Evaluating the Antimicrobial Properties of Commercial Hand Sanitizers, MSphere
Hand sanitizers have been developed as a convenient means to decontaminate an individual's hands of bacterial pathogens in situations in which soap and water are not available. Yet to our knowledge, no study has compared the antibacterial efficacy of a large collection of hand sanitizers. Using zone of growth inhibition and kill curve assays, we assessed the performance of 46 commercially available hand sanitizers that were obtained from national chain big-box stores, gasoline stations, pharmacies, and boutiques for antibacterial activity toward prototypical Gram-positive ( Staphylococcus aureus ) and Gram-negative ( Esche...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why the Healthcare Association of New York State is partnering with Vyv
Vyv makes non-ultraviolet LEDs that kill microbes — including bacteria such as MRSA, salmonella, E. coli and C. diff. — that grow on surfaces. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 13, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Justin Dawes Source Type: news

What Are Toxin-Mediated Diseases?
Discussion A poison is a generic term for “a substance with an inherent property that tends to destroy life or impair health.” A toxin is more specific and is “any poison produced by an organism, characterized by antigenicity in certain animals and high molecular weight, and including the bacterial toxins that are the causative agents of tetanus, diphtheria, etc., and such plant and animal toxins as ricin and snake venom.” A toxin does not include those substances that are made synthetically produced. Venom is also a toxin that is used by animals and insects for predation or defense which can cause ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 12, 2021 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Healthcare-associated infections
Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) are bacterial infections that commonly occur as a direct result of healthcare interventions (such as medical or surgical treatment), or from being in contact with a healthcare setting. They are the most well-known healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). HCAIs pose a serious risk to patients, staff and visitors, can incur high costs for the NHS, and can cause significant morbidity to those infected. The emergence of new infections also poses a risk to patients and staff, as highlighted by the transmis...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - March 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

B.C. boy permanently brain damaged after eating lettuce contaminated with E. coli
Marketplace finds out why outbreaks of E. coli keep happening with romaine lettuce — and meets a B.C. family whose young son was sickened, and will never be the same. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - March 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Marketplace Source Type: news

New Phase 3 Data Show First-in-Class TREMFYA ® (guselkumab) Achieved Complete Skin Clearance and Favorable Joint Efficacy in Adult Patients with Active Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Through Two Years
SPRING HOUSE, PENNSYLVANIA, March 16, 2021 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced long-term data from the Phase 3 DISCOVER-2a study showing that the skin clearance, joint symptom relief, and safety of TREMFYA® (guselkumab) previously demonstrated through 24 weeks and one year (Week 52) in adults with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) continued through two years (Week 112).1,2 These findings also confirmed that the robust efficacy TREMFYA demonstrated in patients at Week 24 on physical function, physical aspects of health-related quality of life, and resolution of enthesitis...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - March 16, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Type III secretion system effectors form robust and flexible intracellular virulence networks
Infections with many Gram-negative pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Shigella, and Yersinia, rely on type III secretion system (T3SS) effectors. We hypothesized that while hijacking processes within mammalian cells, the effectors operate as a robust network that can tolerate substantial contractions. This was tested in vivo using the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium (encoding 31 effectors). Sequential gene deletions showed that effector essentiality for infection was context dependent and that the network could tolerate 60% contraction while maintaining pathogenicity. Despite inducing very different co...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ruano-Gallego, D., Sanchez-Garrido, J., Kozik, Z., Nunez-Berrueco, E., Cepeda-Molero, M., Mullineaux-Sanders, C., Naemi-Baghshomali Clark, J., Slater, S. L., Wagner, N., Glegola-Madejska, I., Roumeliotis, T. I., Pupko, T., Fernandez, L. A., Rodriguez-Pato Tags: Engineering, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Bacterial competition in situations of food scarcity prevents survival of mutants
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Study compares the phenomenon observed in the species E. coli to a " tragedy of the commons " , in which individual interests take precedence over the collective good. According to the authors, it masks the emergence of bacterial variants and makes the colony's mutation rate appear lower. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 10, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lupin launches generic diarrhea drug in US market
Nitazoxanide tablets, 500 mg, are indicated in the treatment of diarrhea caused by Giardia lamblia or Cryptosporidium parvum in patients 12 years of age and older. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - March 10, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Three Modes of Transmission Explain Most Giardiasis Outbreaks
FRIDAY, March 5, 2021 -- Three main modes of transmission have been identified for giardiasis outbreaks in the United States in 2012 to 2017, although a single transmission mode could not be identified for 43 percent of outbreaks, according to... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 5, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Giardiasis Outbreaks - United States, 2012-2017
This report describes giardiasis outbreaks in 26 states (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - March 4, 2021 Category: American Health Tags: Giardiasis MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Outbreaks Source Type: news

