Ginger As Antiemetic in Children With Acute Gastroenteritis Ginger As Antiemetic in Children With Acute Gastroenteritis
Is oral administration of ginger effective in reducing vomiting in children with acute gastroenteritis?Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

New Case Linked to Illness Outbreak at Kansas Splash Park New Case Linked to Illness Outbreak at Kansas Splash Park
The Shigella bacteria is spread from person to person through exposure to contaminated feces, the public health agencies said.Associated Press (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - July 16, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Multistate Outbreak of E. coli Infections Linked to Raw Flour Multistate Outbreak of E. coli Infections Linked to Raw Flour
This outbreak of E. coli across nine states underscores the need to be cognizant of raw flour as an important cause of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection.Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health & Prevention Journal Article Source Type: news

FDA Approves New Asparaginase Product for Leukemia FDA Approves New Asparaginase Product for Leukemia
The new recombinant product, Rylaze, is approved for use in patients who have developed hypersensitivity to asparaginase derived from E coli.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Alert Source Type: news

Study shows potential dangers of sweeteners
(Anglia Ruskin University) New research has discovered that common artificial sweeteners can cause previously healthy gut bacteria to become diseased and invade the gut wall, potentially leading to serious health issues. The study, published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, is the first to show the pathogenic effects of some of the most widely used artificial sweeteners - saccharin, sucralose, and aspartame - on two types of gut bacteria, E. coli (Escherichia coli) and E. faecalis (Enterococcus faecalis). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Announcing the re-annotation of RefSeq genome assemblies for E. coli and four other species!
We have re-annotated all RefSeq genomes for Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Bacillus subtilis, Acinetobacter pittii, and Campylobacter jejuni using the most recent release of PGAP. You will find that more genes now have gene symbols (e.g. recA). Your feedback indicated that the lack of symbols was an impediment to comparative analysis, so we hope that this improvement … Continue reading Announcing the re-annotation of RefSeq genome assemblies for E. coli and four other species! → (Source: NCBI Insights)
Source: NCBI Insights - June 23, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: NCBI Staff Tags: What's New Genome annotation Genome assemblies NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline (PGAP) Reference genome RefSeq Source Type: news

New version of PGAP available now!
We are happy to announce that a new version of PGAP is available. This version will annotate 20 to 25% more genes with symbols (e.g. recA) on the assembled genomes of key species, compared to previous versions. You will observe an increase in symbols when you annotate the genomes of Escherichia coli, Campylobacter jejuni and … Continue reading New version of PGAP available now! → (Source: NCBI Insights)
Source: NCBI Insights - June 15, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: NCBI Staff Tags: What's New NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline (PGAP) Source Type: news

Shrinking to survive: Bacteria adapt to a lifestyle in flux
(Washington University in St. Louis) E. coli adapt to survive sudden starvation. Biologists from Washington University in St. Louis and Stanford showed that when E. coli cells lack nutrients, the cytoplasm becomes more dense as its volume decreases, probably because of water loss. At the same time, the periplasm increases in volume as the inner membrane pulls away from the outer membrane. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Maternal Sepsis: presentation, course, treatment and outcomes
The current adult definition of sepsis and septic shock, as developed in 1992, does not adequately define sepsis in the pregnant and peripartum women due to the alteration of sepsis presentation in the maternal population. The purpose of this study was to determine potential causative factors for sepsis with the aim of prevention and reducing morbidity and mortality. Study Design and Methods: A descriptive observational design via a retrospective medical record review was used with a convenience sample of 22 women who were identified after admission as having sepsis. The setting was the labor and delivery unit of a large u...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - June 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Norovirus Genotypes in Children With Acute Gastroenteritis Norovirus Genotypes in Children With Acute Gastroenteritis
Identifying new or emerging norovirus strains associated with acute gastroenteritis in children could have important implications for vaccine development and efficacy.Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 3, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

