High-fructose corn syrup enhances intestinal tumor growth in mice
Excessive consumption of beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is associated with obesity and with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Whether HFCS contributes directly to tumorigenesis is unclear. We investigated the effects of daily oral administration of HFCS in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutant mice, which are predisposed to develop intestinal tumors. The HFCS-treated mice showed a substantial increase in tumor size and tumor grade in the absence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. HFCS increased the concentrations of fructose and glucose in the intestinal lumen and serum, respectively, and ...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Goncalves, M. D., Lu, C., Tutnauer, J., Hartman, T. E., Hwang, S.-K., Murphy, C. J., Pauli, C., Morris, R., Taylor, S., Bosch, K., Yang, S., Wang, Y., Van Riper, J., Lekaye, H. C., Roper, J., Kim, Y., Chen, Q., Gross, S. S., Rhee, K. Y., Cantley, L. C., Y Tags: Medicine, Diseases reports Source Type: news

Better water testing, safer produce
(American Society of Agronomy) Irrigation water's E. coli results can differ between labs, test types. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 20, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Human microbiome metabolites tip the scale in intestinal E. coli infections
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A multi-disciplinary team of biological engineers, microbiologists, and systems biologists at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering working on the Institute's DARPA-supported 'Technologies for Host Resilience' (THoR) Project, whose goal it is to uncover the causes of tolerance to infection exhibited by certain individuals or species, has now succeeded in modeling infection of human colon with EHEC in vitro using a microfluidic Organ-on-a-Chip (Organ Chip) culture device. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 20, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Antibiotic management of urinary tract infection in elderly patients in primary care and its association with bloodstream infections and all cause mortality: population based cohort study
This journal article concludes that in elderly patients with a diagnosis of UTI in primary care, no antibiotics and deferred antibiotics were associated with a significant increase in bloodstream infection and all cause mortality compared with immediate antibiotics. In the context of an increase of Escherichia coli bloodstream infections in England, early initiation of recommended first line antibiotics for UTI in the older population is advocated. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - March 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Campylobacteriosis Outbreak Associated With Municipal Water Campylobacteriosis Outbreak Associated With Municipal Water
This Campylobacter outbreak occurred due to a malfunctioning irrigation system that allowed livestock waste water to collect near wells feeding a municipal water supply.Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health & Prevention Journal Article Source Type: news

Novel potent antimicrobial from thermophilic bacterium
(University of Groningen) University of Groningen microbiologists and their colleagues from Lithuania have discovered a new glycocin, a small antimicrobial peptide with a sugar group attached, which is produced by a thermophilic bacterium and is stable at relatively high temperatures. They also succeeded in transferring the genes required to produce this glycocin to an E. coli bacterium. This makes it easier to produce and investigate this compound, which could potentially be used in biofuel production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Access to Water Is a Daily Battle in Poor Neighborhoods in Buenos Aires
Julio Esquivel and two children in the La Casita de La Virgen soup kitchen in Villa La Cava stand next to the filter that removes 99.9 percent of bacteria, viruses and parasites, with a capacity of up to 12 liters per hour. The purifier became the starting point for raising awareness in this shantytown on the outskirts of the Argentine capital about access to water as a human right. Credit: Daniel Gutman/IPSBy Daniel GutmanBUENOS AIRES, Mar 11 2019 (IPS) “Look at this water. Would you drink it?” asks José Pablo Zubieta, as he shows a glass he has just filled from a faucet, where yellow and brown sediment...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Daniel Gutman Tags: Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Environment Featured Headlines Health Integration and Development Brazilian-style Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs Projects Regional Categories TerraViva Unit Source Type: news