Signs and symptoms of sepsis: raising awareness in the learning disability community, Learning Disability Practice: N.PAG-N.PAG
This article discusses sepsis in people with learning disabilities and describes a leaflet developed as part of a student assignment at De Mont fort University to inform people with learning disabilities about sepsis. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - March 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lost your appetite? Experts say nutmeg oil can bring it back
(Natural News) Loss of appetite is a common symptom that can be caused by a wide variety of conditions. For instance, bacterial, fungal and viral infections, such as upper respiratory tract infections, skin infections, pneumonia or gastroenteritis, can all cause loss of appetite. Stress, boredom, anxiety and depression are also known to cause this symptom. Other... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Adherent-Invasive E. Coli Metabolism Drives Inflammation in Crohn's Disease Adherent-Invasive E. Coli Metabolism Drives Inflammation in Crohn's Disease
Researchers have identified the process by which adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) bacteria drive inflammation in Crohn's disease.Medscape (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Clinically relevant mutations in core metabolic genes confer antibiotic resistance
Although metabolism plays an active role in antibiotic lethality, antibiotic resistance is generally associated with drug target modification, enzymatic inactivation, and/or transport rather than metabolic processes. Evolution experiments of Escherichia coli rely on growth-dependent selection, which may provide a limited view of the antibiotic resistance landscape. We sequenced and analyzed E. coli adapted to representative antibiotics at increasingly heightened metabolic states. This revealed various underappreciated noncanonical genes, such as those related to central carbon and energy metabolism, which are implicated in...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Lopatkin, A. J., Bening, S. C., Manson, A. L., Stokes, J. M., Kohanski, M. A., Badran, A. H., Earl, A. M., Cheney, N. J., Yang, J. H., Collins, J. J. Tags: Evolution, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Genotoxic E. coli 'caught in the act'
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) Max Planck researchers and their collaborators reveal transformation of colon organoids in vitro. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 17, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bacterial degradation of the MYC oncogene -- a new cancer treatment strategy?
(Lund University) Scientists at Lund University have discovered how E. coli bacteria target and degrade the well-known oncogene MYC, which is involved in many forms of cancer. The study is now published in Nature Biotechnology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists identify how harmless gut bacteria " turn bad "
(University of Bath) An international team of scientists has determined how harmless E. coli gut bacteria in chickens can easily pick up the genes required to evolve to cause a life-threatening infection. Their study, published inNature Communications, warns that such infections not only affect the poultry industry but could also potentially cross over to infect humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Reversal of the Pathophysiological Responses to Gram-Negative Sepsis by Megadose Vitamin C, Critical care medicine 49(2): e179-e190
Objectives: Oxidative stress appears to initiate organ failure in sepsis, justifying treatment with antioxidants such as vitamin C at megadoses. We have therefore investigated the safety and efficacy of megadose sodium ascorbate in sepsis.; Design: Interventional study.; Setting: Research Institute.; Subjects: Adult Merino ewes.; Interventions: Sheep were instrumented with pulmonary and renal artery flow-probes, and laser-Doppler and oxygen-sensing probes in the kidney. Conscious sheep received an infusion of live Escherichia coli for 31 hours. At 23.5 hours of sepsis, sheep received fluid resuscitation (30 mL/kg, Hartmann...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gulls, sentinels of bacteria in the environment
(University of Barcelona) Gulls are one of the main wild birds that act as reservoirs of Campylobacter and Salmonella, two most relevant intestinal antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing gastroenteritis in humans. Therefore, according to an article published in the journalScience of the Total Environment seagulls could act as sentinels of the antibiotic pressure in the environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Specific bacteria in the gut prompt mother mice to neglect their pups
(Salk Institute) As scientists learn more about the microorganisms that colonize the body--collectively called the microbiota--one area of intense interest is the effect that these microbes can have on the brain. A new study led by Salk Institute scientists has identified a strain of E. coli bacteria that, when living in the guts of female mice, causes them to neglect their offspring. The findings were published January 29, 2021, in the journalScience Advances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 29, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Regulating the ribosomal RNA production line
(Penn State) The enzyme that makes RNA from a DNA template is altered to slow the production of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), the most abundant type of RNA within cells, when resources are scarce and the bacteria Escherichia coli needs to slow its growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NIH scientists study salmonella swimming behavior as clues to infection
Bacteria commonly cause human gastroenteritis, inflammation of the lining of the intestines. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - January 13, 2021 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Can Gastroenteritis Cause a High White Blood Cell Count?
Title: Can Gastroenteritis Cause a High White Blood Cell Count?Category: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 1/13/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 1/13/2021 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Digestion General)
Source: MedicineNet Digestion General - January 13, 2021 Category: Nutrition Source Type: news