New Phase 3b Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Data Show First-in-Class TREMFYA ® (guselkumab) Achieved Robust Joint Symptom Improvement and Complete Skin Clearance in Patients with Inadequate Response to Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibition (TNFi-IR)
SPRING HOUSE, PENNSYLVANIA, June 2, 2021 – Today the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced new efficacy and safety data for first-in-class TREMFYA® (guselkumab), including data from the first study evaluating a selective IL-23 inhibitor in adult patients with active PsA, all of whom had demonstrated inadequate response or intolerance to TNFi.1 In the COSMOS Phase 3b study, significantly higher proportions of patients treated with TREMFYA showed joint symptom improvement and complete skin clearance versus placebo at week 24 in this true TNFi-IRa patient population, which is often more...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - June 2, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

NIH scientists find that Salmonella use intestinal epithelial cells to colonize the gut
onella Typhimurium bacteria live in the gut and often cause gastroenteritis in people. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - May 26, 2021 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Common food poisoning bacteria may also be an STI, scientists warn 
Campylobacter infection, the most common foodborne illness in the Western world, can also be spread through sexual contact, according to researchers from the University of Oklahoma. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 24, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rotavirus Vaccine Tied to Major Reduction in Infections Rotavirus Vaccine Tied to Major Reduction in Infections
Two widely used rotavirus vaccines performed comparably in a meta-analysis, reducing risk of rotavirus gastroenteritis by more than 60% in young children.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - May 21, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

A tripartite-chromosome E. coli strain allows the chromosome isolation and implantation
(Japan Science and Technology Agency) A group of Japanese researchers has succeeded in splitting the E. coli chromosome into three of 1 million base pairs. The 1 million base pairs chromosome can be used for E. coli transformation. This E. coli-based technology has the potential to greatly advance synthetic genomics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

OU researcher identifies new mode of transmission for bacteria
(University of Oklahoma) Campylobacter infection, one of the most common foodborne illnesses in the Western world, can also be spread through sexual contact, according to a new research discovery by an OU Hudson College of Public Health faculty member, working in conjunction with colleagues in Denmark. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 21, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How human cells and pathogenic shigella engage in battle
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) DALLAS - May 21, 2021 - One member of a large protein family that is known to stop the spread of bacterial infections by prompting infected human cells to self-destruct appears to kill the infectious bacteria instead, a new study led by UT Southwestern scientists shows. However, some bacteria have their own mechanism to thwart this attack, nullifying the deadly protein by tagging it for destruction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New antimicrobial surface reduces bacteria build-up on medical instruments
(Monash University) Patient infection from urinary catheters are a global health concern. In a world-first, Monash University researchers have developed a new 3D antimicrobial surface to reduce bacterial build-up. The study saw a reduction in bacteria colonisation for three leading Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) pathogens, including E. coli. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 18, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Notes from the Field: An Outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infections Linked to Romaine Lettuce Exposure - United States, 2019
This report describes an outbreak of Escherichia coli in multiple states linked to romaine lettuce. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - May 6, 2021 Category: American Health Tags: E. coli Infection MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Outbreaks Source Type: news

Processed diets might promote chronic infections that can lead to disorders such as diabetes
(Georgia State University) Processed diets, which are low in fiber, may initially reduce the incidence of foodborne infectious diseases such as E. coli infections, but might also increase the incidence of diseases characterized by low-grade chronic infection and inflammation such as diabetes, according to researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 28, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New Phase 3 Data Showed First-in-Class TREMFYA ® (guselkumab) Provided Durable Complete Skin Clearance Through Five Years in Moderate to Severe Plaque Psoriasis (PsO) and Robust Joint Symptom Improvement Through 52 Weeks in Active Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA)
SPRING HOUSE, PENNSYLVANIA, April 23, 2021 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced new Phase 3 data which showed TREMFYA® (guselkumab) sustained durable, complete skin clearance rates in a majority of adults with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis (PsO) through five years (252 weeks), a and improved disease activity and axial symptoms in adults with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) through one year (52 weeks).1,2,3 These data are being presented at the American Academy of Dermatology Virtual Meeting Experience 2021, where Janssen will present a total of 22 abstracts. TREMF...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - April 23, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Notes from the Field: Multistate Outbreak of Escherichia coli O26 Infections Linked to Raw Flour - United States, 2019
This report describes an outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing E. Coli linked to contaminated flour in the United States. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - April 22, 2021 Category: American Health Tags: E. coli Infection MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Source Type: news