Zinc could help as non-antibiotic treatment for UTIs
(University of Queensland) New details about the role of zinc in our immune system could help the development of new non-antibiotic treatment strategies for bacterial diseases, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs).UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide and can lead to serious conditions such as kidney infection and sepsis.A team of researchers examined how our immune system uses zinc to fight uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) -- the major cause of UTIs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Resources to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections
NHS Improvement has launched a suite of resources to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) - a known source of E coli blood stream infections. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - March 8, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Aston University develops E.coli-killing glass
Researchers said the method is similar to medieval stained glass-making. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - March 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Raw Dog Food Can Be Risky for Pet, Family
Bacteria including E. coli and salmonella can make animals very sick. And pets can shed those germs, putting owners at risk from being around the animals, as well as handling the raw food. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How fashionable raw meat dog food could see pet owners risk dangerous bugs including E.coli
A study has found samples of the food in Britain and Sweden, made mainly from offal, uncooked meat and bones, contain food poisoning bugs including E.coli and salmonella. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Confused By Expiration Dates? You ’re Not Alone. Here’s What They Really Mean
Most Americans are needlessly tossing out packaged food—not because it’s gone bad, but because they take the date stamped on it far too literally. That’s according to a recent study published in the journal Waste Management, which surveyed more than 1,000 people about the phrases and dates on food packages. Many Americans wrongly believed that food product dates—often prefaced by “best by” or “sell by”—are federally regulated and indicate the point after which the food is no longer safe to eat. (Neither is true: labeling decisions are made voluntarily by food companies ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Radiation-resistant E. coli evolved in the lab give view into DNA repair
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Scientists in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Biochemistry are blasting E. coli bacteria with ionizing radiation once a week to watch evolution happen in real time as the bacteria become radiation resistant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 26, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Using E. coli to create bioproducts, like biodiesel, in a cost-effective manner
(Louisiana State University) LSU mechanical engineering graduate student Tatiana Mello of Piracicaba, Brazil, is currently working on genetically engineering and optimizing E. coli bacteria to produce bioproducts, like biodiesel, in a cost-effective manner. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cocktail of common antibiotics can fight resistant E. coli
(Technical University of Denmark) Scientists from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability have discovered that a combination of two common antibiotics is able to eliminate multi-drug resistant E. coli causing urinary tract infections. This combination treatment could become an effective measure against clinically relevant antibiotic resistant urinary tract infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cracking colibactin's code
(Harvard University) In an effort to understand how colibactin, a compound produced by certain strains of E. coli, may be connected to the development of colorectal cancer, Harvard researchers are exploring how the compound damages DNA to produce DNA adducts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The human gut bacterial genotoxin colibactin alkylates DNA
Certain Escherichia coli strains residing in the human gut produce colibactin, a small-molecule genotoxin implicated in colorectal cancer pathogenesis. However, colibactin’s chemical structure and the molecular mechanism underlying its genotoxic effects have remained unknown for more than a decade. Here we combine an untargeted DNA adductomics approach with chemical synthesis to identify and characterize a covalent DNA modification from human cell lines treated with colibactin-producing E. coli. Our data establish that colibactin alkylates DNA with an unusual electrophilic cyclopropane. We show that this metabolite i...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Wilson, M. R., Jiang, Y., Villalta, P. W., Stornetta, A., Boudreau, P. D., Carra, A., Brennan, C. A., Chun, E., Ngo, L., Samson, L. D., Engelward, B. P., Garrett, W. S., Balbo, S., Balskus, E. P. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. and Deputy Commissioner Frank Yiannas on findings from the agency ’s investigation of the November 2018 outbreak of < em > E. coli < /em > O157:H7 in California-linked romaine lettuce
Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. and Deputy Commissioner Frank Yiannas on findings from the agency ’s investigation of the November 2018 outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 in California-linked romaine lettuce (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - February 13, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Theraly Fibrosis Inc. Licenses Scarab Genomics & rsquo; Bacterial Production Technologies for its Pharmaceutical Program
Scarab Genomics LLC, a global biotechnology company focused on developing breakthrough technologies in biomanufacturing by applying its proprietary Clean Genome® E. coli expression and production... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Tags: The Scientist The Marketplace Source Type: news

Microbiologists Determine That Workout Warriors Are Drinking from Reusable Water Bottles Contaminated with Bacteria Found to Cause Hospital-Acquired Infections
Brazilian study finds Staph, E. coli, and other bacteria that contribute to hospital-acquired infections in reusable water bottles used by members of multiple fitness centers In the latest example of Microbiologists swabbing and culturing samples taken from common, everyday items, a research team in Brazil has found germs associated with hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) infections on […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - February 6, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Pathology Source Type: news

Probiotics Work for Kids With AGE, Right? Not so Fast! Probiotics Work for Kids With AGE, Right? Not so Fast!
Older studies suggested that probiotics were an effective strategy for treating acute gastroenteritis in kids. But now two new randomized trials call that conclusion into serious question.Medscape Pediatrics (Source: Medscape Pediatrics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pediatrics Headlines - February 1, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Pediatrics Viewpoint Source Type: news

Lack of Probiotic Benefit for Acute Pediatric Gastroenteritis Lack of Probiotic Benefit for Acute Pediatric Gastroenteritis
Dr William F. Balistreri on two new trials that show, at least when it comes to one probiotic strain, that treatment may hold no advantages over placebo.Medscape Gastroenterology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Commentary Source Type: news