NIH scientists study salmonella swimming behavior as clues to infection
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteria (S. Typhimurium) commonly cause human gastroenteritis, inflammation of the lining of the intestines. The bacteria live inside the gut and can infect the epithelial cells that line its surface. Many studies have shown that Salmonella use a " run-and-tumble " method of short swimming periods (runs) punctuated by tumbles when they randomly change direction, but how they move within the gut is not well understood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 13, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Shiga toxin's not supposed to kill you
(University of Connecticut) E. coli food poisoning is one of the worst food poisonings, causing bloody diarrhea and kidney damage. But all the carnage might be just an unintended side effect, report researchers from UConn Health. Their findings might lead to more effective treatments for this potentially deadly disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Campylobacter jejuni chemoreceptor Tlp10 has a bimodal ligand-binding domain and specificity for multiple classes of chemoeffectors
Campylobacter jejuni is a bacterial pathogen that is a common cause of enteritis in humans. We identified a previously uncharacterized type of sensory domain in the periplasmic region of the C. jejuni chemoreceptor Tlp10, termed the DAHL domain, that is predicted to have a bimodular helical architecture. Through two independent ligand-binding sites in this domain, Tlp10 responded to molecular aspartate, isoleucine, fumarate, malate, fucose, and mannose as attractants and to arginine, galactose, and thiamine as repellents. Tlp10 also recognized glycan ligands when present as terminal and intermediate residues of complex str...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - January 5, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Elgamoudi, B. A., Andrianova, E. P., Shewell, L. K., Day, C. J., King, R. M., Taha, , Rahman, H., Hartley-Tassell, L. E., Zhulin, I. B., Korolik, V. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Interactions between nascent proteins translated by adjacent ribosomes drive homomer assembly
In this study, we investigated whether direct interaction of two nascent proteins, emerging from nearby ribosomes (co-co assembly), constitutes a general mechanism for oligomer formation. We used proteome-wide screening to detect nascent chain–connected ribosome pairs and identified hundreds of homomer subunits that co-co assemble in human cells. Interactions are mediated by five major domain classes, among which N-terminal coiled coils are the most prevalent. We were able to reconstitute co-co assembly of nuclear lamin in Escherichia coli, demonstrating that dimer formation is independent of dedicated assembly machi...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 31, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Bertolini, M., Fenzl, K., Kats, I., Wruck, F., Tippmann, F., Schmitt, J., Auburger, J. J., Tans, S., Bukau, B., Kramer, G. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

Is E coli Contagious
Is E. coli Contagious? (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - December 11, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Toxin provides clues to long-term effects of diarrhea caused by E. coli
(Washington University School of Medicine) A study from researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that a toxin produced by E. coli changes intestinal cells to benefit itself, an ability that could provide a clue to why the bacteria have been linked to nutritional problems such as malnutrition and stunted growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Escherichia coli as the king's dye maker
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - December 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Funk, M. A. Tags: twil Source Type: news

Tackling metabolic complexity
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) CRISPRi screens reveal sources of metabolic robustness in E. coli. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

English Surveillance Programme for Antimicrobial Utilisation and Resistance (ESPAUR) Report 2019 to 2020
Annual report shows there were an estimated 65,162 antimicrobial resistance infections diagnosed in 2019, up from 61,946 in 2018. E. coli remains the most common bloodstream infection, rising 14% in 2015 to 77.5 in 2019, which is a significant concern. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - November 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

E. Coli Outbreak May Be Linked to Recalled Romaine Lettuce
A link between an Escherichia coli outbreak that has sickened 12 people in six states and recalled romaine lettuce sold by Tanimura& Antle is being investigated by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Five of the patients have... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - November 12, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

SURVEILLANCE SUMMARIES: Investigations of Possible Multistate Outbreaks of Salmonella, Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes Infections - United States, 2016
Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), and Listeria monocytogenes cause most multistate foodborne disease outbreaks in the U.S. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - November 12, 2020 Category: American Health Tags: E. coli Infection Foodborne Disease Listeriosis MMWR MMWR Summaries Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Salmonella Surveillance Source Type: news

CDC: 3 Ongoing E. Coli Outbreaks, One May Be Linked To Romaine Lettuce
The FDA also announced that Tanimura& Antle is recalling certain lots of their Romaine lettuce. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - November 12, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Y. Lee, Senior Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Business /business Food & Drink /food-drink pharma Source Type: news