Evaluating the Antimicrobial Properties of Commercial Hand Sanitizers, MSphere
Hand sanitizers have been developed as a convenient means to decontaminate an individual's hands of bacterial pathogens in situations in which soap and water are not available. Yet to our knowledge, no study has compared the antibacterial efficacy of a large collection of hand sanitizers. Using zone of growth inhibition and kill curve assays, we assessed the performance of 46 commercially available hand sanitizers that were obtained from national chain big-box stores, gasoline stations, pharmacies, and boutiques for antibacterial activity toward prototypical Gram-positive ( Staphylococcus aureus ) and Gram-negative ( Esche...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why the Healthcare Association of New York State is partnering with Vyv
Vyv makes non-ultraviolet LEDs that kill microbes — including bacteria such as MRSA, salmonella, E. coli and C. diff. — that grow on surfaces. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 13, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Justin Dawes Source Type: news

What Are Toxin-Mediated Diseases?
Discussion A poison is a generic term for “a substance with an inherent property that tends to destroy life or impair health.” A toxin is more specific and is “any poison produced by an organism, characterized by antigenicity in certain animals and high molecular weight, and including the bacterial toxins that are the causative agents of tetanus, diphtheria, etc., and such plant and animal toxins as ricin and snake venom.” A toxin does not include those substances that are made synthetically produced. Venom is also a toxin that is used by animals and insects for predation or defense which can cause ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 12, 2021 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Healthcare-associated infections
Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) are bacterial infections that commonly occur as a direct result of healthcare interventions (such as medical or surgical treatment), or from being in contact with a healthcare setting. They are the most well-known healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). HCAIs pose a serious risk to patients, staff and visitors, can incur high costs for the NHS, and can cause significant morbidity to those infected. The emergence of new infections also poses a risk to patients and staff, as highlighted by the transmis...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - March 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

B.C. boy permanently brain damaged after eating lettuce contaminated with E. coli
Marketplace finds out why outbreaks of E. coli keep happening with romaine lettuce — and meets a B.C. family whose young son was sickened, and will never be the same. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - March 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Marketplace Source Type: news

New Phase 3 Data Show First-in-Class TREMFYA ® (guselkumab) Achieved Complete Skin Clearance and Favorable Joint Efficacy in Adult Patients with Active Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Through Two Years
SPRING HOUSE, PENNSYLVANIA, March 16, 2021 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced long-term data from the Phase 3 DISCOVER-2a study showing that the skin clearance, joint symptom relief, and safety of TREMFYA® (guselkumab) previously demonstrated through 24 weeks and one year (Week 52) in adults with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) continued through two years (Week 112).1,2 These findings also confirmed that the robust efficacy TREMFYA demonstrated in patients at Week 24 on physical function, physical aspects of health-related quality of life, and resolution of enthesitis...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - March 16, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Type III secretion system effectors form robust and flexible intracellular virulence networks
Infections with many Gram-negative pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Shigella, and Yersinia, rely on type III secretion system (T3SS) effectors. We hypothesized that while hijacking processes within mammalian cells, the effectors operate as a robust network that can tolerate substantial contractions. This was tested in vivo using the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium (encoding 31 effectors). Sequential gene deletions showed that effector essentiality for infection was context dependent and that the network could tolerate 60% contraction while maintaining pathogenicity. Despite inducing very different co...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ruano-Gallego, D., Sanchez-Garrido, J., Kozik, Z., Nunez-Berrueco, E., Cepeda-Molero, M., Mullineaux-Sanders, C., Naemi-Baghshomali Clark, J., Slater, S. L., Wagner, N., Glegola-Madejska, I., Roumeliotis, T. I., Pupko, T., Fernandez, L. A., Rodriguez-Pato Tags: Engineering, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Bacterial competition in situations of food scarcity prevents survival of mutants
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Study compares the phenomenon observed in the species E. coli to a " tragedy of the commons " , in which individual interests take precedence over the collective good. According to the authors, it masks the emergence of bacterial variants and makes the colony's mutation rate appear lower. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 10, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lupin launches generic diarrhea drug in US market
Nitazoxanide tablets, 500 mg, are indicated in the treatment of diarrhea caused by Giardia lamblia or Cryptosporidium parvum in patients 12 years of age and older. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - March 10, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Three Modes of Transmission Explain Most Giardiasis Outbreaks
FRIDAY, March 5, 2021 -- Three main modes of transmission have been identified for giardiasis outbreaks in the United States in 2012 to 2017, although a single transmission mode could not be identified for 43 percent of outbreaks, according to... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 5, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Giardiasis Outbreaks - United States, 2012-2017
This report describes giardiasis outbreaks in 26 states (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - March 4, 2021 Category: American Health Tags: Giardiasis MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Outbreaks Source Type: news

