Scientists at the University of Dundee have discovered that E. coli bacteria could hold the key to an efficient method of capturing and storing or recycling carbon dioxide. Professor Frank Sargent and colleagues at the University of Dundee's School of Life Sciences, working with local industry partners Sasol UK and Ingenza Ltd, have developed a process that enables the E. coli bacterium to act as a very efficient carbon capture device. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Consumers Advised to Avoid Romaine Lettuce for Now
by William E. Gibson, AARP, January 5, 2018|Comments: 0. A view of a head of romaine lettuce. Getty Images. Fifty-eight people have gotten sick from the E. coli bacteria over the past seven weeks. People should avoid eating romaine lettuce until health officials can determine the cause of E. coli food infections that have  ... (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - January 7, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

E. Coli Deaths Linked to Romaine Lettuce, Officials Say
Officials in Canada blamed the leafy green, but their American counterparts are still investigating the cause of an outbreak in the United States. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NIRAJ CHOKSHI Tags: E Coli (Bacteria) Food Contamination and Poisoning Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Romaine lettuce Canada United States Source Type: news

Romaine lettuce may be to blame for E coli outbreak  
At least 58 Americans and Canadians have been sickened by E. coli bacteria and one has died. Canadian health officials have identified romaine as the source, but the CDC is hesitant to warn against it. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WATCH: Warning of multistate E. coli outbreak in romaine lettuce
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that 17 people in 13 states were diagnosed with E. coli infections that may be tied to romaine lettuce. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - January 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

E. coli triggers warning about romaine lettuce
Dangerous bacteria has sickened people in more than a dozen states (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Romaine Lettuce May Be Linked To E. Coli Outbreak
CBS Local — A warning from health officials is urging people to be cautious of eating romaine lettuce after nearly 60 people were infected by E. coli bacteria. The illnesses were reported in Canada and 13 states including New Hampshire, Vermont and Connecticut. According to Consumer Reports, the dangerous bacteria has sent five to the hospital and killed one person in America. Another patient died of the illness in Canada, where the source of the bacteria was tracked down to the leafy greens. “Even though we can’t say with 100 percent certainty that romaine lettuce is the cause of the E. co...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Chris Melore E. Coli Food Poisoning Lettuce Local TV Romaine Lettuce talkers Source Type: news

Lettuce suspected in US E. coli outbreak that sickens 17, with one death
An outbreak of E. coli made 17 people ill and killed one person across the United States between November 15 and December 8, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Though the source of infection is still unknown, the CDC is investigating leafy greens and romaine lettuce. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news