Romaine lettuce recall 2020: Possible E. coli contamination
The voluntary recall affects over 3,000 heads of lettuce distributed in 20 states. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Romaine lettuce sold at Walmart recalled for E.coli
The voluntary recall affects packaged romaine lettuce distributed to 19 states and Puerto Rico. No illnesses have been reported. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Romaine Lettuce Recalled In Massachusetts And Other States For Possible E. Coli Contamination
BOSTON (CBS) — There’s a recall for romaine lettuce in Massachusetts and several other states. Packaged single heads of romaine sold under the Tanimura & Antle brand could be contaminated with E. coli. The recalled lettuce has a packed on date of 10/15/2020 or 10/16/2020 with UPC number 0-27918-20314-9. So far there have not been any illnesses linked to the recall. There were nearly 3,400 cartons of the recalled romaine shipped to Massachusetts, Alaska, Oregon, California, Texas, Arkansas, Oklaoma, Indiana, Nebraska, Missouri, Tennessee, Wisconsin, New Mexico, South Carolina, Washington, North Carolina, Ohi...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Consumer Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Recall Source Type: news

The Covid-carrying Danish mink are a warning sign – but is anyone heeding it? | Matthew Baylis
Sars, Mers, now this: we must think hard about how we farm animals that are known hosts of human coronavirusesTwo decades ago, aseminal study from the University of Edinburgh compiled a list of all known human infectious diseases. It found a total of 1,415 different human pathogens, and claimed that 61% were capable of spreading between humans and animals. Today, with the world put on hold by adeadly disease that seems likely to have spread first from bats to humans, we know the dangerous effects of such pathogens all too well.The group of diseases that spread from animals to humans are collectively known as zoonoses. The ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Matthew Baylis Tags: Coronavirus Farming Environment Science Sars Infectious diseases Denmark Europe Source Type: news

What's that growing on your face mask?
(Florida Atlantic University) Many people reuse masks and other face coverings many times without sanitizing them. That is likely because current sanitization methods can be cumbersome. A new device using a hanging rack and UV-C light can sterilize up to six masks and other items simultaneously and quickly, killing bacteria, yeasts, mold spores, and viruses. This device has shown its efficacy against pathogens including the highly-contagious E-coli, which was eradicated in about one minute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 9, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Princeton researchers find key to piercing harmful bacteria's armor
(Princeton University) Princeton University researchers have identified a new bacterial protein that assists in delivering components to the outer membrane of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, as they report in recent papers in PNAS and Trends in Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 9, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Romaine lettuce recall 2020: Tanimura & Antle recalls single heads of romaine for possible E. coli contamination
Tanimura & Antle is voluntarily recalling select single heads of romaine lettuce distributed across the country for possible E. Coli... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Romaine lettuce recall 2020: Tanimura & Antle recalls single heads of romaine for possible E. coli contamination
Tanimura & Antle is voluntarily recalling select single heads of romaine lettuce distributed across the country for possible E. Coli... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘Unacceptable’ bacteria levels found on US meat may fuel fears over UK trade deal
Samples of pork and poultry showed high levels of salmonella and E coli in new study (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CFIA tightens restrictions on romaine lettuce imports following E. coli outbreaks
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is instituting stronger restrictions around the import of romaine lettuce. Starting Wednesday, importers will have to prove that their product does not come from California's Salinas Valley or that their lettuce has "below-detectable" levels of E. coli. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - October 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/New Brunswick Source Type: news

New study finds novel functions of the pyruvate-sensing protein PdhR in E. Coli
(Tokyo Institute of Technology) Scientists at Meiji University, Hosei University, and Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) aimed to better understand the homeostasis of pyruvate, a key connection point of many metabolic pathways in Escherichia coli bacteria. Scientists focused on a transcription factor called PdhR because it regulates pyruvate breakdown into other molecules. They identified ~20 genes that PdhR targets, and showed their involvement in pathways connected to pyruvate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Potential drug target for dangerous E. coli infections identified
(University of New South Wales) Treatment for a deadly E. coli strain may be possible in the future, after UNSW Sydney researchers identify a new molecular pathway that controls the potent Shiga toxin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers uncover tools used by predatory bacteria to escape unharmed from prey cell
(University of Nottingham) Predatory bacteria, capable of invading and consuming harmful bugs such as E .coli and Salmonella, use a unique tool to help them escape the cell they have invaded without harming themselves, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 23, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

E. coli bacteria offer path to improving photosynthesis
(Cornell University) Cornell University scientists have engineered a key plant enzyme and introduced it in Escherichia coli bacteria in order to create an optimal experimental environment for studying how to speed up photosynthesis, a holy grail for improving crop yields. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news