Analyzing metagenome helps understand the role of bacterial species in Crohn's disease
(ITMO University) Research on gut metagenome of patients with Crohn's disease elucidates how it influences the taxonomic and functional composition of intestinal microbiota. Among the most common changes are the decrease in the beneficial microbes diversity and the increased abundance of Escherichia coli and other microbes associated with inflammation. The results can help to better understand the causes and progress of the disease, as well as to optimize treatment schemes. The results were published in BMC Genomics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Integrated Device Design Critical to Rapid Medical IoT Development
Medical IoT holds the promise of vastly improved patient outcomes, along with the potential for an evolutionary step-change in the way healthcare is managed and delivered. Medical IoT devices will enable more rapid detection of disease, continuous remote monitoring of a patient’s condition, and far more targeted, effective treatment of conditions ranging from diabetes to cancer. All aspects of fundamental healthcare will be impacted: Prevention and wellness, chronic care, acute care, and post-acute care monitoring. As a consequence, the market for connected medical devices is estimated to grow from $20.6B...
Source: MDDI - January 29, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: James Clements Tags: Electronics Source Type: news

African medicinal plant shown to effectively reduce E.coli strains in the body
(Natural News) Bugi-bugi (Alchornea cordifolia), a plant widely used in traditional medicine in Africa, could be used to treat E. coli, according to a study published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. In their paper, researchers from the University of Dschang in Cameroon looked at the antimicrobial properties of bugi-bugi extract against E. coli using both laboratory tests... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Recalls of hazardous meat, poultry increase 83 percent in last 6 years, report says
A report out Thursday claims recalls of hazardous meat and poultry have gone up 83 percent in the last six years. One in six Americans get sick every year from eating contaminated food, with at least 3,000 deaths per year. Michelle Miller spoke with a man whose wife is struggling after a recent E. coli outbreak. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sepsis programme successes are responsible for the increased detection of bacteraemia
The authors of this journal article state that escherichia coli bacteraemia reduction targets are challenging but, in West Wales, this was the key infection surrogate measure set by the local health board in 2013, prior to the introduction of a Welsh Government target. The initial plateau of cases was not maintained and prompted this review. Success in one area (sepsis management) conflicts with'failure'in reducing E. coli bacteraemia. It is argued that targets need to be considered carefully in the light of all available information. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

You ’re Not Imagining It: Food Recalls Are Getting More Common. Here’s Why
Lately, it’s felt like there’s a new food recall each week, striking everything from romaine lettuce to Ritz crackers. And a new report from the non-partisan Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) says that phenomenon isn’t in your head: Food recalls are actually getting more common. The total number of food recalls in the U.S. increased by 10% between 2013 and 2018, hitting a peak of 905 in 2016, according to the report. Class I recalls — those based on a “reasonable probability” that contaminated food could cause health problems — of meat and poultry rose by 83% during this time p...
Source: TIME: Health - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Image of the Day: Sentinel Cells
Researchers hacked the genetic machinery of E. coli to make them glow and identify proteins linked to cancer. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - January 16, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

Researchers create 'shortcut' to terpene biosynthesis in E. coli
(North Carolina State University) Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed an artificial enzymatic pathway for synthesizing isoprenoids, or terpenes, in E.coli. This shorter, more efficient, cost-effective and customizable pathway transforms E. coli into a factory that can produce terpenes for use in everything from cancer drugs to biofuels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Infectious Diseases A-Z: Norovirus cases rise in winter months
Norovirus is a highly contagious viral infection that is commonly referred to as "stomach flu." However, it is not related to the flu, which is caused by the influenza virus. "Norovirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis," says Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, a pediatric infectious diseases specialist at Mayo Clinic. "Someone who is infected with norovirus [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - January 14, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

SKELETON CREW only for FDA inspections of "high risk" U.S. food-processing facilities while government in shutdown – Domestic food gets even scarier
(Natural News) Do you eat canned foods, chicken, seafood, or dairy products? Anything coming out of a U.S. factory during this government shutdown now has an even higher chance of being contaminated with feces, E. coli, Salmonella, pathogens and parasites – more so than even before this crisis. Even infant formula is considered to be... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Not Just Acid Reflux: The Need to Think Worst First
A previously healthy, well-appearing 42-year-old female living in a modern, high-rise apartment in downtown Los Angeles calls 9-1-1 at 5:30 am complaining of worsening of a burning, epigastric pain she had been experiencing for the last three days. She reports associated nausea and non-bloody, non-bilious vomiting, and that she couldn’t manage to get comfortable in bed until she finally decided to call for help at daybreak. During her 9-1-1 call, she reports “pain, like heartburn, that just woke me up again and I had to throw up, … and then I was sweating so much.” Using the Los Angeles Tiered Disp...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 13, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Stephen Sanko, MD, FACEP Tags: Exclusive Articles Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