Signs and symptoms of sepsis: raising awareness in the learning disability community, Learning Disability Practice: N.PAG-N.PAG
This article discusses sepsis in people with learning disabilities and describes a leaflet developed as part of a student assignment at De Mont fort University to inform people with learning disabilities about sepsis. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - March 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lost your appetite? Experts say nutmeg oil can bring it back
(Natural News) Loss of appetite is a common symptom that can be caused by a wide variety of conditions. For instance, bacterial, fungal and viral infections, such as upper respiratory tract infections, skin infections, pneumonia or gastroenteritis, can all cause loss of appetite. Stress, boredom, anxiety and depression are also known to cause this symptom. Other... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Adherent-Invasive E. Coli Metabolism Drives Inflammation in Crohn's Disease Adherent-Invasive E. Coli Metabolism Drives Inflammation in Crohn's Disease
Researchers have identified the process by which adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) bacteria drive inflammation in Crohn's disease.Medscape (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Clinically relevant mutations in core metabolic genes confer antibiotic resistance
Although metabolism plays an active role in antibiotic lethality, antibiotic resistance is generally associated with drug target modification, enzymatic inactivation, and/or transport rather than metabolic processes. Evolution experiments of Escherichia coli rely on growth-dependent selection, which may provide a limited view of the antibiotic resistance landscape. We sequenced and analyzed E. coli adapted to representative antibiotics at increasingly heightened metabolic states. This revealed various underappreciated noncanonical genes, such as those related to central carbon and energy metabolism, which are implicated in...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Lopatkin, A. J., Bening, S. C., Manson, A. L., Stokes, J. M., Kohanski, M. A., Badran, A. H., Earl, A. M., Cheney, N. J., Yang, J. H., Collins, J. J. Tags: Evolution, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Genotoxic E. coli 'caught in the act'
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) Max Planck researchers and their collaborators reveal transformation of colon organoids in vitro. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 17, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bacterial degradation of the MYC oncogene -- a new cancer treatment strategy?
(Lund University) Scientists at Lund University have discovered how E. coli bacteria target and degrade the well-known oncogene MYC, which is involved in many forms of cancer. The study is now published in Nature Biotechnology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists identify how harmless gut bacteria " turn bad "
(University of Bath) An international team of scientists has determined how harmless E. coli gut bacteria in chickens can easily pick up the genes required to evolve to cause a life-threatening infection. Their study, published inNature Communications, warns that such infections not only affect the poultry industry but could also potentially cross over to infect humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Reversal of the Pathophysiological Responses to Gram-Negative Sepsis by Megadose Vitamin C, Critical care medicine 49(2): e179-e190
Objectives: Oxidative stress appears to initiate organ failure in sepsis, justifying treatment with antioxidants such as vitamin C at megadoses. We have therefore investigated the safety and efficacy of megadose sodium ascorbate in sepsis.; Design: Interventional study.; Setting: Research Institute.; Subjects: Adult Merino ewes.; Interventions: Sheep were instrumented with pulmonary and renal artery flow-probes, and laser-Doppler and oxygen-sensing probes in the kidney. Conscious sheep received an infusion of live Escherichia coli for 31 hours. At 23.5 hours of sepsis, sheep received fluid resuscitation (30 mL/kg, Hartmann...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gulls, sentinels of bacteria in the environment
(University of Barcelona) Gulls are one of the main wild birds that act as reservoirs of Campylobacter and Salmonella, two most relevant intestinal antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing gastroenteritis in humans. Therefore, according to an article published in the journalScience of the Total Environment seagulls could act as sentinels of the antibiotic pressure in the environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Specific bacteria in the gut prompt mother mice to neglect their pups
(Salk Institute) As scientists learn more about the microorganisms that colonize the body--collectively called the microbiota--one area of intense interest is the effect that these microbes can have on the brain. A new study led by Salk Institute scientists has identified a strain of E. coli bacteria that, when living in the guts of female mice, causes them to neglect their offspring. The findings were published January 29, 2021, in the journalScience Advances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 29, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Regulating the ribosomal RNA production line
(Penn State) The enzyme that makes RNA from a DNA template is altered to slow the production of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), the most abundant type of RNA within cells, when resources are scarce and the bacteria Escherichia coli needs to slow its growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NIH scientists study salmonella swimming behavior as clues to infection
Bacteria commonly cause human gastroenteritis, inflammation of the lining of the intestines. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - January 13, 2021 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Can Gastroenteritis Cause a High White Blood Cell Count?
Title: Can Gastroenteritis Cause a High White Blood Cell Count?Category: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 1/13/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 1/13/2021 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Digestion General)
Source: MedicineNet Digestion General - January 13, 2021 Category: Nutrition Source Type: news

NIH scientists study salmonella swimming behavior as clues to infection
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteria (S. Typhimurium) commonly cause human gastroenteritis, inflammation of the lining of the intestines. The bacteria live inside the gut and can infect the epithelial cells that line its surface. Many studies have shown that Salmonella use a " run-and-tumble " method of short swimming periods (runs) punctuated by tumbles when they randomly change direction, but how they move within the gut is not well understood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 13, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Shiga toxin's not supposed to kill you
(University of Connecticut) E. coli food poisoning is one of the worst food poisonings, causing bloody diarrhea and kidney damage. But all the carnage might be just an unintended side effect, report researchers from UConn Health. Their findings might lead to more effective treatments for this potentially deadly disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Campylobacter jejuni chemoreceptor Tlp10 has a bimodal ligand-binding domain and specificity for multiple classes of chemoeffectors
Campylobacter jejuni is a bacterial pathogen that is a common cause of enteritis in humans. We identified a previously uncharacterized type of sensory domain in the periplasmic region of the C. jejuni chemoreceptor Tlp10, termed the DAHL domain, that is predicted to have a bimodular helical architecture. Through two independent ligand-binding sites in this domain, Tlp10 responded to molecular aspartate, isoleucine, fumarate, malate, fucose, and mannose as attractants and to arginine, galactose, and thiamine as repellents. Tlp10 also recognized glycan ligands when present as terminal and intermediate residues of complex str...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - January 5, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Elgamoudi, B. A., Andrianova, E. P., Shewell, L. K., Day, C. J., King, R. M., Taha, , Rahman, H., Hartley-Tassell, L. E., Zhulin, I. B., Korolik, V. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Interactions between nascent proteins translated by adjacent ribosomes drive homomer assembly
In this study, we investigated whether direct interaction of two nascent proteins, emerging from nearby ribosomes (co-co assembly), constitutes a general mechanism for oligomer formation. We used proteome-wide screening to detect nascent chain–connected ribosome pairs and identified hundreds of homomer subunits that co-co assemble in human cells. Interactions are mediated by five major domain classes, among which N-terminal coiled coils are the most prevalent. We were able to reconstitute co-co assembly of nuclear lamin in Escherichia coli, demonstrating that dimer formation is independent of dedicated assembly machi...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 31, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Bertolini, M., Fenzl, K., Kats, I., Wruck, F., Tippmann, F., Schmitt, J., Auburger, J. J., Tans, S., Bukau, B., Kramer, G. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news