Multistate E. Coli Infection Outbreak Appears to Be Over: CDC Multistate E. Coli Infection Outbreak Appears to Be Over: CDC
The multistate outbreak of E. coli infections linked to romaine lettuce from the Central Coastal growing regions in northern and central California appears to be over, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Wednesday.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

CDC: E. Coli Outbreak Linked to Romaine Lettuce Is Over
THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 -- The Escherichia coli outbreak linked to California-grown romaine lettuce appears to be over, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday. As of Jan. 9, there had been 62 cases of E. coli O157:H7... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 10, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

You May Be at Higher Risk of Eating Contaminated Food During the Government Shutdown
The partial government shutdown has crippled the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s food safety surveillance efforts, pausing many domestic inspections and potentially putting more Americans at risk of contracting food-borne illnesses such as E. coli, salmonella and norovirus. “There’s a lot of ready-to-eat food that the FDA oversees that consumers ultimately have to trust doesn’t have a pathogen on it that can kill you,” says Seattle-based food-borne illness lawyer Bill Marler. “We need to get people back to doing their jobs.” About 41% of the FDA’s workforce is currently ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

E. Coli Outbreak Linked to Romaine Lettuce Is Over
The E. coli outbreak linked to California-grown romaine lettuce appears to be over, the CDC said Wednesday. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - January 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Romaine lettuce-linked E. coli outbreak over, CDC says
California-grown lettuce sickened dozens of people in 16 states and D.C. and others in Canada, though no one died (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Highlights: Jan. 10, 2019
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: E. Coli Outbreak Linked to Romaine Lettuce Is Over: CDC The E. coli outbreak linked to California-grown romaine lettuce that disrupted millions... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 10, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

CDC Calls the Romaine Lettuce E. Coli Outbreak Officially Over
The romaine lettuce E. coli outbreak “appears to be over,” the CDC announced Wednesday. From Oct. 7 to Dec. 4, 2018, a total of 62 people in 16 states, Washington, D.C. and Canada were infected with the same strain of E. coli linked to romaine lettuce, according to the CDC. No one died as a result of the outbreak, but 25 people were hospitalized and two developed kidney failure. On Dec. 13, the nation’s leading public health institution said that it had found the possible source of the tainted lettuce, but did not officially declared the outbreak over until today. The outbreak likely originated in northe...
Source: TIME: Health - January 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized California CDC onetime Source Type: news

U.S. officials declare end to outbreak from romaine lettuce
U.S. health officials are declaring an end to an outbreak of E. coli blamed on romaine lettuce from California that sickened 62 people in the U.S. and 29 in Canada. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Government Shutdown Curtails F.D.A. Food Inspections
While the Agriculture Department continues to inspect domestic meat and poultry, the F.D.A. has reduced inspections of fruits, vegetables and other foods. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SHEILA KAPLAN Tags: Shutdowns (Institutional) Food E Coli (Bacteria) Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Agriculture Department Food and Drug Administration Gottlieb, Scott (1972- ) Source Type: news

Multistate E.coli infection outbreak appears to be over: CDC
The multistate outbreak of E. coli infections linked to romaine lettuce from the Central Coastal growing regions in northern and central California appears to be over, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Wednesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Romaine lettuce E. coli outbreak is over, CDC says
"This outbreak appear to be over," the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday of the E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce from some regions of Northern and Central California. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Control of norovirus infection
The purpose of the review is to provide an update on control measures for norovirus (NoV), which is the most commonly implicated pathogen in acute gastroenteritis and outbreaks, causing major disruption in nurseries, schools, hospitals and care homes. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

University of Cincinnati professor studies hamburger e. coli with NIAID grant
(University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center) Alison Weiss, PhD, professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Microbiology in UC College of Medicine, has been awarded a four-year grant of $1.6 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to study Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli 0157:H7, also sometimes referred to as Hamburger E. coli. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Causes of abdominal pain and chills
The causes of stomach pain and chills include gastroenteritis, salmonella, and even the common cold. Treatment depends on the cause. Learn more about these, and the other causes of stomach pain and chills, here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Common desert shrub found to exhibit potent anti-parasitic activity
(Natural News) Plants are constantly exposed to the threat of various parasites, so they have adapted mechanisms through which they can prevent infestations. Most plants produce anti-parasitic compounds that continue to induce their effects even when used by humans, so they have potential use as natural remedies for parasite-related diseases like giardiasis and encephalitis. Researchers from... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Romaine lettuce now safe to eat, Public Health Agency says
The outbreak of E. coli infections linked to romaine lettuce appears to be over in Canada, with no new illnesses reported since mid-November, according to the Public Health Agency of Canada. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - December 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada Source Type: news